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Masters Degrees (Second Language Acquisition)

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The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. Read more
The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. The topics represented within the course draw from some of the related disciplines within Applied Linguistics such as Psycholinguistics, Education (Language Teaching/Learning), Linguistics, and Sociolinguistics. It can be taken either full–time (1 year) or part-time (2 years). The full time course consists of 8 taught modules (4 modules in each of the two years if students choose the part-time route) and 1 research dissertation.

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more
The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of language development research, and their technological applications.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in the language sciences, specialising in language development. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Mandatory modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
-Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
-Developmental Disorders of Language, Learning and Cognition
-Development of Speech Perception and Production
-Language Acquisition
-Introduction to Children's Language Development
-Semantic and Pragmatic Development

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:
-Neuroscience of Language
-Deafness - Cognition and language
-Speech Processing
-Conversation Analysis
-Second Language Speech Learning
-Phonetic Theory
-Foundations of Linguistics
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Stuttering

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of Language Science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on tho further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and in other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Speech and Language Therapist, Kanton Aaargau, Switzerland
-PhD Biomedical Science- Speech and Hearing, Harvard University
-Speech and Language Therapist, West London Mental Health NHS Trust
-Speech and Language Therapist, Whitting Health Foundation Trust
-PGCE Early Years Teaching, Canterbury Christ Church University

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.
Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

Introduction to Language and Linguistics; English Grammar and Discourse; Language Teaching Methodology; Second Language Acquisition; Research Methods; Dissertation (MA only).

Examples of optional modules

Corpus Linguistics; Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition; Discourse and Genre Analysis; English for Specific Purposes; Intercultural Communication; Researching Writing in TESOL; Teaching Practice; Theory and Practice of Language Teaching; World Englishes.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar) and Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops.

And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer.

If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.

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The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS is the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa. It is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in the theory of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions.

It provides a unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

For the Japanese pathway please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students are generally required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses (which may include one language course), and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 300kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/file93574.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:

- Advanced knowledge and understanding of selected approaches, methods and theories in the study of religions, with particular reference to the religious traditions of Asia and Africa.

- Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in religious studies, also as a platform for further research at doctoral level.

- Advanced skills in presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religious studies.

- Specialisation in one area from among those covered by the units listed in the programme structure.

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other relevant traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, such as manuscript transcription, textual bibliography, the editing of texts; familiarity with the study of religions as an academic field of study and its varieties.

- Aspects of literature in the Study of Religions, philosophy, learning, iconography and history, the impact of religion on society.

- Acquisition of language skills.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Those students who take a language option should be able to assess primary sources in foreign languages and critically evaluate interpretations proposed by different scholars.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of religions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing.

- IT-based information retrieval and processing.

- Presentational skills.

- Examination techniques.

- Independent study skills and research techniques.

- Reflexive learning.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.

- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).

- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.

- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.

- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.

- Make judgements involving complex factors.

- Develop self-reflexivity.

- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.

- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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A high standard of oral proficiency, grammatical accuracy and a sound knowledge of the countries are looked for at interview. Your second language should ideally be at least at or near A-level. Read more
A high standard of oral proficiency, grammatical accuracy and a sound knowledge of the countries are looked for at interview. Your second language should ideally be at least at or near A-level. A lower level may be acceptable, so long as you work at raising your competence before entry and during the course; please enquire. If you do not have a second language to offer you may still be considered.

A Disclosure and Barring Service Check and DfE Fitness to Teach test are also required.

The Faculty of Education has a national reputation for high quality initial teacher training which was rated 'outstanding' by Ofsted in their last inspection. We work with over 1,500 schools, colleges and educational organisations and offer a wide range of of secondary specialisms.

MFL is a national shortage subject and government priority with training bursaries available and this course has an excellent reputation. There is a growing need for high calibre language teachers and as such our trainees are very employable. Where appropriate, sessions are conducted in the relevant target language.

Trainees take a course of supporting study, including English as an additional language (EAL) and special educational needs (SEN). We also provide subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses to support graduates who would benefit from intensive MFL tuition before joining a PGCE MFL initial teacher training programme.

This course will be based at our £139 million new academic building at Birley Fields, All Saints campus, Manchester.

In addition to your main language, you will take one of the other two languages as your second language. You will be prepared to teach your main language throughout the 11-18 age range. In your second language, you will be prepared to teach up to either key stage 3 or key stage 4/GCSE, according to qualifications and linguistic competence. Where possible, we take into consideration other languages you may have.

This course enables you to acquire and develop language teaching skills. You will become aware of the needs of pupils of different abilities and of the goals and methods appropriate to them. You will be prepared for a wide variety of teaching situations by observing good practice in schools, by the use of DVDs, through discussions, peer teaching and practical workshops and through intensive practical teaching to a range of abilities. Feedback from experienced teachers and tutors facilitates your professional development.

Classroom management skills are given high priority both at the University and during school placements. Equally, an emphasis is placed upon careful planning, and you will develop the skills of linguistic analysis and sequencing.

You will learn how to teach both the spoken and written language, how to approach teaching grammar and how to plan for using the target language in the classroom. The course aims to develop a thoughtful and critical approach to the relationship between teaching strategies and the pupils' language learning in the classroom. You will learn how to assess and evaluate pupils' learning and how to use this in future planning. Other issues that form part of the course include language acquisition, cultural background, global citizenship and equal opportunities.

In addition to preparation for Key Stages 3-5, we also include provision for Key Stage 2 and you will compile a Primary Languages Portfolio. Methodology sessions in the university are conducted in your main foreign language where appropriate foreign language tutors and assistants will help you develop or maintain your language skills in your second foreign language.

We aim to develop analytical, successful and enthusiastic beginning teachers who are fully aware of the excitement and challenges which lie ahead and who can work effectively in a variety of educational settings.

Trainees will engage with current educational issues and recent and relevant research in order to further develop their understanding and to generate challenging and lively debate. There will be a focus on:

Promoting an inclusive learning and teaching environment:
Working in multi-professional teams
Creating a climate for learning in the classroom
Learning and teaching strategies
Managing students' behaviour
Planning and evaluating students' learning
Developing knowledge and understanding of teachers' professional responsibilities

Trainees will be prepared to teach in a range of different schools, varied in social context, size, philosophy and intake. Posts now also offer scope for Modern Foreign Language teaching in primary schools, to support the 2010 introduction of languages for all primary school children. Many graduates also take up mentoring of new trainee teachers.

There are also opportunities for further study. The PGCE MFL course includes 60 Masters Level CAT ponts which can be credited to our MA Language Education for teachers wishing to develop expertise teaching bilingual learners, English as first language and MFL. We also offer MAs in Education, Educational Leadership and Management and opportunities to study to PhD level at the Education and Social Research Institute, ranked in the UK top 10.

School placements are central to the course and 24 of the 36 weeks will be spent in school. As an intending teacher, you will begin by developing professional awareness, understanding and skills common to learning and teaching in a variety of settings. You will begin to understand the inter-relationship between the school and its community. Your placements will be in at least two different schools or colleges and will range from inner city to rural settings, mixed and single gender schools, City Academies, Comprehensives and Selective Schools, 11-16, 11-18, sixth form and further education colleges.

Special Features

. Programme rated Ofsted 'outstanding'
. European Award for Languages 2010: Teacher Training Toolkit for COLT (Community and Lesser Taught Language Project)
. National reputation in secondary teacher education
. Practice placements available in a diverse range of schools and colleges
. SKE courses available where required (on confirmation of PGCE place)
. Community languages considered
. Course includes 60 Masters Level CAT points which can be credited to our MA Language Education for teachers wishing to develop expertise teaching bilingual learners, English as a first language and MFL
. Access to NQT alumni support in your first year of teaching

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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

The aims of the programme are:

- To analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning

- To provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lang

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643756

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. Read more
This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. It also analyses research in applied linguistics, particularly research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment, such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research.

The programme also explores the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment, with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese, and evaluates the role and future of information technology within a resource-based language-learning framework.

The aims of the programme are:

- To explore linguistics issues in the Japanese language

- To analyse the research in applied linguistics, in particular the research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology within source-based language learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom teaching) methods of language learning.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lljap

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Japanese Teaching Methodology (15 credits)
Japanese Language & Analysis (15 credits)
Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:

- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students will be assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates may consider a role as a language teacher in schools, colleges or universities.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643759

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Combining recent developments in drama education, second language acquisition and ELT methodology, this course offers an innovative approach to teaching drama as a key way of promoting learning and language acquisition in more creative and personalised ways. Read more
Combining recent developments in drama education, second language acquisition and ELT methodology, this course offers an innovative approach to teaching drama as a key way of promoting learning and language acquisition in more creative and personalised ways. It is taught in conjunction with the Centre for Applied Linguistics, which has a particular expertise in ELT.

Balancing the study and practice of drama and ELT as both academic and practical subjects, it is suitable for experienced teachers interested in combining both disciplines (Drama and English Language Teaching) at Master’s level, or for teachers of English as a Foreign Language. You’ll examine how drama can motivate your students, improve their speaking confidence, and enable them to use language in cultural contexts, as well as improving your teacher-student relationships.

Core modules develop and extend your understanding of key approaches to Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and English Language Learning (ELT), and provide a solid grounding in drama techniques and approaches. You’ll also complete a dissertation based on an individual research project, with support from a member of academic staff.

Course structure

Students will split the taught aspects of the course between the Centre for Education Studies and the Centre for Applied Linguistics.

Core modules

-The Role of Story in Drama & Theatre Education
-Drama and Literacy
-ELT Methodology for pre-experience students
OR
-Issues and Research in ELT for post-experience students
-Second Language Acquisition and Classroom Language Learning
-Literature and Drama in ELT
-Research Methodology for ELT
-Dissertation

Optional modules

Students taking ELT Methodology will also take one of the following optional modules:
-Language Testing
-ICT in ELT
-English for Young Learners or Teacher Education and Development
-Teaching Language and Culture or Management and Leaderships of ELT Institutions

Course delivery and learning styles

The course is delivered through a range of teaching and learning methods: lectures, seminars, practical workshops which involve group work and self-study.

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If you are involved in any aspect of defence acquisition, then this course is relevant to you. Read more

Course Description

If you are involved in any aspect of defence acquisition, then this course is relevant to you. Whether you are involved in establishing or managing capability requirements; engaged in procurement, commercial or contracting activities; or developing and implementing support solutions, this course will provide the underpinning knowledge and develop the critical thinking skills required for effective management of defence acquisition. This course offers three pathways - General Acquisition, Through Life Support and Commercial. The MSc programme also provides recognition by a number of professional bodies including the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (CIPS), as this is a CIPS-accredited course, accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT), and, eligibility for a Chartered Management Institute Diploma.

Overview

To be successful in the defence acquisition community requires a clear understanding of the fundamental issues that impact on the establishment of sound commercial relationships; the development of integrated acquisition solutions and the delivery of operational excellence. We aim to develop the ‘T’ shaped individual, with a broad appreciation of strategic issues, and a greater understanding of defence acquisition. The course provides and develops the skills to critically analyse management theories (acquisition), which can be applied to modern, increasingly commercialised, national and international defence acquisition management, in order to enhance the quality of decision making. The range of backgrounds of both staff and students is diverse and includes national and international commercial organisations, the not for profit sector, civil service and the armed forces. Cohort size is 45.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

Students whose native language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7.

Course overview

The course is made up of 12 modules of which 11 are compulsory and 1 is elective. The course is split into three components. The first component consists of 8 compulsory modules including Financing Acquisition and Sourcing Strategies in the Industrial Interface. The second component consists of your chosen pathway (General Acquisition, Through Life support or Commercial), 3 compulsory modules and 1 elective module. The third component consists of a 20,000 word research-based thesis.

Modules

Core:
- Introductory Studies
- Strategic Management and Introduction to Acquisition
- Financing Acquisition
- Project & Programme Management
- Sourcing Strategies and the Industrial Interface
- Managing Acquisition Change
- Knowledge in Defence
- Leading Acquisition Change
- Supply Network Management in Defence and the Commercial Environment
- Supply Network Analysis and Modelling
- Cost Estimation and Planning
- Advanced Negotiation
- Commercial Relationships in the Defence Environment
- Sustainability in Defence
- Availability, Maintainability, Reliability & Supportability
- Efficient and Effective Through Life Support
- Defence Capability Management

Elective:
- The International Dimensions of Defence Acquisition
- Capability, Requirements and Systems
- Personal and Organisational Development

Individual Project

The individual research project begins with a one week compulsory module on Research Methodology and the subsequent production of a 20,000 word research-based thesis.

Assessment

A mixture of examinations, assignments, case study analyses and individual reports.

Career opportunities

Takes you on to career development in the equipment capability area, a Defence Equipment and Support organisation (or other relevant areas such as Defence Estates), defence manufacturers, commercial organisations or Government departments. It also provides a relevant lead-in towards PhD studies focused upon acquisition.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Defence-Acquisition-Management

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This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language. Read more
This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language. These awards have contributed substantially to the professionalising of Arabic teaching in the UK and elsewhere and to the recognition of the expertise of teachers of Arabic as a Foreign or Second Language.

The Certificate in Teaching Arabic is designed:

- to meet the rapidly growing demand in the UK and elsewhere for trained and qualified teachers of Arabic as a foreign language.

- to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills which will enable them to teach Arabic to a broad spectrum of Arabic learners in UK, European and worldwide educational contexts.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Arabic is designed to:

- equip trainees to be able to deal professionally with the teaching of Arabic in different contexts and through the integration of different varieties of the Arabic language.

- familiarise trainees with the theoretical principles underlying the content and design of instructional materials and teaching/testing techniques.

- provide trainees with the knowledge and skills and the supported teaching practice to enable them to teach Arabic using the latest communicative methods.

- show trainees how to create coherent and progressive schemes of work and design effective and efficient lesson plans that are adapted to students’ learning needs.

- show trainees how to analyse empirical data in order to evaluate second language learners’ performance objectively and how to describe achievement and proficiency levels using appropriate terminology.

- enable trainees to fulfil supervisory and pedagogical lead roles such as those of syllabus designer, course co-ordinator, teacher mentor and materials developer.

Graduates will be qualified and well-prepared for teaching Arabic in higher education in the UK, Europe and other parts of the world, for teaching Arabic at private institutions or companies, for fulfilling administrative or consultative roles in educational organisations and for undertaking commissioning and editing in companies which create and market Arabic language courseware.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/arabic/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-arabic-as-a-foreign-language.html

The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in sessions at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The course requires attendance on normally three days per week, depending on assignments set and appointments to observe live teaching which may be on an evening or on a Saturday. The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in session at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The days where no presence at SOAS is required are to be devoted to lesson planning and materials preparation, writing of self-reflections and peer appraisals, readings of theoretical applied linguistics and teaching theory books/journal articles, self-access learning, specified VLE learning activities, guided independent study, assigned homework tasks and completion of formal assessments. The programme is very demanding and students will be expected to spend at least 20-30 hours of study outside of class every week.

Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Arabic is equivalent to 3 post-graduate level course units carrying 135 CATS credits.
The Postgraduate Certificate in teaching Arabic is equivalent to 1.5 post-graduate level course units carrying 67.5 CATS credits.
Trainees take compulsory courses in two main areas.

1. Principles and Practice in Communicative Language Teaching for Arabic:
- Arabic Applied Linguistics (0.5 unit)
- Language Awareness, Methods and Techniques in Teaching Arabic (1 unit)

2. Knowledge and Skills for Second Language Teaching:
- Theories of Language Learning and Acquisition (0.5 unit)
- Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching and Language Assessment (1 unit)

Teaching Practice

A key component of the course is the opportunity for live observation of experienced teachers, followed by teaching practice of Arabic with different types of student groups, covering a range of levels. Trainees will observed and assessed in teaching Arabic, including the quality of lesson plans and teaching materials they have created, competencies in using a range of different communicative teaching techniques and ability to create rapport and establish a co-operative learning environment.

All our teacher trainers are expert classroom teachers themselves. Have a look at one of them teaching (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/) and see the kinds of classroom skills you will learn to use yourself.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/arabic/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-arabic-as-a-foreign-language.html

Closing Date for Applications:
Overseas Applicants - Friday 23rd September 2016
UK and EU Applicants - Friday 7th October 2016

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This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language. Read more
This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language. These awards have contributed substantially to the professionalising of Chinese teaching in the UK and elsewhere and to the recognition of the expertise of teachers of Chinese as a Foreign or Second Language.

The Certificate in Teaching Chinese is designed:

- to meet the rapidly growing demand in the UK and elsewhere for trained and qualified teachers of Chinese as a foreign language.

- to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills which will enable them to teach Chinese to a broad spectrum of Chinese learners in UK, European and worldwide educational contexts.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Chinese is designed to:

- equip trainees to be able to deal professionally with the teaching of Chinese in different contexts and through the integration of different varieties of the Chinese language.

- familiarise trainees with the theoretical principles underlying the content and design of instructional materials and teaching/testing techniques.

- provide trainees with the knowledge and skills and the supported teaching practice to enable them to teach Chinese using the latest communicative methods.

- show trainees how to create coherent and progressive schemes of work and design effective and efficient lesson plans that are adapted to students’ learning needs.

- show trainees how to analyse empirical data in order to evaluate second language learners’ performance objectively and how to describe achievement and proficiency levels using appropriate terminology.

- enable trainees to fulfil supervisory and pedagogical lead roles, such as those of syllabus designer, course co-ordinator, teacher mentor and materials developer.

Graduates will be qualified and well-prepared for teaching Chinese in higher education in the UK, Europe and other parts of the world, for teaching Chinese at private institutions or companies, for fulfilling administrative or consultative roles in educational organisations and for undertaking commissioning and editing in companies which create and market Chinese language courseware.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-chinese-as-a-foreign-language.html

The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in sessions at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The course requires attendance on normally three days per week, depending on assignments set and appointments to observe live teaching, which may be on an evening or on a Saturday. The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in session at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The days where no presence at SOAS is required are to be devoted to lesson planning and materials preparation, writing of self-reflections and peer appraisals, readings of theoretical applied linguistics and teaching theory books/journal articles, self-access learning, specified VLE learning activities, guided independent study, assigned homework tasks and completion of formal assessments. The programme is very demanding and students will be expected to spend at least 20-30 hours of study outside of class every week.

Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Chinese is equivalent to 3 post-graduate level course units carrying 135 CATS credits.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching Chinese is equivalent to 1.5 post-graduate level course units carrying 67.5 CATS credits.
Trainees take compulsory courses in two main areas.

1. Principles and Practice in Communicative Language Teaching for Chinese:
- Chinese Applied Linguistics (0.5 unit)
- Language Awareness, Methods and Techniques in Teaching Chinese (1 unit)

2. Knowledge and Skills for Second Language Teaching:
- Theories of Language Learning and Acquisition (0.5 unit)
- Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching and Language Assessment (1 unit)

Teaching Practice

A key component of the course is the opportunity for live observation of experienced teachers, followed by teaching practice of Chinese with different types of student groups, covering a range of levels. Trainees will be observed and assessed in teaching Chinese, including the quality of lesson plans and teaching materials they have created, competencies in using a range of different communicative teaching techniques and ability to create rapport and establish a co-operative learning environment.

All our teacher trainers are expert classroom teachers themselves. Have a look at one of them teaching (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/) and see the kinds of classroom skills you will learn to use yourself.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-chinese-as-a-foreign-language.html

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The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics. Read more
The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in neuroscience and communication such as neurobioliogy, speech processing, developmental and acquired language disorders and linguistics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), a research report (105 credits) and plan (15 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Introduction to Syntax
-Students select two specialisation modules from those below:
-Introduction to Speech Sciences
-Neurobiology of Speech Processing
-Neuroscience of Language
-Seminar in Neurolinguistics

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:
-Conversation Analysis
-Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech
-Deafness - Cognition and Language
-Designing and Analysing an fMRI Experiment
-Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition
-Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
-Introduction to Event-Related Potential Techniques
-Language Acquisition

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on an aspect of speech, language and cognition which culminates in a research plan of 3,000-6,000 words and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Employability
This MSc is full of opportunities for the students to improve reading, writing and communication skills generally. These opportunities include writing essays, oral presentations, critical reading of scientific articles, and group discussion. These skills are critical for success in a wide range of jobs. Likewise, the programme will help to improve critical thinking skills through the critical evaluation of scientific research. This skill is applicable to those careers requiring problem solving. Lastly, the programme provides practical experience in conducting research, which is highly valuable to those interested in pursuing a research career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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This specialisation is designed for students with a background in linguistics who are interested in applying their knowledge in understanding language impairments in individuals with brain damage and/or carrying out neuroscientific research on language processing, or in pursuing theoretical linguistics research using psychological science methods, such as eye-tracking and imaging. Read more
This specialisation is designed for students with a background in linguistics who are interested in applying their knowledge in understanding language impairments in individuals with brain damage and/or carrying out neuroscientific research on language processing, or in pursuing theoretical linguistics research using psychological science methods, such as eye-tracking and imaging.

Degree information

Students take a set of core modules as a foundation to one of the following areas of linguistics: phonology, syntax, semantics-pragmatics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two specialisation modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Neuroscience of Language
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Students select two specialisation modules from one of these core areas:
-Phonology
-Semantics-Pragmatics
-Syntax

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:
-Deafness: Cognition of Language
-Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
-Language Acquisition
-Rehabilitation of Acquired Neurogenic Communication Difficulties
-Seminar in Neurolinguistics

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of Language Science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PhD Researcher, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and studying PhD Neurobiology of Language, International Max Planck Research School

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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Qualify for the 21st century with a Master of Applied Linguistics. As globalisation expands, so does the demand for people with intercultural communication skills to reach wide audiences. Read more
Qualify for the 21st century with a Master of Applied Linguistics. As globalisation expands, so does the demand for people with intercultural communication skills to reach wide audiences. Applied linguistics is one of the fastest-growing fields of study in the humanities. The course offers a competitive advantage to language teachers, interpreters, editors and other people working with language in increasingly multilingual and multicultural societies, such as Australia. Two specialisations are available: General applied linguistics and Teaching world Englishes for international communication. Our program ranked No. 17 in the world in the QS World University Rankings by Subject for 2014.

The Master of Applied Linguistics broadens your knowledge of how language works in the context of globalisation, with opportunities for research and internships. Applied linguistics has become widely recognised for its ability to solve language-related problems at both the micro and macro levels.

Our multilingual and multicultural classes stimulate lively discussion about the differences between languages and language-learning experiences, and how these relate to the theories and issues covered in the unit. Classes are taught by leading scholars in their field. Monash is renowned for its expertise in Japanese applied linguistics, as well as Australian and Austronesian languages.

Applied linguistics at Monash has an international reputation for producing top graduates, particularly in the areas of Japanese applied linguistics, English as an international language, and the study of multilingualism more broadly. Graduates work in mono- and multi-lingual settings, with careers as language teachers, language-education and assessment experts, speech pathologists, interpreters and translators. They work in industries where language and communication are crucial; for example, in the health areas of speech therapy and speech pathology, or in the engineering or computational fields related to language and speech technology, such as speech recognition and synthesis.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/applied-linguistics-a6001?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

- General applied linguistics
The General applied linguistics specialisation offers an overview of the many areas of applied linguistics, giving you a strong understanding of language structure and use across a variety of languages.

In the core units, you explore the sounds and grammar of Australian English and how these differ from other English varieties and languages. You also learn how we use language differently according to context and how language varies between different social groups. In elective units, you specialise in areas such as literacy, second-language acquisition or language and identity.

- Teaching world Englishes for international communication
By looking at the significance of intercultural communication, the Teaching world Englishes for international communication specialisation gives you a new perspective on the use of English in today's globalised world, in both academic and professional contexts. You will examine the theory and practice of teaching English as an international language. You will also come to understand the implications of the global spread of English and the development of world Englishes.

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced applied linguistics studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced applied linguistics
These studies will provide an orientation to the field of applied linguistics at graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of applied linguistics practice and research. You will gain a critical understanding of theoretical and practical issues relating to applied linguistics, including second/foreign language acquisition, language teaching, language contact and intercultural communication. Your study will focus on your choice either of Applied linguistics or Teaching world Englishes for international communication.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a discipline cognate to applied linguistics, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/applied-linguistics-a6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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