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Masters Degrees (Sexual Violence)

We have 29 Masters Degrees (Sexual Violence)

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Examine the impact of being abusive or being abused. You will look at theoretical perspectives considering abusiveness and its impact in different international, cultural and social contexts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-understanding-domestic-violence-and-sexual-abuse/. Read more
Examine the impact of being abusive or being abused. You will look at theoretical perspectives considering abusiveness and its impact in different international, cultural and social contexts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-understanding-domestic-violence-and-sexual-abuse/

This MA in Understanding Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse is unique and represents the first psychologically informed programme of its kind.

It is particularly suitable for people wanting to increase their grasp of the interplay between mental distress, domestic violence and sexual abuse. The programme will offer a blended learning approach with a mixture of online and face to face contact. The online components will be largely focused on the acquisition of theoretical knowledge through computer mediated activities via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The classroom-based content of the programme will have an emphasis on experiential and reflective learning which will help you understand the process of identifying, assessing and managing both perpetrators and victims. This aspect of the programme will be delivered in blocks preferably over weekends to make the study more accessible to working adults.

Individual modules on the programme are likely to be valued as part of a continuing professional development plan for psychological therapists and other workers in the field.

You may take individual modules separately or exit with a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma.

You can keep up to date with everything that's happening on the programme by following us on Twitter.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Suzanne Martin.

Modules & Structure

Your learning will be underpinned by a unique synthesising of psychodynamic, systemic, cognitive behavioural and social theories to examine the impact of being abusive or of being abused. The programme focuses on looking at practice and research from these theoretical perspectives and will consider abusiveness and its impact in different cultural and social contexts from childhood to older age.

The learning will be provided by a cross-disciplinary team that covers approaches from the social work, community and youth work, cross-sectoral arts, and therapeutic approaches including art and dance psychotherapy, psychodynamic, counselling and cognitive behavioural approaches.

You'll be assessed through a mix of coursework, presentations, and a final dissertation.

Skills

The MA will develop skills including:

a knowledge various theoretical perspectives
an understanding of cross-disciplinary work within the field
an understanding of the different international, cultural and social contexts from childhood to older age within the field

Careers

It is expected that a number of professionals will use either the course credit or the degree to supplement their CPD portfolios, which are a requirement for the majority of these professionals.

For workers with extensive experience this programme (or its constituent courses) will provide a sound basis in theoretical knowledge and current research which will help them develop their current work and increase their potential for further advancement in the field.

The UK has developed recognised forms of intervention in this field that have an international application and relevance. Issues regarding domestic violence and sexual abuse have an international public health and human rights dimension, which makes the programme internationally relevant.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches. Read more
Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches.

The course is ideal for those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence, in policymaking or delivery at local, regional or national levels, or are wishing to establish careers in these sectors.

More about this course

This course provides a comprehensive grounding in theoretical frameworks, research, policy and practice approaches to woman and child abuse.

The MA content covers all forms of violence against women and child abuse, including sexual violence, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, trafficking and harmful practices. Reflecting the work of the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, a specialist research unit, the MA focuses on what we know about these forms of abuse, the contexts in which they occur and the connections between them. While the main focus will be on the UK, intellectual, policy and practice approaches from across the globe will be discussed.

The course content will be cross-disciplinary, mainly drawing on sociology and including social policy, criminology and psychology.

Assessment approaches vary according to the aims of each module and how it is delivered. Examples include essays or other written coursework and individual presentations.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Researching Communities (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Violence: Causes, Consequences and Interventions (core, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (core, 20 credits)
-Woman and Child Abuse Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Children and Families: Policy and Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Community Development (option, 20 credits)
-Crime and Offender Patterns (option, 20 credits)
-Doing Evaluation: Skills and Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-International Child and Human Rights Law (option, 20 credits)
-Law, Ethics and Policy in Mental Health (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Social Research: Principles, Practice and Contexts (option, 20 credits)
-Women, Gender and Human Rights (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is particularly suited to those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence. It is also excellent preparation for those who are wishing to establish careers in this sector.

Our graduates have gone on to key roles in policymaking or service delivery at local, regional and national levels, and some pursue further studies to PhD level, including with the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course is designed to provide students with an overview of historical and current issues and debates in the area of sexual and reproductive health, with special attention to power relations, gender and a global economic perspective. Read more

Sexual & Reproductive Health - Short Course

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of historical and current issues and debates in the area of sexual and reproductive health, with special attention to power relations, gender and a global economic perspective. In addition, it will equip students with insight into rights-based approaches and skills to critically analyse and develop sexual and reproductive policies, services and interventions.

Potential participants note that this is not a clinical course.

Course participants explore the socio-economic, political and organizational dimensions of reproductive health.

Content includes:

-constructions of sexuality
-conferences and contestation: historical development of conceptualisations of sexual and reproductive health
-rights-based approaches
-theories about the relationships between development, population growth and reproductive health and how these inform SRH programmes
-politics and economics of sexual and reproductive health interventions (eg concerning assisted reproductive technologies)
-current sexual health (eg STIs) and reproductive health issues (infertility, abortions, maternal mortality, FGM)
-gender-based violence (including medical violence, eg forced sterilisations, forced abortions, harmful treatments of fertility)
-sexual and reproductive health across the life cycle (special attention for youth and elderly)
-sexual and reproductive health and men
-sexual and reproductive health promotion

Credit Rating: 15 SCOTCAT/5 ECTS

Participants of the professional development courses will receive a certificate of attendance from the Institute.

However, participants wishing to gain an award may register for a post graduate certificate. The modules are then taken for credit on a part-time basis each year. A PG Cert requires 60 credits and a post graduate diploma requires 120 credits. If you do a dissertation in addition to the short courses, you will gain 180 credits.

If you register for an award, you can have up to 4 years for a PG Cert, 5 years for a PG Dip and 7 years for a MSc to complete in part-time mode.

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Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. Read more
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. It offers an exciting opportunity to study both theoretical criminology and the more applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice issues.

The course has three formal stages:
-The Diploma stages consist of three taught modules, a proposal module that is delivered through work groups and a practice-based module involving reflection upon work or volunteering experience.
-Those proceeding to the Master's stage will be required to complete an extended project to be determined individually.
-It is possible to complete your studies at any of the Certificate, Diploma or Master's stages.

Full-time students will complete all these stages in one year. Part-time students would normally complete the diploma and masters stages over two years.

What's covered in the course?

During study, you are asked to reflect upon your experience of crime and the criminal justice system, looking at significant factors involved in crime in contemporary society. These include globalisation, consumerism and political economy, as well as considering more psychological and theoretical drivers of harmful and criminal behaviour and the responses to crime.

In order to provide an engaging and flexible educational experience to diverse range of students, the course utilises a wide range of learning and teaching methods and technologies. Given the small size of each group of students recruited, the postgraduate status of the programme and the experience which many of its recruits have had of the criminal justice system, the course is highly participative. While sessions will provide periods of structured teaching, they will also provide a forum, within which you will take responsibility for your own learning, and share your knowledge and views with other students and staff.

The precise nature of sessions and delivery will vary with the year, the cohort of students, and the general and specific experience possessed by individual students. The programme team also makes increasing use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, where teaching staff will upload lecture notes, web links, video programmes and extracts from academic sources. Moodle is also used for general announcements and communication with a group of students, many of whom are unlikely to be on campus every day.

The course has a strong link with research practice, and will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, as well as enabling you to form judgements on the relative merits of, and relationships between, different research tools and methods. You will also develop the capability to design, manage and disseminate a research project to a professional standard.

Why Choose Us?

-The course has strong links with the University’s Centre for Applied Criminology, a leading research centre staffed by established criminologists. They are renowned for their international reputations, with their specialist areas including homicide, violence and organised crime.
-You’ll have flexible study options, enabling you to focus on either an academic route or a more practice-based approach.
-The course will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, and allow you to form judgements on different research tools.
-The course team has valuable links with the regional criminal justice system and leading non-Government organisations, including therapeutic prison HMP Grendon, where the University holds an annual debate.

How you learn

The course is taught in weekly seminars, tutorials and workshops, which encourage substantial student participation. Our virtual learning environment is also used to deliver some content and facilitate communication remotely.

The MA Applied Criminology will normally be studied on a one-year full-time basis and a two-year part-time basis, with the taught elements of the programme being delivered over a teaching period of approximately 30 weeks from September to May/June.

The programme is divided into study units called modules, each of 20 credits (excluding the Extended Project which amounts to 60 credits). Most modules on the programme are core, but there is also optional modules which cover influential areas of work undertaken in the Centre for Applied Criminology. You’ll complete 120 credits at the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Stage, and a further 60 credits at the Master’s stage. It is expected that most applicants will wish to progress to Master's stage, which is delivered and assessed through an extended project supervised through evening workgroups and through one-to-one supervision, which will come from an expert academic attached to the Centre for Applied Criminology.

The taught Master’s component covers a range of core and option modules, including topics such as - Research Methods (where you will develop your proposal for the final Applied Research Proposal module); Criminological Thought; Criminal Psychology; Penal Theory and Practice; Crime and Rehabilitation in Media; and Reflective Practice or Criminological Issues.

At the Diploma stage, you may select options modules covering topics such as Restorative Justice, Crime Prevention in Homicide and Organised Violent Crime (HAVOC), and Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence (UDSV). Additionally, the MA is awarded on the completion of the Applied Research Project [Dissertation] module (60 credits), which contains a taught component with evening sessions.

Employability

The teaching team draws on the combined with the expertise of members of the Centre for Applied Criminology, who will give you cutting-edge criminological knowledge from their impactful and high-profile research, as well as giving you excellent access to experienced practitioners and Criminal Justice System organisations.

The access provided to professionals, the presence of practitioners among fellow students and the capacity to reflect upon relevant volunteering or work experience within the structure of the course means that the course provides excellent opportunities for building contacts and networking, as well as developing opportunities for employment.

The School of Social Sciences has relationships with a number of criminal justice agencies and non-government organisations, including the local Community Safety Partnership, HMP Grendon and the Howard League.

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The MSc in Crime, Justice and Psychology provides you with an in-depth understanding of the relationship between psychology, mental disorder, crime and law, enabling you to analyse its implications for the treatment and management of offenders. Read more
The MSc in Crime, Justice and Psychology provides you with an in-depth understanding of the relationship between psychology, mental disorder, crime and law, enabling you to analyse its implications for the treatment and management of offenders.

You will consider the application of psychological theories to the investigation of crime and pursuit of justice, and subsequently to the management and rehabilitation of offenders. You will also critically explore debates regarding mental disorder and responsibility for crime.

The course has been prepared by lecturers who are at the forefront of research in this field. You will gain an in-depth knowledge and understanding of crime and its consequences, both theoretical and applied, with a particular focus on the psychology of offending. You will be able to pursue in-depth study in areas that interest you by choosing option modules such as Psychology of Evil; Power, Crime and Criminal Justice; and Domestic and Sexual Violence.

This degree will develop your capacity for imaginative, rigorous and critical thinking. As well as gaining specific knowledge of the social processes of crime, criminalisation and the criminal justice system, you will strengthen your ability to understand and use different types of evidence. You will develop transferable skills that are highly sought after by employers, including the ability to present and develop a cohesive argument, communicate information to academic and non-academic audiences, conduct research and identify solutions to theoretical and research problems.

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This course allows you to develop an advanced knowledge of crime and offenders, as well as to assess contemporary trends and concepts in criminal justice policy and community safety. Read more
This course allows you to develop an advanced knowledge of crime and offenders, as well as to assess contemporary trends and concepts in criminal justice policy and community safety. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

It will incorporate approaches to crime control within the community and penal institutions. You will also gain the methodological and analytic skills required to conduct research within the field of crime and criminal justice; this level of knowledge and skill can prepare you for doctoral study or research posts within the criminal justice arena, or can consolidate your professional experience.

You are assessed via essays, projects, examinations and a dissertation between 12,000 and 15,000 words in length. The dissertation forms a key element of the MSc. It allows you to pursue in depth a topic of your choosing and is to be completed over the summer study period.

Modular structure

The course consists of four core modules, and a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Core modules:
-Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
-Crime Control and Community Safety
-Criminological Research Methods
-Crime and Offender Patterns

Students also select one 'designate' module per semester, and these include (subject to availability):
-Community Development
-Sexual Violence: causes, consequences, and interventions
-Psychology and Criminal Behaviour
-Intelligence Analysis
-Urban Patterns and Spatial Analysis

After the course

The aim of the course is to prepare you for employment or further study in the criminal justice sector.

The curriculum will equip you for a range of careers in the criminal justice system and related professions, all with excellent recruitment prospects. Key career paths include the Metropolitan Police Service, Probation Service, Foreign Office, Prison Service, youth offending and community safety departments, as well as academic or government research posts.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The MSc Investigative & Forensic Psychology is a one year, full-time postgraduate programme. It is accredited by the British Psychological Society and recognised as the first step towards status as a Chartered Forensic Psychologist in the UK for students who have Graduate Basis for Chartership. Read more
The MSc Investigative & Forensic Psychology is a one year, full-time postgraduate programme. It is accredited by the British Psychological Society and recognised as the first step towards status as a Chartered Forensic Psychologist in the UK for students who have Graduate Basis for Chartership. The course is also recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a Research Methods MSc and students taking this course are eligible for the ESRC 1 + 3 studentships.

The MSc provides students with a high quality, balanced postgraduate programme of research and academic knowledge including, awareness of professional, legal and ethical issues, and practical, communication and dissemination skills in Investigative and Forensic Psychology. The programme takes a three-tiered approach.

Students begin with structured sessions on conceptual and theoretical issues (including aggression, sexual violence and deviance, decision-making, leadership and stress, memory, communication and persuasion, and the psychology of crowd dynamics).

They then appreciate how these and related issues can be applied to forensic practice and its legal context (in terms of crime reduction and intervention studies; investigative procedures, forensic interviewing, court processes and proceedings, assessment, custody and rehabilitation).

Finally, they gain skills in communicating knowledge and conducting relevant research on case assessments of individuals and organisations

Why Choose Investigative and Forensic Psychology?

- This course is unique in that it is the only MSc accredited course of its type in a Russell Group University. It is viewed worldwide by many to be the home of Investigative Psychology
- The number and calibre of external practitioners whom deliver key understanding of real life applications, makes the MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology distinct from any other.
- The University of Liverpool has the largest representation of psychologists in Europe, who are research active on Law Enforcement projects.
- High quality teaching and a strong focus on employability skills mean that our students have gone on to be some of the most successful individuals in the field.
- The MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology is renowned worldwide and attracts a large number of International students and visiting speakers each year. In an increasingly global world it is important to raise awareness of the role cultural factors play in psychological functioning and how these may differ from the findings of mainstream Western research.
- This MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology was the first course of its type to receive five commendations by the British Psychological Society.

Key Facts

Research Assessment Exercise 2008
Targeting our key areas of interest we've systematically enhanced our research base, culture and infrastructure, whilst building internationally influential groups.

Our work is theoretically robust and problem and policy focused, with a research agenda that's socially relevant and postgraduate teaching that's truly research-led.

Why School of Psychology?

Breadth and choice

Reflecting our main research strengths, we offer two one-year, full-time, taught Masters (MSc) programmes in:

Investigative and Forensic Psychology
Research Methods in Psychology.
For details of all MRes/MPhil/PhD and MD opportunities in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, see the Research course list at http://www.liv.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/

Professionally recognised

The Investigative and Forensic Psychology course is recognised by the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP, British Psychological Society) and counts towards Chartered Forensic Status.

Innovative research

As home to the Centre for Investigative Psychology, we continue to stretch the boundaries of psychological inquiry with innovative research activity.

We've highly active, internationally renowned research groups and, in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008), 80% of our research activity was rated as of international standard.

Our partners

Our partners include local hospitals and schools, the Regional Neurological and Neurosurgical NHS Trust, Prison Psychology departments, national and international Police Forces and associated Law Enforcement Agencies. There are also close links with other University departments in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences; in particular, Clinical Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Anatomy. Numerous collaborations exist between members of staff and their colleagues in other academic institutions both nationally and internationally.

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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

This programme focuses on the issues surrounding gender based violence and human rights and principles of human rights. This discipline and subject area has a wide international reach in terms of how society and central government tackle the different levels of crimes against women and men in different countries and regions of the world looking at the very basic rights of people, expectations and challenges in some societies to top level and bringing in a range of other disciplines to analyse issues.  There are a wide range of career options within this subject area which range from international development and diplomacy to security, peace-building, charitable work to improve conditions in communities, women's and men's rights, international justice, policy and law making and so on.

In this programme the focus will be on ways we think about, understand and respond to violence. How do we know what counts as violence or a violent act?Why does legislation against violence so often transpire as inadequate, perhaps especially in the case of gendered and sexual violence? As the links between sex, gender and violence appear intimate and often lethal, a central but not exclusive focus of the programme will be on theories and practices of sex/gender. You are taught by experts in the School of Sociology.  

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods
  • Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

  • Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Optional

  • Dimensions of Globalisation
  • The Comparative Study of European Societies
  • Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by renowned international experts from The Centre for Gender Studies and School of Sociology
  • University of Aberdeen provides an excellent range of interdisciplinary events which you can attend

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs 



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This Masters degree is based on internationally recognised research and is delivered by its expert authors. You will extend your knowledge of crime by studying different international contexts and key issues facing law makers, legal practitioner and victims. Read more

This Masters degree is based on internationally recognised research and is delivered by its expert authors. You will extend your knowledge of crime by studying different international contexts and key issues facing law makers, legal practitioner and victims.

•Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2 years)

•A contemporary Masters degree focusing on key issues in a global context

•Course recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority

•Flexible entry points mean you can opt for either an LLM (if you choose exclusively law modules) or MSc (if you decide to take a mix of law and social science modules) award

•Develops critical analysis and assesses legal frameworks from an international perspective

•Can be studied by professionals from a non-law background

Governments and authorities in the 21st century are facing major challenges as they deal with terrorism and complex organised crime which crosses borders and poses difficult issues for legal practitioners and organisations across a variety of sectors.

The MSc/Master of Laws programme in Global Crime, Justice and Security is designed to develop your advanced scholarship and research skills enabling you to progress, academically and intellectually, in a discreet area of international law.

You will critically analyse and understand the complexities of this highly specialist and complex field – both challenging and informing global and comparative perspectives. This course is underpinned by significant engagement with new and established research and advanced scholarship.

For those with a limited knowledge of law, there is a comprehensive induction in the first semester. ‘Law for Non-Lawyers’ covers the essential nature and sources of law and the necessary elements to prepare you for advanced study in this area.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Contemporary issues in global crime, justice and security

Introducing you to core concepts, processes and institutions of international law and how they relate to the programme’s themes of crime, justice and security in a global context

The option modules you will typically study include:

Legal research methods

You will be trained in the process of conducting and writing up research. This module serves as a preparatory stage for the dissertation module at the end of the course

Dissertation

You will undertake a 12,000 word written project on a topic agreed with the programme leader and/or module leader, relevant to the programme's curriculum. A supervisor will be assigned from the programme team to guide you in developing your work

International criminal law

Understand crimes against humanity, genocide and war crimes, and explore how international law provides machinery to hold accountable those responsible for such crimes

Conflict and welfare in international law

Explore the legal rules which govern states' recourse to the use of force against one another, as well as the body of humanitarian law which regulates the manner by which armed conflict is conducted

Global crime and security

An in-depth study into the phenomena of cross-border criminal activity and terrorism, and collaborative responses to it

The United Nations international security and global justice

Understand the role of the United Nations in the maintenance of international peace and security. You will explore the UN's experiences in areas such as peacekeeping, military enforcement and the imposition of sanctions

EU foreign security and justice policy

Consider and explore the role of the European Union as an international actor, and understand how it has performed an increased security function on the global stage

Gender perspectives and international law

Consider various aspects of international law from perspectives that are informed by gender, using examples such as sexual violence during armed conflict to explore more theoretical debates about the role of gender in the operation of international law

Statehood, peoples and statelessness

What is the concept of the state and the phenomena of statelessness; how do states relate to their populations, and under which circumstances do states dissolve?

Democracy, rights and rule of law

Understand the theoretical aspects of human rights, and its relationship with democracy in the modern world

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers. Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.



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This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration. Read more
This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration.

Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in both in September and January, this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understanding and explaining the causes and consequences of forced migration, analysing, critiquing and evaluating host governments’, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNCHR) and NGOs’ policies on protection, assistance, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter -governmental organisations, such as the World Bank and others.

Throughout the course, you’ll also engage in volunteering. Students have volunteered in different organisations , including the UK Refugee Council, British Red Cross, UNHCR, Chance UK, Naz Project London and Eaves in South London. These organisations provide support, advice and advocacy to asylum-seekers, including women who’ve experienced violence, such as trafficking, prostitution, domestic and sexual violence.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

Modules

International Refugee Law
Asylum policy in the EU and Member States
Forced Migration and Human Rights
Forced Migration and Development
Contemporary Issues in Development
Research methods for development
Dissertation (triple module)

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

Employability

The aims and outcomes of this course are designed to develop your knowledge and skills that are relevant to working with forced migrants, including asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and other categories of forced migrants and also for working in refugee-producing and hosting countries world-wide, inter-governmental organisations, such as the UNHCR, non-governmental orgisations, immigration lawyers, lobbying and advocacy groups. The Home Office and immigration authorities in the EU and member states are potential employers of our graduates.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations. Through our pool of visiting lecturers and practitioners, the MSc Refugee Studies networks with activists, academics and practitioners. These networks provide students an opportunity not only to learn about job opportunities but also establish contacts that may prove to be useful in search of employment opportunities. Students’ employability is enhanced by developing their transferable and problem-solving analytical and evaluative skills. Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum-seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Explore an exciting blend of criminology and criminal justice subjects – covering both theory and policy – and address key contemporary questions and debates. Read more
Explore an exciting blend of criminology and criminal justice subjects – covering both theory and policy – and address key contemporary questions and debates.

Our MA is underpinned by our research expertise. You’ll be taught by experts in a wide range of theoretical and methodological areas. Our criminology research has focused on topics such as:
-Sexual violence
-Hate crime
-Sex work
-Women who kill
-Terrorism
-Policing
-Capital punishment
-Retributive justice
-Cultural criminology
-Existential criminology

Our course also draws on expertise from the Sussex Law School, which will enable you to develop an interdisciplinary perspective.

How will I study?

Our core modules give you the necessary theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations. They cover:
-Criminology and criminal justice
-Debates in law
-Research methods

Our options – from both law and criminology – are taught by specialist academics based on their areas of expertise.

Teaching methods include lectures, workshops and seminars. Assessment modes include presentations, essays and briefing papers as well as a 15,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

You’ll gain practical abilities as well as critical and problem-solving skills valued in contemporary job markets.

You will be able to apply your analytical skills to a range of careers in the criminal justice system as well as the public, private and voluntary sectors.

The MA can also provide a strong foundation for further academic study or a career in research.

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A research degree in your chosen law or criminology subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. Read more

A research degree in your chosen law or criminology subject is a period of intensive, supervised investigative work. It builds on your previous academic or professional experience and allows you to develop an original area of expertise.You work closely with a director of studies and two supervisors who are specialists in your chosen field to produce an extended thesis of up to 80,000 words (in the case of doctoral research).

We have a vibrant research culture and we value and support all our research students who make a vital contribution to the intellectual life of the University. There are regular research training events, seminars and informal meetings where you can practise delivering conference papers in a supportive environment, and there is a monthly lunch session for all PhD students to come together. Funds are available to support you in attending conferences and we encourage you to deliver papers and publish your work.

We are regularly advertising studentships funded by Sheffield Hallam University directly. It may also be possible to apply for external studentships. Some part-time teaching may also be available.

We are a group of approximately 80 academics specialising in a wide range of research areas. We have research clusters in

  • desistance and recovery
  • criminal justice institutions
  • human rights and social justice
  • socio-legal studies
  • learning and teaching

Current staff research interests are wide-ranging and include • addiction • anti-doping • anti-semitism • anti-social behaviour • clinical legal education • commercial law • desistance and recovery • data protection • data security • discrimination • domestic and sexual violence • emotional labour • EU law • gambling • human fertilisation • immigration • intellectual property • legal history • motor insurance • pedagogy • policing • privacy • radical criminology • social identity • therapeutic jurisprudence • transitional justice • urban regeneration

Please see the Law and Criminology staff pages for a list of staff and their current research.

This degree is hosted in the Faculty of Development and Society Graduate School.

Assessment

  • a research programme submitted for approval by our research degrees committee
  • a report and oral presentation for the confirmation of PhD stage
  • submission of thesis and viva

Employability

Successful graduates are able to progress within a wide variety of roles in the legal professions and associated fields including

  • government department advisor
  • local government
  • various business-related roles
  • consultancy


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The Master of Science in Forensic Psychology is a 36-credit online program that provides students with insight into the intersection of psychology and legal issues. Read more

The Master of Science in Forensic Psychology is a 36-credit online program that provides students with insight into the intersection of psychology and legal issues. Students gain an understanding of what forensic psychologists do and will learn how to apply this training in a variety of professional contexts.

This degree program will provide students with the professional training necessary to function at an optimal level in a variety of forensic settings where psychology is used including: courts, law enforcement, criminal justice, national security offices, prisons, social services agencies, child welfare agencies, and treatment facilities.

Many students in our program have specialized in law, mental health or other health services and want to work in the forensic area. Others are interested in furthering their careers and assuming more senior level positions. Some of our students use this degree to make them more competitive when applying for a doctoral program.

The online format and non-clinical curriculum make the program an excellent option for working professionals needing to integrate graduate study with job responsibilities. The program also targets those living in rural or frontier areas in and outside the United States, those with limited or no access to this type of graduate level educational program, and individuals working non-traditional shift schedules, such as those in law enforcement, corrections, national security, and the military.

Important Note

There is no licensure or certification in Florida or most states for Forensic Psychology at this time. It is considered a subspecialty of other clinical mental health or legal programs

Curriculum

The Master of Science in Forensic Psychology degree program requires a total of 36 semester hours of graduate course work. The program consists of a core of 24 credits and students are required to complete one of two possible 9-credit specialization tracks, and a 3-credit capstone course. Students can choose to complete either a thesis or a field experience for their capstone's content, although if students are looking to continue their studies it is recommended they chose the research option.

Core Courses (3 credits each)

  • PSY 0900 - Introduction to Forensic Psychological Science
  • PSY 0901 - Psychopathology, Personality Disorders, and Behavioral Interventions in Forensic Settings
  • PSY 0902 - Methods & Tools of Psychological & Violence Risk Assessment
  • PSY 0903 - Evaluation, Methodology, and Psychological Research
  • PSY 0904 - Ethical Concerns & Multicultural Issues in Forensic Psychology
  • PSY 0905 - Communication Skills and Tools in Forensic Psychology
  • PSY 0906 - Best Practices and Policies for the Mentally Ill in the Criminal Justice System
  • PSY 0907 - Gender Violence: Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault & Child Abuse

Specialisation Tracks

Students will choose one of the following two specialisation tracks:

TRACK 1: FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY IN THE LEGAL SYSTEM (9 Credits - Choose 3 courses from below)

  • PSY 0908 - Psychological Issues in Dependency & Family Law Cases
  • PSY 0909 - Therapeutic Jurisprudence & Problem-Solving Courts
  • PSY 0910 - Assessment of Psychological Injury for Legal Cases
  • PSY 0911 - Understanding Psychological Reports and Expert Witness Testimony
  • PSY 0912 - Psychological Evaluation of Competencies, Syndromes, & Sanity Issues
  • PSY 0913 / CJI 6230 - Behavioral Criminology
  • PSY 0914 - Capstone Project in Forensic Psychology in the Legal System

TRACK 2: FORSENSIC PSYCHOLOGY FOR MENTAL HEALTH WORKERS, FIRST RESPONDERS AND DISASTER TEAMS (9 Credits - choose 3 courses from below)

  • PSY 0915 - Suicide Prevention & Crisis Intervention Skills
  • PSY 0916 - Trauma Informed Assessment and Intervention
  • PSY 0917 - Child Maltreatment and Trauma Assessment and Intervention
  • PSY 0918 - Intervening in School & Workplace Violence
  • PSY 0919 - Substance Abuse, Mental Illness and Trauma
  • PSY 0920 / CJI 6220 - Police Psychology
  • PSY 0921 - Capstone Course in Forensic Psychology for First Responders and Disaster Team Workers


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This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/. Read more
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice.

Human rights are carried by different actors:

-grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
-lawyers and judges
-bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
-journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be.

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices.

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance.

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Kate Nash.

Modules & Structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed.

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign).

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology.

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use.

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in Sociology, Media and Communications, the Centre for Cultural Studies, English and Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Politics, Music and Educational Studies.

This includes the following option module, available to Human Rights students only:

Practising Human Rights (30 credits)
This series of workshops accompanies your placement in an organisation or grassroots activist network. We will discuss diaries that each participant will carry out during the placements in the context of broader debates about human rights on the one hand, and about professional practice, organisations and activism on the other hand. As a requirement for this option, you will negotiate a placement in an organisation whose work can be related to human rights or practical involvement in a grassroots campaign.

Skills & Careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights.

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation. Read more
You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation.

You will explore the different methods of criminological research before completing an independent dissertation.

You will study a range of interesting, innovative and challenging modules, taught by world-leading experts who are actively engaged in publication and research. Our teaching staff includes Professor Colin Webster, renowned for his work on ethnicity and crime.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/criminology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The course will further your career prospects across a range of crime and criminal justice related fields including youth justice, the police and prison system, probation service, victim support, child protection, crime prevention and other statutory, private and voluntary sector agencies.

- Police Officer
- Prison Officer
- Probation Officer
- Community Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has been designed in consultation with statutory, charitable and voluntary crime related agencies in the region. It therefore reflects the ongoing need for agencies to upgrade the knowledge and skills of professionals and practitioners. We also introduce advanced criminological knowledge to graduates who wish to further their knowledge or interests.

Our course is taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field who are actively engaged in scholarship, publication and research funded by national bodies such as the Home Office, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Research Councils. Among others teaching the course, Professor Terry Thomas is renowned for his work on Violent and Sexual Offending, and Professor Colin Webster is renowned for his work on Youth Crime and Justice, and Ethnicity and Crime.

Modules

Rethinking Policing
Gain an understanding of the social, historical and economic development of policing within national and international contexts.

Race, Ethniticy and Justice
Develop a critical understanding of theories about race, ethnicity and criminal justice, focusing specifically on the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and class.

Understanding the Sex Industry
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, from men who buy sex, to women who work as sex workers, third parties that own and manage businesses, and those who are exploited through unregulated markets.

Dissertation
Specialise in a chosen area of advanced criminological research through workshops and independent study, resulting in a 15,000 word dissertation.

Mental Health and Crime

Engendering Criminology
Explore major topics and debates relating to gender, crime and victimisation by undertaking an in-depth analysis of the development of feminist criminology.

War, Crime and Violence
Explore acts of war, political violence and crimes of aggression through the lens of criminological discourse, looking at war and its relationship with 'crime'.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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