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Masters Degrees (Semantic)

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Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. Read more
Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. The aim is to provide software and methodologies so that web resources, data in databases and raw data associated with programs can be processed and manipulated in a more intelligent way. This requires storing, understanding, manipulating and reasoning about the meaning of the data. Semantic technologies are increasingly being used in such varied applications as the semantic web, health care and biomedical domains, the life sciences, software/hardware industries and the automotive industry.

The Semantic Technologies pathway combines themes such as 'Data on the Web' with 'Ontology Engineering and Automated Reasoning'. These core offerings can be combined with any other theme. Good complementary themes are Data Engineering, Managing Data, Learning from Data, Security and Software Engineering.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

-Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
-Access to world leading academic staff
-Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working
-Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students
-An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working
-A Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices
-An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet
-Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
-Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools

Career opportunities

Students following the Semantic Technologies pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in software companies or for healthcare providers who are using or developing Semantic Technologies.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.

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Our Master's programmes seek to develop knowledge, creativity and originality in one package - you. Each programme is a framework to help you to develop. Read more
Our Master's programmes seek to develop knowledge, creativity and originality in one package - you. Each programme is a framework to help you to develop:
a systematic understanding of knowledge;
a comprehensive understanding of techniques relevant to your area of study;
the key skills associated with critical awareness and evaluation.

As part of your development on the course, you will be increasingly expected to demonstrate that you can deal with complex issues in a systematic and creative manner and demonstrate self-direction and originality in problem solving.

Your studies on the course will cover:

Research Methods

This module will introduce methods of data collection and analysis when conducting empirical research. This research can take place in an organisational setting. Both in the private or the public sector. This module is essential preparation for the dissertation.

Enterprise Modelling

Cultivates skills and knowledge related to business, conceptual and software modelling. Example topics of study include different paradigms for modelling (including business services, processes and objects), techniques for modelling the business domain and business behaviour, the relationship between business modelling and software modelling and the use of the Unified Modelling Language (UML).

ERP Systems Theory and Practice

Examines the rationale, theories and practices around Enterprise Resource Planning systems (ERP) and develops the knowledge required to understand the forces driving ERP design and implementation. Example topics of study include enterprise systems strategy and rationale, issues of organisational implementation and business services, processes and functions from an ERP perspective. The module provides an introduction to the SAP R/3 environment and the practice of business process integration in that environment.

ERP Systems Deployment and Configuration

Examines the implications of implementing ERP systems in organisations and develops the key skills necessary to deploy and configure ERP systems. Example topics of study include business process improvement alongside enterprise systems configuration and configuration management (including Master Data Management, business services, processes and functions). The module examines practical aspects of configuration in the context of the SAP R/3 environment.

Service-oriented Architecture

Examines the organisational impact of service-oriented approaches and the technologies necessary for the successful implementation of enterprise and web services. Example topics of study include issues in creating and managing a system landscape based on services, architectural approaches to service-orientation and web service technologies (including semantic web services). Practical aspects of web service implementation are examined in the context of integration via the SAP Netweaver environment.

Data Management and Business Intelligence

Develops the knowledge and skills necessary to support the development of business intelligence solutions in modern organisational environments. Example topics of study include issues in data/information/knowledge management, approaches to information integration and business analytics. Practical aspects of the subject are examined in the context of the SAP Netweaver and Business Warehouse environment.

Systems project management

Develops a critical awareness of the central issues and challenges in information systems project management. Example topics of study include traditional project management techniques and approaches, the relations between projects and business strategy, the role and assumptions underpinning traditional approaches and the ways in which the state-of-the-art can be improved.

Semantic Integration Frameworks

Helps you develop a critical and practical understanding of concepts, standards and frameworks supporting semantic system integration, with a particular emphasis on the Semantic Web – the web of the future. Example topics of study include ontologies and their uses, ontology management and integration, inferencing and reasoning for and in semantic integration, as well as semantic integration standards such as RDF and OWL.

Dissertation

In addition, provided that you have reached an acceptable standard in the assessments and examinations, you may then undertake a dissertation. Work on a dissertation for this course will normally involve an in-depth study in the area of distributed information systems and computing (eg, a state-of-the-art review together with appropriate software development) and provides you with an excellent opportunity to demonstrate your expertise in this area to future employers or as a basis for future PhD study. Additionally, you can now work on an internship during your dissertation (see Special Features below).

Awards

A master's degree is awarded if you reach the necessary standard on the taught part of the course and submit a dissertation of the required standard. If you do not achieve the standard required, you may be awarded a postgraduate diploma or postgraduate certificate if eligible.

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Explore advanced topics in computer science with this wide-ranging programme, which will equip you with the understanding and practical skills to succeed in a variety of careers. Read more

Explore advanced topics in computer science with this wide-ranging programme, which will equip you with the understanding and practical skills to succeed in a variety of careers.

Rooted in the established research strengths of the School of Computing, the programme will introduce topics like systems programming and algorithms before allowing you to specialise through your choice of modules.

You could look at emerging approaches to human interaction with computational systems, novel architectures such as clouds, or the rigorous engineering needed to develop cutting-edge applications such as large-scale data mining and social networks.

Building on your existing knowledge of computer science, you’ll develop the theoretical and practical skills required to design and implement larger, more complex systems using state-of-the-art technologies. You’ll even have the chance to work as an integral member of one of our research groups when you develop your main project.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from world-class facilities to support your learning. State-of-the-art visualisation labs including a powerwall, a benchtop display with tracking system, WorldViz PPT optical tracking system and Intersense InertiaCube orientation tracker are all among the specialist facilities we have within the School of Computing.

We also have Ascension Flock of Birds tracking systems, three DOF and 6DOF Phantom force feedback devices, Twin Immersion Corp CyberGloves, a cloud computing testbed, rendering cluster and labs containing both Microsoft and Linux platforms among others. It’s an exciting environment in which to gain a range of skills and experience cutting-edge technology. 

Course content

Core modules in Semester 1 will lay the foundations of the programme by giving you an understanding of the key topics of algorithms and systems programming.

From there you’ll have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your own preferences. You’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules on diverse topics such as cloud computing, image analysis, machine learning, semantic technologies and developing mobile apps.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Advanced Computer Science module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Web Services and Web Data 10 credits
  • Distributed Systems 10 credits
  • Mobile Application Development 10 credits
  • Machine Learning 10 credits
  • Information Visualization 10 credits
  • User Adaptive Intelligent Systems 10 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 10 credits
  • Combinatorial Optimisation 10 credits
  • Secure Computing 10 credits
  • Graph Algorithms and Complexity Theory 10 credits
  • Big Data Systems 15 credits
  • Data Science 15 credits
  • Bio-Inspired Computing 15 credits
  • Knowledge Representation and Reasoning 15 credits
  • Algorithms 15 credits
  • Parallel and Concurrent Programming 15 credits
  • Foundations of Modelling and Rendering 15 credits
  • Games Engines and Workflow 15 credits
  • Geometric Processing 15 credits
  • High-Performance Graphics 15 credits
  • Animation and Simulation 15 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 15 credits
  • Cloud Computing 15 credits
  • Semantic Technologies and Applications 15 credits
  • Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Scheduling 15 credits
  • Scientific Computation 15 credits
  • Graph Theory: Structure and Algorithms 15 credits

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects for MSc Advanced Computer Science students have included:

  • iPad interaction for wall-sized displays
  • Modelling the effects of feature-based attention in the visual cortex
  • Relevance and trust in social computing for decision making
  • Energy-efficient cloud computing
  • Smart personal assistant - Ontology-enriched access to digital repositories

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and can include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer.

Career opportunities

Computing is an essential component of nearly every daily activity, from the collection, transformation, analysis and dissemination of information in business, through to smart systems embedded in commodity devices, the image processing used in medical diagnosis and the middleware that underpins distributed technologies like cloud computing and the semantic web.

This programme will give you the practical skills to gain entry into many areas of applied computing, working as application developers, system designers and evaluators; but further, links between the taught modules and our research provide our students with added strengths in artificial intelligence, intelligent systems, distributed systems, and the analysis of complex data. As a result, you’ll be well prepared for a range of careers, as well as further research at PhD level.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers working as business analysts, software engineers, wed designers and developers, systems engineers, information analysts and app developers. Others have pursued roles in consultancy, finance, marketing and education, or set up their own businesses.



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Developments in cloud computing technology are transforming the way we live and work. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this fast-growing field and allow you to explore a range of advanced topics in computer science. Read more

Developments in cloud computing technology are transforming the way we live and work. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this fast-growing field and allow you to explore a range of advanced topics in computer science.

You’ll gain a foundation in topics like systems programming and algorithms, as well as specialist modules in advanced distributed systems – especially cloud techniques, technologies and applications.

Building on your existing knowledge of computer science, you’ll also choose from optional modules in topics across computer science. You could look at emerging approaches to human interaction with computational systems, data mining and functional programming among others.

The programme will give you the theoretical and practical skills required to design and implement larger, more complex systems using state-of-the-art technologies. You’ll even have the chance to work as an integral member of one of our research groups when you develop your main project.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from world-class facilities to support your learning. State-of-the-art visualisation labs including a powerwall, a benchtop display with tracking system, WorldViz PPT optical tracking system and Intersense InertiaCube orientation tracker are all among the specialist facilities we have within the School of Computing.

We also have Ascension Flock of Birds tracking systems, three DOF and 6DOF Phantom force feedback devices, Twin Immersion Corp CyberGloves, a cloud computing testbed, rendering cluster and labs containing both Microsoft and Linux platforms among others. It’s an exciting environment in which to gain a range of skills and experience cutting-edge technology.

Course content

Core modules in Semester 1 will lay the foundations of the programme by giving you an understanding of the key topics of algorithms and systems programming. Throughout the year you’ll also take modules developing your understanding of cloud computing itself, from designing the high-level framework of a distributed system to big data and the “internet of things”.

From there you’ll have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your own preferences. You’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules on diverse topics such as image analysis, machine learning, semantic technologies and developing mobile apps.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Advanced Computer Science (Cloud Computing) module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 60 credits
  • Cloud Computing 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Web Services and Web Data 10 credits
  • Distributed Systems 10 credits
  • Mobile Application Development 10 credits
  • Machine Learning 10 credits
  • Information Visualization 10 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 10 credits
  • Combinatorial Optimisation 10 credits
  • Secure Computing 10 credits
  • Graph Algorithms and Complexity Theory 10 credits
  • Big Data Systems 15 credits
  • Data Science 15 credits
  • Bio-Inspired Computing 15 credits
  • Knowledge Representation and Reasoning 15 credits
  • Algorithms 15 credits
  • Parallel and Concurrent Programming 15 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 15 credits
  • Semantic Technologies and Applications 15 credits
  • Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Scheduling 15 credits
  • Scientific Computation 15 credits
  • Graph Theory: Structure and Algorithms 15 credits

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects for MSc Advanced Computer Science (Cloud Computing) students have included:

  • Intelligent services to support sensemaking
  • Google cloud data analysis
  • Hadoop for large image management
  • Evaluating web service agreement in a cloud environment

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and can include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer.

Career opportunities

Computing is an essential component of nearly every daily activity, from the collection, transformation, analysis and dissemination of information in business, through to smart systems embedded in commodity devices, the image processing used in medical diagnosis and the middleware that underpins distributed technologies like cloud computing and the semantic web.

This programme will give you the practical skills to gain entry into many areas of applied computing, working as application developers, system designers and evaluators; but further, links between the taught modules and our research provide our students with added strengths in artificial intelligence, intelligent systems, distributed systems, and the analysis of complex data. As a result, you’ll be well prepared for a range of careers, as well as further research at PhD level.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers working as business analysts, software engineers, wed designers and developers, systems engineers, information analysts and app developers. Others have pursued roles in consultancy, finance, marketing and education, or set up their own businesses.



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Big data is becoming more and more important in fields from science to marketing, engineering medicine and government. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this exciting field and allow you to explore a range of advanced topics in computer science. Read more

Big data is becoming more and more important in fields from science to marketing, engineering medicine and government. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this exciting field and allow you to explore a range of advanced topics in computer science.

You’ll gain a foundation in topics like systems programming and algorithms, as well as the basics of machine learning and knowledge representation. You’ll also choose from optional modules focusing on topics like image analysis or text analytics, or broaden your approach with topics like cloud computing.

As one of the few schools with expertise covering text, symbolic and scientific/numerical data analysis, we can provide a breadth of expertise to equip you with a variety of skills – and you’ll work as an integral member of one of our research groups when you develop your main project. We also have close links with the Leeds Institute for Data Analytics which is at the forefront of big data research.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from world-class facilities to support your learning. State-of-the-art visualisation labs including a powerwall, a benchtop display with tracking system, WorldViz PPT optical tracking system and Intersense InertiaCube orientation tracker are all among the specialist facilities we have within the School of Computing.

We also have Ascension Flock of Birds tracking systems, three DOF and 6DOF Phantom force feedback devices, Twin Immersion Corp CyberGloves, a cloud computing testbed, rendering cluster and labs containing both Microsoft and Linux platforms among others. It’s an exciting environment in which to gain a range of skills and experience cutting-edge technology.

Course content

Core modules in Semester 1 will lay the foundations of the programme by giving you an understanding of the key topics of algorithms and systems programming, as well as the basic principles of automated reasoning, machine learning and how computers can be made to represent knowledge.

From there you’ll have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your own preferences. You’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules on diverse topics such as image analysis, cloud computing, semantic technologies and developing mobile apps.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Advanced Computer Science (Data Analytics) module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Machine Learning 10 credits
  • Big Data Systems 15 credits
  • Data Science 15 credits
  • MSc Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Web Services and Web Data 10 credits
  • Distributed Systems 10 credits
  • Mobile Application Development 10 credits
  • Information Visualization 10 credits
  • User Adaptive Intelligent Systems 10 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 10 credits
  • Combinatorial Optimisation 10 credits
  • Secure Computing 10 credits
  • Graph Algorithms and Complexity Theory 10 credits
  • Bio-Inspired Computing 15 credits
  • Knowledge Representation and Reasoning 15 credits
  • Algorithms 15 credits
  • Parallel and Concurrent Programming 15 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 15 credits
  • Cloud Computing 15 credits
  • Semantic Technologies and Applications 15 credits
  • Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Scheduling 15 credits
  • Scientific Computation 15 credits
  • Graph Theory: Structure and Algorithms 15 credits

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects for MSc Advanced Computer Science students have included:

  • Text mining of e-health patient records
  • Java-based visualization on ultra-high resolution displays
  • Data mining of sports performance data
  • Contour topology
  • Efficient computation for simulating tumour growths

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and can include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer.

Career opportunities

Computing is an essential component of nearly every daily activity, from the collection, transformation, analysis and dissemination of information in business, through to smart systems embedded in commodity devices, the image processing used in medical diagnosis and the middleware that underpins distributed technologies like cloud computing and the semantic web.

This programme will give you the practical skills to gain entry into many areas of applied computing, working as application developers, system designers and evaluators; but further, links between the taught modules and our research provide our students with added strengths in artificial intelligence, intelligent systems, distributed systems, and the analysis of complex data. As a result, you’ll be well prepared for a range of careers, as well as further research at PhD level.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers working as business analysts, software engineers, wed designers and developers, systems engineers, information analysts and app developers. Others have pursued roles in consultancy, finance, marketing and education, or set up their own businesses.



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The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Phonology is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for concentrated study in phonology, with a focus on theoretically-driven empirical research. Read more
The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Phonology is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for concentrated study in phonology, with a focus on theoretically-driven empirical research. Students will use typological comparison, data collection, experimental methods, or modelling techniques and will receive extensive training in research methods and the scholarly presentation of ideas.

Degree information

Students gain knowledge and understanding of current research in phonology and are prepared for independent research. On completion of the programme, they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, find and evaluate relevant literature, develop and test new hypotheses, and produce cogent, structured and professionally presented reports.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five pathway modules (60 credits), three optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Pathway modules - students select three from the list below:
-Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology A
-Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology B
-Advanced Phonology Theory A
-Advanced Phonology Theory B

In conjunction with the Programme Co-ordinator, students select two from a list which includes the following:
-Phonetic Theory
-Phonology of English
-Morphology
-Intermediate Generative Grammar A
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Readings in Syntax

Optional modules - a further three modules are selected, either from the list of non-compulsory core modules above or from the list of optional modules below:
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Advanced Semantic Theory B
-Animal Communication and the Human Language
-Communication and Human Language
-Interfaces
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Language Acquisition
-Neurolinguistics
-Pragmatic Theory
-Semantic-Pragmatic Development
-Semantics Research Seminar
-Sociolinguistics
-Stuttering
-The Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics
-Or any statistical training outside the department

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-oriented. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Although the degree can be an end in itself, this advanced programme is an excellent preparation for independent doctoral research in phonology. Graduates from our specialised Master's programmes in linguistics have a very strong track record of securing funded doctoral studentships and have in recent years gone on to research at UCL, MIT, Cambridge, University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Employability
This Linguistics MA equips graduates with the necessary skills to carry out research in the subject of phonology.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full width of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation which is also reflected in other markers of excellence such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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The Linguistics with specialisation in Pragmatics MA is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for a concentrated course in pragmatics, with particular, but by no means exclusive, focus on the relevance-theoretic approach developed by Dan Sperber, Deirdre Wilson and Robyn Carston. Read more
The Linguistics with specialisation in Pragmatics MA is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for a concentrated course in pragmatics, with particular, but by no means exclusive, focus on the relevance-theoretic approach developed by Dan Sperber, Deirdre Wilson and Robyn Carston.

Degree information

Students gain knowledge and understanding of current research in pragmatics and are prepared for independent research. On completion of the programme, they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, find and evaluate relevant literature, develop and test new hypotheses, and produce cogent, structured and professionally presented reports.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two obligatory core modules (30 credits), four pathway modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules - compulsory:
-Pragmatics Research Seminar
-Dissertation in Linguistics - Advanced Level

Pathway modules (students select two from the list below):
-Pragmatic Theory
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Semantic-Pragmatic Development

In conjunction with the Programme Co-ordinator, students select two from a list which includes:
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Interfaces
-Semantics Research Seminar

Optional modules - a further three modules are selected from the list of optional modules below:
-Syntax 1
-Sociolinguistics
-The Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Phonetic Theory
-Animal Communication and Human Language
-Language Acquisition
-Neurolinguistics
-Morphology
-Pragmatic Theory
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Readings in Syntax
-Syntax
-Advanced Phonological Theory
-Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Intermediate Generative Grammar
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Stuttering
-Or any statistical training taken outside the department

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-oriented. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Although the degree can be an end in itself, this advanced programme is an excellent preparation for independent doctoral research in pragmatics. Graduates from our specialised Master's programmes in Linguistics have a very strong track record of securing funded doctoral studentships at institutions and have in recent years gone on to research at MIT, Cambridge, UCL, University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Employability
This Linguistics MA equips graduates with the necessary skills to carry out research in the specialised subject of pragmatics.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. More specifically, UCL Linguistics is the leading department for research in communication and pragmatics in the UK and its staff includes world leaders in theoretical pragmatics and in experimental pragmatics.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, cognition, and communication.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full width of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation which is also reflected in other markers of excellence such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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The programme intends to develop your competence in using tools and techniques for producing computer systems solutions from a sound mathematical and scientific base while appreciating the professional responsibilities and quality needed by industry. Read more
The programme intends to develop your competence in using tools and techniques for producing computer systems solutions from a sound mathematical and scientific base while appreciating the professional responsibilities and quality needed by industry.

What's covered in the course?

The course is designed to cover the advanced concepts of computer science in the first semester, including service-oriented architecture, advanced HCI techniques and advanced mobile computing.

In your second semester, you will consolidate your first semester learning by studying further advanced subjects that emphasise Semantic Web technologies, advanced data science, and Research and Project Management. In addition, you will complete an individual project that provides opportunity to demonstrate technical and general employability skills in preparation for career progression. More specifically, the individual project simulates typical graduate workplace tasks that require in-depth knowledge and skills in a specific area of computer science. This will include consideration of wider issues and the ability to manage activities and resources, as well as generate, implement and report on solutions to meet task objectives.

Throughout your studies, you’ll be supported by our expert teaching staff, all of whom have a wide range of research and industrial experience in areas such as intelligent systems, mobile computing, Semantic Web, machine learning and software engineering, which they use to enhance the curriculum.

Why choose us?

-You’ll have access to dedicated industry-standard facilities in our own fully equipped laboratory. Based within our £114 million Millennium Point building, you’ll be able to undertake work such as artificial intelligence, human computer interaction, mobile and web application development, and data science.
-We are home to a Cisco Systems and a Microsoft Academy Centre – one of Microsoft’s top UK university-based academies – and we are a member of the Microsoft Developer Network Academic Alliance. We are also a Cisco ASC (Academy Support Centre) and Cisco Instructor Training Centre (ITC) – one of only 10 such instructor training centres in the UK.
-The course is supported through the activities of the Innovations in Computing Education research group, designed to keep teaching and assessment updated to match international trends.
-We have strong links with companies such as Oracle, LPI, Microsoft, AWS and Apple, which ensure that the course is relevant and respected by employers.

Course in depth

Knowledge and understanding are acquired though a mixture of formal lectures, tutor-led seminars and practical activities, with other independent learning activities at all stages.

Emphasis is placed on guided, self-directed and student-centred learning with increasing independence of approach, thought and process.

The course provides access to effective commercial development environments and ensures students have practical awareness of computer systems requirements. You are required to meet strict deadlines, and to manage and plan overall workload.

Knowledge is assessed formatively and summatively, by a number of methods, including seminars, course-work, viva, presentation, and project work.

Assessment criteria are published both at a generic course level and to provide guidance for individual items of assessment.

You will undertake a major project involving research and application of that research in the solution of appropriate systems problems.

Semester One
-Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) 20 credits
-Advanced Mobile Computing 20 credits
-Advanced HCI 20 credits

Semester Two
-Research Methods and Project Management 20 credits
-Advanced Data Science 20 credits
-Semantic Web and Knowledge Engineering 20 credits

Semester Three
-Master’s Project 60 credits

Enhancing your employability skills

We know that employers are looking for graduates who have a good balance between in-depth academic knowledge and technical and practical expertise, which is why our course is geared towards employability.

What you learn on our course will help you to stand out when you look for your first professional role.Because you’ll know how to use sophisticated, industry-standard software, you will be able to demonstrate that you can put into practice your deep theoretical knowledge.

We will also prepare you for a career by equipping you with a range of transferable skills, such as complex problem-solving expertise, the ability to analyse in a careful and considered manner, and working as a team member.

In addition, our specialist industry links with the Linux Professional Institute, the Oracle Academy, Cisco, and Microsoft, plus our world-class facilities, will mark you out as a highly employable graduate.

This is why our graduates have gone on to pursue computing and software development and designer careers in a wide range of industries, from SME software companies, to industry, government, banking and healthcare. Furthermore, many graduates continue their studies to Doctorate level.

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The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. Read more
The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. The programme combines theory with practical opportunities for media production. Students will critically examine new developments within digital media and work with partners including the British Film Institute (BFI).

Degree information

This programme provides the opportunity to explore media education, media literacy and related fields. It combines theory with practical opportunities in moving image production, Internet cultures and game design. Students will critically examine developments in the fields of new media, including the impact of new technologies on education, and debates about the place and purpose of media in society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) or a report (30 credits) and an additional optional module (30 credits).

Core modules
-Digital Media, Cultural Theory and Education
-Internet Cultures: Theory & Practice

Recommended optional modules include:
-Moving Image Production
-Digital Games, Play and Creativity

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered by face-to-face lectures and seminars, practical workshops combined with online-learning. Students are assessed by coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words, plus practical work for some modules, and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers in primary, secondary schools and further and higher education, while others have jobs as within areas related to digital media. Graduates can also be found working as museum and gallery education officers and in other informal learning spaces.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is run by UCL's London Knowledge Lab (LKL) where collaborating computer and social scientists research the future of learning with digital technologies in a wide range of settings. LKL conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together computer and social scientists from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

Students are able to work with the BFI, our partner for one of our modules, as well as leading researchers from the DARE Collaborative, a research partnership focussed on the digital arts in education led by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) and the BFI.

LKL conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together computer and social scientists from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

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The Linguistics MA aims to give students a thorough grounding in modern theoretical linguistics. Students gain a basic understanding of the three core areas of linguistics. Read more
The Linguistics MA aims to give students a thorough grounding in modern theoretical linguistics. Students gain a basic understanding of the three core areas of linguistics: phonetics and phonology; syntax; and semantics and pragmatics, and are then able to tailor the programme to meet their personal linguistic interests.

Degree information

Students gain knowledge and understanding of current research in theoretical linguistics and are prepared for independent research. On completion of the programme, they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, find and evaluate relevant literature, develop and test new hypotheses, and produce cogent, structured and professionally presented reports.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Syntax
-Semantics and Pragmatics
-Phonetics and Phonology
-Foundations of Linguistics

Optional modules - students choose one of the following:
-Advanced Phonological Theory
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Intermediate Generative Grammar
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Language Acquisition
-Linguistics of Sign Language
-Morphology
-Neurolinguistics
-Phonology of English
-Readings in Syntax
-Semantic-Pragmatic Development
-Sociolinguistics
-Stuttering

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project in any area of linguistics which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-orientated. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Many linguistics graduates from UCL carry on studying linguistics at MPhil/PhD level with a view to pursuing an academic career. Others go on to teach languages, especially English (as a first or foreign language) or embark on a range of other careers, from law, media, computing and speech and language therapy to all aspects of commerce and industry.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Lecturer, University of Saudi Arabia
-Software Developer, OpenBet Ltd
-Investigations Specialist, Amazon
-Translator, Hunan University
-PhD in Linguistics, University of Cambridge

Employability
Linguistics MA students acquire a wide range of transferable skills, which opens up opportunities in many different sectors include language teaching, translating and interpreting, marketing, communication, journalism, management, and law.

Graduates who achieve good results are well-placed to go on to a research degree in Linguistics at top universities, often with a view to pursuing an academic career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in linguistics, language, mind, and behaviour. More specifically, UCL Linguistics is one of the leading departments for research in theoretical linguistics in the UK and its staff includes world leaders in theoretical syntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonology, and experimental linguistics.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full range of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation, which is also reflected in other markers of excellence, such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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From software agents used in networking systems to embedded systems in unmanned vehicles, intelligent systems are being adopted more and more often. Read more

From software agents used in networking systems to embedded systems in unmanned vehicles, intelligent systems are being adopted more and more often. This programme will equip you with specialist knowledge in this exciting field and allow you to explore a range of topics in computer science.

Core modules will give you a foundation in topics like systems programming and algorithms, as well as the basics of machine learning and knowledge representation. You’ll also choose from optional modules focusing on topics like bio-inspired computing or text analytics, or broaden your approach with topics like mobile app development.

You’ll gain a broad perspective on intelligent systems, covering evolutionary models, statistical and symbolic machine learning algorithms, qualitative reasoning, image processing, language understanding and bio-computation as well as essential principles and practices in the design, implementation and usability of intelligent systems.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from world-class facilities to support your learning. State-of-the-art visualisation labs including a powerwall, a benchtop display with tracking system, WorldViz PPT optical tracking system and Intersense InertiaCube orientation tracker are all among the specialist facilities we have within the School of Computing.

We also have Ascension Flock of Birds tracking systems, three DOF and 6DOF Phantom force feedback devices, Twin Immersion Corp CyberGloves, a cloud computing testbed, rendering cluster and labs containing both Microsoft and Linux platforms among others. It’s an exciting environment in which to gain a range of skills and experience cutting-edge technology.

Course content

Core modules in Semester 1 will lay the foundations of the programme by giving you an understanding of the key topics of algorithms and systems programming, as well as the basic principles of automated reasoning, machine learning and how computers can be made to represent knowledge.

From there you’ll have the chance to tailor your studies to suit your own preferences. You’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules on diverse topics such as image analysis, cloud computing, graph theory and developing mobile apps.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Advanced Computer Science (Intelligent Systems) module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 60 credits
  • Bio-Inspired Computing 15 credits
  • Knowledge Representation and Reasoning 15 credits
  • Image Analysis 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Distributed Systems 10 credits
  • Mobile Application Development 10 credits
  • Machine Learning 10 credits
  • Intelligent Systems and Robotics 20 credits
  • User Adaptive Intelligent Systems 10 credits
  • Data Mining and Text Analytics 10 credits
  • Combinatorial Optimisation 10 credits
  • Graph Algorithms and Complexity Theory 10 credits
  • Big Data Systems 15 credits
  • Data Science 15 credits
  • Algorithms 15 credits
  • Parallel and Concurrent Programming 15 credits
  • Cloud Computing 15 credits
  • Semantic Technologies and Applications 15 credits
  • Scheduling 15 credits
  • Scientific Computation 15 credits
  • Graph Theory: Structure and Algorithms 15 credits

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The professional project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects for MSc Advanced Computer Science (Intelligent Systems) students have included:

  • Object-based attention in a biologically inspired network for artificial vision
  • Advanced GIS functionality for animal habitat analysis
  • Codebook construction for feature selection
  • Learning to imitate human actions

A proportion of projects are formally linked to industry, and can include spending time at the collaborator’s site over the summer.

Career opportunities

Computing is an essential component of nearly every daily activity, from the collection, transformation, analysis and dissemination of information in business, through to smart systems embedded in commodity devices, the image processing used in medical diagnosis and the middleware that underpins distributed technologies like cloud computing and the semantic web.

This programme will give you the practical skills to gain entry into many areas of applied computing, working as application developers, system designers and evaluators; but further, links between the taught modules and our research provide our students with added strengths in artificial intelligence, intelligent systems, distributed systems, and the analysis of complex data. As a result, you’ll be well prepared for a range of careers, as well as further research at PhD level.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers working as business analysts, software engineers, wed designers and developers, systems engineers, information analysts and app developers. Others have pursued roles in consultancy, finance, marketing and education, or set up their own businesses.



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The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Semantics is a research-oriented programme in formal semantics. The programme can prepare students for potential PhD research in semantics or overlapping disciplines, such as the syntax-semantics interface, pragmatic theory, psycholinguistics, and philosophy of language. Read more
The Linguistics MA with specialisation in Semantics is a research-oriented programme in formal semantics. The programme can prepare students for potential PhD research in semantics or overlapping disciplines, such as the syntax-semantics interface, pragmatic theory, psycholinguistics, and philosophy of language.

Degree information

Students will gain knowledge and critical understanding of current research in semantics and of the formal tools it employs, preparing them for independent research. On completion of the programme they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, evaluate current literature, and develop and test new hypotheses using appropriate formalisms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two obligatory core modules (30 credits), two pathway modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Semantics Research Seminar

Pathway modules (students select two from the list below):
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Interfaces
-Formal Methods in Philosophy
-Semantic Pragmatic Development
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics

Optional modules - a further four modules are selected, either from the list of non-compulsory core modules above or from the list of optional modules below:
-Advanced Phonological Theory A
-Animal Communication and Human Language
-Intermediate Generative Grammar A
-Sociolinguistics
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Language Acquisition
-Morphology
-Neurolinguistics
-Readings in Syntax
-Syntax Research Seminar
-The Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Or any statistical training outside the department.

Research project
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation in linguistics (advanced level) of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-oriented. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Although the degree can be an end in itself, this advanced programme is an excellent preparation for independent doctoral research in semantics. Graduates from our specialised Master's programmes in Linguistics have a very strong track record of securing funded doctoral studentships at institutions and have in recent years gone on to research at MIT, Cambridge, UCL, University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Employability
This Linguistics MA equips graduates with the necessary skills to carry out research in the specialised subject of formal semantics.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. UCL Linguistics is a leading department for research in the UK in semantics, with strengths at the interfaces with syntax, pragmatics and philosophy of language. Uniquely, our staff includes three experimental linguists with interests in semantics.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, cognition, and communication.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full width of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation which is also reflected in other markers of excellence such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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The Linguistics with specialisation in Syntax MA is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for a concentrated, advanced course in theoretical syntax, couched broadly within the Principles and Parameters approach to syntax and its offshoot. Read more
The Linguistics with specialisation in Syntax MA is a research-oriented programme designed for students looking for a concentrated, advanced course in theoretical syntax, couched broadly within the Principles and Parameters approach to syntax and its offshoot: the Minimalist Program.

Degree information

Students gain knowledge and understanding of current research in theoretical syntax and are prepared for independent research. On completion of the programme, they will be able to formulate appropriate research questions, find and evaluate relevant literature, develop and test new hypotheses, and produce cogent, structured and professionally presented reports.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five compulsory pathway modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Pathway modules - students choose three from the list below:
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Intermediate Generative Grammar A
-Intermediate Generative Grammar B
-Readings in Syntax

In conjunction with the Programme Co-ordinator, students select two from a list which includes the following.
-Interfaces
-Morphology
-Advanced Phonological Theory
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics

Optional modules - a further three modules are selected, either from the list of non-obligatory core modules above or from the list of optional modules below:
-Advanced Phonological Theory
-Advanced Semantic Theory
-Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Animal Communication and Human Language
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Language Acquisition
-Neurolinguistics
-Phonetic Theory
-Pragmatic Theory
-Semantic Pragmatic Development
-Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics
-Sociolinguistics
-Stuttering
-Any statistical training outside the department

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The teaching and assessment of this programme is strongly research-oriented. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Assessment is through take-home and unseen examination, essays, presentations, assignments and the dissertation.

Careers

Although the degree can be an end in itself, this advanced programme is an excellent preparation for independent doctoral research in syntax. Graduates from our specialised Master's programmes in linguistics have a very strong track record of securing funded doctoral studentships at institutions and have in recent years gone on to research at MIT, Cambridge, UCL, University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Employability
This Linguistics MA equips graduates with the necessary skills to carry out research in the specialised subject of syntax.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in linguistics, language, mind, and behaviour. More specifically, UCL Linguistics is one of the leading departments for research in theoretical linguistics in the UK and its staff includes world-leaders in theoretical syntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonology, and experimental linguistics.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources such as a behavioural neuroscience laboratory, a centre for brain imaging, and extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, cognition, and communication.

Our world-class research is characterised by a tight integration of theoretical and experimental work spanning the full width of the linguistic enterprise and forms the bedrock of the department’s eminent reputation which is also reflected in other markers of excellence such as its editorial involvement with top journals in the field.

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Learning how to build the intelligence used to power the future of the Web. The Web has provided us with novel ways to maintain our social networks, rapidly search for information, and make purchases from the comfort of our own home. Read more
Learning how to build the intelligence used to power the future of the Web.
The Web has provided us with novel ways to maintain our social networks, rapidly search for information, and make purchases from the comfort of our own home. Most of us take these technologies for granted. However, for the Web to function as it does numerous problems had to be solved: which pages should surface given your search query? Which status updates will you enjoy most? Or, how do we make sure you find the products that you where looking for?
These questions are solved using a combination of machine learning, and an understanding of users. As our use of the Web steadily grows, new questions are continuously emerging. Smarter and faster solutions to empower an intelligent Web are needed. In the Master’s specialisation in Web and Language Interaction you’ll learn the building blocks you’ll need to answer resolve future problems that arise on the Web. In this you’ll learn to understand the psychological, technical and statistical aspect of data science and other Web issues.
The key course in this specialisation is the new AI at the Webscale course, in which AI techniques are studied in the context of streaming and massive data. This course is complemented by the App-Lab course, aimed at understanding how Apps are set-up, built and evaluated. Covering human cognition, a choice of courses in psycho-linguistics is offered in line with the broad expertise within the Donders Institute.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/web

Why study Web and Language Interaction at Radboud University?

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Exceptional students who choose this specialisation have the opportunity to study for a double degree in Artificial Intelligence together with the specialisation in Data Science. This will take three instead of two years.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to debate and develop their projects. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our approach to this field

Language Information and Communication Technology lies at the basis of innumerable innovations in our society and has provided remarkable new services (like social media) and new products (like smart phones and tablets). Traditionally, applications of Artificial Intelligence used to be limited to micro worlds and toy systems. The horizon has now been widely extended to distribute mass applications of AI techniques. These developments are supported by a general availability of computation power and connectivity in the form of the web, social media, big data, wireless, and mobile platforms with input and output in many modalities.

Human-human and human-computer communication can be found in natural language applications like in the speech driven free-text systems such as Watson, and Siri, in brand sentiment detection and epidemic monitoring from tweets. But communication is also crucial for web applications and Apps that personalise information and make it accessible with other means. Examples thereof are voter guides, recommendation systems, click stream analysis, crowd sourcing and demand aggregation, e-therapy, e-inclusion, avatars with speech synthesis and recognition, gesture and emotion. Technical issues are e.g. map/ reduce architecture for massive data processing and emerging technologies like the semantic web.

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Booking.com, Webpower, Google, Facebook, Philips, Booking.com, Philips, Rabobank. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Web and Language Interaction could get:
- PhD researcher, for example, on enhancing speech recognition using semantic knowledge or in user interaction design for patient doctor communication in a virtual hospital
- Data Scientist in a web start-up
- Developer for Computer Aided Language Learning
- EU R&D programme leader on machine translation of natural language
- Developer of intelligent software for music studios

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/web

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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