• University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Plymouth Marjon University (St Mark & St John) Featured Masters Courses
Queen’s University Belfast Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Bath Spa University Featured Masters Courses
"shelter"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Shelter)

We have 22 Masters Degrees (Shelter)

  • "shelter" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 22
Order by 
Immediately after a natural disaster a critical need is for safe shelter. The aim of the programme is to develop reflective practitioners who combine understanding of practical and strategic issues of development and emergency practice with an appreciation of the wider political context in which they operate. Read more
Immediately after a natural disaster a critical need is for safe shelter. The aim of the programme is to develop reflective practitioners who combine understanding of practical and strategic issues of development and emergency practice with an appreciation of the wider political context in which they operate.

This is a programme that combines development, humanitarian practice and the role of the practitioner intervening in post disaster reconstruction.

Why choose this course?

This course will provide you with background knowledge to be able to understand and discuss the essential components of shelter response after a disaster. The decisions made very early on in a shelter programme have far reaching effects and can affect the subsequent success or failure of permanent housing; they can enhance or hinder the building of community resilience and its preparedness in the face of future disasters.

The course is equally valid for students with technical as well as non-technical backgrounds. There is no need to have any previous knowledge in building, construction, architecture or engineering. The course delivery is designed to be flexible to allow you to study if you are working, or between deployments, or want to study in Oxford full time. We have developed good relationships with agencies working in the shelter field, and we occasionally are able to offer students internship possibilities within these organisations.

As a student in Oxford you'll be at the heart of the UK's most successful economic region. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, you will have access to the world-renowned Bodleian Library, the Bodleian Law Library and the Radcliffe Science Library.

This course in detail

The course is organised on a modular credit system. Modules combine a ratio of taught to self-led study. For example a module of 20 credits approximates to 200 hours of student effort, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to student-led study. 60 credits are required to complete the PG Cert. Of these the core module accounts for 20 credits, while the extra 40 credits are achieved through a combination of 10 and 20 credit modules. An introduction on the first day of the programme will enable you to make a more informed choice of modules to take. The timetable is structured to minimise the likelihood that two related modules will run at the same time but clashes are not always avoidable.

The Modules on the course are:
-Shelter after Disaster (20 Credits) - core module
-Practice of Theory: Tools and Methods (20 Credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (20 Credits)
-Learning Practice Masterclass (10 Credits)
-Working with Conflict: Practical Skills and Strategies (10 Credits).

Please note: all our courses are reviewed regularly and are responsive to the needs and priorities of shelter practice. The list of modules may not be exactly as above but will be covering areas of study relevant to shelter.

Courses run by some of our partners which Brookes credit rates, can be used as credit towards this programme. RedR and IFRC courses are currently credit rated and we are working on similar partnerships. You can be exempted for up to 40 out of the 60 modules if you have taken these courses. Please get in touch with us if you would like further details

In addition to modules the programme organises many optional events, including PhD research seminars within the School of Architecture, student-led seminar series and occasional lectures. As well as the formal teaching content, the high quality of the student experience is an essential aspect of the programme. Students usually keep in touch after the course has ended via alumni links, where job opportunities are often shared. The PG Cert in Shelter after Disaster is offered as a standalone award wherein you take joint modules also available to students attending the Master's degree in Development and Emergency Practice (DEP). The programme has an average of 35-40 students, usually from over 20 countries, with a wide diversity of backgrounds. You will also benefit from interacting with a wider cohort of development and emergency practitioners.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods on the taught part of the programme are largely class-based. Learning is driven by a mixture of lecturing, one to one and group tutorials, whole group discussion, workshop format, small group work, personal reading, individual written assignments and project design. Wherever possible the programme invites visiting practitioners from humanitarian agencies to contribute to the programme by leading sessions and commenting on student work.

The programme entails hands-on workshops with live problems, sometimes field-based, working with communities, practitioners and development agencies. The emphasis is on action methods and reflection on one’s own role as an activist and practitioner. The objective is to enable students to build both knowledge and skills more suited to the urgency and complexity of people’s changing demands and environmental conditions.

The assessment pattern reflects the programme’s learning outcomes and is intended to demonstrate that graduates possess the skills and knowledge required in practice. Coursework involves a variety of different methods of assessment, including:
-Essay and report writing
-Individual and group presentations in class
-Personal attendance and participation in class
-Case study reports

Careers and professional development

A good number of our former students have found work in the shelter sector and we are building an alumni network to help current students get in contact with organisations who work in the shelter sector.

Read less
Drawing from the University’s unique breadth of expertise, students on this programme develop an in-depth appreciation of how human activity drives environmental change. Read more

Drawing from the University’s unique breadth of expertise, students on this programme develop an in-depth appreciation of how human activity drives environmental change.

Human activity is changing the natural environment at an unprecedented rate. As a result, humanity faces a range of complex and interrelated challenges: global warming, ecosystem disruption, biodiversity loss, and, for many, increasing difficulty in meeting the basic human needs for energy, food, water and shelter.

This part-time, online distance learning programme takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding these contemporary environmental issues and will also develop our students’ capacities to address these in professional life.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Online learning

Due to the highly flexible nature of this programme, it is an excellent way for those with work or family commitments to gain a further qualification with minimum interruption or to introduce students to a virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

The certificate is split into three taught courses, which are delivered through an exciting mixture of online modes, including video lectures, study guides, self-directed and guided reading as well as a range of interactive online reflection and discursive activities.

Global Environment Challenges (offered from September to December)

This course introduces the nature and relevance of key environmental challenges.

Sustainability and Social Responsibility

This course explores the concepts of sustainability and social responsibility through a multidisciplinary approach, examining them from a scientific, social, economic, political and artistic viewpoint. This course will investigate the relationship between planetary boundaries, resource consumption and social development, and explore the range of interdisciplinary approaches to address these global challenges. It will also cover the topics of sustainability metrics, personal contributions and sustainable lifestyles, as well as providing an introduction to strategies for stakeholder engagement and communication/education. You will understand concepts of sustainability and social responsibility and be able to engage and communicate effectively on these issues.

Ecosystem Values and Management

This course considers the roles that ecosystems play in providing a range of ‘services’, including climate regulation, water, food, shelter as well as cultural and spiritual values.

MSc Global Challenges

After taking this programme, graduates can also take two further postgraduate certificates in Global Development Challenges and Global Health Challenges. Completion of all three certificates leads to an MSc in Global Challenges.

Learning outcomes

Students will be equipped to:

  • understand the challenges for society relating to sustainability, human wellbeing and environmental change
  • critically evaluate local and regional environment-related issues, initiatives and projects within a global context
  • apply theories and insights from scholarly research to support the development of appropriate responses to such issues through practice and policy

Career opportunities

This certificate will equip you with the knowledge and skills needed for work with governments, NGOs, international aid organisations, United Nations agencies, the private sector, universities, other research institutions and elsewhere.



Read less
Shelter is one of the most basic human needs, but the provision of that shelter - the development of enough housing of the right type and quality in the most appropriate locations - is a challenge that few, if any, governments in the developed world have fully addressed. Read more
Shelter is one of the most basic human needs, but the provision of that shelter - the development of enough housing of the right type and quality in the most appropriate locations - is a challenge that few, if any, governments in the developed world have fully addressed. This MSc offers an interdisciplinary perspective on the 'housing question' in advanced economies, with core contributions from across the faculty.

Degree information

Students will develop appropriate design, analytical and presentational skills, and work on practical cases that test their capacity for creative thinking and problem-solving. The curriculum covers UK-specific policy and practice as well as a range of international case studies and globally relevant debates in the provision of housing.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two elective modules from across The Bartlett School of Planning or beyond, subject to approval (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two elective modules (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four core modules (60 credits), at least full-time three months, is offered.

Core modules
-Planning for Housing: Process
-Planning for Housing: Project
-Principles of Sustainable Housing Design
-Low Energy Housing Retrofit
-Economics and Finance for Housing Projects
-Management of Housing Projects

Optional modules
-Spatial Planning (for professional accreditation)
-Critical Debates in Planning (for professional accreditation)
-Or any other open MSc module in The Bartlett School of Planning, or the wider Faculty of the Built Environment

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, projects and problem-based learning. Assessment is through a mix of essays, group projects, problem-sheets, individual projects, classroom tasks and the dissertation.

Careers

There is a growing demand for our Master's graduates from a wide range of both public and private employers in the UK and overseas. Many have taken up posts in local and central government planning, others have moved into planning related consultancies. Past students have also found employment in numerous specialist sectors: in housing and transport, planning, urban regeneration and environmental agencies, public and private utility companies, and also in teaching and research.

Employability
As well as preparing students for careers in planning practice and housing delivery, all of our programmes offer an introduction to research and to key research skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Based in the heart of London, students are at the forefront of policy-relevant critical debate, empirical study and research-led teaching. The academic staff are multidisciplinary and are actively involved in shaping the theories and debates covered in their teaching. Our annual public lectures attract pre-eminent speakers from around the world and our student body has a broad international profile.

UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future. The strong research focus across The Bartlett, and links to professional practice, feed into this programme, ensuring engagement with live issues and continual renewal of the subject material.

Students also have the opportunity to spend a period of the programme at a partner institution elsewhere in Europe, North America or Australia.

Read less
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. Read more
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies.

The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development.

This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.

Why choose this course?

This programme has an international reputation for excellence. It is based on the expertise developed at Oxford Brookes University in the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice. You will have the option of going on a field trip. Previous trips have been to Asia, Africa and Latin America. Many graduates go on to secure senior positions with international development or emergency organisations.

This course in detail

This Course requires 200 hours of student input, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars, or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to self-led study. For the postgraduate certificate it is compulsory to pass the core module, Critical Inquiry, Development and Emergencies: Theory and Policy, and pass other modules to achieve a total of 60 credits. For the postgraduate diploma you must pass 120 credits from the taught modules, including both compulsory modules. For the MA you must gain at least 180 credits, including the dissertation.

As courses are reviewed regularly the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.
-Critical Inquiry Development & Emergencies: Theory and Policy (compulsory 20 credits)
-Human Rights & Governance (optional 20 credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (optional 20 credits)
-The Refugee Experience: Forced migration, protection and humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Conflict, Violence and Humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Shelter after Disaster (optional 20 credits)
-Programming and Partnerships (optional 10 credits)
-Improving Humanitarian Action: Responding to crisis in 21st Century (optional 10 credits)
-Working with Conflict (optional 10 credits)
-Independent Study (optional 10 credits)
-Research Methods (optional 10 credits)
-Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning strategies are grounded in theory, case studies and field based experience. The programme concentrates on the development of intellectual knowledge and the cultivation of academic skills including synthesis, analysis, interpretation, understanding and judgement. The programme also focuses on the practitioner’s approach, with reference in particular to:
-The setting in which they work (poverty, conflict, power, vulnerability, capability, risk, urbanisation, environmental change and the history and dynamics of particular places, their people and their society).
-The set of approaches they adopt (community mobilisation, aid, human rights advocacy, governance, risk reduction, livelihoods, humanitarian protection, accompaniment and empowerment).
-Themselves (the personal motivations that drive and shape their own vocation, their particular personality, temperament, strengths, abilities and weaknesses).

The intention is that a deeper understanding of these factors will enable students to move beyond rigid professional boxes to become more self aware, knowledge based practitioners able to work flexibly around a variety of problems in different situations of poverty, armed conflict and disaster.

Careers and professional development

The course is an ideal platform for you to develop your career in, or move into, international development and emergency organisations. Many graduates are able to secure senior positions.

Read less
This programme gives a broad assessment of contemporary international relations. It integrates theoretical approaches with the study of many cases and issues. Read more
This programme gives a broad assessment of contemporary international relations. It integrates theoretical approaches with the study of many cases and issues. It also explores the ways in which the line between the domestic and international is blurred by trade, financial, environmental, strategic, ideological, cultural and ethical issues.

The programme promotes a close-knit student community with easy access to members of staff who all give a high priority to teaching and supervision while maintaining high-quality, high-volume research.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-International Political Economy
-International Security
-Theories of International Relations

Optional units - You will choose three optional units from a selection offered by the School for Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS). Below is an example of topics that may be offered. Options vary each year but may include:
-Conflict, Security and Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Masculinities and IR
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Research Methods
-Military and militarisation
-Discourse Analysis
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Nuclear insecurity
-Theories of Violence
-Understanding Popular Culture in/and World Politics

A list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/2017/ssl/msc-international-relations/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

Read less
This programme examines and deploys perspectives from feminism, gender studies, cultural studies and sexuality studies, along with interdisciplinary research in international political economy, civil-military relations, international development and the study of men and masculinities. Read more
This programme examines and deploys perspectives from feminism, gender studies, cultural studies and sexuality studies, along with interdisciplinary research in international political economy, civil-military relations, international development and the study of men and masculinities.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Feminisms and International Relations
-International Security or International Political Economy
-Theories of International Relations

Optional units
You will choose three optional units from those offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS). Below is an example of topics that may be offered. Options vary each year but may include:
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Environmental Politics
-Masculinities and IR
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Military and Militarisation
-Discourse Analysis
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Theories of Violence

A list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

Read less
There is a growing number of new threats in international security, ranging from civil war, terrorism and transnational crime to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Read more
There is a growing number of new threats in international security, ranging from civil war, terrorism and transnational crime to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

This programme provides students with a theoretical and empirical understanding of the international security environment of the post-Cold War era, including the origins of conflicts and peace, the emergence of new security threats and the many different agencies involved in conflict prevention, peacekeeping and peacemaking today.

The MSc aims to be empirically relevant by teaching students how to apply theoretical concepts to contemporary conflicts and current affairs.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-International Security
-Security Governance
-Theories of Securitisation

Optional units - You will choose no more than three optional units from the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS). Units can vary from year to year but may include:
-Conflict, Security and Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Masculinities and IR
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Military and Militarisation
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Care, Labour and Gender: International Policy Development
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Theories of Violence

A list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

Read less
This programme is designed for a wide range of people involved in conceptualising or administering policies for a sustainable and substantial level of development in the world's poorer countries. Read more
This programme is designed for a wide range of people involved in conceptualising or administering policies for a sustainable and substantial level of development in the world's poorer countries. It is especially suitable for those already involved in planning development strategies, those currently working for non-governmental organisations in the development field or anyone planning for a career in development.

The programme combines an intellectual and academic approach with policy-oriented and empirical studies of development, addressing three interrelated but separate facets of the development process:
-Analysing what development means.
-Studying the processes of planning (external aid, regional disparities, environmental factors, poverty and industrialisation).
-Examining how development policies may be delivered and administered, analysing the importance of effective political and bureaucratic structures, and evaluating the contributions of NGOs and other external bodies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Conflict, Security and Development
-International Political Economy
-Theories of Development

Optional units - You will choose three optional units from those offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. Options vary each year but may include:
-Small Business Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Faith and Development
-International Development Organisations
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Military and militarisation
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Care, Labour and Gender
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Theories of Violence

A full list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

Read less
The study of identity is a burgeoning area of sociological and cultural studies. Over a range of units, this programme provides an introduction to key themes in this field, with identity explored in both theoretical and substantive ways. Read more
The study of identity is a burgeoning area of sociological and cultural studies. Over a range of units, this programme provides an introduction to key themes in this field, with identity explored in both theoretical and substantive ways.

On the one hand, there has been an exciting and innovative strand of work to explore and re-theorise the ideas of subjectivity and selfhood in the context of changes brought about by late modern and postmodern society. On the other, the question of identity has come under scrutiny from within substantive areas of sociology, such as the sociology of race and ethnicity, the sociology of religion and the sociology of gender relations. There are also important discussions concerning the ways in which identities are recorded and observed, including debates over new narrative and other qualitative methodologies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Contemporary Identities and Inequalities
-Dissertation

Optional units
You will also choose at least four further units from a list of sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit can be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGO and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

Read less
This programme is principally concerned with explaining the importance of ethnicity and multiculturalism, race, racism, diaspora and communalism in contemporary societies. Read more
This programme is principally concerned with explaining the importance of ethnicity and multiculturalism, race, racism, diaspora and communalism in contemporary societies. It has a particular focus on the nature of multicultural and multi-ethnic societies, the issues surrounding culture in a modern and postmodern world, and the growing public policy implications of addressing ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious diversity within modern nation-states.

It also examines the discrimination, exclusion, marginality and unfair treatment of minority groups, and the violation of their civil rights in different societies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Dissertation

Optional units - You will choose at least four further units from a list of sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit can be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students from our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGO and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

Read less
This programme provides an introduction to a range of debates located within the so-called 'cultural turn' in sociological studies. Read more
This programme provides an introduction to a range of debates located within the so-called 'cultural turn' in sociological studies. Increasingly, sociologists are looking to the concept of culture as a source of explanation - and questioning - in their studies of contemporary social formations.

Both theoretical and substantive elements of this cultural turn are addressed. Therefore, the works of key thinkers within social and cultural theory (Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault and others) are explored, while the role of cultural explanations within theories of race and ethnicity, gender relations and the sociology of religion (among others) is also given both theoretical and empirical consideration.

These issues are situated within the framework of analyses and critiques of wider debates and discourses in social and cultural theory on questions such as postmodernism, postfeminism and postcolonialism.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Understanding Culture
-Dissertation

Optional units - You may choose four optional sociology units. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

A maximum of one unit may be chosen from the other optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Graduates of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, governement departments and the European Parliament, among others. Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

Read less
This programme gives you the opportunity to extend your core sociological knowledge and understanding. It will also consolidate familiarity with the discipline for those with a background in a related subject, but without specialised knowledge of sociology. Read more
This programme gives you the opportunity to extend your core sociological knowledge and understanding. It will also consolidate familiarity with the discipline for those with a background in a related subject, but without specialised knowledge of sociology.

The key learning goals are to develop critical use and comprehension of social theory, gain a grounding in methodologies and techniques of enquiry, and focus on distinctive, substantive sociological topics, such as ethnicity, multiculturalism, gender, sexuality, religion and culture.

The dissertation gives you the opportunity to pursue a sociological project of your choice in greater depth, while still providing close academic supervision.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Dissertation

And either:
-Qualitative Social Research
OR
-Quantitative Social Research

Optional units - You may choose four units from the list of sociology options. Options vary each year but may include:
-Contemporary Sociological Theory
-Theories of Ethnicity and Racism
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
-Philosophy and Research Design
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
-Understanding Culture
-Narrating the Self
-The Theory and Politics of Multiculturalism
-Interpreting Gender
-Advanced Qualitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Popular Music and Society
-Nations and Nationalism
-Care, Labour and Gender
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk

You will also study a maximum of one unit from the remaining optional units that are offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies in the academic year.

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others. For further information, see our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

Read less
The Urban Development Planning MSc explores international practices in urban development policy, planning and management that address contemporary spatial, socio-economic and political transformations in cities of the Global South. Read more
The Urban Development Planning MSc explores international practices in urban development policy, planning and management that address contemporary spatial, socio-economic and political transformations in cities of the Global South.

Degree information

This MSc aims to equip participants to work effectively as development practitioners in urban contexts through a deeper understanding of the processes that generate urban change. The programme aims to enhance their diagnostic and strategic capacities to respond to such change within the framework of socially just urban governance.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules
-The City and its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management: Strategic Action in Theory and Practice
-Practice in Urban Development Planning

Optional modules - please note, not all optional modules may be available.
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-An Introduction to Public Economics and Public Policy
-Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case studies and alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Food and the City
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
-Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
-Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Knowledge Systems and Sustainable Food Production
-Managing the City Economy
-Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
-NGOs and Social Transformation
-Participatory Processes: Building for Development
-Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
-Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, workshops and field trips. Field trips so far have taken place in Egypt, Ghana, India, Thailand, and Tanzania. Student performance is assessed through essays, coursework, team project reports, written examinations, the overseas field trip and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Careers

This MSc is widely recognised by international organisations and agencies (such as UN agencies and the World Bank) and bilateral aid organisations from different countries. Graduate destinations range from UK-based organisations in the public, private and community sectors to governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations which operate in a development capacity in the South. Graduates have also been employed by international NGOs and aid and development agencies. Some graduates return to their home countries and engage in the practice, teaching or research of urban development practice; other graduates have successfully sought employment in international development organisations away from their own countries.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Investment Banker, Standard Bank
-Assistant Researcher, Institute for Urban Studies, Hangzhou Normal University and studying BSc Economics, The University of London
-Research Assistant, Erzurum Technical University
-Regional Programme Assistant, Merlin
-Shelter Co-Ordinator, Save the Children

Employability
The programme aims to help students:
-Prepare balanced, critical and comparative analysis and argument based on theory and empirical evidence.
-Undertake a comprehensive diagnosis of the problems and opportunities in urban development in specific contexts.
-Formulate systematic and reasoned proposals that address the multi-dimensional complexity of various urban development situations, including organisational and institutional development.
-Build presentation, advocacy and negotiation skills.
-Develop research skills including interviewing, conceptual framework formulation, and the abilitiy to analyse a range of information sources.
-Enhance their teamwork skills.
-Operate professionally in an unfamiliar environment within the context of a developing country.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme argues that planning is key to dealing with urban problems and opportunities presented by rapid urbanisation in the Global South, but that its potential cannot be harnessed without a critical understanding of the processes that generate urban change in specific contexts.

The programme seeks to equip students with the capacity to develop critical diagnoses of urban issues, as a basis for developing propositional responses within the framework of socially, spatially and environmentally just urban governance.

The programme promotes a deeper understanding of community-led and partnership-based urban development planning. Students also benefit from the Development Planning Unit's longstanding and geographically exhaustive alumni and partner network.

Read less
This course will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of how to deliver effective modern water supply, sanitation and other public health interventions in urban and rural areas in low-income and transitional economies. Read more

This course will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of how to deliver effective modern water supply, sanitation and other public health interventions in urban and rural areas in low-income and transitional economies.

Aimed at consultants, and working professionals in national and local government, non-government organisations, international development organisations and public health agencies, it has a strong focus on developing practical and policy skills and addresses the critical future challenges of climate change, population growth and urbanisation. You’ll develop your understanding of technical interventions in water supply, sanitation and solid waste management.

Run in conjunction with the Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development, one of the UK’s preeminent public health research centres, and informed by research undertaken by our Institute for Public Health and Environmental Engineering, this programme will give you the knowledge and skills to identify and deliver investments that will have major benefits for health and development.

Institute for Public Health and Environmental Engineering

Our Institute for Public Health and Environmental Engineering is renowned worldwide for its pioneering work in developing countries. The institute undertakes research in all aspects of the built environment in which the presence of pathogens influences design, including water treatment, solid waste and airborne transmission of disease.

Staff teaching on this course have close working links with a number of key institutions in the field of international development, including UNICEF, the World Bank, the World Health Organization, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council, WaterAid, World Vision, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the African Development Bank.

You’ll also benefit from using our specialist facilities, such as our public health labs with separate areas for solid waste, water and wastewater, and a class II microbiology lab and clean room. We have all the specialist software you’ll need for your programme, and you’ll have access to a dedicated study suite for Masters students.

Accreditation

This degree is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired a partial CEng accredited undergraduate first degree.

This course is also accredited by EUR-ACE, the European quality label for engineering degree programmes at Bachelor and Master level.

Course content

A series of compulsory modules will develop your knowledge and skills in a range of areas. You’ll gain an understanding of the wider issues surrounding public health around the world and how they impact on policy and practice, as well as current debates around the complex topics of health, equity and development understand how health policy is shaped and planned.

At the same time, you’ll be introduced to the principles and practice of public health engineering to bridge the gap between theory, policy and practice and explore key technologies in water supply, sanitation, wastewater and solid waste management. You’ll also consider engineering responses to complex emergencies, especially regarding the provision of water supply, sanitary services and shelter.

You’ll build your knowledge of technical issues in water resource and sold waste management, as well as natural wastewater treatment, and undertake an independent research project. Working with your supervisor, you’ll complete this research or design-based project during the summer months at the end of the programme to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve gained.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the 2016 Water, Sanitation and Health Engineering module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • The Management of WASH Projects 15 credits
  • Engineering for Public Health 15 credits
  • Wastewater and Fecal Sludge Management 15 credits
  • Water Resource Management 15 credits
  • Water Supply 15 credits
  • Solid Waste Management 15 credits
  • Water, Sanitation and Health Engineering Dissertation 60 credits
  • Engineering in Emergencies - MSc 15 credits
  • Key Issues in International Health 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Water, Sanitation and Health Engineering MSc(Eng) in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a unique blend of civil engineering and public health policy skills.

As a result, you’ll be ideally placed to take up a senior position in public health ministries and public health departments in countries of the global south, or to work with international development agencies and international non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

Graduates have gone on to work for organisations such as WaterAid Liberia/Sierra Leone, Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Careers support

You’ll have access to the wide range of engineering and computing careers resources held by our Employability team in our dedicated Employability Suite. You’ll have the chance to attend industry presentations book appointments with qualified careers consultants and take part in employability workshops. Our annual Engineering and Computing Careers Fairs provide further opportunities to explore your career options with some of the UK’s leading employers.

The University's Careers Centre also provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
This innovative programme explores the link and tensions between development and security concerns in theory and practice. Specifically, it builds on the unique combination of expertise and experience in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies to. Read more
This innovative programme explores the link and tensions between development and security concerns in theory and practice. Specifically, it builds on the unique combination of expertise and experience in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies to:

examine the nature of violent conflict in the world today and the international community's response to it;
locate this analysis in a comprehensive theoretical understanding of wider development and security studies debates and controversies, particularly in relation to evolving patterns of global governance;
explore these issues and dilemmas through contemporary, empirical case studies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Conflict, Security and Development
-Theories of Development
-Theoretical Approaches to Security Studies

Optional units
Three optional units from those offered in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. Options vary each year but may include:
-Small Business Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Faith and Development
-International Development Organisations
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Military and Militarisation
-US Security Policy
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-Japan and East Asia
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Care, Labour and Gender
-China's International Relations
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Theories of Violence

A full list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

Further details can be found on our careers and alumni website: http://www.bris.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/ppgtcareersandalumni/

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X