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The MA in Philosophy and Literature is a taught programme, which is designed to provide an additional postgraduate academic qualification for graduates in the areas of Philosophy and English, and to give students a sense of the interdisciplinarity between the areas of Philosophy and English. Read more
The MA in Philosophy and Literature is a taught programme, which is designed to provide an additional postgraduate academic qualification for graduates in the areas of Philosophy and English, and to give students a sense of the interdisciplinarity between the areas of Philosophy and English. It is also designed to develop a sense of critical thinking in both areas and to facilitate critical engagement with contemporary issues and problems.

The MA programme consists of six taught modules. Students will additionally complete a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words on an approved topic. They will also be required to attend a series of postgraduate research methodology seminars as part of the preparation and presentation of dissertations and to submit dissertations by the stipulated deadlines.

The MA in Philosophy and Literature can be studied Full-time over one year and part-time students will require two years.
The programme may lead to doctoral study in the field for suitably qualified graduates.

The objectives of the programme are:
• To provide an additional postgraduate academic qualification for graduates in the areas of Philosophy and Literature
• To give a sense of the interdisciplinarity between the areas of Philosophy and Literature
• To develop a sense of critical thinking in both areas and to facilitate critical engagement with contemporary issues and problems
• To introduce the techniques and strategies for study and research at postgraduate level.

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To register interest and for more information on the programme, please contact Dr Christine Oliver [email protected] m +44 (0)7803 987940 or Dr Martin Miksits [email protected] m +43 (0)660 4444009. Read more
To register interest and for more information on the programme, please contact Dr Christine Oliver m +44 (0)7803 987940 or Dr Martin Miksits m +43 (0)660 4444009.

Course information leaflet - PDF 217.0 KB http://www.beds.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/259701/SystemicLeadership032015.pdf

Course Summary

The different ways in which systemic leadership and consulting practices respond to organisational challenges and personal, relational and development issues is a key element of this course, which will help you develop insights into systemic organisational practice and theory.

Developed for corporate and business leaders in health or care settings, social and community workers, religious leaders and other professionals, it will enable you to take a step-change in your leadership practice.

Intermediate qualifications available:

- Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Choose Systemic Leadership and Organisational Development MSc at Bedfordshire and:

- Study how different paradigms influence ways of leading, consulting, coaching, organising and managing change and development in organisations
- Explore current research and advanced scholarship in systemic and related fields, including a range of theoretical frameworks and approaches in relation to systemic practice and research methodologies
- Develop systemic coaching and consultation techniques so that you can ethically engage with, explore and expand possibilities for communication and action in an organisational context
- Gain reflexive leadership skills so you can observe, discuss, critique and draw learning from your own practice, with a particular focus on issues surrounding power, diversity and social difference
- Benefit from the creative use of a range of inquiry techniques in leadership and consulting situations in ways that serve to ethically intervene in unfolding possibilities in organisations.

Why choose this course?

This course on systemic leadership and organisational development is distinctive in its approach to learning, the transformational experience it offers, the development of practical skills and its ethos. To point to some of these features more specifically the course offers:

Comprehensive and practical systemic frameworks that help you to orientate in complex organisational situations and work effectively and ethically as leader or consultant from within such situations.

Development of relational sensibilities and skills in listening and talking with others in ways that invite understanding, orientation, direction and commitment.

An opportunity to make practical ethical contributions to your organisation whilst you are studying, and in the process developing your role and position in relation to others.

A transformational experience that changes your way of making sense of your organisational `reality and your contribution from within it. The course is likely to also change your sense of professional identity and agency in the world.

Development of scholarship in systemic social constructionist approaches which are increasingly recognised as contributing to cutting edge thinking and practising in the field of organisation studies and development.

An opportunity to take stock of the resources and resourcefulness you bring to the course and build them into your learning practice and experience.

Career Management Skills

The course helps your employability and career management in developing your abilities:

to account for your practice as leader or consultant facilitating the development of organisations and the achievement of objectives
to engage with and make sense of a job opportunity from a wider contextual awareness and mindfulness of the organisation as whole.
to engage with the emergent possibilities rather than only the set properties of a particular job or position
to use your reflective skills to account for your own practice, abilities and experience and how these contribute to developments in coherent and compelling ways.

Career/Further study opportunities

As participants on this course come from diverse backgrounds and experiences it is impossible to point to specific career moves. However the course is likely to be instrumental unlocking career opportunities in several ways:

The course develops you as relational leader who participates with agency and relational responsiveness in your emerging organisation. It will equip you to facilitate and co-create meaning making in your organisation but also to critically reflect on current organisational practice and promote ethical practice. This includes making sense of the organisation as a whole and in your every day practice acting with relational sensibility, poise and practical wisdom.

You will become an agent for change, development and organisational learning who contributes to your organisation or your clients organisation from different systemic consultancy positions, by becoming a reflexive learner yourself, by critically and appreciatively engaging in the process of organisational development and change, and by designing, facilitating and evaluating development interventions to achieve organisational aims.

You will form an identity as a systemic organisational research practitioner with your own research experience and contribution to ethical organisational practice through inquiry and a critical appreciation of different forms of inquiry as instrumental to the emergence of an organisation and the people in it. This will be paramount to taking responsibility for the design and conduct of further research and research programmes and the promotion of ethical organisational practice through forms of inquiry.

Possibilities for further study: Some graduates decide to expand and deepen their systemic insight and practice through a Professional Doctorate in Systemic Practice. Other graduates may want to apply and amalgamate their systemic skills and insight in studying subject matters related to their field of practice e.g. human resource management, business or public administration, education, social work, project management and so on.

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The different ways in which systemic leadership and consulting practices respond to organisational challenges and personal, relational and development issues is a key element of this course, which will help you develop insights into systemic organisational practice and theory. Read more
The different ways in which systemic leadership and consulting practices respond to organisational challenges and personal, relational and development issues is a key element of this course, which will help you develop insights into systemic organisational practice and theory.

Developed for corporate and business leaders in health or care settings, social and community workers, religious leaders and other professionals, it will enable you to take a step-change in your leadership practice.

Intermediate qualifications available:
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Why choose this course?

• Study how different paradigms influence ways of leading, consulting, coaching, organising and managing change and development in organisations
• Explore current research and advanced scholarship in systemic and related fields, including a range of theoretical frameworks and approaches in relation to systemic practice and research methodologies
• Develop systemic coaching and consultation techniques so that you can ethically engage with, explore and expand possibilities for communication and action in an organisational context
• Gain reflexive leadership skills so you can observe, discuss, critique and draw learning from your own practice, with a particular focus on issues surrounding power, diversity and social difference
• Benefit from the creative use of a range of inquiry techniques in leadership and consulting situations in ways that serve to ethically intervene in unfolding possibilities in organisations.

Course detail

This course on systemic leadership and organisational development is distinctive in its approach to learning, the transformational experience it offers, the development of practical skills and its ethos. To point to some of these features more specifically the course offers:

• Comprehensive and practical systemic frameworks that help you to orientate in complex organisational situations and work effectively and ethically as leader or consultant from within such situations.

• Development of relational sensibilities and skills in listening and talking with others in ways that invite understanding, orientation, direction and commitment.

• An opportunity to make practical ethical contributions to your organisation whilst you are studying, and in the process developing your role and position in relation to others.

• A transformational experience that changes your way of making sense of your organisational `reality and your contribution from within it. The course is likely to also change your sense of professional identity and agency in the world.

• Development of scholarship in systemic social constructionist approaches which are increasingly recognised as contributing to cutting edge thinking and practising in the field of organisation studies and development.

• An opportunity to take stock of the resources and resourcefulness you bring to the course and build them into your learning practice and experience.

Modules

• Designing, Facilitating And Sustaining Systemic Organisational Development (ASS054-6) Compulsory
• Dissertation In Systemic Organisational Practice (ASS056-6) Compulsory
• Systemic Leadership And Organisational Development - Principles And Applications (ASS051-6) Compulsory
• Systemic Research Methods: Positions, Actions And Interventions (ASS055-6) Compulsory
• The Leader And Consultant As Systemic Coach (ASS052-6) Compulsory
• The Reflexive Leader/Consultant Within Organisational Complexity (ASS053-6) Compulsory

Assessment

Central to the learning on the course are assignments for systemic practice which relate directly to the content focus of the respective units. Assignments provide you with a structure to make your learning relevant to your work place, using systemic approaches to make sense of situations, engaging with or collaborating with others, supporting others, facilitating developments and so forth. The course structure facilitates you in the development of your assignments through teaching, practice and formative exercises and tutorials.

Assignments create possibilities to learn from action and reflection and provide the opportunity for valuable feedback for your learning. You will account for assignments in seminar papers, presentations or performances that explore how the assignment connects to the course unit, how systemic practice and theory have been applied, provide insight into the specific practice, explore the developments that emerge from it and the learning it creates.

Assessments of seminar papers and presentations provide an opportunity to consolidate and share learning from the course and practice and provide another level of feedback, reflection and discussion on practice learning.

Careers

The course helps your employability and career management in developing your abilities:

• to account for your practice as leader or consultant facilitating the development of organisations and the achievement of objectives
• to engage with and make sense of a job opportunity from a wider contextual awareness and mindfulness of the organisation as whole.
• to engage with the emergent possibilities rather than only the set properties of a particular job or position
• to use your reflective skills to account for your own practice, abilities and experience and how these contribute to developments in coherent and compelling ways.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Read more
The MA Education is founded on a philosophical principle that educational work is an intellectual activity, and, as such, educators are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Much of our activity focuses on enriching that voice, and supporting it so that it might operate in a more assertive and substantiated way.

We encourage our students to complicate and problematise practice, to actively resist those pressures that might seek to otherwise offer reduced and simplified accounts of learning. We intend to bring to the fore your ethical sensibilities and intellectual capacities. We are committed to a sense that in doing so, we enable the kinds of creative and considered practices which make real differences to the experiences of learners.

A second core principle holds that 'practice' should be central to our exploration and analysis. Throughout your study, you will be encouraged to apply new ideas and thinking in practice, and to evaluate and explore their efficacy. Practice is a form of expertise, and it - alongside any form of more conventionally 'academic' material - can be a generator of new thinking and understanding. As such, you will be encouraged to bring your practice in to sessions, in order to generate new discussion and to nuance, enrich and even challenge 'big theory'.

This award is part of the Manchester Met Faculty of Education postgraduate Professional Development Programme.

About the Course

The programme is founded on a philosophical principle that teaching is an intellectual activity, and, as such, that teachers are entitled to an autonomous academic voice. Much of our activity focuses on enriching that voice, and supporting it in operating amongst the more general principles of academic practice so that it might do so in a more assertive and substantiated way.

We encourage our students to complicate and problematise practice, to actively resist those pressures that might seek to otherwise offer a reduced and simplified account of classrooms. We intend to bring to fore the ethical sensibilities of teachers, and their intellectual capacities as sense- and judgement-makers. We are committed to a sense that in doing so, we enable the kinds of creative, considered and innovative practice which can make real differences to the experiences and outcomes of learners.

A second core principle holds that 'practice' should be central to our exploration and analysis. On one level, this is about application. Throughout your study, you will be encouraged to apply new ideas and thinking in practice, and to evaluate and explore their efficacy. This will occur both informally through the sessions, and formally in practice-based 'projects'.

This principle, however, also works in reverse. We hold firm the notion that practice is a form of expertise, and that it - alongside any form of more conventionally 'academic' material - can be a generator of new thinking and understanding. As such, you will be encouraged to bring your practice in to sessions, in order to generate new discussion and to nuance, enrich and even challenge 'big theory'.

Assessment details

Assessment is by coursework for each unit and a full assignment brief is available for each unit. Assessment tasks always allow you to pursue your own thinking and interests within the parameters of the unit and award. Formative feedback is available and built in for every unit.

For taught units (30 credits) the assessment is 5000 words equivalent. The final (60 credit) dissertation is 12-14,000 words.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. Read more
The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. The course provides a first-rate training in clinical psychology, leading to a doctoral qualification accredited by the UK’s Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the British Psychological Society (BPS). The Course’s overarching aim is to train independently minded, scientifically-oriented and compassionate clinicians capable of taking a leadership role in health services at home or abroad.

The UCL Course is at the forefront of many of the national and local developments and innovations which impact on the profession, and many members of staff are closely involved in NHS planning at both national and local level. We aim to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills they need to become effective clinical practitioners in a rapidly changing NHS. The Course has an explicitly pluralistic ethos and exposes trainees to a variety of approaches. It also encourages practice that demonstrates an awareness of equal opportunities and a sensitivity to the multi-cultural contexts routinely encountered in clinical work in London.

The course is three years in length and consists of a mixture of taught lectures, seminars and workshops running alongside a series of 6 placements based in clinical services in and around London. The academic programme is delivered by a highly experienced team of clinical psychologists, many of whom are world-leaders in their academic and clinical fields. The clinical placements provide trainees with opportunities to develop their skills under experienced supervision in a wide variety of contexts, using a broad range of models, and with a wide spectrum of clients.

As a course that is based in one of the world’s top research-intensive universities, UCL trainees have the opportunity to conduct high-quality research under the supervision of leading scientists in the field.

Core Purpose and Philosophy of the Course http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/docs/app_docs/core_purpose_and_philosophy

Applying to the Course

The course welcomes applications from interested candidates from the UK and EU. International candidates apply directly to UCL. Further details can be found on the following webpage: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/international/

For details of the application process for UK and EU candidates, please choose from the options below.

At present trainees are full-time employees of the health service, and their University fees are paid directly by the NHS. Although there is a possibility that these arrangement may not apply to candidates entering programmes in 2017, this is unclear. As such, candidates should not be deterred from making applications.

This message will be updated as soon as more information is forthcoming.

The closing date for for receipt of applications for courses starting in Autumn 2017 is 1pm on 30th November 2016.

Further Entry Requirements

The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is a 3-year full-time programme which entitles graduates to apply for registration as a Clinical Psychologist with the Health Professions Council and as a Chartered Clinical Psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Candidates need to meet some basic academic criteria. After that, they also need to demonstrate (by gaining some relevant clinical experience) that they have some awareness of the roles undertaken by clinical psychologists, are familiar with the sorts of clients psychologists see, and have an idea of the contexts within which psychologists work. In addition, they need to show that they have the appropriate personal characteristics needed to work effectively with a wide range of potentially vulnerable individuals, and to contribute to the work of fellow professionals in the NHS or equivalent organisations.


Candidates who have not achieved a good 2.1 may need to think carefully about whether it makes sense to pursue a training in Clinical Psychology, since it is unlikely that they will be offered a place on a Doctoral Course. However, we recognise that sometimes degrees under-represent someone's academic ability - for example, illness or major life-events may have meant that there were periods when it was hard to maintain a good standard of work. If this is the case applicants need to offer clear evidence of their academic capacity in their application. This evidence must be supported by an academic referee who has monitored the candidate's work and can clearly demonstrate that certain academic achievements results underestimate the applicant's academic abilities.

Candidates with a 2.2 will not usually be accepted on the course unless there is unequivocal evidence of subsequent academic achievement equivalent to a good 2.1. In practice this means obtaining a higher degree, but the type of degree needs to be thought about carefully. Some Masters degrees will not offer enough academic challenge, making it hard for an academic referee to make the unequivocal judgment about a student's ability that a course needs. The more academically demanding a course, the more likely it is that they will be able to do this.

Graduate basis for chartered membership
In order to be considered for a place on any training course in Clinical Psychology it is essential to have Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC)with the British Psychological Society (BPS), usually at the time of applying or certainly by the time shortlisting is completed (in February). Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership is the same as Graduate Basis for Registration: all that has changed is the name. So if you previously had GBR you will now have GBC. The usual way of obtaining this is by completing an undergraduate degree in Psychology, or by taking a qualifying exam or programme which confers eligibility.

Not all Psychology programmes confer eligibility for GBC. If you are unsure whether you are entitled to GBC you should check this with your programme staff or write to the BPS (St Andrews House, 48 Princess Road East , Leicester LE1 7DR; Tel: 0116 254 9568; e-mail: ) for more details.


Relevant clinical experience
In order to have a realistic chance of being selected it is essential to gain some relevant clinical experience before applying to the course. There are several reasons for this. It gives applicants a chance to test out whether work in this field is for them - it is much better to discover this before making a major career commitment. It also means that courses know that candidates' applications are realistic, and gives them an idea of how applicants have responded to the clinical work they have undertaken. Many trainees find that they make good use of their pre-training experience during training, so it is not 'wasted' time.

We know that asking for relevant experience causes people to think twice about applying for Clinical Psychology course. It means that there is a gap between completing an undergraduate degree and starting training, with no guarantee of getting on a course. This presents a real challenge to many people, not least a financial one. There is also a risk - widely recognised by courses - that potential applicants feel themselves obliged to work for a number of years in the hope of gaining enough experience to be taken onto a course. We know that most people work for around 1-2 years before getting on a course, and in most cases this should be sufficient.

Being clear about what counts as experience is hard to specify, especially because suitable posts vary enormously. As above, and very broadly, candidates should look for experience which gives them:

. an idea of what clinical psychologists actually do
. some direct clinical contact with the sort of clients psychologists work with
. an idea of what work with clients actually entails
. a sense of the organisational context in which clinical psychology usually operates

One common route is to find work as an Assistant Psychologist. These posts are advertised in the BPS Bulletin (distributed monthly to all members of the BPS) and also (although less frequently) in other relevant publications - for example, the health section of papers such as The Guardian.

As assistant posts are in relatively short supply, it is important to emphasise that they are not the only route to gaining relevant experience. For this reason applicants should think broadly about the possible options open to them. For example, employment in a social work context or as a nursing assistant in a psychiatric unit, or as a worker in a MIND Day Centre would be extremely valuable; all would count as relevant experience. Another route is to take a post as a research assistant, though the research should usually offer at least some direct involvement in a clinical area. It is worth remembering that a very "academic" research post would not give candidates much of a sense of how the clinical world operates, or how they react to the sorts of clients seen in clinical contexts.

There is something of a myth that applicants need to build an extensive 'portfolio' of experience, with more than one client group, and with a mixture of research and clinical experience. Speaking at least for selectors at UCL, we are not looking for this. We are looking for people whose posts map onto the bullet-pointed criteria just above, and who can show (and reflect on) the benefits of this experience in the way they present themselves. Basically it is the quality of experience - and what the person makes of it - that is as important as the quantity of experience.

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The MA in Childcare Law and Practice is a popular and successful course. It has been fully revised and redesigned in line with other MA courses at the University to facilitate exchange of modules and a longer period of individual research. Read more

Overview

The MA in Childcare Law and Practice is a popular and successful course. It has been fully revised and redesigned in line with other MA courses at the University to facilitate exchange of modules and a longer period of individual research. It is taught jointly by members of the School of Law and the School of Public Policy and Professional Practice as an interdisciplinary course and attracts students from a wide variety of professional backgrounds. The course is specially designed so that it may be taken by those who are in full-time employment. The course content reflects developments and current debates in childcare law and practice. The Keele Law School is highly rated and internationally recognised for teaching and research.

The School is an excellent intellectual environment for postgraduate students. The appropriate infrastructure is also in place, with proper research training, communal areas for postgraduate students and computing equipment. Continued postgraduate expansion is a priority for the School.

"The programme is one that Keele University should be hugely proud of, it was and remains a national leader in the field."
"The students are encouraged to reflect on their practice and to explore the dilemmas of applying the law in practice within a value base that challenges oppression and discrimination. The strengths of this course are considerable and unique in this respect."
(External Examiner comments)

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/childcarelawandpractice/

Course Aims

The central aims of the course are to update and enhance knowledge of relevant law and research literature and to provide an opportunity for experienced practitioners to further develop and critically reflect upon their skills, as applied to a variety of areas and settings in work with children. It also aims to promote anti-discriminatory practice, inter-agency understanding and interdisciplinary working.

The programme is structured in a way that allows students to maintain full-time employment while studying, with teaching for each module taking place over an intensive 3-day period. The programme, therefore, is designed to appeal to both the ‘conventional’ postgraduate student and specifically, those already engaged professionally in this area of activity, in social work, health, the legal profession or otherwise.

Course Structure and Content

The taught Masters programme requires satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 4 taught modules each of 30 credits (120 credits) plus a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words (60 credits). Alternatively, students may finish their studies after obtaining the 120 taught credits and obtain a Postgraduate Diploma. Each student is provided with a personal tutor to assist with studies. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach, drawing upon sociology, social policy, law and childcare practice.

The programme starts with a two day induction course. The teaching of modules takes place over four intensive three-day blocks between September and May. This structure particularly benefits part-time students who appreciate ‘time out’ in an accessible academic environment. If required, the modules can be undertaken over a period of up to four years for further flexibility. During the research year, students wishing to complete the MA attend one, two day block, and a further day later in the year followed by supervision of work towards a dissertation. The full course duration is between two and five years. Any student wishing to study one or two modules should contact the School.

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is based on coursework and a dissertation. There are no exams. Assessment of each taught module is by written assignment of about 5,000 words each. A choice of essay titles is provided for each block. In the research year the emphasis is on independent research – there is a research methods assignment of 2,000 words formatively assessed and a dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. The pass mark for all assessments is 50%.
The modules are taught through 20 hours of contact time, delivered as an intensive three-day block of teaching.

During the module, students will take part in tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading to both supplement and consolidate the classes and to broaden individual knowledge and understanding of the subject.

All students receive initial guidance on how to identify, locate and use materials available in libraries and elsewhere (including electronic sources). Guidelines are provided for the production of coursework assignments and dissertations and these are reinforced by seminars and individual supervision, which focus specifically on essay planning and writing, and research methodology. Detailed written and, if requested, oral feedback is provided on all course work. There is also time set aside during each module and outside the modules for students to consult individually with teaching staff and receive guidance and feedback on assessment and module performance.

While away from Keele, between teaching blocks, students will benefit from directed reading, additional resources posted on the KLE together with a KLE based discussion page for ‘virtual’ interaction between students.

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

What the students say

'Despite not being particularly academic I have enjoyed the course and the challenge it has posed me. I feel a great sense of achievement this far in 'keeping up' and submitting the work. It has been a massive learning curve to me, being from a nursing background and I have had to work really hard. However I feel this has increased my sense of achievement'

'Very useful to hear perspectives of colleagues from different disciplines'

'The sessions were useful and thought provoking. The mix of ethics, practice and law were well balanced.'

'Very interesting. As a child care lawyer, looking at health issues has been fascinating.'

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The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe. This programme is for individuals who wish to develop both their practice and critical understanding with regards to glass and ceramics. Read more
The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe.

Course overview

This programme is for individuals who wish to develop both their practice and critical understanding with regards to glass and ceramics. The subject is explored and contextualized in its widest sense through both practical and theoretical investigation and application.

We do not have a ‘house style’, instead you will be encouraged and supported to develop your own focus, independent creativity, improve your technical skills through expert support, and develop academic skills in research and communication.

You’ll be joining the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, made up of an international team of creative and experienced educators and practitioners. All academic staff on this course are engaged in professional practice or research and are at the forefront of their discipline.

Sunderland is a thriving research hub and hosts the Ceramics Arts Research Centre (CARCuos), which aims to develop, support and disseminate new knowledge and scholarly activity whilst also providing a platform both practically and theoretically for discussion aligned to the ceramic arts.

Graduates from Sunderland have gone on to work throughout the creative industries. MA graduates have also wished to extend their work through a research degree either at MPhil or PhD level and continue studies within CARCuos the ceramic arts research centre at the University.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/ceramics-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Stage 1 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Critical and Professional Contexts in Contemporary Art and Design (30 credits)
-Experimentation in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)

Stage 2 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Professional Practice in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)
-Developing Practice in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)

Stage 3 (60 Credits)
-Contextual Studies: Research Project in Glass and Ceramics (30 credits)
-Synthesis in Glass and Ceramics Practice (30 credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

Facilities & location

Facilities for this course include:
-26 glass kilns, including a large glass casting kiln
-13 ceramic kilns and two large gas kilns
-Ceramics mould-making and glaze workshops
-Hot glass workshop with international-quality equipment
-Two cold working studios (sandblasting, cutting, grinding and polishing)
-Printing facility for ceramics, glass and other surfaces
-Architectural glass studio
-Decal printer
-3D MakerBot Printer
-Water-jet machine/Computer Aided Design
-Project and exhibition space
-Multi-function creative and social space
-Lampworking and future light workshop
-Computer suite and project space
-Arts and Design Library
-Journals and research

We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course are:
-Key Glass and Ceramics magazines and journals
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences

National Glass Centre
The Glass and Ceramics Department is based in National Glass Centre, a nationally recognised glass production and exhibition centre with a world-class programme of creative projects.

Studying here puts you at the heart of an international network of professionals in the ceramics sector. You will be exposed to the latest ways of working through visiting artists and designers, and you can become involved in exhibitions that help launch your career.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working as self-employed practitioners as well as being employed in arts administration and education.

During the course we encourage you to gain professional industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability.

The University has close links with arts organisations including Arts Council England, the BALTIC, Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, Tyne and Wear Museums Service and Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art. We also have international links in USA, China and Czech Republic.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more
This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

◾Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
◾You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
◾Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates.

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses
◾Research methods in practice
◾Theories of the Avant Garde
◾Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
◾Art, embodiment, transgression
◾Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options in the College of Arts
◾a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
◾a course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature
◾a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art
◾Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
◾Independent study
◾Work placement.

Study trip

Students on this programme are invited to take part in an optional study trip of approximately one week, which is funded by the student. Previous destinations include Berlin and Dublin.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

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Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent… Read more
Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Course description

Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our student
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

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The MSc Construction Economics and Management postgraduate course equips graduates with the skills to become senior managers, policy advisers and decision-makers in any branch of the construction industry. Read more
The MSc Construction Economics and Management postgraduate course equips graduates with the skills to become senior managers, policy advisers and decision-makers in any branch of the construction industry. It can also provide teachers and researches in these subject areas with professional academic development.

Degree information

This RICS accredited programme aims to develop students' knowledge and skills under two mutually supporting themes for which the School of Construction and Project Management has an international reputation:
-The economics and finance of construction at project, firm and industry levels.
-The management of construction projects and enterprises.

Construction is taken in its widest sense to include design, infrastructure and the supply chain.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional/elective modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules, four optional modules (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

Core modules
-The Economics of Construction: Economics, Sectors and Industries
-The Economic Institutions of the Construction Industry
-The Management of Construction Projects
-The Management of Construction Enterprises

Optional modules
-Construction Booms and Slumps**
-Construction Clients and the Market for Contracts**
-Economics of Appraisal of Construction Projects: Leading Issues**
-Economics of Speculative Construction Development**
-Construction Industry Development**
-Managing Professional Practice*
-Relationships between Firms*
-Capturing and Delivering Value*
-The Construction Firm: Contractors and Subcontractors*
-Marketing and Project Business Development*
-Managing Change in Organisations*
-Environmental Sustainability in the Construction Sector
-Integrating Project Information Systems with Building Information Modelling
-Managing Construction
-Managing the Enterprise-Project Relationship
-Organisations and People in Projects
-Social Networks in Project and Enterprise Organisations
-Social Networks in Project and Enterprise Organisations

*Students choose at least one
**Students choose at least two

The fourth optional module is selected from the remaining choices displayed above.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation related to the main themes of the programme, under the guidance of an individual supervisor.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and group work on case studies, exercises and problems. Lectures include industry guest speakers. Assessment is through written examination, term papers and the dissertation.

Careers

The career options for graduates are varied, and many students go on to work for construction, engineering and design enterprises, professional consultants and commercial research organisations, and client enterprises with significant project portfolios such as retailers or banks. Graduates are keenly recruited by many of the UK's very best construction-sector firms. The MSc can be used as a foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Junior Engineer, Shanghai Geographical Institute
-Project Manager, IKEA
-Project Manager, Parsons Brinckerhoff
-Risk Analyst, Bank of China
-Associate Consultant, KPMG

Employability
The programme offers an understanding of financial and other kinds of management within the context of the project, the project-based firm and the construction industry in its widest sense. There are some elements which can be put to use straight away combined with other elements of a strategic nature which will prove useful as the graduate's career moves into more senior management. It is thus an excellent graduate qualification to offer employers by those trained in a technical discipline without previous economic training or those trained in economics or finance without previous exposure to construction.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Our school is part of the UCL Bartlett which is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment. It brings together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, finance, design, procure, construct/refurbish and operate the buildings, infrastructure and urban environments of the future.

Outside the faculty we have links within UCL with those involved in engineering, computing and other areas of management.

Located in London, UCL is at the heart of a large cluster of architectural, engineering, surveying, real estate and management consultancies which, together with major construction/infrastructure clients, contractors and financial institutions, are next to the UK's centre of government with all the resources of a world city to hand.

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As we make our way around the world we are continually making decisions and performing actions that are driven by our sense organs. Read more

Introduction

As we make our way around the world we are continually making decisions and performing actions that are driven by our sense organs. Our perception of the world is not just sensory information, but instead an interpretation based on what our brain expects as well as what it is being told by sense organs. Understanding and measuring perception distinct from sensation is a complex task.
The course will explore methods by which it is possible to measure perception with varied content, depending on the specific interests of the student. Lectures from academic staff will form a course introducing the main methods of measuring perception, considering the strengths and weaknesses.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Ross Goutcher and Dr Elena Gheorghiu

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

In addition to broad training in psychological methods, this course ensures that students acquire an understanding of how to measure perceptual experience in a bias-free manner, including the basic framework for understanding such measurements. Students also acquire practical experience in making measurements of perceptual experience through a research project and opportunity to conduct a placement in a laboratory context.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Lectures, seminars and workshops are used to deliver a coherent course of study. Teaching methods are adapted to suit the aims of each module and to provide students with the range and depth of learning required by their needs. Students are able to pick a route through the course that fits their interests and needs as a self-motivated learner.

Teaching emphasises the importance of systematic empirical research, whether in the laboratory or in the field, as appropriate to the problem at hand.

Across the course, students experience a range of different forms of assessment. Specific assessment within the Perception in Action course is a research report. Students will conduct and report (6,000 words) on a small research project involving a measurement of perception. The student will be responsible for the whole process: design of study, programming and other practical aspects of doing the research; data collection and analysis. The main assessment of the report will consider the quality of the research, the level of understanding about measurement of perception, and the competence of the procedures used in the research. The report will also be assessed for clarity and conciseness.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Strengths
Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

This course prepares you for a research career involving perception in action and is ideal if you intend to study for a PhD in Psychology.

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The contemporary art scene is evolving as artists respond to new disciplines and techniques and challenge the boundaries of their practice. Read more
The contemporary art scene is evolving as artists respond to new disciplines and techniques and challenge the boundaries of their practice. The place of art in society is changing as increasingly varied audiences interact with creativity in new ways. MA Curation at NUA is a pioneering course - the first to respond to this changing sector and to equip professionals with the broad skills and contextual understanding needed by the 21st century curator.

Focused above all on the public exhibition of contemporary art, MA Curation at NUA also recognises curation in its most enquiring sense as a way of bringing together and relating ideas, images, objects and texts for public exhibition. This intellectually stimulating course enables students to be creative and open to new ways of working as they begin to define your own specialism. Through practice and research, students are invited to experiment with curation for traditional and innovative public exhibition spheres, including;
• museums, galleries and public spaces
• digital arts, moving image and performance
• print, digital media and the internet

Through ‘hands-on’ practice throughout the course, students on MA Curation will develop key sector skills in the management of collaborative projects; the ability to lead and work within a team and an understanding of the importance and use of networks. The course will encourage students to question the ethical responsibilities of the curator and reflect on controversy within the arts.
MA Curation at NUA is distinguished by an emphasis on practical curatorial experience. Curation is understood in its broadest and most forward-thinking sense as a process of bringing together objects, still and moving image and/or texts into a coherent whole. The course appeals to a range of applicants, including graduates in Fine Art and Art History and those from non-art backgrounds with an interest in curatorial practices.

NUA has a strong reputation for high quality curatorial practice, having staged the prestigious Eastinternational between 1991-2009. The Gallery at NUA provides a showcase for exhibitions of international contemporary art and design and plays a central role in the MA Curation programme. Recently the Gallery at NUA has showcased work by artists including: Grayson Perry, Gilbert and George, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Damien Hirst, Jeremy Deller and Rachel Whiteread. MA Curation students have the opportunity to curate in the Gallery and encouraged and supported to engage in local and national opportunities.

The University has productive links with the Tate and Hayward Gallery as well as with galleries in the region. Tutors and industry guests encourage professional understanding as you develop your appreciation of location and audience and the communication of ideas, meaning and information. You will become accustomed to liaising between artists, dealers, galleries and agents as you progress on your curatorial career.

Taught by leading, established practitioners in the field and with a strong emphasis on industry lectures, workshops, visits and collaborations, the MA focuses heavily on the core professional skills needed to stand out in the competitive field of curation. Students are expected to develop a thorough understanding of current debates in contemporary art, design and media practice. Through expert tuition and regular interaction with students on other postgraduate courses at NUA, students will hone their research and critical interpretation skills.

Unit Tutor, Dr Krzysztof Fijalkowski contributes to the MA Curation and Postgraduate Research programmes at NUA. He is active as a researcher, writer, translator, curator and artist, with particular interests in the history and theory of Dada and Surrealism. Krzysztof also works on the BA Fine Art course, combining teaching in the studio and responsibility for many of the course’s Contextual Studies elements, with a special interest in the crossovers between writing, theory and practice.

Professor of Curation and Art History, Lynda Morris supervises Phd Research students and is the Senior Tutor on the MA Curation course. Professor Morris is the Curator of EASTinternational - the international open submission exhibition - which has been realised in collaboration with a series of eminent invited selectors since 1991. Her activities as a curator and a writer have been concerned with issues of perception, conceptual art, and resistance in art and politics. She was responsible for the first UK exhibitions of several now well-recognised artists including Agnes Martin (1974), Bernd & Hilla Becher (1974-75) and Gerhard Richter (1977). Professor Morris is a Principal Investigator for the major AHRC funded research project 'Picasso; Peace and Freedom' with Tate Liverpool, the Albertina (Vienna) and the Louisiana (Copenhagen). Professor Morris is currently working on a book and recently curated the exhibition As It Was As It Is Now for the Herbert Foundation Ghent 2014 and The Life Room and the City: John Wonnacott & John Lessore at Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery.

MA Curation is relevant to applicants looking to achieve a high level of professional understanding and ability and applications are welcome from outstanding students from diverse disciplines including Fine Art, Design, Film and Moving Image, Art/Design History and those interested in communicating ideas across the arts and sciences to new and existing audiences.

Scholarship and funding information is available. Norwich will be taken over by a festival of contemporary art in key venues across the city in the summer of 2016, as one of four host cities for the 8th edition of the British Art Show. The biggest touring exhibition of contemporary art in the UK has selected Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) as its lead partner in Norwich. See NUA website for details: http://www.nua.ac.uk

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LLB Law (graduate programme) provides you with the opportunity to learn about the law, both in the traditional sense of 'thinking like a lawyer' and in the broader sense of law as a social institution. Read more
LLB Law (graduate programme) provides you with the opportunity to learn about the law, both in the traditional sense of 'thinking like a lawyer' and in the broader sense of law as a social institution.

This is a Qualifying Law Degree which, if taken after an undergraduate degree in another subject, enables you to progress directly to the vocational stage of legal education should you wish to qualify as a solicitor or barrister in England and Wales. It is also recognised in a number of other jurisdictions.

The programme attracts both students from the UK and abroad, from countries such as Canada, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Cyprus, Pakistan and the United States. This generates a wealth of experience and brings a range of views to topical discussions.

The programme covers the same foundational subjects as the 3 year LLB programme, and offers some opportunity for study of options.

Develop your interests

We offer a wide range of study options throughout the LLB programme, allowing you to develop your interests in the specialist legal areas of your choice.

If you are interested in commercial and corporate law, you can take courses in Company Law and Employment Law. However, if your interests lie in the field of criminal justice, you can study Criminology, or Policing. Other options of more general interest include Environmental Law, Evidence and Family Law.

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Thanks to a clear architecture over 3 years (or 4 years with a gap year) the MGE delivers a solid core programme, based on the fundamentals of management and organisation. Read more

Two leading teaching principles: multidisciplinary, intellectually challenging courses

Thanks to a clear architecture over 3 years (or 4 years with a gap year) the MGE delivers a solid core programme, based on the fundamentals of management and organisation. This block of general management skills is equally based on:

Increasingly demanding courses designed to consolidate knowledge throughout the curriculum
The de-compartmentalisation of courses in order to master each discipline transversally, thanks to innovative teaching methods: multidisciplinary case studies, student centred courses putting content into context, rather than lectures, a teaching approach which optimises the assimilation of knowledge...

A rich choice of specialisations, springboard to your first job

More than 20 attractive specialisations, in connection with basic management disciplines or regional areas of expertise, are proposed at the end of the curriculum. Offered on both campuses, they are a springboard to a successful entry onto the job market. They conclude with research work, identical to that required by the greatest universities in the world, thus placing the student at the highest level of international academic excellence.

A double degree can replace the specialisation at the end of the curriculum: 12 double degrees are available in France and 18 double degrees abroad, giving students a wide range of opportunities.
Personal development at the heart of the programme

Dedicated classes, individual guidance and opportunities to meet with experts…, the personal development of each student underlies the whole of the curriculum. This is made possible due to the approach inspired by the expectations and best practice of companies and implemented thanks to the expertise of our faculty. The objective? To help the student establish a clear vision of his or her career path, develop strong leadership skills and learn to make the most of their professional experiences.
Live abroad, on and off campus

The MGE enables students to live an international experience on a daily basis, and not only during the time they spend abroad. Every year, our school hosts international students of different nationalities. On campus multicultural exchanges are omnipresent: classes, conferences, student clubs and societies… This immersion guarantees a true international experience and gives you the keys to develop your career anywhere in the world.
A responsible and committed programme

The Master Grande Ecole seeks to train and guide students by giving them a sense of their individual responsibility: to be confident in the future, to take initiative, to have a sense of commitment, to listen and be part of a team. Thus, the curriculum includes, either as part of the core programme or as an option, through non-profit organisations for example, social projects with a view to developing one’s humanitarian or social character.

Being responsible also means having local involvement. Therefore, a master Grande Ecole student will also play an active role in society and the local community. Two main areas have been identified: helping secondary school pupils strive for their ambitions, and assisting entrepreneurs.

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