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Our MSc in Occupational Health takes a uniquely integrated approach to occupational health and safety, exploring psychological and more traditional physical workplace risk factors, from work-related stress to the prevention of work-related cancer. Read more
Our MSc in Occupational Health takes a uniquely integrated approach to occupational health and safety, exploring psychological and more traditional physical workplace risk factors, from work-related stress to the prevention of work-related cancer.

This comprehensive, research-led programme will help you develop and manage strategies that protect employees’ health and safety whilst promoting well-being and productivity in the workplace.

Wherever you want to go with a career in occupational health: You can with UCC.

Where can an MSc in Occupational Health take you?

If you want to transform your career, an online MSc in Occupational Health will give you the skills and confidence you need. By providing the latest, multidisciplinary expertise in occupational health and safety this programme will help you affect change in the workplace.

Workplace fatalities and disabling injuries are an international health and safety issue and in recent years there has been an increase in psychosocial issues in the modern work environment. Across Europe, 50–60% of all work-related absenteeism is attributed to stress;1 something businesses are keen to address with appropriate expertise. UCC’s renowned Department of Epidemiology and Public Health deliver a research-led teaching agenda that ensures you have access to the most up-to-date research findings. This creates an opportunity to translate research findings into policy and practice, helping you safeguard health and safety in the workplace.

After completing the programme you will be able to:

* Demonstrate multidisciplinary awareness of occupational health, including epidemiology, public health, safety science, law and training and development
* Prevent disease and injury and promote health and safety
* Perform workplace assessments of psychological and physical risks
* Keep up to date with research, critically appraising publications and statistics
* Design occupational health and safety training and development strategies in line with policy
* Apply research evidence to health and safety interventions and health promotion strategies, accounting for legislation
* Carry out research and health and safety programme evaluations

You can with UCC

Our MSc in Occupational Health takes a uniquely integrated approach to occupational health and safety, exploring psychological and more traditional physical workplace risk factors, from work-related stress to the prevention of work-related cancer.

This comprehensive, research-led programme will help you develop and manage strategies that protect employees’ health and safety whilst promoting well-being and productivity in the workplace.

Wherever you want to go with a career in occupational health: You can with UCC.

Entry Requirements

Candidates for the MSc programme in Occupational Health online must meet one of the following criteria:

•A Level 8 Honours primary degree (minimum Second Class Honours, Grade 2) in a relevant area, for example health-related (Public Health, Nursing, Medicine, Environmental Health, Psychology/Behavioural Science, Physiotherapy); Engineering and Human Resource Management and relevant professional experience1 or work placement in an associated Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare area.
OR
•A minimum of a Diploma/Higher Diploma in Occupational Safety, Health and Welfare (minimum Second Class Honours, Grade 1), from UCC, or an equivalent qualification2 from another Institution (Level 8 Diploma, minimum Second Class Honours, Grade 1) and a minimum of two years relevant professional work experience1 in an area associated with Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare.
OR
•Applicants with a minimum of three years professional work experience in an associated area1 of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare will be invited for interview to satisfy the selection committee of their suitability for the programme.

1Relevant professional work experience, job title examples: Health and Safety Officers/Advisors/Managers/Coordinators; Environmental Safety Officers/Managers; Safety Engineers, Health Promotion Officers; HR Officers/Managers; Occupational Health Nurses, Health Scientists, Professional Trainers, Health and Safety Consultants.

2Level 8 examples: Diploma/Higher Diploma/International Diploma in Occupational Health and Safety; Diploma in Environment Management, Diploma in Health Promotion, Diploma in Learning, Development and Work-based Training.

FOOTNOTE

Reference

1. http://www.ilo.org/safework/areasofwork/workplace-health-promotion-and-well-being/WCMS_108557/lang--en/index.htm

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There is an increasing demand for highly trained public health specialists in Ireland and abroad to tackle major public health issues including health inequalities, communicable diseases, international health development, obesity and smoking. Read more
There is an increasing demand for highly trained public health specialists in Ireland and abroad to tackle major public health issues including health inequalities, communicable diseases, international health development, obesity and smoking. University College Cork (UCC) is meeting this need by offering an online Master of Public Health designed to offer multi-disciplinary academic and experiential development, whatever your professional background.

Our online Master of Public Health will arm you with the knowledge and skills necessary to make a real difference in public health. The programme emphasises the use of evidence-based healthcare and practice, enabling participants to put public health principles into effect in both research and professional contexts.

After completing the programme you will be able to:
• Critically analyse theories and issues related to public health
• Construct arguments around the social, political and economic factors determining the health of populations
• Demonstrate competence in the key underpinning disciplines and theories of public health, including epidemiology and communicable diseases
• Demonstrate enhanced knowledge in specific public health areas, including health promotion, health protection, epidemiology and biostatistics in public health
• Employ a range of appropriate research and analysis methods with confidence and expertise

Why pursue your Master of Public Health at UCC?

● UCC is a leading centre of research into multiple areas of public health
● A significant portion of MPH graduates successfully submit work for international publication
● Direct contact with multi-discipline public health and epidemiology researchers
● Exposure to integrative research, both qualitative and quantitative
● Coursework has a strong international public health focus

About Us

University College Cork (UCC) is dedicated to ensuring its students are the very best they can be; a promise underpinned by its award-winning teaching techniques, cutting-edge research credentials and long history of independent thinking from mathematical genius George Boole and beyond. Everyone at UCC, from the lecturers to the administrative staff, is committed to supporting the students, giving them the fuel to fulfil their potential and shape the world we live in. After completing a programme at UCC, students are not just work ready, but world ready.

Accreditation

Rankings and Awards
• Ranked in top 2% of universities worldwide, based on the quality of its research and peer esteem
• Ireland’s first five-star university (QS Stars 2011)
• Consistently strong performance in a number of global rankings:
- CWTS Leiden Ranking 2015: now holds the 16th position in Europe and 52nd position worldwide.
- U-Multirank rankings (March 2015): UCC was the top performing university internationally, based on obtaining the highest number of ‘A’ scores.
- QS World University Rankings by Subject (April 2015): 13 subject areas featuring in the top tier globally and Pharmacy & Pharmacology listed within the top 50 worldwide.
• The only Irish university to be awarded University of the Year by The Sunday Times four times, including one in 2016.

Online Graduate Programmes

UCC’s online programmes have been developed to provide both research-led and practical-based learning to give students the skills and confidence they need to succeed in a real-world environment. UCC recently launched an online version of its successful Master of Public Health that turns a passion for the health and well-being of populations into a dynamic, transferable skillset, which can be applied to a growing number of public health careers.

Career Outlook

Through its Master of Public Health programme, UCC prepares students for a diverse range of public, non-profit and academic-based positions, giving them the experience they need to fulfil their potential and excel in a career in public health on a national or international level.

Unique Opportunities

University College Cork is ranked in the top 2% of universities worldwide, based on the quality of its research, with UCC researchers collaborating with 700 of the world’s top universities, across 110 countries.

Why We Love UCC

University College Cork is dedicated to delivering innovative online programmes with the same level of engagement, research-focus and teaching commitment as campus-based programmes, giving time-pressed professionals an opportunity to ignite their future careers.

Student Reviews

“I have been exposed to a diverse range of public health issues, many of which I would never have previously considered, but now fascinate me. One of the main strengths of this course is its multidisciplinary approach which is taught at such a high level by experts in research and practice.”
Mr. Declan Whelan Curtin

“This masters uncovered my interest in research and formed the foundations for a future career in public health”
Mr. Martin Davoren

Entry Requirements

Prospective students must satisfy the following:

•Students accepted in the course would normally be expected to hold an Honours primary degree in a relevant subject (minimum Second Class Honours) or an Honours primary degree in any discipline (minimum Second Class Honours) and either possess a postgraduate qualification in a relevant field or show evidence of at least two years’ work experience in a relevant field.
•The Department of Epidemiology and Public Health course is open to registered health care professionals in Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Allied Health care disciplines or applicants who hold a relevant primary degree. Applicants must provide evidence of current registration with the relevant professional regulatory body (e.g. the Irish Medical Council, the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland (active registration) and the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland). Applicants not registered with one of the above professional bodies must provide evidence of level 8 qualification in a relevant health care discipline.
•Candidates whose first language is not English must have a minimum of IELTS 6.5 with scores in no individual sections less than 6.0.
•All applicants are required to complete an application form and provide evidence of either current professional registration or primary degree. In all cases, decisions will be based on qualifications and quality of application.

Exemptions at point of entry:

Holders of the Postgraduate Certificates in Health Protection (CKU02/CKU13), the Postgraduate Certificate in Public Health, or the Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health (CKW19/CKW20), will be exempt from certain modules on the programme if passed as part of the Postgraduate Certificate/Diploma examination and if he/she undertakes the MPH within 60 months from the date of successful completion of the aforementioned qualifications.

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Taking a multi and inter-disciplinary approach, this course places particular emphasis on the development of knowledge and skills sought by the broad spectrum of agencies associated with the criminal justice process. Read more
Taking a multi and inter-disciplinary approach, this course places particular emphasis on the development of knowledge and skills sought by the broad spectrum of agencies associated with the criminal justice process. Students gain a thorough understanding of all aspects of crime, criminology and criminal justice through an in-depth examination of the historical, theoretical and applied knowledge in these areas. The programme also examines the current political, economic and social context of relevant debates in the UK and abroad.

The course has been prepared by lecturers who are at the forefront of research in this field. Subject information is updated constantly to keep abreast of this fast-changing subject area, and the very latest teaching techniques are geared to providing an intellectually stimulating, enjoyable and enriching learning experience.


Course Structure and Assessment

The course is studied either full-time over one year or part-time over two years. The programme consists of three core modules, three optional modules and a topic dissertation. Each module is assessed via 4,000 word essay. A 20,000 word dissertation must also be successfully completed to achieve the MSc degree.

Module One: Understanding Crime
Module Two: Penology
Module Three: Criminological Research Methods
Module Four: Option 1
Module Five: Option 2
Module Six: Option 3

Option modules currently available include: Crime, Justice and Psychology, Terrorism II, Media and Crime, Racism, Crime and Disorder, Crime, Justice and the Law, Sexual Violence, Risk Management, Drugs and Crime, Transnational Policing, Surveillance and Society

Entry Requirements

The course is open to people with a first or second class honours degree or an equivalent professional qualification. However, we are able to give special consideration to applicants with significant relevant work experience.

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The course aims to provide an opportunity for interdisciplinary postgraduate study of environmental and occupational health for students from diverse backgrounds and to enable you to develop the knowledge and skills necessary in modern Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) practice. Read more
The course aims to provide an opportunity for interdisciplinary postgraduate study of environmental and occupational health for students from diverse backgrounds and to enable you to develop the knowledge and skills necessary in modern Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) practice.

The successful completion of this course will enable students to cope with rapid social, technological and organisational change through promoting an understanding of relevant concepts. The course also develops your critical and analytical powers in relation to SHE.

The course content reflects the growing trend of companies combining their environmental protection and health and safety functions.

Key benefits:

• Recognised by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) as having cognate degree status
• Vocational orientation and substantial input from professional practitioners
• Interdisciplinary and flexible study

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/safety,-health-and-environment

Suitable for

Applicants should possess at least a UK lower second class honours degree (2:2) or equivalent in any subject.

We welcome applications from students who may not have formal/traditional entry criteria but who have relevant experience or the ability to pursue the course successfully.

Programme details

This course involves engagement with a number of ideas drawn from law, economics and the social and physical sciences which are of relevance to the theory and practice of environmental regulation and occupational health.

The modules have been designed to enable development of the intellectual and analytical skills appropriate for health, safety and environment professionals in the 21st Century.

Modules address the exiting and emerging challenges and review contemporary management and regulatory systems designed to reduce risk.

A feature of the course is applied learning and an emphasis on contextualising study.

The course comprises of four taught modules complemented by a research dissertation. Within the full-time course three modules are compulsory with two studied in semester 1 and the remaining one in semester 2. The remaining module is optional and you can choose one module in semester 2 from the available options.

For part-time students the taught components spans two academic years each consisting of two semesters between September and May. Year 1 involves the study of two core modules. Year 2 involves the study of one core and one optional module.

Format

This course involves lectures, case studies, assignments and seminars. There are site visits to contextualize learning and there is a strong emphasis on students discussing and exchanging their own professional experiences with the course team and invited specialist speakers.

Module titles

• Research and Professional Practice
• Risk: Perception and Management
• Techniques for Environmental Assessment and Management
• Dissertation

Optional modules:

• Control of Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases
• Management of Occupational Health and Safety

Assessment

A mixture of the following:

• Portfolio
• Literature Review
• Case study
• Project
• Examination
• Report
• Dissertation

Career potential

Graduates of this course have found positions as safety, health and environmental managers in business, as environmental regulators and as SHE managers and consultants working in fields as diverse as facilities management, construction, utilities, the civil service and engineering.

This course is designed both as a relevant vocational qualification for those seeking health, safety and environment-related employment, and to meet the continuing professional development needs of personnel in government, industry and the voluntary sector.

This course seeks to develop graduates who are able to play a leading role in the strategic development and implementation of policy initiatives within the industry.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor. This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. Read more
The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor.

Who is it for?

This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. There is a rich blend of students on the course with a variety of backgrounds and interests.

There are students from a number of jurisdictions many of whom will have experience of working in practice. Most students will have a upper second class honours degree or have performed well on the Graduate Diploma in Law. A high standard of work is therefore expected and achieved.

Objectives

This postgraduate Legal Practice Course is a practical course which will give you a strong foundation for a future career in the law. This is reflected in the skills based, transactional nature of the course.

You will work on a series of client files which will be similar to the cases dealt with in a solicitor’s office. The law school’s experienced staff will guide you through the different tasks that would have to be undertaken to advance the client’s case. Your approach to the course will therefore be very different to the one experienced in an academic law course. You will have to apply knowledge in a way that best serves the client’s interests.

The course is very interactive. You will learn by performing tasks relating to the case studies that you are given. These include drafting legal documents, preparing letters of advice or delivering a submission at court. At the end of the course you will therefore be well prepared for your career in the law.

Academic facilities

The course is delivered at the Gray’s Inn Place campus in the heart of legal London. The campus has a specific professional programmes library and all the classrooms have been designed to meet the requirements of the professional law courses.

There is a dedicated LPC suite of classrooms which also includes lockers and a resources room specifically for LPC students. The building which houses the LPC suite also has 10 video rooms where students can practice performances in the oral skills.

Placements

There are no placements as part of the course. However, students will be able to take advantage of the many pro bono opportunities that the law school offers. These include advice clinics, court based projects and schemes which offer the opportunity to work abroad. The City Law School also has links with a wide variety of organisations who can offer opportunities to volunteer with them.

The law school is often approached by firms offering internships to students.

Teaching and learning

One of the strong features of the LPC at City is the level of support students receive. All of the tutors on the course are solicitors, some of whom have worked as partners in their previous firms. They are supported by occasional sessions delivered by practitioners or visiting academics who are experts in their particular fields.

The course is structured in a way that allows you to gain maximum benefit from the experience that tutors have. Students therefore get a high level of face to face contact time with tutors.

This is reinforced by the size of the groups. For the workshops students will be in a group which has a maximum of 16 students. This group will then split into two for the skills sessions which have a maximum of eight students. This allows more time for students to get guidance from tutors.

These smaller sessions are underpinned by the large groups. All students will attend these sessions which give an overview of the area being studied.

Assessment

The assessment regime for the course has to meet the SRA’s requirements. This means that the Core Practice Areas, Electives and Professional Conduct and Regulation (including Solicitors Accounts) are assessed by means of a written examination.

The Course Skills are assessed in the context of the Core Practice Areas and Wills in a manner that is appropriate to the individual skill. For example, you will have to conduct a filmed interview with an actor as your client, make a filmed court submission, draft a legal document or prepare a letter of advice for a client.

Our assessments are open book and therefore test your application of the law rather than your memory.

Modules

The course begins with a two week Foundation when you will have classes every day. This will introduce you the Course Skills and the more practical approach that we take to studying the law. The course is then divided into two stages.

In stage one you will study the core modules. During this stage you will attend four days a week. You will normally have three one and half hour sessions a day amounting to 16 – 18 hours a week.

In stage two, you will study three elective modules. Your timetable will depend on the electives that you choose. You will have around 13.5 – 15 hours of classes a week during this stage.

Stage one - in Stage one you have to complete nine compulsory modules as follows:
-Core Practice Areas
-Course Skills
-Professional Conduct and Regulation
-Wills and the Administration of Estates

Stage two - during Stage two of the course you will study your electives. In order to complete the LPC you must pass three electives. You can take your electives at more than one provider and you can take your electives at providers other than City. You should, however, be aware that it might be more expensive for you to do this. You will choose your electives in November/December after having received guidance from the tutors about your choice. You will have to opt for either a commercial or general practice route although the bulk of the electives are open to all students. All students can choose from the following electives:
-Advanced civil litigation (10 credits)
-Commercial dispute resolution
-Commercial law (10 credits)
-Employment law (10 credits)
-Media law (10 credits)

If you take the commercial route you can also opt for Equity Finance and Mergers and Acquisitions. You will not be able to choose options on the general practice route. On the general practice route you can opt for Family or Private Client but will not be able to take options from the commercial route.

Career prospects

This course is designed to prepare you for life as a trainee solicitor.

Many applicants will not have a training contract when they start the course. The law school offers the bespoke Training Contract Advisory Service (TCAS). This is run by members of the team who were partners in their firms and so know what employers are looking for.

TCAS offers assistance with CV’s, covering letters, selection days and other matters relating to a search for a traineeship. In particular, students can arrange a mock interview with a member of the team. The support offered has allowed graduates to go into a wide variety of firms. These include commercial and high street firms both within and outside London.

We do retain links with our alumni some of whom assist us with the course in a variety of ways. In particular, we have a mentor scheme which involves previous students and members of the profession more generally. The mentors are able to give you guidance on your career.

Some graduates will also go on to further study or use the skills and knowledge acquired in areas outside of the law.

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The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Read more
The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

The course

The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

Pharmacy technicians or other pharmacy staff may study the taught modules at a lower academic level which would incorporate appropriate SQP qualifications and lead to a University College Diploma.

The full programme would typically be delivered on a part-time basis and studied over three academic years, with students completing the ‘taught’ modules to achieve a PgD or UCD within the first two years and those continuing to MSc completing the Masters Dissertation within an individually negotiated timescale over a one to two year period.

How will it benefit me?

Completion of this award will be representative of an individual’s commitment and on-going industrial Continuous Professional Development (CPD) as required by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Successful candidates will gain accreditation from a leading academic provider in the sector but also an award which has the potential to add gravitas and improve the perceived status of those who undertake it, while providing them the opportunity to further develop their higher level discipline specific skills.

Entry requirements

The programmes are offered at different levels of study, therefore for each award there is a different entry requirement:

UCDip (level 5)

Candidates should have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, or equivalent. These should normally include English, Mathematics and a Science or their equivalent. Candidates should also be able to provide evidence of a sufficient standard of core educational skills to benefit from, and succeed in higher education and substantial industrial and professional experience and responsibility or an NVQ at level FE2,3 or 4 as appropriate.

For candidates with no higher education qualifications, such experience should normally be of 5 years or more.

PgC / PgD / MSc

For admission to the University College PgC/PgD/MSc Veterinary Pharmacy candidates would be expected to have obtained a minimum of an upper second class degree in Pharmacy or a related animal science subject.

Applications may also be considered from candidates with a lower second class honours degree, Foundation Degree or good HND (together with related industrial or professional experience of at least two years) or a Graduate Diploma/Graduate Certificate or equivalent. For all applicants, evidence of previous qualifications is required. However, all are judged on their individual merits. Non-graduates with significant work experience are also invited to apply. Where a candidate's honours degree (or equivalent) was not assessed in English, their English language skill will, typically, be evaluated by interview and/or via an approved English Language test.

Further information and applications

For course structure information select the 'Course structure' tab, or download our Course Information PDF.

Due to this being a part time course only, Harper Adams are unable to accept International Students who will require a Tier 4 Visa. If you require more information on this please visit the UK Borders Agency website.

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This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. Read more
This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. At the same time, it enables students to become professionally validated by the National Youth Agency (with JNC recognition) for practice in the UK. Learning on the programme incorporates reflective professional approaches to informal education which enable the development of young people and communities. These are integrated together with wider critical learning on shaping the wider social, political and organisational context in which such practice takes place. The programme combines academic study on taught modules, two periods of fieldwork practice and students conducting their own choice of research with support from experienced researchers. The fieldwork practice placements enable students to develop their practice within local agencies (e.g. local charities and non-governmental organisations) with supported from experienced supervisors. Find out more about the programme from staff and students by watching our short videos.

Course structure

Core modules:
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 1 (15 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 2 (30 credits)

Students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Academic learning is assessed through 3,000 word essays, fieldwork reports, self-assessment, oral presentation and a 10,000 word research report. There are no examinations. To gain a Durham University MA, you must gain 180 credits at Masters level (pass mark 50%)..

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars, fieldwork practice and study visits.

Within an ethos of informal education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes, which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community and youth work and reflect the diverse range of community and youth settings within which practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion, drawn from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area. Two assessed periods of fieldwork practice offer opportunities for learning in practice settings related to community and youth work.

The MA Community and Youth Work provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to professional roles and responsibilities in practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this.

Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations, and assessed fieldwork practice. There is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives that students are encouraged to attend, such as extra-curricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to the professional discipline.

Other admission requirements

Applicants with substantial professional experience may be admitted by concession without an upper second class honours degree, providing that they have demonstrated an ability to undertake Masters level work. All applicants for this programme have to pass an informal interview, which can be conducted either in person in Durham or via telephone/webcam. This will also give applicants an opportunity to find out more about the programme from a member of the teaching team and have any questions answered. If potential applicants have any queries about the entry criteria or programme before making an application, we are happy to respond to informal queries at any stage and to discuss the programme with you.

Admission is subject to satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Enhanced Disclosure check being undertaken upon an offer of a place being made, to assess whether applicants have any previous convictions that prevent them from working with vulnerable people. The cost of a DBS check is currently £44.

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The PGDE (M) is for those with a good second class honours degree (usually 2:1 or above, or the equivalent) and who can evidence that they are able to work independently at a high level in the field of education studies. Read more
The PGDE (M) is for those with a good second class honours degree (usually 2:1 or above, or the equivalent) and who can evidence that they are able to work independently at a high level in the field of education studies. They will need to evidence that they can engage critically with some key ideas in teaching and teacher education.

The PGDE M will lead to 60 credits at level 7 which can be transferred to a full masters award (180 credits including dissertation). Not all graduates will be recruited to the M level qualification. Those who register for a level 7 award and do not achieve at this level will be awarded a Level 6 Diploma if they meet the requirements for this award. Please note that the PGDE (M) is only delivered at the University of Bolton.

What you will learn

The course will equip you to be an effective teacher in the classroom, as well as providing you with the skills and knowledge to work in the post-compulsory sector of education.

Teaching placements are arranged for you in situations which meet the requirements for becoming a qualified teacher in post-compulsory education.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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In. Industrial Relations. or. Industrial Relations & HRM. or. Industrial Relations & Employment Law. or. European Industrial Relations & HRM. Read more

Overview

In:
Industrial Relations
or
Industrial Relations & HRM
or
Industrial Relations & Employment Law
or
European Industrial Relations & HRM

Keele Management School has been delivering high quality part-time distance-learning courses for over 20 years. We continue to offer lifelong learning opportunities to trade unionists, managers, and anyone else involved, or interested, in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (HRM).

Staff are active teachers and researchers within their specialist fields and are experienced adult educators. Most of our students have a practical knowledge of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management.

Part-time courses take 18 months for the PgD, and a further 6 months for the MA. Direct enrolment on to the MA normally requires a second class honours degree. However, applicants with professional qualifications or equivalent experience may also be accepted, subject to interview.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/europeanindustrialrelationsandhrm/

Course Aims

Our part-time courses are suitable for those in full-time employment and are flexible enough to allow completion by students from anywhere in the UK.

Our courses explore key issues such as:
- Theoretical approaches to the employment relationship
- Collective bargaining and trade union organisation
- Performance and reward management systems
- HRM and approaches to labour management

Course Content

The Masters courses are delivered through a taught part consisting of eight 15 credit modules (totaling 120 credits) and one 60 credit dissertation. Students who successfully complete only the taught modules will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. The part-time courses start in September each year and are designed to be taken over eighteen months (Postgraduate Diploma) or two years (MA).

The courses are designed to be both practicable and accessible to those in full-time employment who want to build on their own experience to gain an academic qualification. Our part-time Masters courses are therefore available by distance learning with residential study periods at Keele and extensive learning support. They are flexible enough to allow completion by students anywhere in the UK, Ireland, or Europe, and from any occupation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words. Where applicable, students are encouraged to undertake research connected with their current or previous industrial relations or HRM experience. Students are required to produce a written research proposal, material is supplied on research methods. All students are allocated a supervisor.

Teaching & Assessment]]
- Teaching delivery:
The Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) course is delivered through six residentials at Keele over both years of study supported by distance learning study packs, electronic resources and a dedicated personal tutor for the core part of the course. Each student does eight essay assignments.

Residentials are held in September, January, April and June of each academic year.

- Assessment:
Each module on the taught part of the course is assessed through an essay, with a pass mark of 50%. For those taking the Masters course there is a research methods essay and a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines, we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate course.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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In. Industrial Relations. or. Industrial Relations & HRM. or. Industrial Relations & Employment Law. or. European Industrial Relations & HRM. Read more

Overview

In:
Industrial Relations
or
Industrial Relations & HRM
or
Industrial Relations & Employment Law
or
European Industrial Relations & HRM

Keele Management School has been delivering high quality part-time distance-learning courses for over 20 years. We continue to offer lifelong learning opportunities to trade unionists, managers, and anyone else involved, or interested, in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (HRM).

Staff are active teachers and researchers within their specialist fields and are experienced adult educators. Most of our students have a practical knowledge of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management.

Part-time courses take 18 months for the PgD, and a further 6 months for the MA. Direct enrolment on to the MA normally requires a second class honours degree. However, applicants with professional qualifications or equivalent experience may also be accepted, subject to interview.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/industrialrelations/

Course Aims

Our part-time courses are suitable for those in full-time employment and are flexible enough to allow completion by students from anywhere in the UK.

Our courses explore key issues such as:
- Theoretical approaches to the employment relationship
- Collective bargaining and trade union organisation
- Performance and reward management systems
- HRM and approaches to labour management

Course Content

The Masters courses are delivered through a taught part consisting of eight 15 credit modules (totaling 120 credits) and one 60 credit dissertation. Students who successfully complete only the taught modules will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. The part-time courses start in September each year and are designed to be taken over eighteen months (Postgraduate Diploma) or two years (MA).

The courses are designed to be both practicable and accessible to those in full-time employment who want to build on their own experience to gain an academic qualification. Our part-time Masters courses are therefore available by distance learning with residential study periods at Keele, and extensive learning support. They are flexible enough to allow completion by students anywhere in the UK, Ireland, or Europe, and from any occupation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words. Where applicable, students are encouraged to undertake research connected with their current or previous industrial relations or HRM experience. Students are required to produce a written research proposal, material is supplied on research methods, and all students are allocated a supervisor.

Teaching & Assessment

- Teaching delivery:
The Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) course is delivered through six residentials at Keele over both years of study supported by distance learning study packs, electronic resources and a dedicated personal tutor for the core part of the course. Each student does eight assignments.

Students who register for the MA (or progress from the PgD to the MA) attend two further residentials in year 2 and write a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words. Where applicable, students are encouraged to undertake research connected with their current or previous industrial relations or HRM experience. Material is supplied on research methods, and all students are allocated a supervisor.

Residentials are held in September, January, April and June of each academic year.

- Assessment:
Each module on the taught part of the course is assessed through an essay, with a pass mark of 50%. For those taking the Masters course there is a research methods essay and a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines, we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate course.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Delivered by the Cranfield Forensic Institute this course focuses on providing the knowledge and skills required to conduct comprehensive forensic examinations of digital devices. Read more
Delivered by the Cranfield Forensic Institute this course focuses on providing the knowledge and skills required to conduct comprehensive forensic examinations of digital devices. Guest lectures are delivered by Digital Forensic practitioners throughout the course, with guest lecturers coming from both law enforcement and private companies.

Please note the MSc is available as a full and part-time option. The PgCert and PgDip are only available as a part-time option.

Course overview

The Digital Forensic MSc is available both full-time and part-time. Students will complete a number of taught modules each with theoretical and practical elements and, for the MSc, an individual research project.

Individual Project -

The individual project will involve academic research in a specific area of digital forensics. The student will produce a substantial dissertation detailing their investigation and findings. Students are pushed to produce high quality, novel research during this period, and research outcomes are often at the cutting edge of the subject.

Assessment -

The assessments on this course are a mixture of written and practical exams, oral presentations, coursework assignments and (MSc only) a thesis.

The coursework assignments vary, but will include conducting digital forensics examinations of disk images for particular scenarios, conducting research into the artefacts left by applications, and further written assignments on digital forensic processes and theory.

Start date, duration and location

Start date: Full-time: September. Part-time: September

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

(For MOD status students the duration may vary, subject to annual review.)

Teaching location: Shrivenham

Facilities and resources

Facilities -

There are comprehensive facilities and resources to support study on the Forensic Computing course.

Digital Forensics Laboratories -

The majority of taught modules will be delivered in a dedicated digital forensics teaching computer laboratory regularly reconfigured for different modules, and equipped with all the necessary hardware and software. For example for the “Mac OS X Forensics” module, the PCs are removed and replaced with Apple Macs, for the “Network” module students build their own network and connect to a domain, and for the “Forensic Computing using Linux” module the standard Windows build is replaced with Linux.

There is also a separate digital forensic student laboratory available for general use by students for coursework and research. This is equipped with the latest digital forensics software including Encase 6 and 7, FTK 5, Blacklight, NetAnalysis and WinHex.

In addition a digital forensics research laboratory is used by staff and by students conducting research projects. This contains mobile phone acquisition equipment, reconfigurable networks and customisable hardware.

A network forensics research laboratory is available for research into network protocols and evidence from servers.

A “Crime Scene Room” is used during search and seizure exercises where students will learn how to identify and secure the physical evidence upon which digital evidence resides. The room is equipped with cameras so actions can be recorded and played back in order to analyse and improve strategy and behaviour. It is reconfigured to simulate a variety of crime scenarios.

Learning resources -

Lectures are delivered almost exclusively in the digital forensics teaching laboratory and these along with the practical sessions are supported using Moodle, an open source Virtual Learning Environment ensuring that notes are available electronically. Exercises and exercise data can be downloaded for later study and interactive digital exercises can be used to support the learning of complex subjects.

The Barrington Library provides resources to support the main teaching material where electronic and physical access is available to the latest digital forensics journals including Digital Investigation. Access to the latest textbooks, digital forensics magazines, and past Cranfield digital forensics theses that date back to 2002 are also accessible. Cranfield University subscribes to the latest library databases so digital forensics papers located in non-specialist journals can also be easily located during research and assignments.

Full-time and part-time students will join together during classroom (residential study school) sessions. This is an ideal opportunity for networking.

Entry Requirements

Normally a first or second class Honours degree or equivalent in science, engineering or mathematics. Alternatively, a lesser qualification together with appropriate work experience may be acceptable.

The full-time course is ideally suited to recent graduates in a related subject such as Computer Science who wish to specialise in Forensic Computing. It is also suitable for those who have recently completed a BSc in Computer Forensics, Digital Forensics, Cybercrime Forensics or a related subject, who would wish to deepen their knowledge, improve their skills and increase their employability, in what is a very competitive market.

The part-time course is more suited to those already in full-time employment, such as law enforcement officers, government staff, security consultants, accountancy and banking organisations, corporate security personnel and members of associated agencies in both the UK and overseas. This programme could lead to a new career or promotion with an existing employer. Guidance may be sought by those who do not have the formal qualifications necessary to enrol immediately onto the programme, as to the best study route to take. Please contact us ()

English Language -

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7

Funding

For more information on funding please contact .

Additional information is available here - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Research/Doctoral-Research/Funding

Career opportunities

Our MSc course and it’s individual modules, or equivalent, are regularly cited in job adverts for digital forensics jobs.

This highlights our real-world learning, application to the work place and our relevance to practitioners.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/taught/digital-forensics

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MA IN URBAN HISTORY AT THE CENTRE FOR URBAN HISTORY. GENERAL INFORMATION. This course, designed by leading academics in the field, is an exciting and challenging programme, unique in Britain and abroad. Read more
MA IN URBAN HISTORY AT THE CENTRE FOR URBAN HISTORY

GENERAL INFORMATION
This course, designed by leading academics in the field, is an exciting and challenging programme, unique in Britain and abroad. It offers a broad, interdisciplinary introduction to the study of the city from classical antiquity to modern times, enabling students to concentrate on specialist fields including urban archaeology, the history of English towns, Victorian cities, urban topography, the development of town planning, and modern urban problems. The MA uses the unifying theme of the city to explore the social, cultural, political and economic changes brought about by urban growth.

The course will have a strong appeal to historians, archaeologists, local historians, geographers, art historians and all those with an interest in the study of the city and of individual communities.

The MA offers you the opportunity to:
· Study the history of urban society in depth using a multi-disciplinary approach
· Gain training in research methods
· Work with leading researchers in the field of urban history
· Enhance your historical understanding and encourage you to develop your own area of expertise

The skills acquired in research and in presentation are invaluable in many career fields.

DURATION
One year full-time study or two years part-time.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of a second class honours degree or its equivalent.

COURSE STRUCTURE
Semester 1:
Students take four common courses including a comprehensive survey of European urbanisation - ‘Ancient to Modern European Urban Historiography’, Economic Theory for Historians; and training in research methods and archival research.

Semester 2:
Students take one common module – ‘Introduction to Social Theory’ and two optional modules which (subject to availability)include:


· Victorian Cities looks at some of the following themes: strategies for survival in the city; social segregation, the role of the town council, neighbourhood and community, culture in the city, architecture and decoration, knowledge and power in the city. It makes use of various on-line data sets and involves field trips and a suburban walk.

· Images and Realities: Urban Topography 1540-1840: This module surveys the changing ways in which towns have been depicted and represented through a variety of media such as maps, engravings, travel literature. The course includes a field trip to Bath.

· Vices and Virtues: Behaving and Misbehaving in British Society: This module looks at changing attitudes towards behaviour between 1880 and 1980. It covers a number of vices and virtues including drinking, smoking, cleanliness and manners. A variety of sources are consulted during the course, in particular oral history and autobiography.

· Planning the City – Domesticating the Urban Environment in Europe 1840-1914 explores the major stages by which urban planning developed to regulate and order urban growth, to domesticate the city as a human environment.

· Colonial Cities in British Asia and Africa 1850-1950 focuses on the economic, political and cultural forces that shaped urban life in colonial cities of.
In focusing on the making of urban modernity in the colonial context, it seeks to draw out the comparative dimension of historical processes and ideas that may have originated in Europe but became truly global in reach and scope during the age of empire.


Modules are complemented by field trips to relevant historic sites.

For Further information on the modules see http://www.le.ac.uk/urbanhist/courses.html


DISSERTATION
You will also produce a dissertation. This is an important opportunity for students to develop their own research expertise while working on an approved topic under the direction of a supervisor. The dissertation consists of a maximum of 20,000 words.


TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT
Teaching at the Centre for Urban History is innovative and high quality and conducted by enthusiastic and experienced staff. Each of the course modules is taught primarily in small group seminars. Assessment for modules varies between options. Some are assessed by coursework alone and others by a mixture of coursework and written ‘open’ examination.

FUNDING
The Centre has again received confirmation of its excellence in research training from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) which means that
students can apply for an ESRC 1+3 studentship.
These awards fees plus maintenance for eligible students to undertake a one-year MA degree followed by a PhD. Students may also apply for studentships from the AHRC which operate on a similar basis.

OTHER MA DEGREES OFFERED BY THE CENTRE
The Centre for Urban History also offers a part-time MA in Social History and a full-time MA in European Urbanisation which involves a semester abroad in an European University.

FURTHER INFORMATION
More information about the Centre for Urban History, its facilities and resources, the postgraduate environment and the broad range of workshops, seminars, field trips and summer schools can be seen at http://www.le.ac.uk/urbanhist/
For application forms contact Kate Crispin

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Anyone interested in child development, or planning to work with children in the future, will be fascinated by this course. Read more
Anyone interested in child development, or planning to work with children in the future, will be fascinated by this course. As well as core modules in Social, Developmental, Biological and Cognitive Psychology, Research Methods and Statistics that will give you a BPS-recognised Psychology degree, you will take a series of specialist Child Development modules in years one, two and three that will give you a chance to study children’s thoughts, emotions and behaviour in great detail. You will be able to do a work placement in a child-centred setting, and you will complete an original research study under the supervision of an active developmental researcher. If you want to see how children play or how they interact with their carers or peers, you will have access to our purpose-built Child Observation Suite. If you want to see what is happening inside their heads, we have a fantastic Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience lab with a wide range of imaging equipment designed for children of all ages. If you are interested in Educational Psychology, we have lots of links with local schools and other children’s services, providing opportunities to study language development, literacy, peer relations, online safeguarding, antisocial behaviour and bullying.

DBS CHECKS

This course will involve access to children and/or vulnerable adults. You will be required to obtain a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service clearance (formerly termed CRB) and we will guide you through this process.

INDUSTRY LINKS

We continuously engage with employers to make sure our curriculum delivers the skills and knowledge industry needs. These include a number of professionals from various sectors, including NHS Trusts, patient groups, medical practitioners, allied health professionals, the Prison Service, police forces, local education authorities, schools and professional sports organisations.

PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION

Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for Graduate Membership of the Society with the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership, provided a minimum standard of qualification of second class honours is achieved.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

You’ll be taught by academics that produce first-class research, which has an impact not just in academia but in our working and everyday lives. Much of our psychological research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ and ‘world-leading’ in the last research assessment exercise.

Year 1 is assessed by coursework and Multiple Choice Question exams; Year 2 through coursework, MCQ and essay exams; Year 3 through coursework or essay exams and the project. Percentage of coursework to exams is roughly 50/50.

OPPORTUNITIES

You can get involved in the research carried out by our staff, both as a participant and as a researcher, and not just through your classes and final year projects - there are paid research student internships and part-time research assistant positions available. You can also take part in conference talks, research publications and research grants - our current students regularly publish themselves, or become members of the editorial panel of ‘Diffusion’, UCLan’s own undergraduate research journal.

Some of our graduates pursue a career in psychology by undertaking postgraduate training to become professional psychologists, including our BPS-accredited Master’s programmes. However, UCLan graduates are valued more broadly, and others utilise the skills that our degree encourages to take graduate-level positions in a range of organisations, including the Police, Prison Service, NHS, social and community services, health authorities and in the pharmaceutical industry, and in education and training.

FURTHER INFORMATION

All our Psychology degrees share a common first year, with the opportunity to start specialising from Year 2. You can choose BSc routes in (i) Developmental Psychology, (ii) Forensic Psychology, (iii) Health Psychology, (iv) Neuropsychology, (v) Psychology with Psychotherapy and Counselling and (vi) Psychology and Criminology.

The Psychology syllabus is informed by the professional body, the British Psychological Society (BPS). All core modules are completed by Year 2, after which you can choose your specialism and, if you like, progress straight onto a Master's degree, which can provide stage 1 of your training towards becoming a professional psychologist.

In Year 1 you will attend lectures, seminars, workshops and labs. You will take part in Psychology practicals and develop your skills in statistical analysis and report-writing. Lectures are delivered to large groups, but other classes contain about thirty students. These small groups allow you to develop your understanding of psychology and to practise your communication skills. You should get to know your fellow group members, and learn to use your Academic Advisor as a source of academic advice.

In Year 2, you will study core areas of psychology in more depth, including Social and Developmental Psychology, Cognitive and Physiological Psychology, and Psychological Research Methods. You will continue to develop your skills in psychological research and report-writing but work in smaller groups, and take a role in designing your own studies.

In Year 3, you will complete a double module research project on a Developmental topic. This can be the most exciting part of your degree because it lets you investigate a subject in which you have a particular interest, supported by one-to-one discussions with your supervisor. The rest of Year 3 is made up of a mixture of specialist and general modules including two core Developmental Psychology and Educational Psychology modules.

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The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. Read more
The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. It is designed to acquaint students with all aspects of the research process and to introduce them, mainly through active participation, to a wide variety of research techniques.

This enables students either to qualify for posts involving such skills in academic or research settings or, subject to the approval of the Higher Degree Committee of the University, to transfer to a course leading to a PhD.

The course is also highly relevant to those entering such professional fields as educational or clinical psychology where research skills form an important part of job requirements.

Course structure
Instruction in basic research methods, as applied to selected research fields among those listed below, will be given by means of lectures, tutorials and seminars. Emphasis will be placed throughout on practical exercises in the laboratory and in appropriate field settings such as schools and hospitals.

Course components are:
• Quantitative methods – including statistical methods and computing
• Ethical and professional issues
• Survey research methods and questionnaire design
• Interviewing and assessment methods
• Language and discourse analysis
• Observational methods and use of video in the laboratory and in the field
• Cognitive-developmental research methods
• Practical research skills: oral presentation; critical analysis; grant application.

During the last stage of the course, students will be required to design an empirical study and present a thesis on it of not more than 20,000 words.

Assessment
Final assessment will be based on coursework and the thesis. An oral examination may be held at the discretion of the Board of Examiners.

It is expected that some students will subsequently continue the investigation pursued in their thesis work with a view to obtaining a PhD.

Start date and duration
The course commences at the beginning of the academic session in late September/early October and is of 12 months’ duration on a full-time basis only.

Entry requirements
The entry requirements will normally be a first or second class Honours degree in Psychology, or an equivalent qualification recognised for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society.

The Department
The Department offers facilities for postgraduate study and research in a number of fields focusing around the following main areas:
• Interactive Learning
• Developmental and Educational Psychology
• Road Use Behaviour
• Applied Social psychology
• Cognitive Neuropsychology

The Department has two Research Centres within it. The Centre for Research into Interactive Learning has a broad remit concerned with:
• Learning through peer interaction
• Expert-novice interaction
• Interaction with and around computers

The Centre for Applied Social Psychology carries out strategic and policy-oriented research into, amongst other topics:
• Use and misuse of illicit drugs
• Health and eating
• Problems of alcohol use in society
• Human factors and safety
• Aids

How to apply
Application forms may be obtained from:

The Secretary, Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1QE

Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2581
Fax: +44 (0) 141 548 4001
Email:

Further details can be viewed at http://www.strath.ac.uk/Departments/Psychology/

Contact details
For further information please contact:

Prof Kevin Durkin
Course Director
Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2574
Email:

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The one-year CEMS Masters in International Management (CEMS MIM) degree aims to develop multicultural and multilingual managers with a key understanding of European issues and the skills to thrive in tomorrow’s business environment. Read more
The one-year CEMS Masters in International Management (CEMS MIM) degree aims to develop multicultural and multilingual managers with a key understanding of European issues and the skills to thrive in tomorrow’s business environment. It’s a natural choice for high achieving students who possess the potential and desire to take on a senior international management role.With course offerings and business projects designed jointly by faculty and corporate partners, the CEMS MIM programme bridges university education and practical management, offering insights into leadership best practice.

The programme facilitates international mobility, with each student spending one semester at the ‘home’ university and one semester at a partner university. Ultimately a fast track to success internationally, the unique features of the CEMS MIM include a ten-week internship overseas, skills seminars, and completion of a Group Business Project.

Students participating on the CEMS MIM at UCD Smurfit School will pursue the MSc in International Management. Graduates, on successfully meeting the requirements for both degrees, are awarded the CEMS Masters in International Management and an MSc in International Management.

Applicants must meet the following criteria:

• A minimum second class honours (2.1) in business or related discipline
or
• An honours Higher Diploma in Business Studies

Plus students should demonstrate fluency in three languages including mother tongue, as stipulated by CEMS.

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