• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
University of Dundee Featured Masters Courses
University of Dundee Featured Masters Courses
"shakespeare" AND "studie…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Shakespeare Studies)

We have 95 Masters Degrees (Shakespeare Studies)

  • "shakespeare" AND "studies" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 95
Order by 
This programme, delivered by and taught at the . Shakespeare Institute.  in Stratford-upon-Avon, offers an unrivalled opportunity for the study of Shakespeare.  . Read more

This programme, delivered by and taught at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, offers an unrivalled opportunity for the study of Shakespeare.  

It develops a critical but appreciative understanding of Shakespeare’s contribution to literary and theatrical history, and the place his works occupy in today’s cultural landscape. It provides you with a rigorous and wide-ranging knowledge of approaches to the study of Shakespeare, with emphasis on criticism, textual studies, the plays in performance, and the history of Shakespeare's reception. It has proved invaluable for students heading towards a variety of careers, and it provides a solid foundation for research at a higher level.

Course details

The dynamism of Shakespeare studies owes much to the sheer diversity of critical, theatrical, and historical approaches.

It offers sustained study in a variety of fields, drawing on the special interests of a dedicated team of Shakespeare scholars. 

You will study four core modules: 

  • Plays and Poems of Shakespeare A
  • Plays and Poems of Shakespeare B
  • Textual Studies in Shakespeare
  • Research Skills in Shakespeare

You will also take one module in performance studies, chosen from the following: 

  • History of Shakespeare in Performance
  • Shakespeare and Early Modern Playhouse Culture
  • Shakespeare and Theatre Practice
  • Shakespeare's Legacy

You will also choose one optional module from a range of Shakespeare Institute modules. Full module descriptions are available below.

You will also attend Thursday Seminars held once a week during term-time at the Shakespeare Institute which feature papers presented by a range of established visiting scholars as well as fellows of the Shakespeare Institute and other University of Birmingham academic staff. 

Assessment

Each module is assessed by written assignment with the exception of the optional module in Shakespeare and Theatre Practice, which is assessed by either two performance assignments and a 2,000-word research paper, or by one 4,000-word research paper.

You will also submit a 15,000-word dissertation at the end of the programme. The dissertation will focus on a relevant topic of your choice, agreed with the programme convenor earlier in the year.  

Explore the Shakespeare Institute

Learning and teaching

Full-time students attend formal seminars totalling 5-8 hours per week.

In addition, all students are expected to attend the weekly Thursday Seminar for all Institute members. Please note that this programme is only available on campus, and cannot be studied by distance learning. 

The programme allows access to the unique Shakespearian resources of the Shakespeare Institute Library, the Library of the Shakespeare Centre that curates the archives of the RSC, and the Royal Shakespeare Company. Study materials for this programme are enhanced by the close ties that the Shakespeare Institute has with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, the Royal Shakespeare Company, and the archives associated with both of these institutions.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Shakespeare Studies

Postgraduates at the Shakespeare Institute are able to develop a broad range of creative, research and theatre skills, as well as in-depth subject knowledge.

Over the past two years, over 93% of our postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation.

In recent years, our postgraduates have successfully entered a variety of sectors from teaching in secondary and higher education to performing arts, publishing, museums and library and archive work. Employers that graduates have gone on to work for include: National Trust; Royal Shakespeare Company; Shakespeare Birthplace Trust; Shakespeare's Globe, University of Birmingham and University of Oxford.



Read less
Taught jointly between King's and Shakespeare's Globe, this unique MA programme offers you the opportunity to study the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Read more

Taught jointly between King's and Shakespeare's Globe, this unique MA programme offers you the opportunity to study the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

You will be able to draw on expertise at both King's and Shakespeare's Globe, studying Shakespeare close to the types of theatres for which he wrote and just a stone's throw from where his plays were originally performed. 

At the Globe you will learn about early modern playhouses, audiences, performance practices and get to play on the stage and at King's you will cover early modern drama and other literary genres, examining Shakespeare alongside his contemporaries.

Key benefits

  • Unique collaboration between Shakespeare's Globe Theatre and the Department of English, King's College London.
  • Ideal opportunity to study the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in a theatrical context in the heart of London.
  • Graduates of the degree have gone on to study a PhD at King's and at other major universities both in the UK and the US or to work in the creative industries, arts administration and publishing.

Description

The degree is offered jointly by King’s and Globe Education, allowing you to capitalise on the academic and practical expertise of both of these institutions. At the Globe you will take two compulsory module and at King’s you will take a critical methodologies module (‘Working with Early Modern Literary Texts’), which includes training in palaeography (the study of ancient writing systems and the deciphering and dating of manuscripts) and bibliography, along with one optional module. Through this degree you will pursue advanced study of the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, makeing use of the facilities and opportunities provided by Shakespeare's Globe Theatre and by King's. You will develop a detailed knowledge of early modern drama, particulary Shakespearean drama. 

Assessment

Our modules are assessed entirely through coursework, typically a 4,000-word essay for 20-credit modules and 8,000 to 10,000 words for a 40-credit module. There will also be a dissertation.

Teaching

You will also write a dissertation between May and September, supervised by academics at either King's or at the Globe, depending on the chosen subject. 

Teaching across the degree is delivered by academics from King’s and Globe Education, and complemented by visiting experts.

Course purpose

Advanced study of the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the context of the facilities and opportunities provided by Shakespeare's Globe Theatre and by King's. To provide a thorough knowledge of early modern drama, particularly Shakespearean drama, in its material and institutional contexts. Ideal grounding for further academic work and for work in arts administration, theatre, education, publishing.

Course format and assessment

Taught compulsory and optional courses assessed by coursework and/or examination plus a dissertation.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



Read less
This programme offers a unique approach to the study of Shakespeare’s life and work, fusing traditional scholarly approaches with the thrill of being involved in new creative work. Read more

This programme offers a unique approach to the study of Shakespeare’s life and work, fusing traditional scholarly approaches with the thrill of being involved in new creative work. It is delivered by and taught at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon.

It makes the most of the unrivalled resources of Shakespeare’s Stratford and involves expert tuition from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the Library of Birmingham. The programme is particularly enhanced by the Institute's collaboration with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), offering unique and extensive opportunities to work on its premises with RSC artists.

This programme will attract aspiring academics, actors, writers, directors, arts administrators, as well as anyone with a lively interest in Shakespeare.

Course details

This programme brings together academic, theatrical and civic interests in Shakespeare and creativity, generating a comprehensive and forward-looking conversation about what Shakespeare is and can be in today's world.

You will produce traditional academic essays as well as creative work, all of which will explore Shakespeare’s potential in the modern world. You will make new creative work with and at the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and benefit from unique and exciting access to the RSC's studio theatre, The Other Place.

You will study four core modules: [full descriptions available below]

  • Shakespearience
  • Shakespeare and Theatre Practice (formerly Shakespeare and Creative Practice)
  • The Shakespeare Ensemble
  • Shakespeare and Society

You will choose two optional modules from a range of Shakespeare Institute modules.

You will also attend weekly Thursday Seminars at the Shakespeare Institute (term-time only), which feature papers presented by a range of established visiting scholars as well as Institute and University of Birmingham staff.

Assessment

Shakespearience and optional modules are each assessed by written assignment; Shakespeare and Theatre Practice is assessed by either two performance assignments and a 2,000-word research paper, or a 4,000-word research paper; Shakespeare Ensemble and Shakespeare and Society both combine shorter written assignments with creative work. 

You will complete the MA with a 15,000-word dissertation. For your dissertation, you will have the chance to work intensively on an RSC project at The Other Place theatre.

Explore the Shakespeare Institute

Learning and teaching

This programme will make use of the unrivalled resources of Shakespeare’s Stratford, involving expert sessions from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the Library of Birmingham

It also particularly benefits from the Institute's collaboration collaboration with the RSC, offering unique and extensive opportunities to work with the Company and at The Other Place. Students will also have access to the Shakespeare Institute Library, the Library of the Shakespeare Centre that curates the archives of the RSC, and the Shakespeare Collection held at the Library of Birmingham.

The programmes will also draw upon the expertise of key members of the Shakespeare Institute team: co-convenors Professor Ewan Fernie and Dr Abigail Rokison-Woodall; and Director of the Shakespeare Institute, Professor Michael Dobson.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Shakespeare Studies

Postgraduates at the Shakespeare Institute are able to develop a broad range of creative, research and theatre skills, as well as in-depth subject knowledge.

Over the past two years, over 93% of our postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation.

In recent years, our postgraduates have successfully entered a variety of sectors from teaching in secondary and higher education to performing arts, publishing, museums and library and archive work. Employers that graduates have gone on to work for include: National Trust; Royal Shakespeare Company; Shakespeare Birthplace Trust; Shakespeare's Globe, University of Birmingham and University of Oxford.



Read less
Are you interested in learning the ways in which Shakespeare has been used in the classroom at different historical and cultural moments?. Read more

Are you interested in learning the ways in which Shakespeare has been used in the classroom at different historical and cultural moments?

Do you want to immerse yourself in the works and plays of Shakespeare? 

The Shakespeare Institute's MA in Shakespeare and Education is a unique, modular programme that is particularly appropriate for practicing teachers, offering the opportunity to enhance expertise in different aspects of Shakespeare’s work. Throughout the programme you will be incorporating the study of Shakespeare's plays in performance and adaptation. You can study this programme on-site at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon or by distance learning.

Course details

This programme offers you the opportunity to enhance your expertise in different aspects of Shakespeare's work, while maintaining a pedagogical focus. 

You will study three core modules:

  • Shakespeare and Pedagogy
  • Shakespeare’s Theatre
  • Research Skills

You will also choose three optional modules (see module information below). 

The flexible structure of this course allows study in a wide variety of ways, on a full- or part-time basis. Modules are available to study through a variety of routes that may include:

  • Three long weekends at the Shakespeare Institute at approximately monthly intervals
  • One day a week throughout a semester at the Shakespeare Institute (ten days)
  • Distance-learning option via online study
  • One intensive week for the Shakespeare and Pedagogy module, delivered before the Easter holidays.

Full-time study is on site in Stratford-upon-Avon and part-time students can choose to study the whole programme either on-site, primarily by online distance learning or a combination of the two. The schedule of delivery allows access to all modules through a range of modes over any three-year period, although some are not available to study via distance learning. The compulsory Pedagogy module, which is co-taught with the Royal Shakespeare Company, must be studied on-site due to its interactive nature.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by written assignment with the exception of the optional module in Shakespeare and Theatre Practice, which is assessed by either two performance assignments and a 2,000-word research paper, or by one 4,000-word research paper. You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word pedagogical dissertation.

Explore the Shakespeare Institute

Learning and teaching

The programme allows access to the unique Shakespearian resources of the Shakespeare Institute Library, the Library of the Shakespeare Centre that curates the archives of the RSC, and the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Study materials for this programme are enhanced by the close ties that the Shakespeare Institute has with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, the Royal Shakespeare Company, and the archives associated with both of these institutions.

Studying by distance learning

Many of the programme’s modules are also available via distance learning, meaning that you can study online from anywhere in the world. Distance learning modules will combine print, audio, and video teaching methods in order to give students a varied and enriching educational experience.

This means that you can study for a Masters degree (MA) almost entirely by distance learning. However, you will need to come to Stratford-upon-Avon for a one-week residential school in the spring in order to complete your core module on Shakespeare and Education, which is scheduled to coincide with the Easter holidays.

Although self-study is central to doing a programme by distance learning, support is always available. 

You will have a personal tutor and dissertation supervisor to guide you and answer any questions, and you have access to a wide range of online resources too. You also have the opportunity to meet other students and academic staff through online chats and discussion forums and at the Easter residential.

Read more about distance learning with the Shakespeare Institute 

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Shakespeare Studies

Postgraduates at the Shakespeare Institute are able to develop a broad range of creative, research and theatre skills, as well as in-depth subject knowledge.

Over the past two years, over 93% of our postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation.

In recent years, our postgraduates have successfully entered a variety of sectors from teaching in secondary and higher education to performing arts, publishing, museums and library and archive work. Employers that graduates have gone on to work for include: National Trust; Royal Shakespeare Company; Shakespeare Birthplace Trust; Shakespeare's Globe, University of Birmingham and University of Oxford.



Read less
Do you want to immerse yourself in the works of Shakespeare? Are you interested in understanding how Shakespeare’s plays work in performance?. Read more

Do you want to immerse yourself in the works of Shakespeare? Are you interested in understanding how Shakespeare’s plays work in performance?

This innovative Shakespeare Institute programme allows you to study the performance history but also the way in which Shakespeare’s plays have been performed through history, up to the modern moment. It encourages a historical approach to interpretation and styles of presentation and it promotes the value of close reading as the basis for evaluating the plays on the page, stage, and screen. You will have the opportunity to look at different productions and adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays in their historical, political, and cultural contexts and to think about the performance choices actors and directors make when approaching Shakespeare’s texts. You can also study how the textual history of Shakespeare’s plays influences performance today.

You can study on-site at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon or by distance learning.

Course details

You will study two core modules:

  • Shakespeare’s Theatre
  • Research Skills

You will also choose four optional modules (see module information below). 

The flexible structure of this course allows study in a wide variety of ways, on a full- or part-time basis. Modules are available to study through a variety of routes that may include:

  • Three long weekends at the Shakespeare Institute at approximately monthly intervals
  • One day a week throughout a semester at the Shakespeare Institute (ten days).
  • Distance-learning option via online study. 

Full-time study is on site in Stratford-upon-Avon and part-time students can choose to study the whole programme either on site, via online distance learning or a combination of the two. You are also encouraged to visit the theatre and cinema to benefit from the excitement of Shakespeare's plays in performance.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by written assignment, with the exception of the optional module in Shakespeare and Theatre Practice which is assessed by either two performance assignments and a 2,000-word research paper, or by one 4,000-word research paper. While completing all six taught modules will lead to a Diploma-level qualification, MA students will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation.

Explore the Shakespeare Institute

Learning and teaching

The programme allows access to the unique Shakespearian resources of the Shakespeare Institute Library, the Library of the Shakespeare Centre that curates the archives of the RSC, and the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Study materials for this programme are enhanced by the close ties that the Shakespeare Institute has with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, the Royal Shakespeare Company, and the archives associated with both of these institutions.

Studying by distance learning

Many of the programme’s modules are also available via distance learning, meaning that you can study online from anywhere in the world. Distance learning modules will combine print, audio, and video teaching methods in order to give students a varied and enriching educational experience.

Although self-study is central to doing a programme by distance learning, support is always available. 

You will have a personal tutor and dissertation supervisor to guide you and answer any questions, and you have access to a wide range of online resources too. You also have the opportunity to meet other students and academic staff through online chats and discussion forums.

Read more about distance learning with the Shakespeare Institute

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Shakespeare Studies

Postgraduates at the Shakespeare Institute are able to develop a broad range of creative, research and theatre skills, as well as in-depth subject knowledge.

Over the past two years, over 93% of our postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation.

In recent years, our postgraduates have successfully entered a variety of sectors from teaching in secondary and higher education to performing arts, publishing, museums and library and archive work. Employers that graduates have gone on to work for include: National Trust; Royal Shakespeare Company; Shakespeare Birthplace Trust; Shakespeare's Globe, University of Birmingham and University of Oxford.



Read less
This pathway of the MA in Literary Studies is ideal if you’re keen to study Shakespeare at an advanced level. Centred on Shakespeare and early modern literature and culture, you’ll also explore the reception and performance of Shakespeare in later times. Read more

This pathway of the MA in Literary Studies is ideal if you’re keen to study Shakespeare at an advanced level. Centred on Shakespeare and early modern literature and culture, you’ll also explore the reception and performance of Shakespeare in later times.

The programme is challenging, flexible, and invigorated by current research. It will deepen your understanding of Elizabethan literature, its historical and cultural contexts, and how this fascinating literary tradition has evolved, and how it is received in the world in the present.

You’ll combine theory with a close reading of a wide range of texts, from different media (literary, filmic, visual), periods, and cultural, geographical and linguistic backgrounds. All texts will be studied in English, English translation, or with English subtitles.

The pathway also offers a unique opportunity to work directly with one of England’s most respected theatre directors, Bill Alexander (artistic director of the Birmingham Repertory Theatre and Honorary Associate of the Royal Shakespeare Company) to explore, through the module “Text in Performance: Shakespeare”, how a play is read and analysed in the rehearsal room and how its language and imagery shapes character and performance choices.

Modules & structure

Core module

In addition to the core module and dissertation, you also take three option modules. Please visit the website for more information.

Skills

You'll develop transferable skills, including:

  • enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
  • the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
  • the ability to organise information; the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to pursue careers in:

  • publishing
  • journalism
  • public relations
  • teaching
  • advertising
  • the civil service
  • business
  • industry
  • the media

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



Read less
The MLitt in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture is an intensive one-year taught programme offering an all-round introduction to the literature of the 16. Read more

The MLitt in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture is an intensive one-year taught programme offering an all-round introduction to the literature of the 16th and 17th centuries, with particular focus on the work of William Shakespeare.

Highlights

  • Develop your skills as a researcher within a specific area of study by taking special topic modules in manuscript, print, speech and the editing of Renaissance texts. 
  • Become part of a welcoming and lively academic community. St Andrews is a consortium member of the Folger Shakespeare Library Institute in Washington DC and also hosts a number of research groups relevant to the English Renaissance.
  • Explore the key developments in modern and contemporary literary studies in dialogue with leading scholars in the fields of Shakespeare studies, Shakespearean book history, Renaissance popular literature and 17th-century literary culture.

Teaching format

Taught modules are comprised of weekly seminars and cover both elite and popular writing, the influence of other continental vernaculars, and the importance of print and manuscript media. Class sizes typically range from three to ten students.

Modules are assessed through coursework essays. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary.

During the course of the year, but with particular focus during the last four months, students will research and write a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choosing.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



Read less
Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies (one year full-time or two years part-time) provides students with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of English Renaissance literature and culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. Read more
Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies (one year full-time or two years part-time) provides students with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of English Renaissance literature and culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. All students are introduced to the methodologies and theories underpinning Renaissance studies today, and choose from a wide range of specialist modules. The course is suited to English Literature graduates who wish to pursue advanced-level study either as an end in itself or as preparation for a PhD. Funding is available to the best students from various sources, including AHRC, DEL and the School of English at Queen’s.

Read less
Note that this course is delivered by the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education. This blended learning (online and face-to-face) 30-credit Postgraduate Award in Educational Studies course takes as its starting point the power of the performance in developing understanding of Shakespeare in pupils. Read more
Note that this course is delivered by the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education.

This blended learning (online and face-to-face) 30-credit Postgraduate Award in Educational Studies course takes as its starting point the power of the performance in developing understanding of Shakespeare in pupils. It uses a practical, workshop and classroom-based approach, which is supported by a foundation of deepening theoretical knowledge about Shakespeare in context, with a particular focus on developing a critical and analytical awareness of the theatricality of specific Shakespeare plays.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16002

Course detail

Aims of the programme:

- To explore with The Globe Theatre the opportunities offered for the effective teaching of Shakespeare through practical and applied classroom strategies;
- To resource and to generate research-based debate regarding teaching Shakespeare through performance;
- To encourage sharing of ideas and approaches within different groups of the English and drama teaching community, all of whom have a distinctive contribution to make to the debate and particular training needs;
- To impact positively on planning and teaching of Shakespeare;
- To contribute, via web or paper-based published outcomes, to the understanding of effective teaching of Shakespeare through performance strategies and The Globe Theatre's resources.

Format

Using resources developed by The Globe Theatre and the Faculty and located in a Virtual Learning Environment, you will be required to reflect analytically and critically on the assumptions which documented production choices embody and to show an understanding of the implications various critical approaches may generate for production choices. You will also be asked to evaluate your own teaching of Shakespeare using the ideas developed through the course.

You will be asked to attend an introductory session at the Faculty of Education at the beginning of the course. You will then meet at The Globe Theatre for a Saturday workshop. The theoretical foundation of the course is designed as an online component and will require you to undertake some small classroom-focused research tasks. The course ends with a further workshop at The Globe Theatre and attendance at the matinee on that day of one of the Globe's productions.

Please note: you are required to attend two Saturday workshops at The Globe Theatre, as well as completing the online component of the course.

Contact time

- Supervision: 3 hours per year
- Face-to-face conferences: 6-12 hours per year
- Small group teaching: 2 hours per week during terms (online)

Assessment

Essays, projects and written papers
4,000 words

Students receive written comments on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support (including Professional and Career Development Loans): https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

Read less
This exciting, intellectually rigorous programme gives you the opportunity to develop the study of literature from a variety of perspectives through a number of flexible pathways. Read more

This exciting, intellectually rigorous programme gives you the opportunity to develop the study of literature from a variety of perspectives through a number of flexible pathways.

The pathways you can take are:

These enable you to combine theoretical angles with the close reading of a wide range of texts, from different media (literary, filmic, visual), periods, and cultural, geographic and linguistic backgrounds – though all texts will be studied in English, in English translation, or with English subtitles.

Modules & structure

Each of the seven pathways centres around a core module which will ground you in the specific features of the period/region/theoretical discipline covered.

Pathway

Core Module

Pathway in Comparative Literature & Criticism - Studies in Comparative Literature & Criticism

Pathway in Modern Literary Theory - Theories of Literature & Culture

Pathway in Modern Literature - Modern Literary Movements

Pathway in Literature of the Caribbean & its Diasporas - Literature of the Caribbean & it Diasporas

Pathway in American Literature & Culture - American Literature & Culture: Critical & Theoretical Concepts

Pathway in Romantic and Victorian Literature & Culture - Nineteenth-Century Literature: Romanticisms

Pathway in Shakespeare: Early & Modern - Shakespeare and the Early Modern

A Study Support Workshop will run a number of sessions throughout the year, including sessions on, for example, resources, essay-writing at Master's level, planning and developing dissertation projects.

You will also be able to take part in GLITS, the department's weekly research seminar; in LINKS, the London Intercollegiate Network for Comparative Studies; and in the many activities organised by the Graduate School and other Goldsmiths departments.

Option modules

Around the core module you choose three option modules from the wide range of options taught in the Department to reflect your own particular interests. You may also take the core module of another pathway as one of your options.

In addition, you also undertake a dissertation.

For core and option module details, see the pathway pages.

Assessment

Extended course essays; dissertation of 15,000 words.

Skills

You'll develop transferable skills, including:

  • enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
  • the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
  • the ability to organise information; the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to pursue careers in:

  • publishing
  • journalism
  • public relations
  • teaching
  • advertising
  • the civil service
  • business
  • industry
  • the media

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



Read less
"O this learning, what a thing it is!". The Taming of the Shrew.  (1.2.130). Read more

"O this learning, what a thing it is!"

The Taming of the Shrew (1.2.130)

If you have a passion for the works of William Shakespeare, this MA gives you the space to study the full range of Shakespeare’s works more closely and comprehensively than you could as an undergraduate – approaching Shakespeare as a maker of theatre on page and stage. The course focuses closely on the works themselves, looking at what they say about our world today, as well as what they reveal about Shakespeare’s. We've designed the course so that you'll discover the critical, historical and theoretical issues in his plays and poetry as you encounter them, rather than providing you with prescribed routes to take. 

The MA is designed to provide you with both breadth of coverage and depth of focus, and the course is ideal whether you wish to pursue research at PhD level or simply wish to develop your knowledge of Shakespeare and your critical skills. You will be taught by the people creating and animating current critical debates on manuscript, print and performance.

Join a department that's joint 2nd in the UK for outstanding and world-leading research environments. You'll benefit from our incredible research: over two thirds of our research was judged ‘world leading and internationally excellent’ in REF 2014. All staff in the department are highly regarded scholars, writers and critics who are engaged in research, writing ground-breaking books, talking to or writing in the national media, and providing expert advice to organisations including the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Department for Education and other national and international bodies.

Designed to be flexible, this course can be studied full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

Course structure

Core modules

The Works - Plays and Poetry

This module spans Shakespeare’s entire career as a playwright and poet, analysing in detail his nineteen major plays – including histories, comedies, tragedies, romances and problem plays – and the Sonnets. The theatrical, historical and theoretical issues raised by the works will be addressed as they emerge out of individual response and class discussion.

King Lear and The Tempest - Critical Debate and Creative Response

This course aims to engage you in a sustained, intensive study of Shakespeare’s supreme tragic masterpiece, the controversies it has provoked, and the diverse ways in which it has been adapted and transformed by poets, dramatists, novelists, and by film and theatre directors, since Shakespeare’s time. You will begin with detailed discussion of the play itself before turning to critical debate and then exploring the creative impact of King Lear on later poetry, drama and fiction. The second term is devoted to studying the creative response to King Lear in the theatre and the cinema, tracking its performance history on stage and screen through in-depth analysis of landmark productions and film adaptations. 

Methods and Materials of Research

This module is designed to introduce you to a number of key topics related to the methods of postgraduate research, and to some of the resources and materials that will be useful to your studies.

Dissertation

This will be a piece of original written work, of between 12,000 and 15,000 words. The topic of the dissertation will be agreed between you and whichever member of staff is allotted as supervisor and is normally required to be submitted by the beginning of September in the year of the completion of the programme.

Teaching & assessment

This course comprises of 120 units:

  • The Works - Plays and Poetry (60 units)
  • King Lear and The Tempest - Critical Debate and Creative Response (30 units)
  • Shakespeare and Dramaturgy (30 units)
  • Methods and Materials of Research (unweighted)
  • Dissertation (60 units)

You will attend seminars and be expected to read texts, conduct achival research on the internet or in libraries, and attend performances.

You will be assessed through essays and your final Dissertation.

Your future career

Our postgraduates have gone into academic roles at the Universities of Edinburgh, Sussex and Leeds, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland.

We will prepare you for careers in other areas too, such as teaching, librarianship, marketing, and theatre administration.



Read less
Delivered in partnership with Queen Mary University of London, the course provides a unique opportunity to experience postgraduate life with two world-leading institutions with strong expertise in the fields of Shakespeare, Renaissance studies, performance and modern languages. Read more
Delivered in partnership with Queen Mary University of London, the course provides a unique opportunity to experience postgraduate life with two world-leading institutions with strong expertise in the fields of Shakespeare, Renaissance studies, performance and modern languages.

On this course you’ll find yourself at the centre of a unique initiative to engage with, critique, and develop ideas of globalisation, interdisciplinarity and translation that inform a new approach to the study of Shakespeare.

You will form a critical perspective on Shakespeare as a global cultural phenomenon — from Elizabethan England through his transformations and translations to the 21st century — as a catalyst and as a site of resistance to globalisation. You’ll also consider Shakespeare in online media and in films by internationally-acclaimed directors. The course investigates theoretical, historical, performance and pedagogical approaches to Shakespeare’s global afterlives and provides a rich mix of intellectual activity that will support you to become a Shakespearean without borders.

Your first term will be spent at London’s Queen Mary University accessing a variety of theatrical performances at venues such as Shakespeare’s Globe, Donmar Warehouse and the National Theatre, as well as visiting the many museums, libraries and archives of the capital. The second term is spent at Warwick, located close to Stratford-upon-Avon, where you can access performances at the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and the research facilities of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.

This is a joint degree with Queen Mary University of London, see: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/coursefinder/courses/125726.html for further module details.

Read less
The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Read more
The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Our expert tutors will introduce you to the very latest academic debates, along with longstanding critical issues such as race, class and sexuality.

Why study English Studies at Dundee?

The MLitt English Studies is a taught one year full-time, or two years part-time, postgraduate degree, which can be tailored to your needs, allowing you to pursue any literary interest you can imagine, whether it’s Arthurian literature or American crime fiction, animal rights or post colonialism.

This degree will:
Provide training in literary and cultural research as a firm basis for proceeding to doctoral work
Provide a taught postgraduate programme to suit individual student research interests and research needs
Enable completion of a dissertation of 18,000 words: an independent piece of work based on primary texts and sources, on your own topic, under the direction of an expert in the field.

Unique to Dundee is the “Special Author” option module, which allows you to explore in depth the full range of your chosen author’s works, whether it might be the Harry Potter series, Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, or the poems of Geoffrey Hill. Other examples include: Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Robert Burns, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Orwell, Joseph Conrad, or Angela Carter.

What's so good about English Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
English Studies is part of the School of Humanities at Dundee, is a centre of research excellence, we have recognized strengths in book history, authorship studies and visual culture, and we lead the way in interdisciplinary scholarship. Our research culture thrives on probing the creative relationships between literature and film, poetry and theatre, word and image.

In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

We are also home to an annual Literary Festival which regularly attracts high profile writers to Dundee.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

What you will study

There is one core module: Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture which runs over two semesters, and you choose two optional modules, from the list available each year, plus the English Studies Dissertation.

Below is a typical list of modules, which varies from year to year, and is subject to demand and availability. You can also choose your optional modules from any grouping.

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
Exploring Old English Texts
Special Author: directed reading
Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
The Scottish Novel
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
British and Irish Poetry, 1680-1830
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
Literature & Society, 1750-1900
The Irish Novel
Special Author: directed reading
Modern and Contemporary Literature

The Scottish Novel
Constructing Identities: Self, Subject and Persona in Contemporary Poetry
Virginia Woolf
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
The Irish Novel
The Literature of Hollywood
Writing, Texts and Books
Joyce and the Cinema
Postwar American Fiction and Transatlantic Exchange
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
Gender, Ethnicity, Text: Contemporary Readings
Special Author: directed reading
For the current list, visit the Humanities website.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Humanities degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, recent graduate

Read less
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history. Read more
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history.

Grounded in and administered from the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century, this is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. The Centre provides an excellent research context for the MA programme and any further postgraduate work that will arise from it.

Among the teachers involved in this MA are Jennie Batchelor (English), Jonathan Friday (History and Philosophy of Art), Donna Landry (English), Paddy Bullard (English) and Ben Thomas (History & Philosophy of Art).

The Eighteenth-Century Studies MA is also available at Canterbury and Paris (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/221/eighteenth-century-studies-paris). After spending your first term at our Canterbury campus, you relocate to our Paris centre for the spring term to study in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/220/eighteenth-century-studies

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation or an editorial project between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In the 2014/15 academic year the following two core specialist modules were available: EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eighteenth Century and EN895 - Jane Austen and Material Culture. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
HI826 - Literary Undergrounds and Anarchists in the Basement (12 credits)
HI874 - Religion and Society in Seventeenth-Century England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture and its political and cultural contexts

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of eighteenth-century studies today

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement.

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced study in the field

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills for those intending to teach eighteenth-century studies, especially in higher education

- provide an interdisciplinary context for the study of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture.

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
MA Renaissance Studies explores the question of what the Renaissance was and what approaches are best suited to understanding it. Read more
MA Renaissance Studies explores the question of what the Renaissance was and what approaches are best suited to understanding it. The programme considers different aspects of Renaissance culture, particularly the social and intellectual histories of England, France, Italy and Spain. You will study with Birkbeck's internationally recognised experts in Renaissance English literature and culture, history of art, French, history and Spanish, tailoring your module choices towards chosen specialisms. By the end of the course you will be able to demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the questions associated with the study of the Renaissance and will have had the opportunity to either specialise or work in an interdisciplinary way. From the start, you will undertake training in postgraduate research skills.

You begin with a core course which examines the way the Renaissance has been understood and then you go on to take 3 options in areas of specialist interest. You can see detailed descriptions of our core course and all the option modules below. Finally, you will be individually counselled in your choice of dissertation topic.

We are based in Bloomsbury in central London and the unrivalled resources both within and near to Birkbeck will enable you to develop advanced research skills, which will support your dissertation writing and provide a thorough preparation for PhD study. Many of our students progress to MPhil/PhD level at Birkbeck and other institutions, including other colleges of the University of London and the University of Oxford.

In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many Birkbeck Renaissance events. This includes the London Renaissance Seminar, which brings many internationally renowned academics to Birkbeck, and events specific to the Birkbeck Renaissance group, including our day on 'Researching the Text'.

To find out more, read our programme handbook.

What is special about this MA?

You decide how to use the MA. You can choose to work within a discipline (e.g. English literature) or explore the full interdisciplinary possibilities of Renaissance Studies.
We offer research internship placements at the Globe Theatre.
Students specialising - in Spain, Shakespeare, Rome or London, for example - benefit immensely from putting that specialism into a wider context by learning about a range of approaches to the Renaissance in the core module.
We are committed to personal tuition. Each student has many opportunities to discuss their work and plan one-to-one meetings with specialist tutors who are working at the cutting-edge of Renaissance studies.
You can decide as you study if you want to progress beyond your MA and undertake further, independent research.
Birkbeck's prestige in this area means it has an unrivalled range of Renaissance activities: join the early modern society, bring your friends to Renaissance events in Arts Week and take part in our 'Researching the Text' day, as well as attending the London Renaissance Seminar.

What our students say

'Deciding to undertake an MA in Renaissance Studies was one of the wisest things I have ever done. It gave me huge intellectual satisfaction and insight into curatorial and research skills that are essential to my role in running a national museum.' (Ian Blatchford, Director of the Science Museum Group)

'I thoroughly enjoyed my course in MA Renaissance Studies, especially researching on the theme of women and Islam during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. I am very appreciative of all the help I was provided with during the MA and couldn't have developed my career without doing this course. When applying for jobs as an English teacher, my MA helped immensely during the application process, as well as continuing my professional development in this field.' (Maarya Desai, English teacher)

'Deciding to do the MA Renaissance Studies course at Birkbeck was one of the best decisions I could have made, especially as a student coming from the USA. The evening modules allowed me to explore London to its fullest during the day and to use the British Library for my research.' (Christeen Abee)

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X