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This is a multidisciplinary MSc programme that brings together the areas of international business and economic development. Taught jointly by the School of Economics and Kent Business School, the programme benefits from the expertise and strong research in both schools. Read more
This is a multidisciplinary MSc programme that brings together the areas of international business and economic development. Taught jointly by the School of Economics and Kent Business School, the programme benefits from the expertise and strong research in both schools.

The programme provides an excellent postgraduate education in the core principles of international business and economic development and helps to develop a broad set of skills that are highly sought after by global employers. It provides a structured approach to developing the knowledge and skills required to pursue a career in international business and/or economic development. You have the chance to develop an international perspective on business and economic development issues through working with an international group of students, and build your own international network.

The MSc is particularly suited to Business students who are looking to acquire economics understanding and skills in order to pursue a career in multinational enterprises, international organisations and consultancy companies. It also offers opportunities for the development of managers who want to deepen their understanding of the international economic environment, and for those who wish to pursue further academic study at PhD level.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/773/international-business-and-economic-development

About the School of Economics

The School of Economics is dedicated to excellence in both teaching and research, demonstrated by results in the REF 2014 and recent student surveys. All academic staff are research active, and teaching and learning are informed by the School's thriving research culture and strong cosmopolitan academic community. Our taught programmes offer a combination of training in core economics with the opportunity to specialise in areas such as finance, econometrics, development, agriculture or the environment.

About Kent Business School

Kent Business School has over 25 years’ experience delivering business education. Our portfolio of postgraduate programmes demonstrates the breadth and depth of our expertise. Academic research and links with global business inform our teaching, ensuring a curriculum that is relevant and current. We are ranked as a top 30 UK business school for the standard of our teaching and student satisfaction. We also hold a number of accreditations by professional bodies.

Course structure

The International Business and Economic Development MSc can be studied over one year full-time or two years part-time and is divided into two stages: eight taught modules (seven of which are compulsory) and a dissertation on either International Business or Economic Development.

All of our MSc programmes require some mathematical analysis, and we recognise that students have widely differing backgrounds in mathematics. The first week of all our MSc programmes includes compulsory intensive teaching in mathematics, refreshing and improving your skills in order to equip you with the techniques you will need for the rest of the programme.

Students who successfully pass the taught element of the programme, proceed to the dissertation stage, where you undertake a supervised project of your choice on a Business or Economic Development issue. Advice on choice of dissertation topic and management is given during the taught stage of the programme. The dissertation stage develops students’ research skills and follows on from the Research Methods module. Student dissertations are supervised by academic staff.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CB934 - Strategy (15 credits)
CB936 - Business in an International Perspective (15 credits)
EC817 - Research Methods (15 credits)
EC833 - Economic Principles (15 credits)
EC835 - Quantitative Methods for Economists (15 credits)
CB859 - Managing the Multinational Enterprise (15 credits)
CB900 - Corporate Responsibility and Globalisation (15 credits)
CB9083 - Dissertation in International Business (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is based on a combination of coursework assignments, projects, presentations, reports and written examinations (in May). The programme is completed by a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words on an approved topic between May and September.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide a pre-experience Master’s programme for those wishing to pursue a career in international business and economic development.

- equip future business specialists with knowledge and skills in economics, econometrics and international development

- prepare students for a career in international business and economic development by developing skills in international business, economics and development or as preparation for research. Add value to first degrees by developing in individuals an integrated and critically aware understanding of international business, economics and organisations in international environments.

- develop a deeper understanding of the way economics and quantitative techniques can be applied to problem solving in international business and development.

- develop in students the ability to apply economic knowledge, analytical tools and skills in range of theoretical and applied business and development problems.

- develop students’ knowledge and understanding of organisations, the economic context in which they operate and how they are managed.

- develop skills necessary for independent research in business and economic development.

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills, research skills and relevant personal and interpersonal skills.

- foster enhancement of lifelong learning skills and personal development so as to be able to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to business and economic development of society at large.

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Kent Business School and the School of Economics.

- provide information and advice on future employment and further postgraduate study.

- support national and regional economic success via the development opportunities offered by the programme, including those related to an understanding of international business practices and economic development.

Careers

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

A postgraduate degree in the area of economics and business is a particularly valuable and flexible qualification that can open the door to exciting careers in multinational enterprises, international organisations and consultancy companies.

The School's employability officers and the University's Careers and Employability Service are available throughout the year to offer one-to-one advice and help on all aspects of employability at any stage in your postgraduate studies. We also offer online advice on employability skills, career choices, applications and interview skills.

Professional recognition

Kent Business School is a member of the European Foundation for Management Development (EMFD), CIPD, CIM and the Association of Business Schools (ABS). In addition, KBS is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA).

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. Read more
The rationale for this innovative programme of study lies in the global environmental and development challenges that have been articulated in the Sustainable Development Goals. It is clear that solutions to the challenge of sustainable development require holistic, integrated and co-ordinated actions across a very wide range of sectors, and will increasingly require a multidisciplinary approach. This programme aims to provide students with a broad grounding in the main concepts associated with sustainable development, but also provides the opportunity to specialise in one area in greater depth.

Visit the website https://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/programmes/sustainable/msc/

Structure

For the MSc in Sustainable Development students will take:

- 3 core modules
- 4 elective modules*
- 2 research modules

* including one free choice from across all programmes (subject to approval on the Programme Convenor)

- Specialisms
If you are taking an MSc or a Postgraduate Diploma you choose elective modules within a particular specialism. This creates the opportunity for a clear focus in your studies, whereby you can develop understanding and skills relevant to specific professional interests. The name of the specialism will appear on the certificate awarded.

Core Modules:

- Understanding Sustainable Development [compulsory]
- Climate Change and Development
- Environmental Science and Management
- Ethics for Environment and Development

Elective modules:
Specialisms

Development Management:
- Economics and Institutions for Development
- Managing Knowledge and Communication for Development
- NGO Management
- Project Planning & Management
- Management in Rural Development

Environmental Economics:
- Economic Principles [advised]
- Economics of Environmental Policy
- Environmental Valuation: Theory, Techniques and Application
- Natural Resource Economics

Environmental Management:
- Introduction to Environmental Economics & Policy
- Environmental Assessment
- Environmental Auditing and Environmental Management Systems
- International Environmental Law

Natural Resource Management:
- Water Resources Management
- Sustainable Land Management
- Biodiversity, Conservation and Development
- Natural Resource Economics

Rural Development and Change:
- Agricultural Trade and Policy
- Understanding Poverty
- Food Security and Social Protection
- Rural Development
- Gender & Social Inequality

Research component :
- Research Methods
- Dissertation

Teaching & Learning

1. Academic level

All CeDEP programmes are taught to Master’s (Second Cycle) level, which involves building upon existing knowledge and understanding typically associated with the Bachelor’s (First Cycle) level or its equivalent. Study at Master’s level requires:

- originality in developing and/or applying ideas, and extending or enhancing previous learning

- application of knowledge and understanding, including problem solving in new or unfamiliar environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts

- integration of knowledge and handling of complexity

- formulating judgements with incomplete or limited information, including reflection on social and ethical responsibilities

- clear and unambiguous communication of conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- learning skills to study in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous

Prospective students should note that distance education of this kind demands a high degree of commitment, determination and self-discipline. Whilst CeDEP provides significant support through the tutorial system and by other means, students taking on programmes of this nature should possess a strong measure of self-reliance.

2. Study Expectations

- How long will it take?
For students in full time employment, the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma, usually take three or four years to complete and the Certificate 2 years.

- When can I study?
You can begin your studies in either February or June. The examinations for all students are in October. The study periods are 30 weeks for students starting in February and 15 weeks for those starting in June.

- How many hours a week?
For the 30 week study period starting in February, you will need to allocate 5–6 hours of study time per module, per week. For students starting their studies in June with the shorter 15 week session, 10–12 hours per module, per week is recommended.

- How many modules can I take per study year?
We strongly recommend that students should take only one or two modules in their first year, so that they can adjust to studying at a distance, whilst combining this with work and family life.

Students wishing to complete an MSc in two years they will need to enrol/pay for three core modules and both Research Methods and the Dissertation in the first year although the Dissertation is written and submitted in the second year. Please contact your programme convenor by email.

3. Assessment

- How you will be assessed
For each module you will sit a two-hour unseen examination held on a specific date in October, worth 80% of your total module mark. There is also an Examined Assignment (worth 20% of the total module mark) which is submitted during the study year and marked by your tutor.

- Examination arrangements
Examinations are held in students’ countries of residence, using the University of London’s network of approved Overseas Examination Authorities. Fees for taking examinations at all examination centres other than London are the responsibility of the student.

Assignments are submitted to CeDEP electronically via the online learning environment.

- Assessment of the Research Component
The Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541) are not assessed through final written examinations. These two modules constitute the Research Component of an MSc and are assessed entirely by submitted coursework.

4. Research Component

In order to qualify for an MSc, it is mandatory for CeDEP students to pass the Research Component.

The Research Component comprises two of the nine modules necessary for completion of an MSc. These are a Research Methods module (P506) and the Dissertation (P541). The modules are assessed as follows:

- RP506 through two examined assignments submitted during the study year
- P541through a 10,000 word dissertation

The Research Component is studied over two consecutive years. The Research Methods module (P506) must be studied and successfully passed before the Dissertation module (P541). This is because it provides skills and techniques which will assist with the subsequent development and conduct of your research and preparation of your dissertation. Students are required to enrol and pay for P506 and P541 at the same time.

The dissertation is usually carried out during the final year of registration with CeDEP. Students conduct desk- or field-based research in a relevant topic of their choice. All research topics are subject to approval and each student is assigned a personal supervisor. Background reading and preparation of the proposal take place between the October exams and commencement of the final study year in February.

Scholarships

For further details and information on external scholarships visit the Scholarships section (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/)

Career prospects for graduates

Graduates of this programme will have a wide range of backgrounds and will typically find work in:

- government ministries and other public sector organisations concerned with policy analysis in the fields of sustainable development and environmental planning

- international and non-governmental organisations concerned with the sustainable dimensions of economic change

- consultancies and development projects concerned with issues of sustainability and analyses of the interface between environment and poverty

- applied research and teaching in institutions of research and higher education

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cedep/applying/

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This course will give you a firm understanding of development theory in an international context, with a particular focus on how to bring theory into practice and build your practical expertise in range of development disciplines. Read more
This course will give you a firm understanding of development theory in an international context, with a particular focus on how to bring theory into practice and build your practical expertise in range of development disciplines.

The course aims to enhance your capacity to critically evaluate economic, political and social factors that are affecting the development policy environment, on a national and international level. Throughout this Master’s degree, you will develop management techniques and skills, and the ability to apply them in a development context.

Through empirical research and analysis, you will have the opportunity to develop specialist expertise in a particular aspect of development management.

The course is designed to prepare you for a career in development management with an international organisation, a non-governmental body or a government development agency. Our graduates are NGO programme officers, trade advisors, project managers, micro finance specialists and development consultants. Some of our graduates have also set up their own development charities or proceeded to PhD research and teaching.

Course content

Our regular contributors to teaching and learning activities include experienced field practitioners drawn from international development organisations and NGOs.

Active and enquiry-led learning is a central learning method on the course. Learning is based studying on real-world case studies with official project materials and survey data from the World Bank, International Monetary Fund and other development agencies.

As part of this course, you have the opportunity to obtain a PRINCE2 Foundation certification in project management.

A highlight for many students are the field trips and social events organised throughout the course which provide an opportunity for networking and extending learning in new environments.

You will also benefit from free access to part of the material on the course reading list.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-Current Issues in International Development
-Development Economics and Policy
-Human Resource Strategies for the International Manager
-International Development Finance
-Managing Data
-Managing Development Interventions
-Project
-Research Methods

Option modules
You can choose one option module from the University's postgraduate programme, subject to approval by the Course Leader. This gives the unique benefit of allowing you to choose according to your past academic studies, work experience or, perhaps, in line with your future career pathways or interests.

Accredited internship

All students on our full-time business Masters courses can apply to undertake the PG/MBA Internship Programme Reflective Practitioner Module. This is an 8 week unpaid accredited internship, which can be taken in addition to option modules and will help students to gain invaluable work experience. The internships, which are with London-based organisations, take place during the summer period. To apply, students must submit a completed application form and a copy of their updated CV to the Business Experience Team; the team then shortlist from the applications and conduct group meetings with the applicants.

Ultimately it is up to our internship employers to decide whether they would like to interview the candidate(s) and offer him/her an internship. We have received very positive feedback from both postgraduate students and employers and expect that the internship programme will continue to remain popular amongst our students.

Associated careers

The course will particularly suit those seeking to work within NGOs and the international development community (including the World Bank, IMF, central and development banks, and government economic planning directorates), as self-employed development specialists or consultants, or as trade attaché in foreign diplomatic offices.

Should you wish to complete the PRINCE2 project management qualification, this will also enable you to work with multinational corporations where, alongside good technical skills, an awareness of global development issues and challenges and the ability to think critically about the world are valued.

Graduates from the programme have worked as specialists advisers with top NGOs across the globe and as advisers with trade and economic departments in government offices. Others are currently working as development consultants, microfinance specialists and as advisors on United Nations-sponsored projects.

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The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. Read more
The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. It explores the evolution of development theories and how successful national development needs to be founded on the integration of sound socio-economic analysis with an enabling legal environment. The contents are multi-disciplinary, ranging from exploration of key topics in development economics, to the rule-of-law and the foundation pillars for the creation and effective operation of development institutions. In addition, the Programme imparts a full spectrum of competencies needed for project cycle management (PCM).

CURRICULUM OF THE MASTER:

PART I -DISTANT LEARNING

A self-learning tutor-assisted period of 12 weeks’ duration designed to introduce the participants to the pre-requisite entry level knowledge in the disciplines of Part II, namely economics, institutional design, sociology, law and project management. The training materials will include selected chapters from key textbooks in addition to a number of articles from well-known journals. The learning content will be posted on the programme’s website while the participants will be provided with at least one prescribed textbook. Two weeks subsequent to arrival in Turin the participants will sit for two written examination covering the topics of Part I.

PART II - FACE-TO-FACE LEARNING

Module I: Introduction to developmentactors and institutions
• Introduction to development aid, international donor institutions – UN system, IMF and World Bank
• Project cycle management: logical framework approach, operational planning, budget, monitoring and evaluation

Module II: Economics of Development

• Economic development theories
• The global economic crisis
• Strategies of economic development: selected countries
• The role of FDI in development
• Environmental economics
• Inequality and poverty
• Cost and benefi t of migration in sending and destination countries

Module III: Legal concepts in development

• Enabling legal frameworks for effective and sustainable development
• The role and function of key actors in development, inter alia, multilateral and bilateral development agencies and NGOs.
• Human Rights based approach to development programming
• Labour Standards with emphasis on gender and prevention of child labour

Module IV: Institutional development and social analysis

• Factors infl uencing “institutional effi ciency “
• Political regimes and instruments of participation
• Development, politics and culture: perspectives from political science
• Family, gender and participation (special reference to problems of health and education)
• NGOs management

This face-to-face part is the core learning component of the Master. The participants will be asked to sit for three written exams in order to assess their learning achievement in the subject matter of Part II.

PART III - INDEPENDENT WORK- thesis preparation

This part is dedicated to individual or group formulation of a full-fledged project document in response to a perceived “development need” in a sector and country related to the participants’ work or field of interest.

Deadline for Application: 26 September 2015



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The MSc International Development provides a multidisciplinary social science-based analysis and understanding of international development. Read more

Overview

The MSc International Development provides a multidisciplinary social science-based analysis and understanding of international development.

Students undertaking this programme will:

- Conduct a comprehensive review of current issues in international development policy and practice.
- Study a critical in-depth analysis of specific aspects of international development relating to specific areas of interest.

We also encourage diversity of intake in terms of experience, qualifications and interests to stimulate the mutual experience and learning.

This programme has a limited intake of students per year, fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

The excellence of the research undertaken within the Department of Social & Policy Sciences has been recognised by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/msc-inte-deve/

Core Units

- Foundations of international development
- Economics for international development
- Sociology & social anthropology of development
- Policy and politics of developing countries
- Critical skills for international development and policy research
- Academic research skills and dissertation preparation

Optional units

- Critical issues in social development
- Globalisation & economic insecurity: social policy challenges
- Globalisation 2: political economy of globalisation
- Management of development
- World politics: conflict, security & development
- Sustainable development: natural resources and sustainability
- Wellbeing & human development 2: ethics and public policy
- Wellbeing assessment in public policy and development practice

Students can also study one regional research specialism from South Asia, Africa and Latin Americaas part of an international development extended essay

View Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/sp/sp-proglist-pg.html#DB) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the unit assessments, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of coursework essays, class exercises, projects and oral presentations.

We also place strong emphasis on developing presentation and discussion/communication skills, which in many units is part of the assessed work.

Careers

The Social & Policy Sciences department is committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their training.

Our graduates generally go on to work in a wide variety of organisations, such as:

- Social research in universities and research institutes, government, business, voluntary organisations and international organisations.
- Public policy analysis at local, national and international levels.
- Public information and campaigning within organisations concerned with wellbeing, sustainability and social justice.

About the department

The Department of Social & Policy Sciences (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/) includes academics from social policy, sociology, social work and international development.

The international excellence of our research (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/) was recognised by the award of the prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2011.

We are committed to advancing learning and knowledge through teaching and research. Our Department collaborates with a wide range of users at the local, national, European and global levels.

Postgraduate programmes:
We offer a wide range of postgraduate programmes. Our postgraduate teaching strongly reflects our research and our links to policy-makers and development institutions at the national, European and global level.

Our Department also has an active MPhil/PhD research programme. We take great pride in fostering a friendly and supportive learning environment.

Seminar series:
We run a lively and well attended postgraduate research seminar series. Each of the Research Centres run seminar series and conferences associated with their research activities. The University of Bath also has a Research in the World public lecture series where key national and international academics are invited to speak.

Main areas of research

We are an internationally-recognised research-intensive department with a strong focus on policy and practice and a commitment to contribute to social wellbeing and social justice.

We draw together academic staff with backgrounds in Social Policy, Sociology, Social Work and International Development and work closely with colleagues in Psychology, Economics, and Health.

We also have an active and vibrant community of research students (http://www.bath.ac.uk/sps/research/research-students/) undertaking their own research alongside our academic staff.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Read more
This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Students acquire the tools necessary to respond to a diverse range of problems including productive capacity, intersectoral integration, economic and social diversification, and self-sufficiency.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to analyse the development process and to formulate appropriate policies for meeting development goals. The field trip, conducted in a developing country, provides the opportunity to study the problems encountered in development, and the cultural, administrative and institutional context in which decisions are made.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (90 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and dissertation (60). A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (90 credits), optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules - four core modules
-Contemporary Approaches to Development Management
-Development in Practice
-Critical Ideas of Development Conceptions and Realities
-Society and Market: Private Agency for Development

Recommended optional modules include:
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-Cost Benefit Analysis: Theory and Practice
-Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case Studies and Alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Food and the City
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-Housing as urbanism: housing policy and the search for scale
-Housing policies: practical dimensions and alternative options
-Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Land, Food and Agriculture
-Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
-Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
-Social Policy and Citizenship
-The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
-Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
-Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
-Urbanisation and Development
-Or any other open MSc module in The Bartlett School of Planning.

Please note: not all optional modules listed above may be available.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word paper on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic is chosen by the student in dialogue with the Programme Director.

Teaching and learning
The programme consists of reading, essay writing and individual and group project work, in the context of lectures, seminars, workshops, case study analysis, and a field trip abroad. In recent years field trip destinations have included Uganda and Ethiopia. Student performance is assessed through coursework, unseen examinations and a final dissertation report.

Fieldwork
The overseas fieldwork trip is a practical research-based residential that helps draw the various elements of the degree together.
The DPU will cover the following costs of the field trip: return flights, visas, travel insurance, accommodation and fees, and costs of local experts and inputs. However, food, local travel and incidental expenses of a personal nature will not be covered by the DPU.

Careers

Graduates are engaged in a diversity of professional activities including local, regional and national government, consultancy firms, national and international NGOs, United Nations programmes and international aid agencies. A small proportion of graduates pursue advanced research degrees while several work as academics in leading universities or as independent consultants.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Project Manager, London Borough of Camden
-Administration Officer, Pakistani Government
-Coordinator, Department of Development Administration and Planning
-Campaigning Researcher, Gaia Foundation
-Consultant, United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

Employability
The central objective of this programme is to equip participants with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise necessary to make a positive contribution to the development effort in countries with which they are engaged.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Development Planning Unit (DPU) at UCL is an international centre concerned with promoting sustainable forms of development, understanding rapid urbanisation and encouraging innovation in the policy, planning and management of cities and regions, especially in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Its programmes are supported by international agencies and by national and provincial governments.

This MSc examines and analyses the theory and practice of development administration at international, national and regional levels to provide participants with an understanding of the processes generating social change and with the skills and abilities to respond.

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This programme is run by the Centre for Environmental Strategy (CES) – a leading centre for environmental and sustainability-related research and postgraduate teaching. Read more
This programme is run by the Centre for Environmental Strategy (CES) – a leading centre for environmental and sustainability-related research and postgraduate teaching.

CES accommodates a wide range of disciplines dedicated to resolving environmental problems, and this Masters programme prepares a new generation of environment and sustainability professionals for the challenges and opportunities ahead.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme equips you with the tools essential for analysis of the relationship between environmental issues and human society, in order to make informed decisions. As part of this approach, you will evaluate political, socio-economic, ethical, cultural and regulatory frameworks.

You will acquire a sensitive appreciation of issues surrounding sustainable development and an understanding of the theory and application of sustainable development.

This programme provides a route to graduate membership of the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Life Cycle Thinking and the Circular Economy
-Ecological Economics
-Environmental Science & Society
-Foundations of Sustainable Development
-Corporate, Social and Environmental Responsibility
-Energy Policies and Economic Dimensions
-Energy-Consumer Goods in the Home
-The Energy Market from the Purchaser’s Perspective
-Corporate Energy Management
-Environmental Law
-Industrial Placement
-Integrated Assessment
-Environmental Auditing and Management Systems
-Sustainable Development Applications
-Transitions to a Low Carbon Economy
-Psychology of Sustainable Development
-Energy in industry and the built environment
-Risk Management
-Emissions Trading
-Life Cycle Assessment
-Renewable Energy and Sustainability
-Transport Energy and Emissions
-Dissertation

INDUSTRIAL PLACEMENT

Full-time students are able to undertake an industrial placement module which enables them to spend six to twelve weeks working for a company or NGO, doing the type of work they will aim to find on graduation.

Examples of organisations at which recent industrial placements have taken place include:
-Minimise Solutions
-Portsmouth City Council
-GAP
-Diocese of London
-The Radisson
-LC Energy
-AECOM
-Solar Aid
-NUS

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates go on to a diverse range of careers implementing sustainable development and dealing with the real environmental challenges facing humanity.

Recent examples include working as an energy efficiency officer for a local government, an environmental officer in multi-national chemical company, a sustainability advisor for a national television / radio station, an environmental consultant for an engineering consultancy, and a programme officer with a sustainability charity.

Other graduates use the research skills they developed to go on and do PhDs.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-To provide participants with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to understand the concept of Sustainable Development, and make judgements about Sustainable Development policies and their implementation
-To equip participants to evaluate existing political, socio-economic, ethical, cultural and regulatory frameworks to inform decisions regarding Sustainable Development
-To encourage participants to develop a sensitive appreciation of the significance of the contextual settings of sustainable development, especially as they relate to developing countries
-To develop and enhance participants' research and data handling skills

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-The concept of sustainable development, and awareness of current debates
-Ecological principles and processes and how they are affected by human activities
-How to integrate sustainable development into the day-to-day management and functioning of organisations, and on-going performance monitoring
-Accessing and using environmental data

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-Absorb complex information and communicate them effectively through logically constructed arguments
-Critical reading and analysis of sustainable development principles
-Learn the value of teamwork to solve problems that require multi-disciplinary engagement
-Independent learning and study through self-directed assignments and dissertation
-Inductive reasoning: using specific examples/observations and forming a more general principal
-Deductive reasoning: use stated general premise to reason about specific examples

Professional practical skills
-Evaluate technical, social, environmental, economic and political aspects of sustainable development
-Adapt economic and social assessment tools to support decision-making
-Incorporate ethical dimensions to project design and implementation
-Give coherent presentations
-Lead discussions on complex subject areas
-Competently handle environment information
-Self-motivation, self-regulation and self-assurance

Key/transferable skills
-Independent learning capacity
-Deliver a structured and successful presentation
-Team work (group)
-The use of analytical approaches appropriately in different decision-making situations
-Write effectively as a means of communicating important ideas
-Communication of findings and presentation of research to a non-specialist audience
-Lead discussion of small/large groups
-Organise and manage a research project
-Basic to advanced IT skills

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This programme is aimed at students interested in making a change to society, environment and economy with a background in politics, sociology, environmental sciences, biology, mathematics or economics. Read more

MSc in Sustainable Development

This programme is aimed at students interested in making a change to society, environment and economy with a background in politics, sociology, environmental sciences, biology, mathematics or economics.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

The University is working with a range of key stakeholders to promote sustainable development across the higher education sector. As an active member of the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) the University shares learning across the higher education and further education sector.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

Sustainable development is now widely regarded as the most promising framework within which these challenges can be addressed, moving humanity towards the creation of a more just and environmentally sustainable ‘global village’.

There is no single description of what sustainable development means, but one commonly used definition can be found in the 1987 Brundtland Report: “Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Help others directly through development or aid work.

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. Read more
This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. You will gain the skills required to manage sustainable tourism businesses, alongside the specialisms of strategic destination management and marketing. You will explore tourism’s relationship with the socio-economic and political contexts within international development, tourism disasters affecting tourist destinations, and the role of tourism in the development of countries that have experienced conflict. An emphasis upon the micro-economic contribution of enterprise projects to support development and sustainability also features within the curriculum; delivered through the Ashoka Changemaker philosophy.

Upon completion of the programme, you may wish to progress your studies through a doctoral qualification.

Course content

The programme encourages you to analyse and evaluate the relationship between sustainable development principles and the management of destinations to achieve long-term viability of resources; and the role of event tourism in destination development as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. In addition, the programme provides insight into the political economies surrounding development and the contribution that tourism makes to a destination’s risk mitigation, social renewal and recovery after disasters and post conflict scenarios.

Drawing on a variety of case studies and projects, the programme explores the global scope of tourism, the policies and strategies associated with successful management, the role the industry plays in international development, and the stakeholders involved in its development. The programme will also prepare students for the practical, project based, and customer focused characteristics of the tourism industry.

Semester 1

From the beginning of the programme, you will be introduced to some of the main themes in destination and tourism management, to enable you to analyse the strategic and dynamic nature of international tourist destinations and issues facing managers of such destinations. Modules in semester one will highlight the need to ensure long-term viability of destination resources through themes such as sustainable development and political economies of international development.

Semester 2

You will examine the vulnerability of destinations and the strategies and approaches needed by managers to develop and recover, particularly post-conflict. The strategic use of events in both the public and private sectors will be examined, particularly their use as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. There is a strong emphasis on developing personal adaptability in cross cultural (work) environments as Master graduates can be expected to, and will have the expectation to – lead and manage other people internationally. You will also begin to prepare for the completion of a dissertation through a series of taught research methods sessions, during which a research proposal is produced.

Semester 3

The research proposal produced in Semester two will guide the development of a clearly defined and evidenced study purpose, a critical review of the extant literature, and a robust methodology. Data is then collected, analysed, interpreted and applied to the study purpose, and a 15-20,000 word research report (dissertation) is produced, with the support of a dissertation supervisor.

For further information on course content and modules please refer to the award map: http://oldweb.northampton.ac.uk/caf/pgmsaward/international-tourism-development-ma

Course modules (16/17)

-Political Economies of International Development
-International Sustainable Tourism
-Strategic Destination Management
-Risk, Crisis and Post-conflict Management in Tourism
-Strategic Events Management
-Managing Across Cultures
-Dissertation​ and Research Methods

Opportunities Abroad

In previous years students have participated in an optional study trip to an international destination. The cost of this optional trip would not normally exceed £500 for flights and accommodation. Students normally allow an additional £100 for their expenses.

The programme team also aims to provide a regional or national study trip annually to a tourism attraction or exhibition. In some cases students are required to contribute to the cost of entry; this would normally not exceed £50.00.

Methods of Learning

Typically you will have nine hours (approximately) of contact time with your tutor in the first semester and eleven hours (approximately) in the second. Overall you will spend 108 hours per module in self-directed study (reading and research).

Assessments

A variety of individual and group based assessments are used including reports, presentations, posters, e-portfolios, projects, client briefs, multiple choice tests and examinations.

Facilities and Special Features

Ashoka U is the global association of the world’s leading universities supporting social entrepreneurs; those working together to create solutions for the world’s most urgent social problems. The programme emphasises this philosophy, through Ashoka Changemaker projects.

Careers

The programme will interest students wishing to pursue a specialist career in destination management, sustainable tourism management or international development, with an emphasis on employment within development organisations, NGOs, aid organisations, post conflict and disaster charities, as well as public and private sector tourism organisations.

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This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making. Read more
This course looks at international development through a communications lens and the role media play in development and policy making.

Who is it for?

This course is for students looking for an opportunity to explore the impact of media and communications on international policy and within sociological context.

The course will appeal to students with a general interest in communication studies and cross-disciplinary interests in development studies, sociology and politics.

Objectives

Communication is integral to development programmes. At a time when ideas about freedom of expression, democracy, human rights and access to natural and material resources guide development projects across the world, the question about the role of media and communications for social change becomes ever more pertinent.

Development is taken as a contested concept that translates into courses for advocating democratic forms of participation, policy initiatives and training activities in media and communications sectors in different geographical regions.

The International Communications and Development MA provides you with an interdisciplinary framework for understanding and critically assessing the role of communications for and in development projects.

It also gives you a broad interdisciplinary overview of developments in broadcasting, telecommunications, the press and information technology drawing on economics, political science, international relations, development theory, sociology and law.

On the course you will develop an ability to participate in policy making and evaluation in the context of changing national and global economic and political relations.

The Department of Sociology at City offers you an extensive range of module options. This enables you to specialise in your particular areas of interest, developing your critical skills and advancing your knowledge, culminating with you undertaking an extended piece of original research.

Teaching and learning

The educational aims are achieved through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes supported by a personal tutorial system. You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen their knowledge of the subject. In the course of self-directed hours you are expected to read from the set module bibliography, prepare your class participation, collect and organize source material for your coursework, to plan and write your coursework.

The Department also runs a personal tutorial system which provides support for teaching and learning and any problems can be identified and dealt with early.

During the second term the Department offers a Dissertation Workshop to guide you on your dissertation outline.

Modules

The course focuses on the relationship between communication, development and democracy. Over the course of the year you will develop your knowledge of media and communication studies within the context of globalisation, Political communication and the work of international organisations and nongovernmental organisations in development communication.

Your will also cover more specific areas such as media representation (national and trans-national) and audiences and the communications policies that affect them.

You will take three 30-credit core modules and either two 15-credit modules or one 30-credit module elective modules.

Core modules
-Democratisation and Networked Communication SGM311 (30 credits)
-Research Workshop SGM302 (30 dredits)
-Communication, Culture and Development SGM312 (30 credits)

You must also complete a 60 credit dissertation in order to be awarded the Master's qualification. You are normally required to pass all taught modules before progressing to the dissertation.

Elective modules
-Developments in Communication Policy SGM309 (15 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication SGM308 (15 credits)
-Celebrity SGM314 (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics IPM104 (15 credits)
-Religion in Global Politics (IPM119) (15 credits)
-Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics IPM118 (30 credits)
-Global Political Economy - Contemporary Approaches IPM116 (30 credits)
-Evaluation Politics and Advocacy AMM420 (15 credits)
-Analysing Crime SGM301 (30 credits)
-Criminal Justice Policy and Practice (SGM303) (30 credits)
-Victims: Policy and Politics SGM305 (15 credits)
-Criminal Minds SGM304 (15 credits)

NB. Elective modules choices are subject to availability.

Career prospects

Graduates have entered a wide variety of careers in the civil service, broadcasting, press and telecoms networks, NGOs, the development sector and consultancies, advertising, marketing, politics, journalism, PR, media management and regulatory agencies. Recent graduate positions include; Fundraising and Communications Officer at Alone in London, Communications Specialist at Government Division of Health and Social Services and Civil Servant at Seoul Metropolitan Government.

Jessica Perrin who recently graduated with an MA in International Communications and Development is now Head of NGOs at Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Students have access to the expert services of our Careers, Student Development and Outreach Office. They regularly receive information about internship and job opportunities and are invited to participate in media fairs and panel discussions with alumni.

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- Compulsory modules. Read more

MSc in Sustainable Development Energy

- Compulsory modules
Interrogating Sustainable Development – This module will introduce you to, or develop your knowledge across, areas such as the history and genesis of sustainable development, an understanding of earth systems science, the social and economic systems that shape humanity and impact on the environment, and an understanding of how these systems interact.

Quantitative Research Methods in Social Sciences – This module will introduce you to various quantitative and statistical approaches used to analyse social processes and phenomena and how to apply these in sustainable development.

Master Class in Sustainable Development – This module will enable an in-depth study of a number of areas. These areas will be investigated via group work with the research being initiated by invited lecturers from the appropriate areas.

Qualitative Research Methods in Social Sciences – This module will provide you with the necessary skills of dealing with qualitative data from interviews, participant observations, questionnaires and other sources.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development have been growing very rapidly. The original MSc programme started with nine students in the 2009-2010 academic year and currently 30 students are registered. On this programme you attend an average number of 24 lectures lasting for three hours each in Semester 1 and an additional 15 lectures in Semester 2. There are also a number of tutorials, seminar presentations, student-led workshops, as well as field trips and away days. There is also a dissertation conference where you can present your research findings before you submit your dissertation.

The double MSc in Sustainable Energy takes place in both St Andrews and Moscow. The first year involves taking similar modules in the one-year programme at St Andrews with a more specific focus on energy issues. The second year challenges students to complete study abroad on a wide range of energy modules.

Sustainable Development students are extremely well catered for in several aspects. Firstly, you have the use of a dedicated postgraduate space in the Observatory. There are ports for physical laptop internet access. The room is also served by high speed WiFi connections. You have access to the room on a 24/7 basis. It offers a location for group or individual work, classes, events, receptions and even relaxation. The building is primarily for the use of Sustainable Development postgraduate students. Secondly, you have a close relationship with staff on the course. Class sizes are limited to provide a one-to-one service for students. This is a unique aspect of undertaking Sustainable Development research and teaching at St Andrews. Thirdly, the interdisciplinary nature of Sustainable Development allows you to interact with a wide range of students in other disciplines. This allows for the creation of an extended group of student and staff contacts. Fourthly, Sustainable Development students have the benefit of a number of targeted field trips, including the Glen Tanar estate trip, pictured opposite, where students reflect on issues from ecology to landownership.

Why does sustainable development matter?

Humanity faces enormous environmental and developmental challenges in the twenty-first century. The United Nations has identified five global issues of particular concern: the provision of clean water and adequate sanitation, energy generation and supply, human health, food production and distribution, and the continuing threat to biodiversity.

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunity, as people are working together across the globe to address the serious challenges facing humankind. We must learn to live within environmental limits and embrace sustainability as the key concept that will allow us to develop in the twenty-first century and beyond.

Our postgraduate programmes in Sustainable Development, co-ordinated by the School of Geography & Geosciences, will enable you to develop the knowledge and understanding you need, not only to understand all these issues from multiple perspectives but also to utilise the knowledge you gain to tackle them and realise the opportunities they create.

Transition University of St Andrews

Transition University of St Andrews was launched in 2009 and is part of the UK-based Transition initiative, which has been expanding worldwide over the last five years. Transition operates within community groups on a grassroots level, founded and operated by the communities themselves, in response to the threats of climate change and peak oil. Through working on practical projects with different community groups, the initiative helps communities minimise their impact on the planet, become more self-sustaining, and strengthens community ties. It also benefits individuals by developing their skills and encouraging re-consideration of
the aspects of life that truly promote happiness and wellbeing. A number of MSc students in Sustainable Development have participated in Transition’s activities which complement a number of themes pursued in our programmes.

Careers

Your question should not be “What can I do with a degree in Sustainable Development?” but instead “Can you imagine a future where it could not be useful?” Sustainability impacts upon almost all aspects of life, so your future career could take you in one of many different directions. For example, you could:
• Work in industry addressing sustainability aspects of business management, engineering, planning, transport, project management, construction, waste, energy or environmental management.

• Make yourself heard as a sustainability researcher or policy adviser in local, regional or national government, NGOs and campaigning groups.

• Act as an adviser to supra-national bodies such as the United Nations, World Bank, European Union, and the OECD.

• Become a sustainability adviser and assessor working directly in private sector organisations, industry or as a consultant (in both mainstream and specialist businesses).

• Help others directly through development or aid work.

• Spread the word by outreach and education in sustainable living via public or third sector organisations (e.g. Councils or NGOs).

• Stay at university for a PhD, perhaps eventually going on to a teaching or research career.

• Recent graduates now work at: UNDP; the World Bank; Christian Aid in Africa; LCI consultancy; and at a global bank in Dubai.

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Rural Economics and Management. Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. Read more
Rural Economics and Management : Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countriesIn the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds.

The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses.

The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS). The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen:

Rural Economics and Management

Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countries are studied in depth.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning Outcomes

-Understand different socio-economic concepts, theories and multi-disciplinary approaches with respect to rural economies and rural development.
-Have profound insights in different rural development realities, and compare rural development issues, approaches and policies within an international context..
-Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterise and analyse the economic and social problems of rural areas, food and agricultural chains, natural resource management, national and international agriculture.
-Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve problems related to agriculture, food chain and natural resource- management, and to rural development and countryside stewardship.
-Design, implement and monitor national and international agro-food policies, rural institutions and rural development programmes.
-Construct innovative tools and instruments for the (multifunctional) development of rural areas.
-Design and assess research in the domain of rural development, formulating a problem statement and operationalizing objectives and research questions within an adequate research plan.
-Select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect and analyse data from literature and empirical research in the domain of rural development.
-Critically reflect on topical rural development issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.
-Work in an integrated internationally composed team dealing with rural development and food production challenges, interacting respectfully with diverse others and developing a global perspective.
-Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders of the socio-professional world (food sector, NGOs, rural organisations, rural administration, universities and research institutes).
-Communicate convincingly (written, oral, using appropriate tools) about (own) research findings and project results and their underpinning rationale.
-Effectively and appropriately use good language, communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.
-Design and plan own learning processes based on continuous reflection (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, and attitudes and functioning.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.
-Independently perform scientific research in the domain of rural development. Give proof of a clear international orientation.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted).
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development. A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). Read more
Change the neighbourhood, the world, or the organization with North America’s only MBA in Community Economic Development.

A desire for change is what steered you here to Cape Breton University, to the Shannon School of Business and our innovative MBA in Community Economic Development (CED). The only MBA program in the Americas with community at its core; one that delivers advanced business knowledge and skills to make a difference in the local and global community.

Our one-of-a kind MBA in CED is designed for a new generation of leaders; for learners who aspire to be instruments of change in the public and corporate sectors and in not-for-profit organizations. Our MBA in CED offers a leading edge curriculum that includes all business subjects found in traditional MBA programs, with an emphasis on economic development, leadership, governance, and management of change. Specializing options include electives in Strategic Leadership, Peace Building, Public Administration, First Nations, Sustainability or International Business.

About Our MBA

Flexible delivery: Our MBA in CED fits with your busy life. We offer flexible delivery formats including short, on campus residencies in July and weekend classes in Toronto, Kingston, Saskatoon, Edmonton, or Whitehorse. Full time students can complete the program at our Sydney campus over a 12-month period.

Accessible: Cape Breton University’s MBA in CED is flexible. It is open to those starting their careers and to experienced managers. Our program works well for those who have completed an undergrad program, (not just business) and for those who have extensive business and community experience, but without formal academic credentials. For those who already have a degree in business or commerce, credits may be applied for as many as four foundation courses.

Nationally Recognized Faculty: Faculty members have strong backgrounds in teaching, business and community economic development, in addition to holding high academic credentials. Our faculty are award-winning teachers and includes honorees of the prestigious Order of Canada.

Research Focus: CBU’s MBA program includes a core Research Methodology course and the completion of an applied research project. Preparing this research component enables our students to compete for the coveted $17.5K SSHRC Canada Graduate Studies scholarships or continue their studies in a PhD program. A number of our full-time students have been successful in winning scholarships while others are now enrolled in a PhD program.

Diversity: Our MBA in CED attracts a large number of women, aboriginals and non-business graduates from Canada and around the world.

At the core of this unique program is community. Cape Breton Island is rooted in community-based efforts that overcome obstacles, face difficulties with creativity and use innovation to solve age-old problems. The island heritage includes community economic development giants like Father Jimmy Tompkins, founder of the co-operative and credit union movement in English Canada and is home to growing community ventures like New Dawn Enterprises – the oldest community economic development corporation in Canada.

It is a heritage Cape Breton University is proud to continue.

Options

Strategic Leadership Option
Leadership techniques for advancing organizations and communities; challenges in making changes in an existing organization and understanding the dynamics with various leadership theories and styles.
-MBAC6219 Social Dynamics of Leadership
-MBAC6233 Contemporary Issues: Change Management and Governance

First Nations Option
Delves into community economic development issues facing Indigenous communities across the country. For Aboriginal and non-aboriginal learners.
-MBAC6209 Land Claims, Self-Government and CED
-MBAC6211 The Dynamics of Community Economic Development in First Nations

International Business Option
Advanced content and strategies needed to grow the global organization; builds on modules in the core International Business course.
-MBAC6228 International Marketing
-MBAC6226 International Finance

Peace-Building, Reconstruction and Good-Governance Option
These courses are designed to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the role of CED in dealing with local and national emergencies and the role of CED in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict restoration activities.
-MBAC6215 Emergency Management
-MBAC6217 Conflict Resolution and Community Reconstruction

Public Policy
-MBAC 6221 Public Policy
-MBAC 6223 Government, Business and Third Sector Relations

Sustainability
-MBAC 6227 Environment, Energy, and the Economy: strategies for sustainable futures
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing

Marketing (2 courses)
-MBAC 6206 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6228 International Marketing
-MBAC 6229 Sustainability Marketing
-MBAC 6231 Marketing Strategy

Tourism
-MBAC 6205 Cultural Tourism Marketing
-MBAC 6206 Tourism Management & Planning

What to Expect

As a career professional, you have developed an expertise in your field. You have a comprehensive understanding, study the trends and see opportunities that others with less experience, often miss.

An MBA in CED from the Shannon School of Business at Cape Breton University will highlight the interaction between community and business and expose you to development practices and advanced management concepts and skills in a whole new way.

Our graduates are prepared for senior leadership roles. Utilizing their previously acquired professional expertise blended with a new, broad, general management perspective, means decision-making skills are integrated across their entire organization. Courses demand critical analysis and include deliverables, such as marketing plans, business models and plans, development of community plans and organizational strategy.

Program depth-and-breadth characteristics:
-Program requires completion of 16 courses, including an individual research project, 48 credits in total
-Program curriculum focuses on the critical areas for performance of organizations: accounting, marketing, strategy, finance, organizational behavior, leadership, venture analysis
-Core curriculum includes subjects that provide insights in community economic development, such as comparative development, business and community development, economic geography
-Core program has an intense research component, typically found in social science graduate programs, requiring completion of a research methods course and an individual applied research project, accompanied by a mini-thesis of 70-90 pages.
-Curriculum allows for 2 elective courses that provide specialization in First Nations urban and rural economic development, peace-building and community reconstruction, strategic leadership or international business.
-Courses require application of theory and concepts into practical objectives such as marketing plans and business models.
-The classes are often a mixture of early career and mid-career managers. This provides for a unique experience of enriching exchanges of knowledge and ideas. In-class and after-class interaction among students and faculty creates an environment of critical reflection.

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This MA programme is dedicated to the study of sport as a tool for international development. It considers the ways in which sport can be used to tackle a range of social welfare issues, and how development has come about through sport policy worldwide. Read more
This MA programme is dedicated to the study of sport as a tool for international development. It considers the ways in which sport can be used to tackle a range of social welfare issues, and how development has come about through sport policy worldwide.

A particular focus of the course is on the evolving role of sport in the field of international development and this is brought to life by practical work with INGOs. It considers the conceptual and ideological dimensions of this rapidly expanding sector, and looks to evaluate those action-based interventions that aim to address inequalities and ameliorate conflict in seriously divided societies.

The course is led by Dr Thomas Carter, who is a leading authority in this area with his work on labour migration, human trafficking, and governance in sport. Dr Carter heads a group of internationally renowned staff with a variety of research interests, including Professor John Sugden who is internationally renowned for his work in the field of sport for development and peace.

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, the school was awarded the highest score of any social-scientific sports submission and the university's Football for Peace programme was identified as a national exemplar of research impact in sport. Students have the opportunity to be part of these continued efforts and investigations.

Areas of study

You'll study sport and international development using a critical social science perspective, drawing on sociology, history, geography, politics, anthropology, philosophy and cultural studies in practical, real-world situations. The course is designed to maximise your opportunities to gain professional experience whilst studying.

Core modules:

Evidence Building in International Development
Sport and International Development: Critical Perspectives
Professional-Based Learning
Contemporary Issues in Sport and International Development
Sport and International Development and Peace
Final Project

You will be expected to be working with an NGO or other development organisation as part of your course work for the Evidence Building and Professional-Based Learning modules. This can include working with our partners or an NGO of your choice.

You may also incorporate practical experience in to your Final Project and your option module choice.

Options:

Globalisation, Society and Culture
Events: Theory and Practice
Anthropology, Tourism and Development
Consultancy

Features

Additional qualifications:

During your studies you are able to undertake Football for Peace (F4P) training which leads to a Tier 1 Trainers' qualification. The qualification will enable you to become a volunteer coach on F4P international programmes.

These trips are self-funded and you will therefore be expected to raise funds to cover travel costs.

It may be possible to also study for other qualifications during your course.

Networking opportunities:

During your studies there will be opportunities to attend professional events and conferences and you will be encouraged to take advantage of these for networking.

It may also be possible to incorporate a period of studying abroad.

Careers and employability

This degree serves to position graduates in the growing field of sport and international development. It provides the requisite knowledge and skills for employment with international NGOs and other deliverers of sport and development projects. It also allows you to progress to an MPhil or a PhD.

Previous students have secured work as university lecturers, press officers, policy officers and sport development officers in the UK and overseas.

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The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. Read more
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies.

The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development.

This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.

Why choose this course?

This programme has an international reputation for excellence. It is based on the expertise developed at Oxford Brookes University in the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice. You will have the option of going on a field trip. Previous trips have been to Asia, Africa and Latin America. Many graduates go on to secure senior positions with international development or emergency organisations.

This course in detail

This Course requires 200 hours of student input, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars, or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to self-led study. For the postgraduate certificate it is compulsory to pass the core module, Critical Inquiry, Development and Emergencies: Theory and Policy, and pass other modules to achieve a total of 60 credits. For the postgraduate diploma you must pass 120 credits from the taught modules, including both compulsory modules. For the MA you must gain at least 180 credits, including the dissertation.

As courses are reviewed regularly the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.
-Critical Inquiry Development & Emergencies: Theory and Policy (compulsory 20 credits)
-Human Rights & Governance (optional 20 credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (optional 20 credits)
-The Refugee Experience: Forced migration, protection and humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Conflict, Violence and Humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Shelter after Disaster (optional 20 credits)
-Programming and Partnerships (optional 10 credits)
-Improving Humanitarian Action: Responding to crisis in 21st Century (optional 10 credits)
-Working with Conflict (optional 10 credits)
-Independent Study (optional 10 credits)
-Research Methods (optional 10 credits)
-Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning strategies are grounded in theory, case studies and field based experience. The programme concentrates on the development of intellectual knowledge and the cultivation of academic skills including synthesis, analysis, interpretation, understanding and judgement. The programme also focuses on the practitioner’s approach, with reference in particular to:
-The setting in which they work (poverty, conflict, power, vulnerability, capability, risk, urbanisation, environmental change and the history and dynamics of particular places, their people and their society).
-The set of approaches they adopt (community mobilisation, aid, human rights advocacy, governance, risk reduction, livelihoods, humanitarian protection, accompaniment and empowerment).
-Themselves (the personal motivations that drive and shape their own vocation, their particular personality, temperament, strengths, abilities and weaknesses).

The intention is that a deeper understanding of these factors will enable students to move beyond rigid professional boxes to become more self aware, knowledge based practitioners able to work flexibly around a variety of problems in different situations of poverty, armed conflict and disaster.

Careers and professional development

The course is an ideal platform for you to develop your career in, or move into, international development and emergency organisations. Many graduates are able to secure senior positions.

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