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Masters Degrees (Sensory)

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The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. Read more
The Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies (SenSyT) MRes programme was devised in consultation with industry partners developing treatments for sensory disorders. It is an innovative biomedical and translational sciences programme intended for students aiming to pursue a career in academia or to work in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industrial sectors.

Degree information

Through a major year-long research project and supplemental coursework, students will learn to conduct cutting-edge research aimed at understanding fundamental principles of sensory systems function and/or developing novel technologies and therapies for sensory disorders, such as deafness and blindness.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research project with dissertation/report (120 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to Sensory Systems, Technologies & Therapies
-Research in Practice
-Translating Science into the Clinic

Optional modules - one optional module can be chosen from a group of appropriate modules currently offered at the UCL Ear Institute or at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, to provide more in-depth knowledge and understanding of particular issues in sensory systems research. Examples include:
-Anatomy and Physiology of the Audiovestibular System
-Auditory Biophysics and Electroacoustics
-Ocular Cell Biology, Genetics and Epidemiology of Ocular Disease
-Ocular Development in Health and Disease
-Visual Neuroscience

Students may choose an alternative optional module from across UCL with prior approval of the Programme Director, provided that it aligns with the topic of the extended research project.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake a year-long independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, practicals, seminars, workshops, journal clubs, and an extended research project. Assessment is through coursework, oral presentations, essays, practicals, unseen written examinations, and research dissertation.

Careers

The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes was devised in consultation not only with academic scientists pursuing cutting-edge research in sensory systems and therapies, but also with representatives from industries interested in developing new treatments for sensory disorders. The programme has therefore been designed with the intention of ensuring that successful graduates will be attractive candidates either for further PhD research or for jobs in the commercial sector (for example, in companies developing or marketing novel treatments for visual impairment or hearing loss).

Employability
Students will graduate with interdisciplinary training in sensory systems science; a good understanding of the clinical and commercial context for development of sensory systems technologies and therapies; and substantive experience with a cutting-edge research project.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is among the world's top universities for biomedical research, with particular strength in neuroscience, sensory systems research, and translational studies. Students taking the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will be based at the UCL Ear Institute, an internationally recognised centre for auditory research, and will also take core modules at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, one of the world's major centres for vision research.

MRes students will have access to potential research supervisors from across all UCL, and will benefit from interaction with students on the Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MPhil/PhD introduced in 2014. The Sensory Systems, Technologies and Therapies MRes will therefore provide students with outstanding opportunities to learn from and network with scientists, engineers, clinicians and students throughout the UCL community.

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This course aims to provide occupational therapists, physiotherapists and speech and language therapists with a career pathway to certification as an Advanced… Read more
This course aims to provide occupational therapists, physiotherapists and speech and language therapists with a career pathway to certification as an Advanced Practitioner of Sensory Integration, equivalent to or greater than the criteria adopted by the University of Southern California and Western Psychological Services in the delivery of their Sensory Integration training pathway, at a postgraduate, post-registration academic level. This is awarded by our partners, Sensory Integration Network.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/msc-sensory-integration-pt-o

Course description

- Description -

This course provides a unique opportunity for the practitioner to achieve high quality qualifications integrally linked into current and emerging models of care and also scientific and technological advances. National and internationally recognised experts in their fields ensure that state of the science knowledge is informing tomorrow’s practitioners. The course is designed to equip you with the knowledge and skills required to apply current theories of SI to your everyday practice. It will provide you with an advanced theoretical basis for the management of people with SI dysfunction and will enable you to further enhance your skills in reviewing evidence to inform practice. It aims to develop your skills in evaluation and administration, scoring and interpretation of standardised assessments.

- Purpose -

Sensory Integration and related sensory integration based approaches allow therapists to use their understanding of mind, body, brain to facilitate opportunities for clients to actively engage in enhanced opportunities to take in, process and respond to sensory experiences in order to promote both short and long term neurological changes necessary to enhance and promote function.

- Teaching and learning assessment -

Theoretical material is introduced through online and face-to-face lectures, and developed and reinforced through directed reading and online workshops.

Formative assessment is provided through the submission of practice online tests and essay plans. Feedback is provided prior to submission of the online test and the essay.

Summative assessment is provided through online tests, case presentations, case studies, test administration and interpretation, poster presentations, a research proposal, a project report and, finally, a research report.

Career options

On successful completion of the Postgraduate Certificate, you will be able to practise as a Practitioner of Sensory Integration and you will be eligible for progress to PGDip/MSc in Sensory Integration or Advancing Practice. On successful completion of Sensory Integration IV: From Planning to Therapy, you will be able to practice as an Advanced Practitioner of Sensory Integration.

Participation may enhance your options within the health service and beyond and will provide the development opportunities for you to progress to doctoral level activity.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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Our department is home to a world-renowned sensory neuroscience research group. Their projects provide the basis for teaching and research training on this MSc. Read more

About the course

Our department is home to a world-renowned sensory neuroscience research group. Their projects provide the basis for teaching and research training on this MSc.

The course covers molecular, cell and developmental biology of auditory and visual systems. Advanced imaging and behavioural analysis focus on information processing: from sensory transduction to the central nervous system and behaviour. You’ll also study animal models of sensory deficits and the development of therapeutic treatments for hearing loss and blindness.

Where your masters can take you

Graduates with skills in stem cell and regenerative medicine are in demand. Your degree will prepare you for a career in research in academia or industry, or in a clinical-related field. Our graduates are working all over the world – from the UK to China, India and the USA – and over half go on to doctoral study.

Learn from the experts

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rates us No 1 in the UK for research in this field. Our international reputation attracts highly motivated staff and students. Sheffield is a vibrant place to take a masters based on pioneering research.

Regular seminars from distinguished international experts help you to connect your studies to the latest developments. We’re also part of collaborative research groups for developmental biology, cell biology, physiology, pharmacology, neuroscience, models of human disease, stem cell science and regenerative medicine.

Our three research centres focus on translating laboratory research to the clinical environment: Bateson Centre, the Centre for Stem Cell Biology, and the Centre for Membrane Interactions and Dynamics.

Leaders in our field

We have a long track record of groundbreaking discoveries. These include breakthroughs in human stem cells for hearing repair, and the generation of animal models for Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, muscular dystrophies and their use for therapeutic studies.

Labs and equipment

We have purpose-built facilities for drosophila, zebrafish, chick and mouse genetics and for molecular physiology. Other facilities provide all the tools you’ll need to examine and analyse a range of cellular structures. We have an electron and a light microscopy centre, a PCR robotics facility, a flow cytometry unit and an RNAi screening facility.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures, practical classes, tutorials and seminars. In small group teaching classes you’ll discuss, debate and present on scientific and ethical topics. Laboratory placements within the department provide you with one-to-one attention, training and support to do your individual research project. Assessment is by formal examinations, coursework assignments, debates, poster presentations and a dissertation.

Our teaching covers ethics, practical scientific skills and an overview of the current literature. You’ll also develop useful career skills such as presentation, communication and time management.

Core modules

Literature Review; Practical Research Project; Analysis of Current Science; Ethics and Public Understanding.

Examples of optional modules

Integrated Mammalian Biology; Practical Developmental Genetics; Neuroscience Techniques; Sensory Neuroscience; Developmental Neurobiology; Computational Neuroscience.

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Recent research has indicated a need for structured Sensory Science training in the UK food industry. The aim of this course is to provide a flexible progressive approach at postgraduate level, in association with Campden BRI. Read more
Recent research has indicated a need for structured Sensory Science training in the UK food industry. The aim of this course is to provide a flexible progressive approach at postgraduate level, in association with Campden BRI.

The Food Sciences group at The University of Nottingham (UoN) is well known for its excellence in research and teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Campden BRI, the UK's largest food RA, supports the food industry through training, scientific services and research. The Sensory Group at Campden BRI has substantial experience in providing sensory services for industry. Such a combination of expertise offers delegates excellent opportunities to develop their own knowledge and apply this in the workplace.

Some modules are available as individual Short Courses. Please see our web pages.

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The Nutrition and Health programme studies nutrition and health at the (sub)cellular, individual and population level. Nutrition and Health focuses on the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in human health and disease. Read more

MSc Nutrition and Health

The Nutrition and Health programme studies nutrition and health at the (sub)cellular, individual and population level.

Programme summary

Nutrition and Health focuses on the role of dietary and lifestyle factors in human health and disease. This role is studied from a biomedical perspective at the individual and population levels. In addition, the mechanisms underlying beneficial and adverse effects are studied at the sub-cellular (DNA), cellular and organ/ organism levels. Human nutrition is a multidisciplinary field of expertise. To solve problems in nutrition and health, you must consider chemical and biochemical characteristics, physiological and biomedical aspects, the social and behavioural context of nutrition, and the relationships between these factors. Solving problems in this domain requires multidisciplinary biomedical knowledge and skills as well as an interdisciplinary approach to communication with experts in human nutrition and other fields.

Specialisations

The specialisations within Nutrition and Health are:

Epidemiology and Public Health
Epidemiologists try to determine causal relationships in large groups of people, such as the elderly or people with cardiovascular problems; between food, lifestyle and the development of diseases. Research results act as starting points for health advice and lead to a greater understanding of cause and effect. If you know that certain behaviour leads to a disease, that behaviour can be addressed, and the effectiveness of the efforts to do so can be measured. You will be helping to improve the overall health of people and may be able to prevent food-related diseases from developing.

Complete Online Master
From September 2015, Wageningen University started the specialisation "Nutritional Epidemiology and Public Health" as the first complete online Master of Science. For more information go to http://www.wageningenuniversity.eu/onlinemaster

Nutritional Physiology and Health Status
In this specialisation, you will study various age groups and situations, such as growth, pregnancy, and food consumption behaviour. You will also review special situations including serious diseases (clinical food), during sports and activity. You may also research the food consumption behaviour and habits of individuals and how you may be able to influence that, for example, through portion sizes. In short, you will review different aspects and will learn what the effects are of food consumption patterns and the physiological processes on the body and what that means for the status of its health and illness.

Molecular Nutrition and Toxicology
In this specialisation, you will learn to use techniques, at molecular and cellular levels, to discover the mechanism driving the relationship between food and health. In toxicology, you will learn to study the possible poisonous effects of substances present in food. For instance, new ingredients in food products and additives, but also natural substances present in our food. The relationship between food consumption, food and medicines can also be researched and through this research, you will find many new leads to improving our health.

Sensory Science
This specialisation is positioned at the interface of the programmes Food Technology and Nutrition and Health. Sensory scientists deal with the way humans perceive the world and act upon sensory input. They address how sensory systems function, from stimulation and perception to cognition and behaviour. You will work with humans and products in different contexts and study the way in which product properties affect, for example, sensory perception. The study always keeps a link to the application of this knowledge in the fields of human health and the design, production and consumption of attractive healthy foods.

Your future career

Many of our graduates begin working as researchers or PhD students. Another group becomes advisors, trainers or take up other jobs in the private sector. The majority of graduates finds employment at universities (including university medical centres), research institutes (TNO Nutrition or RIVM), in the public sector (national, regional and local governments, Netherlands Nutrition Centre, District Health Authorities) or companies involved with nutrition, pharmacology and toxicology (Unilever, Nutricia, Friesland Campina, Danone Research, Novartis). As graduates progress in their careers, they usually advance to a (more) managerial level.

Alumna Pascalle Weijzen.
Pascalle did a thesis in Epidemiology and Sensory Science. After her graduation, she did a PhD project on the dynamics of food choice and sensory specific satiety. She joined FrieslandCampina afterwards, as a Researcher Sensory & Consumer Science, where she has been responsible for innovation projects aiming at strategies to stimulate healthy food choices. “I really feel I can contribute to profit for the company and to public health at the same time. In this job I still benefit from the broad nutrition and sensory expertise, the strong academic level of thinking, and the worldwide expert network which I built up during my MSc and PhD degrees.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Safety
Health and Society (specialisation)

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This is the only master’s course in sensory science in the UK. You will acquire skills and experience on completion which will significantly enhance your employability either within a research environment or in industry. Read more
This is the only master’s course in sensory science in the UK. You will acquire skills and experience on completion which will significantly enhance your employability either within a research environment or in industry. The intensive, modular nature of the part-time route also makes it easily accessible if you are currently working in the food and allied industries.

In addition to course fees, both full-time and part-time options require industrial support and sponsorship for completion of your research project.

The course is co-ordinated by the Sensory Science Centre, within the school's Food Sciences group - the highest rated University Food Sciences Research Group in the UK, based at the Sutton Bonington Campus. See:
http://nottingham.ac.uk/biosciences/subject-areas/food/index.aspx

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The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. Read more
The general objective of this programme is to communicate an anthropologically-informed understanding of social life in both Western and non-Western societies. By confronting students with the remarkable diversity of human social and cultural experience, its aim is to encourage them to question taken-for-granted assumptions and to view the world from a new perspective.

Through a set of core modules, comprising about a third of coursework credits, students are provided with a comprehensive grounding in classical as well as contemporary debates in social anthropology and are introduced to the distinctive research methods and ethical positions associated with the discipline. Students then complete their coursework credits by choosing from a broad range of around 50 different modules offered around the Faculty of Humanities. Through these options, students apply the social anthropological theories and methods learnt on the core modules to particular substantive themes and topics. Diploma students complete their coursework in May and formally graduate in July. Over the summer vacation, MA students carry out research for a 15,000 word dissertation that is submitted in September. They then would normally expect to graduate formally in December.

Most of the coursework optional modules have been organized into pathways based on particular themes and topics. Go to the Study Details tab for more details on the Visual and Sensory Media pathway. Pathways are designed to ensure both an academic and timetabling fit between the options. Students are encouraged, on the basis of past experience and/or future goals, to select a pathway shortly after registration in consultation with the programme director. MA students' dissertation topics will normally also relate to this pathway. In addition to the Visual and Sensory Media pathway, there are currently six others.

Career opportunities

Past graduates of the MA in Social Anthropology have gone on to many different careers both inside and outside academic life. As it is a 'conversion' course aimed at those who want to explore anthropology after undergraduate studies in another field, or at least within a different anthropological tradition, it often represents a major change of career direction, opening up a wide range of different possibilities.

About 20% of our graduates carry on to do a doctorate, be it here or elsewhere. But the MA in Social Anthropology also represents a very appropriate preparation for careers in which an informed awareness of the implications of social and cultural diversity are important. Some past students have been drawn to the voluntary sector, either in the UK or with development agencies overseas, others have gone on to work in the media or cultural industries or in education at many different levels. Others again have found opportunities in business or the civil service, where ethnography-based methods are increasingly popular as a way of finding out how people - from consumers to employees - interact with their everyday worlds.

The MA in Social Anthropology also trains students in a broad range of transferable skills that are useful in many walks of life, including social research methods and the ethics associated with these, effective essay-writing, oral presentational skills in seminars and other contexts, basic computing skills, using the internet as a research tool and conducting bibliographic research.

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Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/. Read more
Designed for students interested in new ways of exploring and understanding the social world through the use of visual, sensory and other experimental approaches, this programme allows you to study sociological issues alongside innovative methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-visual-sociology/

The MA will enable you to intervene in and represent the social world by developing the ability to undertake empirical research and present it publicly in a variety of media and materials.

You will engage with sociology as an inventive research practice, orientated towards the creative deployment of research methods.

An introduction to debates in visual and sensory sociology

The MA in Visual Sociology provides an introduction to the range of debates in visual and sensory sociology, encouraging you to build on these by using visual and sensory methodological practices to carry out critical social research in your areas of interest, whether this is science and technology, contemporary capitalism, gender and sexual cultures, human rights, globalisation or other aspects of social life.

A hands-on approach to sociological research

The programme combines lectures and seminars with practical sessions and workshop-based projects in which you develop a hands-on approach to sociological research, providing a skill base in methods which could be used in public sector contexts, art/media research, design or commercial application.

As well as presenting your ideas through writing, during the course you will have the opportunity to produce a range of different outputs including exhibitions, visual models and film/video. Critical feedback sessions function as a testing ground for individual projects.

Themed projects allow groups of students to further develop a portfolio of research outputs geared to a variety of audiences. The dissertation allows you to undertake a substantive research project geared to your individual interests.

You will have access to the Visual Media Lab, which offers post-production and editing stations, as well as equipment for photography and video. Students can also borrow equipment from the Media Equipment Centre.

At the forefront of the discipline

The MA is based in the Department of Sociology, home of the The Methods Lab and at the forefront of research using live methods. It is taught by staff with a wide range of experience in both sociology and interdisciplinary research, including visual and experimental approaches.

The course is suitable for applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds, including art, design, anthropology, media and communications, cultural studies, geography, and sociology.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rebecca Coleman.

Modules & Structure

Core modules:
In the first part of the course you will take 'Introduction to Sensory Sociology', a module that investigates the transformation of sociology in the age of visual, digital and other empirical methods. The module 'Key Debates for Inventive and Visual Sociology' enables you to address debates within visual sociology, and also encompasses more recent issues surrounding the notions of media, translation and studio practice which are associated with inventive approaches. Assessment of these modules is by essay.

Alongside these modules you will take a core practical component that offers the opportunity to gain skills in photography, sound and video and to develop materials that engage a sociological imagination. A central focus is on how to translate a research question into a variety of materials or media and to be able to critically discuss the selection and use of these.

In the second term you continue with a practical module in inventive sociology in which students working individually or in groups respond to a theme to create a visual, sensory or experimental object or media. Assessment of the practical work includes a diary of research process alongside documentation of work.

These core modules are taught in Sociology. In the second term you will also take an option that may be chosen from Sociology or may be taken from departments across Goldsmiths including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Educational Studies, Music, and the Centre for Cultural Studies. 



In the summer term you will complete a dissertation involving a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff.
 The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Option modules:
You will chose an option module to the value of 30 credits from Sociology or from departments across the College including the Departments of Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Media and Communications, Music, Educational Studies, and the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules in Sociology address themes such as:

contemporary capitalism and inequality
human rights
globalisation and urban life
gender and sexuality
science, technology and medicine
digitisation of social life

Skills & Careers

This programme attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds, including art and design, business, and the third sector, as well as those with social science degrees. This means the careers that they are interested in pursuing are wide and varied.

The programme helps students develop their critical and analytical abilities as well as a number of other practical skills and competencies, which are valued in different sectors. For example, as well as reflecting moves within sociology to study the visual and sensory, the MA also responds to how sociological methods – such as interviews, focus groups and ethnography – are increasingly used in commercial settings, including in social and market research, and in research and development for international companies.

The programme can lead to many types of career including in the arts and creative industries, the charity and public sectors, social research. A number of graduates from the programme are also interested in pursuing further academic research.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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-Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media. Read more
-Study at the Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology - widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology and Sensory Media
-The course combines anthropology with practical training in film-making, editing, visual methods, photography, sensory ethnography and sound
-Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe

We welcome students from across the social sciences and humanities. The MA in Visual Anthropology is tailored to meet the needs of different levels of anthropological and film-making experience, whether you have little or no background in formal anthropology, film-production, visual methods and photography, or if you have substantial experience in one or more of these areas.

For nearly 30 years, the University's Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology has been widely recognised as the world's leading centre for Visual Anthropology. Our graduates have produced more than 400 ethnographic films seen around the world and it is now at the forefront of the emergent dialogue between art and anthropology, including sensory ethnography and sound, experimental and practice-based methods, photographic and digital media, museum and gallery installations.

Our MA and MPhil courses combine anthropology with training in film-making and editing, visual methods, photography sensory ethnography and sound. Students are provided with professional equipment and supported by an internationally renowned staff comprising the largest visual anthropology faculty in Europe.

The Granada Centre's teaching and research continues to set the standard of excellence in the social sciences as well as arts. This was formally recognised by the ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council), and by the AHRC, awarding the master's programme the status of a Professional Preparation masters, something awarded to no other visual anthropology programme in the UK.

Teaching and learning

The course combines conventional lectures and seminars with practical 'hands-on' instruction and workshops. Students work in teams and individually. Their final piece is an individual production, however throughout the year they will spend time working in teams so as to develop team-working & presentational skills as well as technical and artistic expertise. Work is presented to the class and receives feedback from fellow students as well as instructors. In this way, students learn to analyse their own and others works and through each other's successes and failures, generating a strong range of intellectual, practical and aesthetic resources as well as a sense of camaraderie and cooperation.

Coursework and assessment

During both semesters, students take 1 x 30-credit or 2 x 15 credit practical film or media courses and 2 x 15-credit lecture- or seminar-based modules on more theoretical, methodological or substantive ethnographic topics. The latter are each assessed by means of a 4000-word essay. The practical modules are assessed by various combinations of a portfolio of project work and an accompanying written text.

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Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines. genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few. Read more
Researchers in the School of Biological Sciences conduct cutting-edge research across a broad range of biological disciplines: genomics, biotechnology, cell biology, sensory biology, animal behaviour and evolution, population biology, host-disease interactions and ecosystem services, to name but a few.

In 2014 the school relocated to a new £54 million, state-of-the-art Life Sciences building. Our new laboratory facilities are among the best in the world, with critical '-omics' technologies and associated computing capacity (bioinformatics) a core component. The new building is designed to foster our already strong collaborative and convivial environment, and includes a world-leading centre for evolutionary biology research in collaboration with key researchers from earth sciences, biochemistry, social medicine, chemistry and computer sciences. The school has strong links with local industry, including BBC Bristol, Bristol Zoo and the Botanic Gardens. We have a lively, international postgraduate community of about 150 research students. Our stimulating environment and excellent graduate school training and support provide excellent opportunities to develop future careers.

Research groups

The underlying theme of our research is the search for an understanding of the function, evolution, development and regulation of complex systems, pursued using the latest technologies, from '-omics' to nanoscience, and mathematical modelling tools. Our research is organised around four main themes that reflect our strengths and interests: evolutionary biology; animal behaviour and sensory biology; plant and agricultural sciences; and ecology and environmental change.

Evolutionary Biology
The theme of evolutionary biology runs through all our research in the School of Biological Sciences. Research in this theme seeks to understand organismal evolution and biodiversity using a range of approaches and study systems. We have particular strengths in evolutionary genomics, phylogenetics and phylogenomics, population genetics, and evolutionary theory and computer modelling.

Animal Behaviour and Sensory Biology
Research is aimed at understanding the adaptive significance of behaviour, from underlying neural mechanisms ('how', or proximate, questions) to evolutionary explanations of function ('why', or ultimate, questions). The approach is strongly interdisciplinary, using diverse physiological and biomechanical techniques, behavioural experiments, computer modelling and molecular biology to link from the genetic foundations through to the evolution of behaviour and sensory systems.

Plant and Agricultural Sciences
The global issue of food security unifies research in this theme, which ranges from molecular-based analysis of plant development, signal transduction and disease, to ecological studies of agricultural and livestock production systems. We have particular strengths in functional genomics, bioinformatics, plant developmental biology, plant pathology and parasite biology, livestock parasitology and agricultural systems biology. Our research is helped by the LESARS endowment, which funds research of agricultural relevance.

Ecology and Environmental Change
Research seeks to understand ecological relations between organisms (plant, animal or microbe) at individual, population and community levels, as well as between organisms and their environments. Assessing the effect of climate change on these ecological processes is also fundamental to our research. Key research areas within this theme include community ecology, restoration ecology, conservation, evolutionary responses to climate change and freshwater ecology. Our research has many applied angles, such as ecosystem management, wildlife conservation, environmental and biological control, agricultural practice and informing policy.

Careers

Many postgraduate students choose a higher degree because they enjoy their subject and subsequently go on to work in a related area. An Office of Science and Technology survey found that around three-quarters of BBSRC- and NERC-funded postgraduates went on to a job related to their study subject.

Postgraduate study is often a requirement for becoming a researcher, scientist, academic journal editor and for work in some public bodies or private companies. Around 60 per cent of biological sciences doctoral graduates continue in research. Academic research tends to be contract-based with few permanent posts, but the school has a strong track record in supporting the careers of young researchers by helping them to find postdoctoral positions or develop fellowship applications.

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The PG Dip in Habilitation and Disabilities of Sight (Children and Young People) trains students to support, plan, carry out, supervise and evaluate children’s and young people’s (from birth to 25 years) habilitation skills at home, in public settings, and in educational transitions. Read more
The PG Dip in Habilitation and Disabilities of Sight (Children and Young People) trains students to support, plan, carry out, supervise and evaluate children’s and young people’s (from birth to 25 years) habilitation skills at home, in public settings, and in educational transitions.

Degree information

The programme provides students with the opportunity to benefit from our links with Habilitation VIUK (formerly MISE UK), obtaining a qualification that matches the initial quality standards-based registration requirements for habilitation practitioners in the UK. Students work with eminent practitioners in the field of visual impairment, gaining experience of working in a variety of habilitation settings and environments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (45 credits).

Students are able to exit with a Graduate Certificate on successful completion of modules one and two (taken in this order and worth 90 credits) and all other first-year assessment elements. No optional modules are available.

Core modules - passes in all four core modules, taken in order, and successful completion of all the various assessment elements of the programme are required for an overall pass for the programme.
-Policy and Practice in Habilitation Studies
-Habilitation in Educational Contexts and the Extended Curriculum
-Habilitation at Home, In Public Contexts and During Transitions
-Habilitation, Professional Practices and the Service Setting: The Extended Assessed Placement

Teaching and learning
Both face-to-face and virtual learning environment elements will inform the pattern of teaching on the programme. It is assessed by written assessments, coursework assignments, practical skill assessments, skill observations, self-videoed practical assessment activities, presentations, placements, and a portfolio which is matched against the Quality Standards for Habilitation Work with Children and Young People (2011).

Placement
Modules three and four involve an extended training/teaching placement.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working as habilitation specialists and assistants in local authorities for sensory services, consortia or sensory impairment services for national and local visual and sensory impairment-related charities.

Employability
Graduates of this programme work across agencies such as local authorities, schools, and charities to support and develop the habilitation (mobility and independence) of children and young people who are blind or partially sighted.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme has been matched against the National Occupational Standards for Sensory Services of the CWDC (2009) and has been developed with the support of the DfE, RNIB and Habilitation VIUK. It takes trainees from the basics of habilitation up to the standard needed for registration as an Habilitation Specilaisit with HabilitationVIUK.

Successful completion of the Graduate Diploma, followed by a probationary year, is a registration requirement of the UK Habilitation Professional Body, Habilitation VI UK.

Introductory Braille sessions are available for those not already qualified.

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This programme will teach you how to apply project management, industrial experimental design, sensory and quality design techniques to food product development - from concept to product launch. Read more

This programme will teach you how to apply project management, industrial experimental design, sensory and quality design techniques to food product development - from concept to product launch.

You’ll develop in-depth specialist knowledge of scientific techniques and practical skills in the assessment and control of food quality, food safety, product design and new product development. In addition to industrial monitoring of quality, you will also study industry standard techniques and international standards in quality and safety management, as well as the impact of EU law and legislation on food products.

Course content

Throughout the programme you will develop an understanding of the underpinning scientific techniques in chemistry, biochemistry, physics, mathematics and biology relevant in applications of food science and the food industry.

You’ll examine different aspects of the product development process from product conception through to product launch. Through the process you’ll apply principles of project management, industrial experimental design, quality design techniques and sensory science in developing new food products and production processes that integrate consumer needs and expectations ,while at the same time conforming to food legislation, food quality and safety requirements.

The study of the principles of quality assurance, management and improvement and its application through design, measurement and monitoring will also be examined, covering aspects such as quality auditing, quality control and HACCP, predictive modelling and experimental design.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety 20 credits
  • Food Processing 20 credits
  • Structure and Function of Food Components 20 credits
  • Food Analysis 10 credits
  • Food Product Development 80 credits
  • Sensory Science 20 credits
  • Food Quality Assurance and Control 10 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Food Quality and Innovation MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials, seminars and supervised research projects. Extensive use is made of IT and a wide range of materials is available to enable you to study at your own pace and in your own time, to enhance and extend the material taught formally.

Assessment

Assessment is by course work and written exams which take place at the end of the semester in which the module is taught.

Career opportunities

Postgraduates from the School go into careers in research, in the food industry, into regulatory and public bodies across the world, backed by the confidence and skills gained from studying at one of the leading schools of food science and nutrition internationally.

Our graduates are in big demand and food companies come to Leeds to recruit the best talent. Some of our past graduates hold key positions in the food industry and government agencies.

There are many opportunities open to you within the food industry, from jobs in nutrition and new product development to roles in the supply chain, purchasing, logistics and distribution. You may decide to become a development scientist, working on new foodstuffs and producing food which is safe and nutritious with a consistent flavour, colour and texture. There are roles within this area in industry, but also within government and local authority food inspection departments. Other job roles include industrial buyer, retail buyer, production manager or quality assurance manager.

Read more about typical career paths:

Further study

A Masters in food science will also serve you well in progression to research-led projects. Many of our students go on to undertake PhD research here at the University of Leeds in one of the School’s research groups.

Read about postgraduate research in the School of Food Science and Nutrition.

Careers support

The School of Food Science and Nutrition has its own dedicated Employability Enhancement Officer who can offer quality advice and support with regards to careers, CV and cover letter writing, job applications etc. The Employability Enhancement Officer promotes a range of opportunities available to students to ensure they maximise their capabilities through a process of personal development and career planning.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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This distance learning programme enables qualified teachers and others working in education related fields to work more effectively with learners who are deafblind (multi-sensory impaired). Read more
This distance learning programme enables qualified teachers and others working in education related fields to work more effectively with learners who are deafblind (multi-sensory impaired). It is the only nationally recruiting programme leading to the GTC recognised Mandatory Qualification in Deafblindness/Multi-sensory Impairment. While many students are practising teachers working with children, others are from further education, social services, paramedical or medical specialisms, or residential work. An alternative non mandatory (Non MQ) programme is also open to teachers (as well as other professionals with appropriate qualifications) working with children and young people who are deafblind who are not seeking the MQ.

The programme aims to provide an understanding of the effects and implications of dual sensory impairment on development, learning, and communication, through theoretical and practical work. It will include skills in assessment, monitoring and recording, a knowledge of teaching approaches and of support systems.

Awards:

AdCert Modules 1–3 (Honours Level)
BPhil Modules 1–5 (Non Mandatory only)
PGCert Modules 1–3 (Masters Level)
PGDip Modules 1–5
MEd Modules 1–5 plus PIE and dissertation
PGDip + MQ Modules 1–5 plus teaching placement

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Read more

MSc Food Technology

Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. The programme focuses on aspects of production, composition and design of food products.

Programme summary

The Food Technology programme at Wageningen University has been in place for more than 50 years and is considered one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Wageningen University offers high-level courses and research in all areas of food science; ranging from advanced technical fields, such as Process Engineering or Chemistry, to fields with a more economic or sociological focus, such as Marketing and Gastronomy.

The Wageningen Food Science faculty is larger than that of any other European university. It includes professors and lecturers from a wide range of departments: Food Chemistry, Food Physics, Food Microbiology, Food Quality and Design, and Food Process Engineering. Food Technology covers nearly all aspects of food science and technology. As a result of being a very broad field, students are required to choose one of the specialisations offered.

Specialisations

Within the programme Food Technology you can choose your own specialisation that meets your personal interests.

Ingredient Functionality
This specialisation focuses on the composition of food, especially, on the role of various components, ingredients or structures in the quality and functionality of the final product. It deals with sensory, nutritive and textural aspects of foods in relation to their components. You major in Food Chemistry or Food Physics.

Product Design
While many new products are launched, not all succeed. This specialisation deals with the design and development of new or improved products. The focus is on the processes used in Food Technology, the design of new products from a consumer perspective and on modelling new product concepts/processes and predictive quality control. You major in Food Process Engineering or Food Quality and Design.

Food Innovation and Management
This specialisation combines courses in Food Technology with courses in Management Studies. It is intended for students who wish to work on product development in small businesses or who plan to start their own business. You will do a thesis in Management Studies and an internship in one of the Food Technology groups.

Food Biotechnology and Biorefining
This specialisation focuses on using micro-organisms or enzymes in food production. During this specialisation, you will learn about processes that can be used for biorefinery or agricultural raw materials. The focus is on biotechnological food production. You major in Food Microbiology, Food Chemistry, Food Process Engineering.

Dairy Science and Technology
This specialisation focuses on the dairy production chain. Its core programme consists of dairy-related courses and several additional courses, such as Food Components and Health, Advanced Fermentation Science and Predicting Food Quality. During the second year, you complete a dairy-related thesis research project and internship.

Sustainable Food Process Engineering
This specialisation focuses on the development of processes that are more efficient in their use of resources. Thesis can be carried out under the supervision of one of the following groups: Food Process Engineering; Operations Research and Logistics; Biobased Chemistry and Technology; or Food Quality and Design.

European Masters Degree in Food Studies
This international specialisation is developed in cooperation with the universities of Cork (Ireland), Lund (Sweden) and Agro-Paris Tech (Paris, France) as well as with ten large industrial partners. For more information see: http://www.eurmscfood.nl.

Gastronomy
This specialisation focuses on the molecular science behind products and dishes used in small scale settings. Scientific insights are used to develop improved food preparation techniques. The cultural aspects of food will also receive attention. You major in Food Chemistry, Food Physics or Rural Sociology.

Sensory Science
This specialisation combines Food Technology with Nutrition and Health. You will work with products and humans in different contexts and study how sensory systems function, how this relates to products and how to analyse these aspects.

Your future career

Graduates find jobs with relative ease, especially in the Netherlands and Western Europe. Recent graduates found positions in the private sector (from small- and medium-sized companies to large multinationals), at Wageningen University or other universities as PhD students, and at research institutes domestically and abroad. Graduates also work in the field of process technology at innovation centres, innovative food companies or government agencies. Most achieve management positions.

Student Harmke Klunder
“It is rich in proteins, unsaturated fats, vitamins and is available in large quantities all over the world. You may conclude, ‘The ideal food ingredient.’ However, would you still think it was ideal if you knew it was made from insects? With three other students, we added insects to a third world food product, thereby winning an international competition from the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists). Malnutrition in Africa could be fought by enriching their daily porridge, sorghumpap, with protein-enhanced termites. As food ingredients technologist, it is possible to look beyond the products found on the shelves of the local supermarkets.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Safety
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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Applied Human Nutrition is a practical, research driven masters course detailing the science behind the nutritional requirements of humans from pre-conception to old age. Read more
Applied Human Nutrition is a practical, research driven masters course detailing the science behind the nutritional requirements of humans from pre-conception to old age.

Recently there has been a significant rise in diet-related illnesses around the globe, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and cardiovascular disease. Poor nutrition is causing increasing public health problems in all sectors and ages, especially among the young and the elderly. On the other hand, in some areas of the world deficiency diseases and malnutrition are common.

A key focus of this course is examining the provision of food and nutrients to the body to facilitate optimum physical and mental development and maintenance of health throughout a lifetime. It also emphasises the specific problems of global nutrition and the public health implications.

The course is suited to graduates with a background in the biological sciences. Applications are encouraged from UK, EU and international students with an interest in acquiring expertise in nutrition, and from graduates who wish to pursue careers as nutritionists.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/applied-human-nutrition/

Why choose this course?

- High profile speakers from the food industry, government and research bodies regularly present at our nutrition seminar series, keeping students up-to-date with current thinking on nutrition, food and policy topics.

- You have opportunities to work with our Functional Food Centre, the UK's first research centre dedicated to functional foods, in undertaking your research project - involving you in some of the cutting edge research that helps the government and food industry develop new products with specific health and nutritional benefits.

- Our Functional Food Centre has excellent links with the food industry, giving students an opportunity to undertake their research project externally or to develop contacts for career progression.

- Our course is accredited by the Association for Nutrition (AfN), the largest learned society for nutrition in Europe. There is increasing recognition among employers, in industry and in the public sectors that registration with the AfN is a sign of quality, which could enhance graduate career prospects.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, with each module involving approximately 200 hours of student input and approximately 36 hours of staff contact, normally delivered through three hours' teaching each week for 12 weeks. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, practical and project work. The research project will be supervised on a one-to-one basis.

Each module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written or design work, and to some extent on verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, formal written examinations, in-class tests, project work, design and verbal presentations, workshops, simulations, and practical exercises.

Teaching staff are drawn primarily from the Department of Sport and Health Sciences, but will include visiting speakers from business and industry, local government, consultancies, research bodies and other universities.

The Functional Food Centre is an internationally-renowned research group consisting of visiting professors, fellows, research assistants and PhD students, who are all researching nutrition and food topics.

Specialist facilities

As one of the biggest European Centres for Glycaemic Index testing, the Functional Food Centre boasts impressive facilities including a dedicated product development kitchen and fully equipped sensory booths

How this course helps you develop

There are a number of networking opportunities with people from the nutrition profession through the Functional Food Centre's links with the food industry, public health bodies and other research institutes. In addition, students will benefit from the experience of meeting and listening to high-profile speakers from food companies, government and other universities who give key-note lectures.

Careers

Graduates pursue a range of nutrition-related careers, particularly in health promotion as food and health co-ordinators: in industry with food and drink manufacturers and retailers, medical food companies, food service providers and trade associations; in government and policy to improve the health of the population; and in research in universities, food companies or research institutes.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

We have a number of research strengths and exciting projects currently underway that you can can get involved in during your research projects.Some of the areas of interest include:
- Glycaemic control and the development of low glycaemic index foods
- Female nutrition and the role of the menstrual cycle in energy regulation
- Appetite and satiety
- Childhood obesity and the factors influencing it
- Sensory testing of foods
- Weight management
- Management of type 2 diabetes with nutrition and physical activity
- Functional food ingredients and their effect on energy regulation
- Antioxidant properties of foods

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