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Masters Degrees (Sex Work)

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*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualifications. Read more
*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualifications.

This programme provides an ideal route for practitioners working with young people, including youth workers and those who manage them, enabling them to develop an advanced understanding of the issues involved in managing work with young people. It is designed for those who wish to further their understanding of these issues at postgraduate level and who already have (or do not require) a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work.

Course structure

Core Modules

-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students studying this programme in previous years.
-Community Analysis (15 credits)
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

To study the PG Certificate in Managing Youth Work Practice you will be required to take Management in Community and Youth Work and Youth Policy and Practice plus one 15 credit optional module.

To study the PG Diploma in Managing Youth Work Practice you will be required to take Management in Community and Youth Work, Youth Policy and Practice and Professional and Personal Development plus 45 credits from the optional modules.

Learning and Teaching

The MA Managing Youth Work Practice is designed for a range of professionals working with young people including youth workers and those who manage them, who wish to undertake related advanced study. It is ideal for those wishing to develop their understanding of the management of this work especially for those who already have or do not require a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work. It is offered through both a full time and part time route however, this summary refers to the full time route with the part time options being individually tailored to accommodate work patterns of those students already employed in profession practice. The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars and study visits.

Within an ethos of Informal Education our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional disciplines of youth work and reflect the diverse range of settings within which the management of practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion and draw from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area.

The MA Managing Youth Work Practice provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to the managerial roles and responsibilities of their practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this. The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations so there is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

This programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives which the students are encouraged to attend such as extracurricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to their professional discipline.

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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

This programme focuses on the issues surrounding gender based violence and human rights and principles of human rights. This discipline and subject area has a wide international reach in terms of how society and central government tackle the different levels of crimes against women and men in different countries and regions of the world looking at the very basic rights of people, expectations and challenges in some societies to top level and bringing in a range of other disciplines to analyse issues.  There are a wide range of career options within this subject area which range from international development and diplomacy to security, peace-building, charitable work to improve conditions in communities, women's and men's rights, international justice, policy and law making and so on.

In this programme the focus will be on ways we think about, understand and respond to violence. How do we know what counts as violence or a violent act?Why does legislation against violence so often transpire as inadequate, perhaps especially in the case of gendered and sexual violence? As the links between sex, gender and violence appear intimate and often lethal, a central but not exclusive focus of the programme will be on theories and practices of sex/gender. You are taught by experts in the School of Sociology.  

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods

Advanced Social Theory

Semester 2

Sex, Gender, Violence: Critical Approaches

Optional

Dimensions of Globalisation

The Comparative Study of European Societies

Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World

Semester 3

Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/291/sex-gender-violence/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by renowned international experts from The Centre for Gender Studies and School of Sociology
  • University of Aberdeen provides an excellent range of interdisciplinary events which you can attend

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation. Read more
You will explore and reflect upon the latest thinking and research in criminology. Study race, ethnicity and gender and investigate the causes and prevention of crime, criminality and victimisation.

You will explore the different methods of criminological research before completing an independent dissertation.

You will study a range of interesting, innovative and challenging modules, taught by world-leading experts who are actively engaged in publication and research. Our teaching staff includes Professor Colin Webster, renowned for his work on ethnicity and crime.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including social work and social policy.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/criminology_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

The course will further your career prospects across a range of crime and criminal justice related fields including youth justice, the police and prison system, probation service, victim support, child protection, crime prevention and other statutory, private and voluntary sector agencies.

- Police Officer
- Prison Officer
- Probation Officer
- Community Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our course has been designed in consultation with statutory, charitable and voluntary crime related agencies in the region. It therefore reflects the ongoing need for agencies to upgrade the knowledge and skills of professionals and practitioners. We also introduce advanced criminological knowledge to graduates who wish to further their knowledge or interests.

Our course is taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field who are actively engaged in scholarship, publication and research funded by national bodies such as the Home Office, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and the Research Councils. Among others teaching the course, Professor Terry Thomas is renowned for his work on Violent and Sexual Offending, and Professor Colin Webster is renowned for his work on Youth Crime and Justice, and Ethnicity and Crime.

Modules

Rethinking Policing
Gain an understanding of the social, historical and economic development of policing within national and international contexts.

Race, Ethniticy and Justice
Develop a critical understanding of theories about race, ethnicity and criminal justice, focusing specifically on the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and class.

Understanding the Sex Industry
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, from men who buy sex, to women who work as sex workers, third parties that own and manage businesses, and those who are exploited through unregulated markets.

Dissertation
Specialise in a chosen area of advanced criminological research through workshops and independent study, resulting in a 15,000 word dissertation.

Mental Health and Crime

Engendering Criminology
Explore major topics and debates relating to gender, crime and victimisation by undertaking an in-depth analysis of the development of feminist criminology.

War, Crime and Violence
Explore acts of war, political violence and crimes of aggression through the lens of criminological discourse, looking at war and its relationship with 'crime'.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Environmental changes, ageing populations, the media and new technologies, asylum and migration, intergenerational justice, complex multilevel governance arrangements, the impact of trade and investment, poverty and inequalities, the rise of identity politics and the changing nature of the personal sphere are contemporary global challenges facing human rights calling into question the fundamental tenets of human rights law both in terms of its formulation and implementation through policy development and law-making.

Differentiated from existing LLMs, the LLM Human Rights explicitly focuses on these contemporary challenges and how best to respond to them though law, policy and practice. The Human Rights programme draws on the research strengths in the College of Law and Criminology, but also from other colleges, in its teaching; and, exploits strong relationships with external partners to integrate a distinctive applied focus to the Human Rights programme.

Key Features

Students pursuing the LLM Human Rights will benefit from a programme designed around high calibre research and impact in human rights. Human Rights students will also benefit from academics' strong relationships with external partners working in the field of human rights, giving the programme a distinctive approach centred on the implementation and application of human rights.

The focus on implementation and practice in human rights is complemented by a multidisciplinary approach. Human rights policy and practice often do not recognise disciplinary divides. The Human Rights programme allows students to experience teaching from other disciplines to enhance their knowledge and understanding of human rights as an integrated project (e.g. politics and international development).

Uniquely the Human Rights programme addresses diverse challenges in human rights faced by law and policy, and by practitioners at the global, regional, State and sub-State levels. The approach focuses on how these challenges might be effectively managed through law and policy. The Human Rights programme offers:

- The opportunity and choice to address a range of human rights topics and challenges across a number of thematic areas, with teaching by expert researchers in the field.

- A multidisciplinary approach reflecting the reality of human rights in practice.

- A practical and practice focused philosophy.

Modules

The LLM Human Rights is a modular programme, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances a student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts:

Part I consists of 3 taught modules, each 20 credits. Students will be required to undertake 2 compulsory modules, these are: International Human Rights Law and Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention. Students are also required to select 1 further optional 20 credit taught module from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Part II gives students a choice of 3 optional modules, each 20 credits, from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Students of LLM in Human Rights are also required to undertake a dissertation, which contributes 60 credits.

The following are examples of modules offered to Human Rights students (modules available for selection will be dependent on contingencies, e.g. whether a module leader is in study leave).

Human Rights and Environment, Climate Change and Sustainability

Trade, Investment and Human Rights

Human Rights and the Media

Human Rights and Family Law

Human Rights and Identities

Accountability for Human Rights Implementation

Impact Assessment and Human Rights

Children’s Human Rights

Human Rights and Poverty

Human Rights, Migration and Human Trafficking

Human Rights and Criminal Justice

Human Rights and Terrorism on-line

Human Rights and Medical Law

Human Rights and Employment

Extra-curricular Activities

Throughout their studies Human Rights students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities to enhance their practical understanding of human rights. These include:

Guest lectures by expert practitioners in human rights.

Workplace learning through voluntary work and/or placement.

Involvement in collaborative research projects with research partners.

Engagement with the College’s projects focussed on practical implementation and impact from research (e.g. Cyberterrorism Project, Wales Observatory, Centre for Environment, and the Sex Work Consortium).

Careers and Employability

The LLM Human Rights will open the door to a range of careers, including:

- Human rights institutions: increasingly international and regional human rights institutions are seeking to support, monitor and influence State policy and social arrangements. Potential graduate destinations include: the United Nations and the Council of Europe as well as other regional institutions.

- The public sector, including government at all levels. Potential graduate destinations include: civil service, regional, national and sub-national government, local authorities and other public bodies, and, political and policy advice work.

- The private sector: human rights are increasingly the concern of the private sector in the realm of socially responsible capitalism. Potential graduate destinations include: global business (including institutions such as the World Bank); the business sector (from large scale business such as the banking sector, to smaller concerns seeking to appeal to the ethical consumer).

- The NGO sector: non-governmental agencies are well-established stakeholders in human rights. Potential graduate destinations include: international NGOS (e.g. UNICEF); regional or local level NGOS.

- Research and academia: research on human rights is a well-established concern for academia.

The LLM Human Rights enhances student employability as:

- The Human Rights programme ranges across a broad spectrum of human rights topics relevant to law, policy and practice and encourages a practical approach in these areas.

- Students will have the opportunity to engage with projects providing opportunity for hands-on experience of human rights research as well as dissemination to support practical application.

- The Human Rights programme offers a range of work place learning opportunities.

- Entrepreneurial skills will be developed by encouraging students to contribute ideas to project work and project activities.



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Explore an exciting blend of criminology and criminal justice subjects – covering both theory and policy – and address key contemporary questions and debates. Read more
Explore an exciting blend of criminology and criminal justice subjects – covering both theory and policy – and address key contemporary questions and debates.

Our MA is underpinned by our research expertise. You’ll be taught by experts in a wide range of theoretical and methodological areas. Our criminology research has focused on topics such as:
-Sexual violence
-Hate crime
-Sex work
-Women who kill
-Terrorism
-Policing
-Capital punishment
-Retributive justice
-Cultural criminology
-Existential criminology

Our course also draws on expertise from the Sussex Law School, which will enable you to develop an interdisciplinary perspective.

How will I study?

Our core modules give you the necessary theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations. They cover:
-Criminology and criminal justice
-Debates in law
-Research methods

Our options – from both law and criminology – are taught by specialist academics based on their areas of expertise.

Teaching methods include lectures, workshops and seminars. Assessment modes include presentations, essays and briefing papers as well as a 15,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

You’ll gain practical abilities as well as critical and problem-solving skills valued in contemporary job markets.

You will be able to apply your analytical skills to a range of careers in the criminal justice system as well as the public, private and voluntary sectors.

The MA can also provide a strong foundation for further academic study or a career in research.

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Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations… Read more
Research supervision is available across the range of the department's subjects, with examples of current students' interests being Sino-Soviet relations in the 1940s, the politics of direct action, war crimes, refugees and asylum seekers, Syrian politics, international relations in the Maghreb, the social exclusion of older people and the policing of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gendered people.

Staff have expertise for postgraduate supervision in Criminology including: crime control, policing, the penal system, comparative criminology, penology, philosophy of punishment, miscarriages of justice, sex work, domestic violence and sadomasochism.

How You Study

The School aims to provide considerable support to enable you to become an independent researcher. You are required to follow a structured pattern of activity during which your progress can be monitored and encouraged. You are allocated two supervisors and the emphasis is on providing whatever training you may require.

As a research student you usually have two internal supervisors with specialist knowledge of their subject areas and you can attend regular meetings with them for advice, monitoring and other support. Where appropriate, additional advisors may also be utilised. You also have the opportunity to contribute to the School’s internal seminar series and may also be able to contribute to teaching.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to successfully defend that thesis to your examiners.

Career and Personal Development

Graduates may go on to take positions as researchers or academics in institutes of higher education. Others may choose to use the experience for personal development and go on to careers in related sectors.

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By taking our Criminology in Practice MSc, you can combine the theoretical analysis of criminology with a core spine of employability-focused modules. Read more
By taking our Criminology in Practice MSc, you can combine the theoretical analysis of criminology with a core spine of employability-focused modules. Our modules will cover the key issues in contemporary criminological theory and practice. Further bespoke modules will prepare you to undertake a six-week work-based placement in a criminal justice or related setting. As part of the placement you will develop an appreciation of the interplay between research and practice in Criminology and will conduct a supervised piece of criminological research.

You will gain a thorough understanding of the criminal justice system and develop your critical awareness of historical debates, theories and research in criminology. You will also examine the current political, economic and social context of relevant debates on crime and criminal justice practice in the UK and abroad.

The course has been prepared by lecturers who are at the forefront of research in this field. Our selection of option modules allows you to specialise in areas of academic or professional interest including Forensic and Legal Psychology; Crime Prevention and Community Safety; Responding to Terrorism; and the Regulation of Sex Work.

You will learn how to critically appraise research as well as conduct and write up your practice-based research project. You will develop transferable skills that are highly sought after by employers including the ability to present and develop a coherent argument, communicate information to academic and non-academic audiences, conduct research and solve theoretical and practical problems. The employability-focused modules promote a greater understanding of your own skills and the needs of criminal justice and related agencies in order to enhance your employment prospects.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Master's degree in Social Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences.

Key Features of MSc in Social Research Methods

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of research areas and publishing in top international journals

- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities

- Specialist modules in criminology, social work and human geography, research leadership and management

- Emphasis on development of ethical, knowledgeable, skilful social researchers” through critical discussion, up to date information, debates and presentations

MSc Social Research Methods is a highly regarded and prestigious qualification which has been developed to:

- enable students to develop practical research skills and advanced methodological expertise (both qualitative and quantitative);

- instil familiarity with research ethics and governance, and

- gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Elective modules and a dissertation provide scope for specialisation in applied social sciences, including but not limited to: criminology, human geography, social work and health.

This Master’s degree in Social Research Methods has ESRC accreditation and provides advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences. The degree instils familiarity with research ethics and governance, and students gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Students on the Social Research Methods course are encouraged to devise research dissertations themselves (supported by an academic supervisor).

Modules

Modules on the Social Research Methods programme typically include:

Qualitative Research Methods

Introduction to Research and Study Skills

Data Collection Methods

Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

Quantitative Research Methods

Advanced Research in Human Geography

Research Leadership and Project Management

Case Studies in Applied Social Research: Social Work

Case Studies in Applied Social Res: Applied Research in Crime & Criminal Justice

Dissertation (Social Research)

Social Research Methods Course Structure

Teaching is in the form of lectures, seminars, group-project work and individual study. All Social Research Methods students are assigned a Personal Tutor and Dissertation Supervisor appropriate to their chosen area of study.

The Social Research Methods course is made up of six 20-credit modules (Part 1) and a 60-credit dissertation (Part 2).

Who should apply?

The Social Research Methods course is suitable for:

- students who want to prepare themselves for the challenge of MPhil or PhD study; who are already professionally involved in working with people in the social sector and want to develop their own skills and professional expertise

- students from different academic disciplines who are interested in conducting social research and are interested in seeking employment or already have employment in both public and private sectors

- previous students are those with backgrounds in social policy, sociology, law, criminology, human geography, politics, arts and humanities, ageing studies , psychology and health science

- anyone wanting to add a valuable qualification as part of developing a full academic career

- anyone who is interested in society, social behaviour, and social change and would like to learn more

- anyone working in, or wishing to work in, government or voluntary organisations, and commercial areas where social research is undertake

Career Prospects

Past Social Research Methods students have gone on to be employed in public and private sectors, research work, PhD , vocational work, the criminal justice system, social work, environmental health, teaching, local government, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and health and social care.

Staff Expertise

Contributing lecturers are renowned nationally and internationally. For example, Professor David Hughes has published on the universal coverage healthcare reforms of Thailand and Turkey, Debbie Jones jointly led on The Student Sex Workers' project from Swansea University's Centre for Criminal Justice and Criminology.

The MSc Social Research methods is serviced by research active staff, many of whom are leaders in their field of research. The team has strong links with Criminology whose staff have been awarded Howard league Research Medal 2013 for work on the Swansea Bureau Youth Scheme. Lecturers from the course also include those from the world renowned Centre for Innovative Aging and also Human Geography.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification. This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. Read more
*Individual modules are also available as short courses, which can be combined into the large qualification

This programme provides an opportunity for a range of professionals whose role includes engaging with communities to undertake related advanced study and professional development to develop their career further. It is ideal for those wishing to develop their understanding of the management and policy context of this work at a postgraduate level, especially for those who already have (or do not require) a professional qualification in Community and Youth Work. This might include those practising in community development, housing associations, community health, community enterprise, neighbourhood regeneration, community arts, and professionals in a range of statutory, voluntary and private sector posts that have an element of community involvement and engagement; for example, economic development, planning, policing, transport, and voluntary sector development.

The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. Core modules enable students to explore and develop their understanding of management, policy and practice in this field, as well as learn core research methods skills and carry out their own piece of advanced research. Students have a choice of optional modules to enable more focused study in their own areas of interest.

Course structure

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.

Core Modules

-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Practitioner Research and Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional Modules

Typical modules outlined below are those that were available to students styuding this programme in previous years.
-Community Analysis (15 credits)
-Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry (30 credits)
-Drugs, Crime and Society (30 credits)
-Gender, Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
-Policy Related and Evaluation Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)

To study the PG Certificate in Managing in Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice and Management in Community and Youth Work plus one 15 credit optional module.

To study the PG Diploma in Managing Community Practice you will be required to take Community Policy and Practice, Management in Community and Youth Work and Professional and Personal Development, plus 45 credits from the optional modules.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars and study visits.

Within an ethos of Informal Education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community work and reflect the diverse range of community settings within which the management of practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion and draw from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area.

The MA Managing Community Practice provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to the managerial roles and responsibilities of their practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this. Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations so there is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives to which the students are encouraged to attend such as extracurricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to their professional discipline.

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This distance learning degree is designed especially for graduate students or professionals already working with children caught up in the legal system. Read more

Why take this course?

This distance learning degree is designed especially for graduate students or professionals already working with children caught up in the legal system.

Supported by academics who have research interests and expertise in child witnessing and children as suspects/offenders, this course provides a chance for you to study relevant specialist topics.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by actively researching academics at the cutting edge of child forensic psychology research
Participate in live web-based chat forums to discuss your work with lecturers and other students
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources or access library facilities and borrow books locally via the SCONUL scheme

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course provides an opportunity for those supporting or working with child victims, witnesses or suspects to enhance their knowledge and skills, and gain an academic qualification.

Module Details

Year One

Full time students will study all units in one full year.

Part time students - Year One:

You will normally study three units each year, and will begin to explore potential research ideas and research methodologies in your first year.

Here are the units you will study:

Child Development and Young Offenders: This unit discusses child development theories including cognitive, emotional, social, and sexual development and in the second half of the unit, it critically discusses the factors, prevention, and intervention strategies for children as perpratators. A summary of research on adolescent violent offenders and adolescent sex offenders is followed by a section on child suspects, criminal responsibility, and false confessions and suggestibility.

Law and Procedures Relating to Children: This unit provides an historical overview of what influenced the changes to the law that have provided the special measures to help children have greater access to the criminal justice process. It also outlines current laws and procedures in England and Wales.

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods: This unit introduces experimental and survey-based research methods, as well as quantitative data analysis techniques. It also covers qualitative methods for data collection and analysis, as well as to how to write research reports in both traditions.

Year Two

Part time students - Year Two

In your second year you will cover several other applied topics and carry out an independent research project relevant to children caught up in the legal system.

Here are the units you will study:

Interviewing Child Witnesses and the Detection of Deception: This unit introduces the issue of suggestibility and outlines the current advocated interview protocols for the investigative interviewing of child witnesses. It discusses Statement Validity Assessment, a technique for assessing the truthfulness of statements based solely on what is spoken by the child. The second part of this unit includes discussion of risk factors, prevention and intervention strategies for children as perpetrators.

Research Project: The research project requires you to initiate, conduct and report upon an original piece of research. The work is conducted to deadlines agreed with a project supervisor and must include empirical quantitative or qualitative research – data collection and relevant analysis must be included. Any statistical analysis must be both descriptive (e.g. means, standard deviations and graphs and so on) and inferential (i.e. statistical tests).

An option unit – the current choices are one unit from these two options:

Communication and Investigative Interviewing of People with Intellectual Disabilities: This unit aims to promote communication skills and opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities and outline the status of the law concerning vulnerable adults as witnesses/victims. It aims to provide you with the opportunity to examine issues that arise when people with intellectual disabilities are interviewed as witnesses/victims of crime.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: This unit outlines and discusses the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy. You are strongly encouraged to view this course as an introduction to the academic literature on this subject, rather than as training to be a therapist.

Programme Assessment

Despite its distance learning mode, this course is still extremely student focused. You will be given resources, materials, help and guidance to complete your studies to your full ability. Using our virtual learning environment you can participate in group discussions with other students in a friendly yet challenging online class environment. Plus real-time text based 'chat sessions' with lecturers will ensure you receive all the support you need for the topics you study.

You are assessed in a variety of ways to reflect the individual topics, however there are no examinations and all assessment is coursework based. Here’s how we assess your work:

Essays
Critical reviews
Information leaflets
Wikis
Presentation slides
A research project

Student Destinations

Many of our students are already employed or involved with children caught up in the legal system. Others, however, are new graduates and have yet to work in this environment. Whatever your experience, this course aims to enable you to have a greater understanding of many aspects concerning children as victims, witnesses or suspected offenders.

Previous graduates of the course frequently make significant progress in their careers. Some are just in the beginning stages while others move on to senior manager positions and upwards. Those yet to embark on a career have gone on to find work in related professions, such as the police. Others have chosen to complete more studies such as a social work qualification to be able to work directly with children. More recently, students have gone on to study for advanced academic qualifications.

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Compared to our MA courses, our MRes programmes offer more flexibility and fewer taught modules, as the emphasis of your course is on your dissertation and individual research assignments. Read more
Compared to our MA courses, our MRes programmes offer more flexibility and fewer taught modules, as the emphasis of your course is on your dissertation and individual research assignments. You must have a draft research proposal at your application stage, and a supervisor is assigned to you to guide your choice of modules and work on your dissertation.

On this course, you gain familiarity with contemporary work in sociolinguistics and related fields such as conversation analysis, and acquire the theoretical and practical skills to pursue original research.

You cover topics including:
-Quantitative and qualitative methodologies for analysing sociolinguistic data
-Interview, questionnaire and observation data
-Sociocultural factors in language use
-Variationist sociolinguistic theory

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned (REF 2014). Their books dominate the reading lists at other universities. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios, and we integrate language learning with linguistics wherever there is synergy.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, and Christina Gkonou focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

Specialist facilities

-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
Meet other language enthusiasts through our student-run Linguistics Society
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

On our course you develop key employability skills including thinking analytically, research design, data collection using quantitative and qualitative methods, data analysis and essay writing. Our course can lead to a career in areas such as academia, secondary school teaching, forensics, publishing, administration, and public service.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MRes Analysing Language Use
-Dissertation (Research)
-CA I - Conversation and Social Interaction
-Language and Sex
-Pragmatics: Discourse and Rhetoric
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)

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We scrutinise the differing political and ethical claims on childhood and youth that inform contemporary policy and practice. You’ll be exposed to new and original ways of thinking about children and young people. Read more
We scrutinise the differing political and ethical claims on childhood and youth that inform contemporary policy and practice.

You’ll be exposed to new and original ways of thinking about children and young people. You’ll be able to:
-Communicate effectively with child- and youth-focused professionals
-Carry out empirical research with children and young people
-Transfer your analytical, writing and other skills to the workplace

How will I study?

You study core modules and options. You also undertake a research methods module and a research dissertation or work-based project.

You are assessed through essays and case studies of 1,500–3,000 words, and group presentations. As part of the dissertation component of the course, you produce a dissertation proposal and a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Work placement

We have strong links with a number of local organisations through which we offer work placements as part of this course. Many of our graduates find employment in non-profit organisations, schools, and social-research settings.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

PGCE First-Generation Scholars Award (2017)
-£600 maintenance award to PGCE students with a household income below £42,875

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Centre for Innovation and Research in Childhood and Youth Studies

The School is among the leading academic units in the UK for the quality of its research and hosts the ground-breaking Centre for Innovation and Research in Childhood and Youth (CIRCY). The Centre brings together academic expertise from across the University and also benefits from having an international advisory group including policy and professional experts.

We warmly encourage student participation in all CIRCY activities including the regular seminars and workshops we host in collaboration with our external partners.

Recently commissioned research projects include:
-An international study into children’s participation
-Safeguarding children’s internet use in the digital age
-Child protection in secondary schools
-The development of a ‘sex positive’ health-service delivery for young people

Careers

You may already have a professional qualification in social work, teaching, youth work, early years or related fields and wish to specialise further in the field of childhood and youth studies.

Our MA is ideal for advanced practitioners, leaders and managers, project development and policy officers, and others working with children and young people in local, national and international agencies in the statutory and non-governmental sectors.

Whatever your level, this MA provides an excellent step into doctoral-level study in any academic discipline or profession concerned with childhood and youth.

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Diversity Management awards from the University of Bradford are designed for those interested in establishing or advancing their careers in diversity related areas. Read more
Diversity Management awards from the University of Bradford are designed for those interested in establishing or advancing their careers in diversity related areas. Modules address management, leadership, and cross-cultural communication in national and global contexts.

The courses adopt a holistic approach to diversity covering a wide range of perspectives and cultural markers including sex, age, race, colour, ethnic or national origins, gender identity, disability, religious or political beliefs and affiliations, marital status, family responsibilities, sexual orientation and other distinctions. The courses cover all protected rights covered by the Equality Act (2010) and other international legislative drivers and policies including the European Council Directives.

With these qualifications individuals may pursue a wide range of roles in human resources, management and customer service as well as roles more specific to the field such as Equality and Diversity Officer, Manager, or Director. They may also pursue roles within organisations that promote social justice, democracy, and human rights.

Why Bradford?

-Students working for the NHS and organisations providing placements for students in the Yorkshire and Humber area often can obtain funding from the Health Education Yorkshire and Humber (HEYH)
-The Diversity Management course is located within the Faculty of Health Studies. However, teaching covers equality and diversity across different types of public, private, and voluntary organisations and is not focused primarily upon health care settings
-Students may opt to take individual modules before committing to a full programme of study

Modules

Year 1
Applicants should already have achieved 120 credits equivalent to PG Dip Diversity Management. To achieve the MSc students complete a final 60 credit module:
-Pursuing a Clinical Dissertation
-Pursuing a Systematic Review
-Work-Based Project

Learning activities and assessment

Study is through a blended learning approach. For each module there are typically two study days attended on campus (alternative arrangements may be possible for distance students), weekly one hour tutorials in a virtual learning environment, and ongoing tutor support.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Globalisation and increasing domestic diversity in the UK and elsewhere have led to the emergence of diversity management as a key skill area for professionals.

Employers in a variety of sectors increasingly require individuals capable of addressing the challenges of working with diverse employee and customer bases. Some individuals working with diversity may simply be general managers who handle diverse groups of employees or customers and who work in virtually any type of organisation.

Others have roles more specific to diversity which involve the development of strategy and implementation of initiatives to ensure equitable employment practices, the design and implementation of diversity training initiatives, or the oversight of discrimination and unfair practice complaints. These individuals typically work in large organisations including local authorities, central government departments, trade unions, universities and colleges, the police and armed forces, NHS Trusts, financial institutions and national businesses, as well as within the voluntary sector. International organisations also increasingly employ people who are skilled in diversity management to facilitate working with individuals across national borders.

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Study at the frontiers of archaeological science. Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Read more
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science

Why choose this course?

Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Uniquely, however, it is the only course in the UK to combine this discipline with the molecular analysis of human remains. Nowhere else can you immerse yourself in the study of stable isotopes, lipid residue analysis, palaeoproteomics and ancient DNA – and play an active role in the development of new techniques in this constantly evolving branch of archaeology. In 2014, seven of the top 100 discoveries in science were in archaeology, and BioArCh staff were involved in three of these.
-Advanced training in human osteoarchaeology, delivered by the UK’s leading practitioners
-Study ancient biomolecules in world-class facilities at the BioArch centre and Department of Biology
-Unique opportunity to combine bioarchaeology with complementary subjects and tailor a course to suit your interests
-Access an incredible range of in-house analytical equipment
-Take part in cutting-edge science and build essential practical skills
-Work alongside leading researchers and academics in a diverse range of specialisms
-Work on diverse material that is often ‘fresh out of the ground’ and make valuable contributions to live projects Receive career and research guidance from staff with significant experience in the sector and a track record of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and dissertation research, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of bioarchaeology theory, investigation and practice.

Uniquely, you can combine bioarchaeology with a range of subjects and tailor your degree to your own interests. You could adopt a ‘period’ focus, for example, to specialise in the bioarchaeology of the Medieval, Viking, Mesolithic or early prehistoric periods. You could combine human bioarchaeology with zooarchaeology and orientate your course towards more advanced studies of bone function and anatomy. Or you could focus on skills such as GIS modelling and field archaeology.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for students with a passionate interest in the future of archaeology, who want to work at the frontiers of archaeological science. The degree is primarily aimed at those whose previous experience is in archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, but we do accept students from diverse backgrounds. The common factor among our student intake is a keen interest in science and in human remains at a biomolecular or bone level.

What can it lead to?

Molecular analysis is used increasingly widely in archaeology, but the range of osteological and molecular skills offered by the course provide valuable training and expertise for a wide range of careers and further study.

Many students go on to take PhDs at York and other institutions around the world. Others pursue a wide range of professional careers, from osteoarchaeology and environmental archaeology to the medical humanities and laboratory technician work.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Bioarchaeology course you will be able to:
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Understand advanced methods for analysing bone tissues, including biomolecular methods
-Apply chemical and biomolecular methods to skeletal material
-Understand the processes of decay and diagenesis of bone tissue
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Work effectively within a laboratory environment
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many our MSc Bioarchaeology postgraduates go on to further research in bioarchaeological and environmental fields. The BioArch department has a successful track record of placing students on PhD courses in York and institutions worldwide.

Here’s a selection of the career and research destinations of some of our recent students: US graduate school programmes
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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