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Masters Degrees (Second Language Acquisition)

We have 254 Masters Degrees (Second Language Acquisition)

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The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. Read more
The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. The topics represented within the course draw from some of the related disciplines within Applied Linguistics such as Psycholinguistics, Education (Language Teaching/Learning), Linguistics, and Sociolinguistics. It can be taken either full–time (1 year) or part-time (2 years). The full time course consists of 8 taught modules (4 modules in each of the two years if students choose the part-time route) and 1 research dissertation.

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Your programme of study. If you want to teach English internationally to non native speakers this Master's level qualification is the top level teaching qualification to open doors for you overseas. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to teach English internationally to non native speakers this Master's level qualification is the top level teaching qualification to open doors for you overseas.

TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) is one of the most internationally recognised and sought after qualifications in the world. At Aberdeen you are able to study it to Master's level to ensure you can work anywhere in the world.  You gain experiential teaching experience to develop deep understanding of language, teaching methods and assessment. You will be surprised at just how many places in the world need English Language teachers. English is the language of business and you can look at employment options within large scale businesses and training institutions in most major towns and cities in the world.  TESOL is also taught widely in the UK. You can also consider teaching positions as a native English teacher as a TESOL Centre Director and a specialist.

You will be able to teach English well with an internationally recognised qualification to give you practical skills, linguistics and choice.  In your first semester you look at second language acquisition theory and practise and research. In your second year you look at TESOL methodology, peer teaching, difference in second language acquisition, advanced English structure and varieties of English.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Second Language Acquisition Theory and Practice
  • Research Methods in TESOL

Semester 2

  • Compulsory
  • TESOL Methodology
  • Peer teaching
  • Individual difference in Second Language Acquisition
  • Advanced English Structure and Use

Optional

  • Peer Teaching in TESOL
  • Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition
  • Advanced English Structure and Use
  • Varieties in English

Semester 3

  • TESOL Focused Teaching Portfolio

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  •  This is a programme which you can take with a degree from any discipline or background
  • You gain a very marketable and internationally recognised skill set from which you can travel anywhere in the world
  • You are taught by an internationally renowned language centre

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Months Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more

The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of language development research, and their technological applications.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in the language sciences, specialising in language development. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Mandatory modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
  • Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental Disorders of Language, Learning and Cognition
  • Development of Speech Perception and Production
  • Language Acquisition
  • Introduction to Children's Language Development
  • Semantic and Pragmatic Development

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:

  • Neuroscience of Language
  • Deafness - Cognition and language
  • Speech Processing
  • Conversation Analysis
  • Second Language Speech Learning
  • Phonetic Theory
  • Phonetic Theory
  • Foundations of Linguistics
  • Issues in Pragmatics
  • Current Issues in Syntax
  • Stuttering

Not all modules will run every year; some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Language Development) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and in other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Secondary School Teacher (Greek Language), Lysse Lanco Hellenique
  • Speech and Language Therapist, West London Mental Health NHS Trust
  • PGCE Early Years Teaching, Canterbury Christ Church University
  • PhD in Biomedical Science - Speech and Hearing, Harvard University

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.
Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

Introduction to Language and Linguistics; English Grammar and Discourse; Language Teaching Methodology; Second Language Acquisition; Research Methods; Dissertation (MA only).

Examples of optional modules

Corpus Linguistics; Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition; Discourse and Genre Analysis; English for Specific Purposes; Intercultural Communication; Researching Writing in TESOL; Teaching Practice; Theory and Practice of Language Teaching; World Englishes.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar) and Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops.

And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer.

If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.

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The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS is the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa. It is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in the theory of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions.

It provides a unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

For the Japanese pathway please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students are generally required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses (which may include one language course), and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 300kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/file93574.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:

- Advanced knowledge and understanding of selected approaches, methods and theories in the study of religions, with particular reference to the religious traditions of Asia and Africa.

- Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in religious studies, also as a platform for further research at doctoral level.

- Advanced skills in presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religious studies.

- Specialisation in one area from among those covered by the units listed in the programme structure.

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other relevant traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, such as manuscript transcription, textual bibliography, the editing of texts; familiarity with the study of religions as an academic field of study and its varieties.

- Aspects of literature in the Study of Religions, philosophy, learning, iconography and history, the impact of religion on society.

- Acquisition of language skills.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Those students who take a language option should be able to assess primary sources in foreign languages and critically evaluate interpretations proposed by different scholars.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of religions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing.

- IT-based information retrieval and processing.

- Presentational skills.

- Examination techniques.

- Independent study skills and research techniques.

- Reflexive learning.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.

- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).

- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.

- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.

- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.

- Make judgements involving complex factors.

- Develop self-reflexivity.

- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.

- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Studying the acquisition, understanding and production of language. A mature language user has a vocabulary of about thirty to forty thousand words. Read more

Studying the acquisition, understanding and production of language.

A mature language user has a vocabulary of about thirty to forty thousand words. Speech is produced at a speed of three to five words per second. How is it possible that, in such an amazingly short period of time, you can select the correct words, put them in the correct order and grammatical form, and pronounce them intelligibly? The acquisition and comprehension of language are based on extremely complex cognitive processes which are not yet entirely understood. It’s these processes, and their biological underpinnings, that form psycholinguistics’ field of study and are the basis of this specialisation.

A large majority of our graduates gain a PhD position, while other graduates find jobs in the commercial sector or at research institutes. Graduates of this specialisation can find a position with one of the psycholinguistic research institutes, a government institution or for example, in the care sector (rehabilitation centres) or in education (language disorders).

Why study Language and Communication at Radboud University?

Theoretical training

All specialisations in the Master’s programme have a common basis. In the first year you’ll become acquainted with the most important theories, models, techniques and analysis methods in Cognitive Neuroscience. Click here for an overview of the General programme outline.

As a student of the specialisation in Language and Communication you are obligated to take five of the following seven courses:

  • Word Recognition and Production
  • Sentence Production and Comprehension
  • Multilingualism
  • Language Acquisition
  • Multimodal Language, Cognition, and the Brain
  • Neurobiology and Evolution of Language
  • Structural Aspects of Language

Practical training: research project

The second year of the Master’s programme is primarily spent in the laboratory so that you gain ample hands-on experience. You’ll execute practical training in one of the participating research groups under the supervision of a researcher. In this way you’ll acquaint yourself with the discipline in actual practice. You’ll:

  • Develop a theoretical research question.
  • Report on your research in a Master’s thesis. This thesis must be written in the form of a scientific article.

You can read more about the research in this specialisation on the website of the Donders Institute: Theme 1.

Read more about the courses, reading requirements and course schedule in the online prospectus.

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

The aims of the programme are:

- To analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning

- To provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lang

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643756

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. Read more
This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. It also analyses research in applied linguistics, particularly research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment, such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research.

The programme also explores the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment, with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese, and evaluates the role and future of information technology within a resource-based language-learning framework.

The aims of the programme are:

- To explore linguistics issues in the Japanese language

- To analyse the research in applied linguistics, in particular the research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology within source-based language learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom teaching) methods of language learning.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lljap

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Japanese Teaching Methodology (15 credits)
Japanese Language & Analysis (15 credits)
Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:

- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students will be assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates may consider a role as a language teacher in schools, colleges or universities.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643759

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Combining recent developments in drama education, second language acquisition and ELT methodology, this course offers an innovative approach to teaching drama as a key way of promoting learning and language acquisition in more creative and personalised ways. Read more
Combining recent developments in drama education, second language acquisition and ELT methodology, this course offers an innovative approach to teaching drama as a key way of promoting learning and language acquisition in more creative and personalised ways. It is taught in conjunction with the Centre for Applied Linguistics, which has a particular expertise in ELT.

Balancing the study and practice of drama and ELT as both academic and practical subjects, it is suitable for experienced teachers interested in combining both disciplines (Drama and English Language Teaching) at Master’s level, or for teachers of English as a Foreign Language. You’ll examine how drama can motivate your students, improve their speaking confidence, and enable them to use language in cultural contexts, as well as improving your teacher-student relationships.

Core modules develop and extend your understanding of key approaches to Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and English Language Learning (ELT), and provide a solid grounding in drama techniques and approaches. You’ll also complete a dissertation based on an individual research project, with support from a member of academic staff.

Course structure

Students will split the taught aspects of the course between the Centre for Education Studies and the Centre for Applied Linguistics.

Core modules

-The Role of Story in Drama & Theatre Education
-Drama and Literacy
-ELT Methodology for pre-experience students
OR
-Issues and Research in ELT for post-experience students
-Second Language Acquisition and Classroom Language Learning
-Literature and Drama in ELT
-Research Methodology for ELT
-Dissertation

Optional modules

Students taking ELT Methodology will also take one of the following optional modules:
-Language Testing
-ICT in ELT
-English for Young Learners or Teacher Education and Development
-Teaching Language and Culture or Management and Leaderships of ELT Institutions

Course delivery and learning styles

The course is delivered through a range of teaching and learning methods: lectures, seminars, practical workshops which involve group work and self-study.

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Through two distinct pathways, the TESOL MA is designed to cater both for experienced teachers and those who have little or no teaching experience. Read more
Through two distinct pathways, the TESOL MA is designed to cater both for experienced teachers and those who have little or no teaching experience.

It offers a flexible but structured framework to support your personal and professional development, as you engage with academic and professional debates in the areas of second language teaching, second language acquisition, applied linguistics and learning technology.

As part of the Language Teacher Education Programme, the TESOL MA has a strong international flavour. Students come from a range of countries and teaching backgrounds, which adds a rich cross-cultural perspective to both your studies and your social life.

Furthermore, the course stresses the importance of international context, featuring activities and topics that help you to develop cultural awareness when evaluating teaching methods and learning materials.

Academic support

We give extra support to TESOL students whose first language is not English, providing a variety of pre-sessional language programmes for students who want to improve their language skills before starting their degree.

We also organise a regular writing group for our international students, led by an experienced English for Academic Study tutor.

Course structure

There are two core modules common to both the pre-service and experienced pathways: Research Methods for Investigating Second Language Teaching and Learning and the Dissertation. You will have three other core modules, which depend on your allocated pathway, and need to choose two from a selection of optional modules.

Research Methods:

This module focuses on developing an awareness and understanding of research methods appropriate to the field of second language teaching and learning. It is designed to support the dissertation and enable you to formulate a research question with clear rationale, aims and methodology and to select appropriate sources to research a relevant topic for your project. Students complete a data-gathering project and a research proposal outlining a specific enquiry for the dissertation.

Dissertation:

The dissertation is an independent small-scale enquiry that you complete under the guidance of a supervisor, building on the knowledge and skills acquired from the course. It involves the identification and critical analysis of a problem or question relevant to second language pedagogy, and extensive exploration of relevant literature – including current research. On this basis, you design and undertake an original enquiry, which involves the selection of appropriate research methods, data gathering and analysis, and the presentation and discussion of findings.

Syllabus

Pre-service pathway Modules:

Research Methods for Investigating Second Language Teaching and Learning
Cultures of English Language Teaching
Teaching English as an International Language
The Practice of English Language Teaching
Dissertation

Two from:

Investigating Language Classrooms
Language Awareness
Language Teaching and Technology
Second Language Acquisition
Checkland Building at Falmer

Experienced pathway Modules:

Research Methods for Investigating Second Language Teaching and Learning
Second Language Teaching
Language Teaching and Technology
Language Teacher Education
Dissertation

Two from:

Investigating Language Classrooms
Language Awareness
English Language Teaching Materials
Second Language Acquisition
Teaching English as an International Language

Careers and employability

Graduating with a TESOL MA from the University of Brighton will open up opportunities across the world in the field of English language teaching. Equipped with relevant research skills and advanced knowledge about secondary language learning, you will have all of the relevant training you need to begin your career.

Our graduates have gone on to successful positions not only in second language teaching in schools and universities but also in educational management, educational marketing, teacher training, materials development and publishing, as well as further academic study.

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The Diploma in TESOL at the University of Brighton is a postgraduate professional qualification for experienced English language teachers wanting to develop their practice and understanding of English Language Teaching (ELT). Read more
The Diploma in TESOL at the University of Brighton is a postgraduate professional qualification for experienced English language teachers wanting to develop their practice and understanding of English Language Teaching (ELT).

It is part of the School of Humanities ELTEP (English Language Teacher Education Programme) suite of courses, which includes the TESOL MA. Students wanting to go on to the MA after the Diploma can be accredited for previous study.

The Diploma in TESOL combines assessed teaching practice with academic study into aspects of language teaching and learning such as ELT methodology, use of technologies, materials, language analysis and exploration and second language acquisition.

A key component of the Diploma in TESOL is the development of teaching practitioners’ reflective ability. Our aim is to help teachers deepen their understanding about their own professional practice and this is integrated throughout the course.

Why study with us?

• Shared modules with the TESOL MA, meaning you can carry over up to 60 credits towards the masters programme

• Students from a range of cultural and teaching backgrounds – a variety that adds depth to seminar discussions

• Chance to apply the course to your own professional context and experience, and personalise it according to your needs

• Exploration of modern technology and its impact on education, reflecting the importance of English in the new media of global communication

• Preparation for the complexities of the global market through teaching that accounts for international contexts

Course structure

The course comprises five modules, which relate theories and research to professional contexts. Assessments are varied and most encourage the development of reflective practice, which plays a key part in professional development. This reflection is assessed in the form of a reflective blog that documents your teaching assessments, peer observations and reactions to and thoughts about issues relating to your experiences on the course, in your professional context and from your reading.

The Diploma in TESOL is validated by the University of Brighton and has the appropriate amount of assessed teaching practice and input hours set by British Council guidelines. The course is therefore equivalent to other ELT Diplomas such as the Cambridge DELTA or Trinity DipTESOL.

Areas of study

• ELT Methodology – Approaches and Methods

This module informs you of a range of developments in English language teaching methodology and extends your repertoire of teaching skills. It also familiarises you with a range of ELT resources for different contexts and enables you to approach a variety of teaching contexts reflectively.

The module is assessed by a portfolio with three components: a short Statement of Relevance where you relate an issue from the module to your practice; an in-class presentation; and a longer reflective essay.

• Language Awareness

This module develops an awareness of language systems. It helps you to critically evaluate analytical and classificatory frameworks of English grammar and pronunciation and to analyse the organisation of discourse in English. The modules is assessed by a three-hour exam.

• Second Language Acquisition

This module explores research on second language acquisition (SLA), from the analysis of learner language to current cognitive and sociocultural models. An important focus is the consideration of the implications of SLA research for English language teaching.

The module is assessed by a 4,000-word essay that applies SLA research to a professional context.

• Materials

This module focuses on the role, use and development of materials in the language classroom. It explores at the evaluation and design of materials as well as the use of new technologies.

• Teaching and Reflection

This is the most important module, allowing you to gain practical experience teaching English as a second language. Your classes need to demonstrate a variety of levels, content and approaches, as you are assessed in your place of work five times over the duration of the course.

From the five assessments, the top four make up your final module grade. Observations are recorded so you can look at your own practice and develop reflective skills and self-awareness. Even students who were at first apprehensive have responded very positively to this experience.

In addition, you are required to document your learning and developments through a reflective blog. This blog will contain reflections on your assessed teaching, peer observations and at least five ‘critical incidents’ that have made you question aspects of your own practice or the ELT context in general.

Support is provided through a series of Saturday workshops, tutor support and small action learning groups.

Careers and employability

The Diploma in TESOL at the University of Brighton is recognised as being equivalent to other similar Diplomas (DELTA, Trinity DipTESOL) as it has the required amount of teaching assessments and course content. As such, it equips language teachers with the skills needed to develop professionally within a wide range of ELT contexts.

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The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics. Read more

The combined specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of neuroscience, speech processing and language impairments where students have completed related previous study which may not include demonstrable experience in theoretical linguistics.

About this degree

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in neuroscience and communication such as neurobioliogy, speech processing, developmental and acquired language disorders and linguistics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two specialisation modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Introduction to Syntax
  • Students select two specialisation modules from those below:
  • Intermediate Phonetics
  • Neurobiology of Speech Processing
  • Neuroscience of Language
  • Seminar in Neurolinguistics

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. Possible options are listed below:

  • Conversation Analysis
  • Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of Speech
  • Deafness - Cognition and Language
  • Designing and Analysing an fMRI Experiment
  • Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition
  • Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Introduction to Event-Related Potential Techniques
  • Language Acquisition

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on an aspect of speech, language and cognition which culminates in a research plan of 3,000-6,000 words and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Neuroscience and Communication) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Employability

This MSc is full of opportunities for students to improve reading, writing and communication skills generally. These opportunities include writing essays, oral presentations, critical reading of scientific articles, and group discussion. These skills are critical for success in a wide range of jobs. Likewise, the programme will help to improve critical thinking skills through the critical evaluation of scientific research. This skill is applicable to those careers requiring problem-solving. Lastly, the programme provides practical experience in conducting research, which is highly valuable to those interested in pursuing a research career.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This specialisation is designed for students with a background in linguistics who are interested in applying their knowledge in understanding language impairments in individuals with brain damage and/or carrying out neuroscientific research on language processing, or in pursuing theoretical linguistics research using psychological science methods, such as eye-tracking and imaging. Read more

This specialisation is designed for students with a background in linguistics who are interested in applying their knowledge in understanding language impairments in individuals with brain damage and/or carrying out neuroscientific research on language processing, or in pursuing theoretical linguistics research using psychological science methods, such as eye-tracking and imaging.

About this degree

Students take a set of core modules as a foundation to one of the following areas of linguistics: phonology, syntax, semantics-pragmatics. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (60 credits), two specialisation modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Neuroscience of Language
  • Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
  • Students select two specialisation modules from a group in one of these core areas:
  • Phonology
  • Semantics-Pragmatics
  • Syntax

Optional modules

Students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:

  • Deafness: Cognition of Language
  • Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Language Acquisition
  • Rehabilitation of Acquired Neurogenic Communication Difficulties
  • Seminar in Neurolinguistics
  • Not all modules will run every year; some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in an area of language science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language Sciences (with specialisation in Linguistics with Neuroscience) MSc

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, other UK institutions and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops – independent research, presentation skills, statistics – are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Research Assistant and Patient Co-Ordinator, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging
  • PhD in Linguistics, UCL
  • PhD in Psychology, University of Sheffield
  • PhD Researcher, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and studying PhD in Neurobiology of Language, International Max Planck Research School
  • Research Assistant, University of Cambridge

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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About the program. The Master of Arts (TESOL) program provides language teacher education in teaching and learning English as a Second/Additional Language. Read more

About the program

The Master of Arts (TESOL) program provides language teacher education in teaching and learning English as a Second/Additional Language. The program aims to prepare prospective teachers of English as a Second Language for their future career and to assist current TESOL teachers in extending their professional knowledge. Subject contents cover theoretical aspects of language, language teaching, language acquisition and the practical applications of these in language teaching. The Master of Arts (TESOL) prepares teachers for the international career in the diverse global world. This program is not available for international student visa holders in Australia 

Our TESOL programs offer something different. Hear from our TESOL students, staff and graduates as to what they believe makes our program unique.

Master of Arts (TESOL)(online) students have access to a range of online learning resources, all managed by Academics with an array of online teaching experience. The online delivery adds to the internationalisation of the program, as students can be anywhere in the world and have access to the virtual classroom.

The Bond TESOL difference means that students will receive a personalised online learning experience, in small class sizes, working with like-minded individuals from all over the world, who bring a truly international flavour to the online classroom. The friendships formed often lead to industry contacts and introductions overseas. Our graduates tell us that this combination of experience, international perspective and contacts put them way ahead of the competition when it comes to applying for teaching positions.

Structure and subjects

View the Master of Arts (TESOL) Online - Program Structure and Sequencing

The Master of Arts (TESOL) program comprises 12 subjects, as follows:

Foundation subjects (8)

Subjects dependent on commencement of program and Option choice, please refer to program sequence.

Options

Students choose one (1) of the following options:

Major

or

Minor

Teaching methodology

Bond University’s teaching methodology involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects.

Part-time flexible options are available.

Practicum

As part of the MA TESOL Online program, students are required to complete a practical teaching component of at least six (6) hours of supervised and evaluated teaching. Students are required to source a suitably qualified supervising teacher in their home country who can evaluate their practice in an English language teaching setting. Students must complete a portfolio of tasks which are to be submitted to the course lecturer along with a recording of their sessions. The Practicum is a component of the subject Professional Practice in Language Teaching (LING71-102)



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