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Masters Degrees (Second Class Honours)

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The Master of Science (MSc) normally takes 12-18 months of full-time study to complete. Read more

The Master of Science (MSc) normally takes 12-18 months of full-time study to complete. The degree requires 180 points, which is made up of 90 points in taught papers and a 90-point thesis (research project).  This balance of theses to taught papers may be changed subject to permission from the graduate co-ordinator in your chosen discipline.

Study a MSc at Waikato University and you will enjoy more lab and field work, more one-on-one time with top academics and access to world-class research equipment. Our great industry contacts will also mean exciting collaborations with local, national and international companies and organisations.

This is an ideal degree for students wanting to improve their career opportunities, and seeking a qualification that is potentially not so research-heavy.

This qualification is taught at a level significantly in advance of undergraduate study, providing you with the challenges and knowledge needed to prepare for a successful career.

Facilities

The University of Waikato’s School of Science is home to a suite of well-equipped, world-class laboratories.  You will have the opportunity to use complex research equipment and facilities such as NMR spectroscopyDNA sequencing and the University of Waikato Herbarium (WAIK).

The computing facilities at the University of Waikato are among the best in New Zealand, ranging from phones and tablets for mobile application development to cluster computers for massively parallel processing. Students majoring in Computer Science, Mathematics or Statistics will have 24 hour access to computer labs equipped with all the latest computer software.

Subjects

Students enrolling in an MSc via the Faculty of Science & Engineering can study Biological SciencesChemistryEarth SciencesElectronicsMaterials and ProcessingPhysicsPsychology, and Science, Technology and Environmental Education.

Students taking Computer ScienceMathematics or Statistics will enrol through the Faculty of Computing & Mathematical Sciences.

Course Structure

An MSc is normally completed over 12-18 consecutive months, although it may be possible to study for the degree on a part-time basis. Each full-time student will normally enrol in the first year of the Masters programme in a minimum of 90 points’ worth of taught papers in addition to 30 points towards their thesis. These taught papers may be assessed exclusively on coursework, examination, or a mixture of both. In the second year each student will normally enrol in the remaining research and taught papers required to complete the degree. The degree may be awarded with First Class Honours, or Second Class Honours (first division), or Second Class Honours (second division), or without Honours.

Practical experience

You will spend more time putting theory into practice in the laboratories and out in the field. Smaller class sizes in taught papers mean more one-on-one time with renowned academics.

The University of Waikato also boasts excellent industry collaborations with organisations such as NIWA, AgResearch, Plant and Food Research and Landcare Research. These strong relationships generate numerous research projects for MSc students, who are able to work on real issues with a real client.

Build a successful career

Depending on the major completed and your particular interests, graduates of this degree may find employment in a range of science-related industries.

 Career opportunities

  • Local and Regional Council
  • Crown Research Institutes
  • Energy Companies
  • Environmental Agencies
  • Government Departments
  • Biomedical/Pharmaceutical Industries
  • Private Research Companies
  • Food and Dairy Industries
  • Agriculture and Fisheries


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The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor. This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. Read more
The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor.

Who is it for?

This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. There is a rich blend of students on the course with a variety of backgrounds and interests.

There are students from a number of jurisdictions many of whom will have experience of working in practice. Most students will have a upper second class honours degree or have performed well on the Graduate Diploma in Law. A high standard of work is therefore expected and achieved.

Objectives

This postgraduate Legal Practice Course is a practical course which will give you a strong foundation for a future career in the law. This is reflected in the skills based, transactional nature of the course.

You will work on a series of client files which will be similar to the cases dealt with in a solicitor’s office. The law school’s experienced staff will guide you through the different tasks that would have to be undertaken to advance the client’s case. Your approach to the course will therefore be very different to the one experienced in an academic law course. You will have to apply knowledge in a way that best serves the client’s interests.

The course is very interactive. You will learn by performing tasks relating to the case studies that you are given. These include drafting legal documents, preparing letters of advice or delivering a submission at court. At the end of the course you will therefore be well prepared for your career in the law.

Academic facilities

The course is delivered at the Gray’s Inn Place campus in the heart of legal London. The campus has a specific professional programmes library and all the classrooms have been designed to meet the requirements of the professional law courses.

There is a dedicated LPC suite of classrooms which also includes lockers and a resources room specifically for LPC students. The building which houses the LPC suite also has 10 video rooms where students can practice performances in the oral skills.

Placements

There are no placements as part of the course. However, students will be able to take advantage of the many pro bono opportunities that the law school offers. These include advice clinics, court based projects and schemes which offer the opportunity to work abroad. The City Law School also has links with a wide variety of organisations who can offer opportunities to volunteer with them.

The law school is often approached by firms offering internships to students.

Teaching and learning

One of the strong features of the LPC at City is the level of support students receive. All of the tutors on the course are solicitors, some of whom have worked as partners in their previous firms. They are supported by occasional sessions delivered by practitioners or visiting academics who are experts in their particular fields.

The course is structured in a way that allows you to gain maximum benefit from the experience that tutors have. Students therefore get a high level of face to face contact time with tutors.

This is reinforced by the size of the groups. For the workshops students will be in a group which has a maximum of 16 students. This group will then split into two for the skills sessions which have a maximum of eight students. This allows more time for students to get guidance from tutors.

These smaller sessions are underpinned by the large groups. All students will attend these sessions which give an overview of the area being studied.

Assessment

The assessment regime for the course has to meet the SRA’s requirements. This means that the Core Practice Areas, Electives and Professional Conduct and Regulation (including Solicitors Accounts) are assessed by means of a written examination.

The Course Skills are assessed in the context of the Core Practice Areas and Wills in a manner that is appropriate to the individual skill. For example, you will have to conduct a filmed interview with an actor as your client, make a filmed court submission, draft a legal document or prepare a letter of advice for a client.

Our assessments are open book and therefore test your application of the law rather than your memory.

Modules

The course begins with a two week Foundation when you will have classes every day. This will introduce you the Course Skills and the more practical approach that we take to studying the law. The course is then divided into two stages.

In stage one you will study the core modules. During this stage you will attend four days a week. You will normally have three one and half hour sessions a day amounting to 16 – 18 hours a week.

In stage two, you will study three elective modules. Your timetable will depend on the electives that you choose. You will have around 13.5 – 15 hours of classes a week during this stage.

Stage one - in Stage one you have to complete nine compulsory modules as follows:
-Core Practice Areas
-Course Skills
-Professional Conduct and Regulation
-Wills and the Administration of Estates

Stage two - during Stage two of the course you will study your electives. In order to complete the LPC you must pass three electives. You can take your electives at more than one provider and you can take your electives at providers other than City. You should, however, be aware that it might be more expensive for you to do this. You will choose your electives in November/December after having received guidance from the tutors about your choice. You will have to opt for either a commercial or general practice route although the bulk of the electives are open to all students. All students can choose from the following electives:
-Advanced civil litigation (10 credits)
-Commercial dispute resolution
-Commercial law (10 credits)
-Employment law (10 credits)
-Media law (10 credits)

If you take the commercial route you can also opt for Equity Finance and Mergers and Acquisitions. You will not be able to choose options on the general practice route. On the general practice route you can opt for Family or Private Client but will not be able to take options from the commercial route.

Career prospects

This course is designed to prepare you for life as a trainee solicitor.

Many applicants will not have a training contract when they start the course. The law school offers the bespoke Training Contract Advisory Service (TCAS). This is run by members of the team who were partners in their firms and so know what employers are looking for.

TCAS offers assistance with CV’s, covering letters, selection days and other matters relating to a search for a traineeship. In particular, students can arrange a mock interview with a member of the team. The support offered has allowed graduates to go into a wide variety of firms. These include commercial and high street firms both within and outside London.

We do retain links with our alumni some of whom assist us with the course in a variety of ways. In particular, we have a mentor scheme which involves previous students and members of the profession more generally. The mentors are able to give you guidance on your career.

Some graduates will also go on to further study or use the skills and knowledge acquired in areas outside of the law.

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The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Read more
The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

The course

The Veterinary Pharmacy courses at Harper Adams University College are run in conjunction with the Veterinary Pharmacy Education Programme (VPEP) which is endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). It is managed by Harper Adams and some of the delivery is undertaken by staff from VPEP.

This qualification is primarily intended for pharmacists involved or wishing to develop an involvement in the animal health industry and in the supply and use of animal medicinal products.

Pharmacy technicians or other pharmacy staff may study the taught modules at a lower academic level which would incorporate appropriate SQP qualifications and lead to a University College Diploma.

The full programme would typically be delivered on a part-time basis and studied over three academic years, with students completing the ‘taught’ modules to achieve a PgD or UCD within the first two years and those continuing to MSc completing the Masters Dissertation within an individually negotiated timescale over a one to two year period.

How will it benefit me?

Completion of this award will be representative of an individual’s commitment and on-going industrial Continuous Professional Development (CPD) as required by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). Successful candidates will gain accreditation from a leading academic provider in the sector but also an award which has the potential to add gravitas and improve the perceived status of those who undertake it, while providing them the opportunity to further develop their higher level discipline specific skills.

Entry requirements

The programmes are offered at different levels of study, therefore for each award there is a different entry requirement:

UCDip (level 5)

Candidates should have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, or equivalent. These should normally include English, Mathematics and a Science or their equivalent. Candidates should also be able to provide evidence of a sufficient standard of core educational skills to benefit from, and succeed in higher education and substantial industrial and professional experience and responsibility or an NVQ at level FE2,3 or 4 as appropriate.

For candidates with no higher education qualifications, such experience should normally be of 5 years or more.

PgC / PgD / MSc

For admission to the University College PgC/PgD/MSc Veterinary Pharmacy candidates would be expected to have obtained a minimum of an upper second class degree in Pharmacy or a related animal science subject.

Applications may also be considered from candidates with a lower second class honours degree, Foundation Degree or good HND (together with related industrial or professional experience of at least two years) or a Graduate Diploma/Graduate Certificate or equivalent. For all applicants, evidence of previous qualifications is required. However, all are judged on their individual merits. Non-graduates with significant work experience are also invited to apply. Where a candidate's honours degree (or equivalent) was not assessed in English, their English language skill will, typically, be evaluated by interview and/or via an approved English Language test.

Further information and applications

For course structure information select the 'Course structure' tab, or download our Course Information PDF.

Due to this being a part time course only, Harper Adams are unable to accept International Students who will require a Tier 4 Visa. If you require more information on this please visit the UK Borders Agency website.

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This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. Read more
This programme provides an exciting opportunity to develop professional practice that is supported by an in-depth theoretical understanding for those working in a wide range of careers with young people and communities. The programme attracts practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context. At the same time, it enables students to become professionally validated by the National Youth Agency (with JNC recognition) for practice in the UK. Learning on the programme incorporates reflective professional approaches to informal education which enable the development of young people and communities. These are integrated together with wider critical learning on shaping the wider social, political and organisational context in which such practice takes place. The programme combines academic study on taught modules, two periods of fieldwork practice and students conducting their own choice of research with support from experienced researchers. The fieldwork practice placements enable students to develop their practice within local agencies (e.g. local charities and non-governmental organisations) with supported from experienced supervisors. Find out more about the programme from staff and students by watching our short videos.

Course structure

Core modules:
-Community Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Youth Policy and Practice (15 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Management in Community Settings (30 credits)
-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 1 (15 credits)
-Fieldwork Practice Development 2 (30 credits)

Students are required to pay for travel costs to and from their fieldwork practice placement.

Academic learning is assessed through 3,000 word essays, fieldwork reports, self-assessment, oral presentation and a 10,000 word research report. There are no examinations. To gain a Durham University MA, you must gain 180 credits at Masters level (pass mark 50%)..

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials, group work, reflective practice seminars, research seminars, fieldwork practice and study visits.

Within an ethos of informal education, our teaching and learning incorporates a range of methods which reflect this and time is allocated to provide a balance between tutor-led and self-directed learning. The programme is taught as part of a group of programmes, which attract practitioners from a wide range of contexts and countries, enabling learning in an internationally-comparative context, whilst including a particular focus on UK policy and practice.

Typically, taught sessions provide students with academic input on a particular area of the professional discipline of community and youth work and reflect the diverse range of community and youth settings within which practice takes place. Drawing from relevant literature and legislation and acknowledging the related range of professional skill, competence and understanding, issues are identified for discussion, drawn from historical and contemporary contexts. Seminars provide the opportunity for students to discuss and debate the issues, to share ideas and experience, broaden their understanding and test out their knowledge gained through the taught sessions and independent study. Classroom learning provides students with the latest research and critical theory on the subject area. Two assessed periods of fieldwork practice offer opportunities for learning in practice settings related to community and youth work.

The MA Community and Youth Work provides the student with a learning opportunity within which they can apply and test understanding, knowledge and skills related to professional roles and responsibilities in practice settings. A critical examination of the relationship of theory and practice is central to this.

Core modules are structured to enable students to attend university for teaching on an average of one day per week (part time) or two days per week (full time), so that their study can fit around other commitments that they may have.

The programme is assessed through continual assessment using a range of methods including written assignments, reflective journals, individual and group presentations, and assessed fieldwork practice. There is an expectation that students will undertake independent study to prepare and plan for their classes, through reading relevant literature and legislation, journals and drawing on their current and previous practice experience.

The Community and Youth Work Programme is part of the School of Applied Social Sciences and is significantly involved with the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action at Durham University, as well as being a partner in many collaborative pieces of research and professional practice developments. There are therefore many events and initiatives that students are encouraged to attend, such as extra-curricular training, research seminars and workshops to broaden their understanding and deepen their knowledge of wider issues related to the professional discipline.

Other admission requirements

Applicants with substantial professional experience may be admitted by concession without an upper second class honours degree, providing that they have demonstrated an ability to undertake Masters level work. All applicants for this programme have to pass an informal interview, which can be conducted either in person in Durham or via telephone/webcam. This will also give applicants an opportunity to find out more about the programme from a member of the teaching team and have any questions answered. If potential applicants have any queries about the entry criteria or programme before making an application, we are happy to respond to informal queries at any stage and to discuss the programme with you.

Admission is subject to satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Enhanced Disclosure check being undertaken upon an offer of a place being made, to assess whether applicants have any previous convictions that prevent them from working with vulnerable people. The cost of a DBS check is currently £44.

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The PGDE (M) is for those with a good second class honours degree (usually 2:1 or above, or the equivalent) and who can evidence that they are able to work independently at a high level in the field of education studies. Read more
The PGDE (M) is for those with a good second class honours degree (usually 2:1 or above, or the equivalent) and who can evidence that they are able to work independently at a high level in the field of education studies. They will need to evidence that they can engage critically with some key ideas in teaching and teacher education.

The PGDE M will lead to 60 credits at level 7 which can be transferred to a full masters award (180 credits including dissertation). Not all graduates will be recruited to the M level qualification. Those who register for a level 7 award and do not achieve at this level will be awarded a Level 6 Diploma if they meet the requirements for this award. Please note that the PGDE (M) is only delivered at the University of Bolton.

What you will learn

The course will equip you to be an effective teacher in the classroom, as well as providing you with the skills and knowledge to work in the post-compulsory sector of education.

Teaching placements are arranged for you in situations which meet the requirements for becoming a qualified teacher in post-compulsory education.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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The primary objective of the Masters of Psychology (Forensic) Degree is to provide advanced education in the professional practice of psychology. Read more

About the program

The primary objective of the Masters of Psychology (Forensic) Degree is to provide advanced education in the professional practice of psychology. The training is based on a scientist-practitioner model and is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and applied skills required by a registered practicing psychologist with an emphasis in the area of program specialisation (i.e., Forensic Psychology). The programs draw from a range of theoretical perspectives informed by contemporary research and practice. The Masters by Coursework Degree integrates coursework, research and practical placement experience. Students complete a series of placement experiences under the supervision of highly qualified and experienced Supervisors, and apply best practice models to a professional standard. Upon successful completion of program requirements, graduates are eligible to apply for full registration as a Psychologist, full membership of the APS, and associate membership of the APS College of Forensic Psychologists.

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/master-psychology-forensic

- Work experience & internships
Placements are an integral part of this program. Students will undertake practical placements as part of their training.

- Professional recognition
This program is fully accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditaion Council (APAC) and has full approval of the Australian Psychological Society (APS) for the purpose of Associate Membership to the APS College of Forensic Psychologists.

Professional outcomes

The program meets the requirements set out by the Psychology Board of Australia. Graduates will be eligible to apply for full registration after two years of provisional registration. Graduates will be eligible to apply for membership to the Australian Psychological Society (APS) and for associate membership of the APS College of Forensic Psychologists.

Academic entry requirements

Completion of an Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) accredited 4 year sequence of study in psychology (e.g., Bachelor of Psychological Science (Honours); Graduate Diploma of Psychological Science or equivalent) within the last 10 years, and have achieved a minimum upper second class Honours (H2A), or equivalent. Applicants must also be eligible for provisional registration as a psychologist. Applicants are assessed on academic performance, 2 referee reports, psychometric assessment, and personal suitability via interview.

Students who have obtained their qualifications outside Australia must have their qualifications assessed prior to applying for this program and prior to applying for registration with the Psychology Board of Australia. The Australian Psychological Society (APS) provides this assessment service for the Board and the assessment assists the Board in determining if the student’s qualifications are equivalent to an ‘approved qualification’. However, it is important to note the final decision on equivalence rests with the Board. For more information on equivalency assessments please visit http://www.psychology.org.au

If you obtained your qualifications outside Australia please submit evidence of your APS equivalency below.

Students must obtain provisional registration from the Psychology Board of Australia before commencing the program.

Find out how to apply here https://bond.edu.au/future-students/study-bond/how-apply

See the website https://bond.edu.au/program/master-psychology-forensic

For contact information see here https://bond.edu.au/program/master-psychology-forensic

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In. Industrial Relations. or. Industrial Relations & HRM. or. Industrial Relations & Employment Law. or. European Industrial Relations & HRM. Read more

Overview

In:
Industrial Relations
or
Industrial Relations & HRM
or
Industrial Relations & Employment Law
or
European Industrial Relations & HRM

Keele Management School has been delivering high quality part-time distance-learning courses for over 20 years. We continue to offer lifelong learning opportunities to trade unionists, managers, and anyone else involved, or interested, in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (HRM).

Staff are active teachers and researchers within their specialist fields and are experienced adult educators. Most of our students have a practical knowledge of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management.

Part-time courses take 18 months for the PgD, and a further 6 months for the MA. Direct enrolment on to the MA normally requires a second class honours degree. However, applicants with professional qualifications or equivalent experience may also be accepted, subject to interview.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/europeanindustrialrelationsandhrm/

Course Aims

Our part-time courses are suitable for those in full-time employment and are flexible enough to allow completion by students from anywhere in the UK.

Our courses explore key issues such as:
- Theoretical approaches to the employment relationship
- Collective bargaining and trade union organisation
- Performance and reward management systems
- HRM and approaches to labour management

Course Content

The Masters courses are delivered through a taught part consisting of eight 15 credit modules (totaling 120 credits) and one 60 credit dissertation. Students who successfully complete only the taught modules will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. The part-time courses start in September each year and are designed to be taken over eighteen months (Postgraduate Diploma) or two years (MA).

The courses are designed to be both practicable and accessible to those in full-time employment who want to build on their own experience to gain an academic qualification. Our part-time Masters courses are therefore available by distance learning with residential study periods at Keele and extensive learning support. They are flexible enough to allow completion by students anywhere in the UK, Ireland, or Europe, and from any occupation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words. Where applicable, students are encouraged to undertake research connected with their current or previous industrial relations or HRM experience. Students are required to produce a written research proposal, material is supplied on research methods. All students are allocated a supervisor.

Teaching & Assessment]]
- Teaching delivery:
The Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) course is delivered through six residentials at Keele over both years of study supported by distance learning study packs, electronic resources and a dedicated personal tutor for the core part of the course. Each student does eight essay assignments.

Residentials are held in September, January, April and June of each academic year.

- Assessment:
Each module on the taught part of the course is assessed through an essay, with a pass mark of 50%. For those taking the Masters course there is a research methods essay and a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines, we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate course.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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In. Industrial Relations. or. Industrial Relations & HRM. or. Industrial Relations & Employment Law. or. European Industrial Relations & HRM. Read more

Overview

In:
Industrial Relations
or
Industrial Relations & HRM
or
Industrial Relations & Employment Law
or
European Industrial Relations & HRM

Keele Management School has been delivering high quality part-time distance-learning courses for over 20 years. We continue to offer lifelong learning opportunities to trade unionists, managers, and anyone else involved, or interested, in Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management (HRM).

Staff are active teachers and researchers within their specialist fields and are experienced adult educators. Most of our students have a practical knowledge of Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management.

Part-time courses take 18 months for the PgD, and a further 6 months for the MA. Direct enrolment on to the MA normally requires a second class honours degree. However, applicants with professional qualifications or equivalent experience may also be accepted, subject to interview.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/industrialrelations/

Course Aims

Our part-time courses are suitable for those in full-time employment and are flexible enough to allow completion by students from anywhere in the UK.

Our courses explore key issues such as:
- Theoretical approaches to the employment relationship
- Collective bargaining and trade union organisation
- Performance and reward management systems
- HRM and approaches to labour management

Course Content

The Masters courses are delivered through a taught part consisting of eight 15 credit modules (totaling 120 credits) and one 60 credit dissertation. Students who successfully complete only the taught modules will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. The part-time courses start in September each year and are designed to be taken over eighteen months (Postgraduate Diploma) or two years (MA).

The courses are designed to be both practicable and accessible to those in full-time employment who want to build on their own experience to gain an academic qualification. Our part-time Masters courses are therefore available by distance learning with residential study periods at Keele, and extensive learning support. They are flexible enough to allow completion by students anywhere in the UK, Ireland, or Europe, and from any occupation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words. Where applicable, students are encouraged to undertake research connected with their current or previous industrial relations or HRM experience. Students are required to produce a written research proposal, material is supplied on research methods, and all students are allocated a supervisor.

Teaching & Assessment

- Teaching delivery:
The Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) course is delivered through six residentials at Keele over both years of study supported by distance learning study packs, electronic resources and a dedicated personal tutor for the core part of the course. Each student does eight assignments.

Students who register for the MA (or progress from the PgD to the MA) attend two further residentials in year 2 and write a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words. Where applicable, students are encouraged to undertake research connected with their current or previous industrial relations or HRM experience. Material is supplied on research methods, and all students are allocated a supervisor.

Residentials are held in September, January, April and June of each academic year.

- Assessment:
Each module on the taught part of the course is assessed through an essay, with a pass mark of 50%. For those taking the Masters course there is a research methods essay and a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines, we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate course.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Delivered by the Cranfield Forensic Institute this course focuses on providing the knowledge and skills required to conduct comprehensive forensic examinations of digital devices. Read more
Delivered by the Cranfield Forensic Institute this course focuses on providing the knowledge and skills required to conduct comprehensive forensic examinations of digital devices. Guest lectures are delivered by Digital Forensic practitioners throughout the course, with guest lecturers coming from both law enforcement and private companies.

Please note the MSc is available as a full and part-time option. The PgCert and PgDip are only available as a part-time option.

Course overview

The Digital Forensic MSc is available both full-time and part-time. Students will complete a number of taught modules each with theoretical and practical elements and, for the MSc, an individual research project.

Individual Project -

The individual project will involve academic research in a specific area of digital forensics. The student will produce a substantial dissertation detailing their investigation and findings. Students are pushed to produce high quality, novel research during this period, and research outcomes are often at the cutting edge of the subject.

Assessment -

The assessments on this course are a mixture of written and practical exams, oral presentations, coursework assignments and (MSc only) a thesis.

The coursework assignments vary, but will include conducting digital forensics examinations of disk images for particular scenarios, conducting research into the artefacts left by applications, and further written assignments on digital forensic processes and theory.

Start date, duration and location

Start date: Full-time: September. Part-time: September

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

(For MOD status students the duration may vary, subject to annual review.)

Teaching location: Shrivenham

Facilities and resources

Facilities -

There are comprehensive facilities and resources to support study on the Forensic Computing course.

Digital Forensics Laboratories -

The majority of taught modules will be delivered in a dedicated digital forensics teaching computer laboratory regularly reconfigured for different modules, and equipped with all the necessary hardware and software. For example for the “Mac OS X Forensics” module, the PCs are removed and replaced with Apple Macs, for the “Network” module students build their own network and connect to a domain, and for the “Forensic Computing using Linux” module the standard Windows build is replaced with Linux.

There is also a separate digital forensic student laboratory available for general use by students for coursework and research. This is equipped with the latest digital forensics software including Encase 6 and 7, FTK 5, Blacklight, NetAnalysis and WinHex.

In addition a digital forensics research laboratory is used by staff and by students conducting research projects. This contains mobile phone acquisition equipment, reconfigurable networks and customisable hardware.

A network forensics research laboratory is available for research into network protocols and evidence from servers.

A “Crime Scene Room” is used during search and seizure exercises where students will learn how to identify and secure the physical evidence upon which digital evidence resides. The room is equipped with cameras so actions can be recorded and played back in order to analyse and improve strategy and behaviour. It is reconfigured to simulate a variety of crime scenarios.

Learning resources -

Lectures are delivered almost exclusively in the digital forensics teaching laboratory and these along with the practical sessions are supported using Moodle, an open source Virtual Learning Environment ensuring that notes are available electronically. Exercises and exercise data can be downloaded for later study and interactive digital exercises can be used to support the learning of complex subjects.

The Barrington Library provides resources to support the main teaching material where electronic and physical access is available to the latest digital forensics journals including Digital Investigation. Access to the latest textbooks, digital forensics magazines, and past Cranfield digital forensics theses that date back to 2002 are also accessible. Cranfield University subscribes to the latest library databases so digital forensics papers located in non-specialist journals can also be easily located during research and assignments.

Full-time and part-time students will join together during classroom (residential study school) sessions. This is an ideal opportunity for networking.

Entry Requirements

Normally a first or second class Honours degree or equivalent in science, engineering or mathematics. Alternatively, a lesser qualification together with appropriate work experience may be acceptable.

The full-time course is ideally suited to recent graduates in a related subject such as Computer Science who wish to specialise in Forensic Computing. It is also suitable for those who have recently completed a BSc in Computer Forensics, Digital Forensics, Cybercrime Forensics or a related subject, who would wish to deepen their knowledge, improve their skills and increase their employability, in what is a very competitive market.

The part-time course is more suited to those already in full-time employment, such as law enforcement officers, government staff, security consultants, accountancy and banking organisations, corporate security personnel and members of associated agencies in both the UK and overseas. This programme could lead to a new career or promotion with an existing employer. Guidance may be sought by those who do not have the formal qualifications necessary to enrol immediately onto the programme, as to the best study route to take. Please contact us ()

English Language -

Students whose first language is not English must attain an IELTS score of 7

Funding

For more information on funding please contact .

Additional information is available here - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Research/Doctoral-Research/Funding

Career opportunities

Our MSc course and it’s individual modules, or equivalent, are regularly cited in job adverts for digital forensics jobs.

This highlights our real-world learning, application to the work place and our relevance to practitioners.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/taught/digital-forensics

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What is the course about?. Public health is the science and art of promoting and protecting health and wellbeing, preventing ill-health and prolonging life through the organised efforts of society. Read more

What is the course about?

Public health is the science and art of promoting and protecting health and wellbeing, preventing ill-health and prolonging life through the organised efforts of society.

This is a fully online, distance-learning course using digital learning technology to allow learners to study from anywhere in the world and better fit study around personal and professional commitments. Flexibility in the course start dates (September, January or May) and module choices in Year 2 helps provide students with a more bespoke learning experience designed to match learning needs, interests and aspirations.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for students who want to explore the current and emerging key issues in the field while reflecting on their own practice, experiences and interests. We are keen for students to collaborate with us in better understanding how public health works across research, policy and practice at the local, national and global level.

Public heath practitioner roles differ greatly in the work they focus on and in their specific job titles. Some examples of the types of roles include: Health Policy Advisor; Public Health Advisor; Substance Misuse Worker; Heath Improvement Practitioner; Public Health Nutritionist; Teenage Pregnancy Coordinator; Smoking Cessation Advisor; Advanced Health Improvement Practitioner; Environmental Scientist; Health/Education Advisor; Support Workers and many more.

Distinctive features

You will receive the relevant theoretical and practical skills that are needed for careers as researchers, policymakers and/or practitioners across the public, private and voluntary/community/not-for-profit sectors.

You will be provided with expert knowledge and different perspectives from across research, policy and practice, focusing on contemporary public health issues relevant locally, nationally and internationally. The course will be taught by research-active staff alongside input and additional materials from policy and practice partners. Co-creation of content is also a key feature we explore with the course, allowing us to shape the curriculum with our students to build on their experiences, expertise and interests.

Course design

Through the course, students will be supported to:

• Explore and understand public health theory and techniques appropriate to their own area of practice or interest.

• Gain first-hand insight into approaches used by researchers, practitioners and policy-makers.

• Develop as skilled and knowledgeable multidisciplinary public health practitioners and researchers.

• Develop practical and transferable skills such as report writing, team working, literature searching, research methods and critical appraisal.

• Develop as critical and independent thinkers.

Teaching and assessment

The MPH offers you the opportunity to graduate with a named award recognised globally for public health knowledge and expertise.

The flexibility of this course allows you to manage your studies around your professional and personal life. Further flexibility is provided by the diverse variety of optional modules available throughout the entirety of the course. To ensure that you are equipped with the necessary knowledge and capabilities to conduct a successful research project and complete your Masters, there are taught elements within the research project module designed to develop your understanding and practical abilities.

The MPH Course Director is Dr Tony Robertson. Teaching on the course will be provided by colleagues across the Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport, particularly from the Centre for Population Health and Public Health Research (led by Prof Andrew Watterson and Prof Sally Haw) and the Institute for Social Marketing (led by Prof Linda Bauld). Module Coordinators include Dr Dawn Cameron, Dr Nicola Cunningham, Claire Eades, Dr Josie Evans, Dr Niamh Fitzgerald, Dr Richard Purves, Dr Tony Robertson and Ashleigh Ward.

Quote

You will gain a Masters degree from a multi-award winning faculty, led by a group of world-leading academics.

Module Information

Year 1 core modules

What is Public Health?

Epidemiology & Its Numbers

What is Public Health Research?

Year 2 core module

Policy in the Real World

Year 2 option modules

Society & Health

Health Behaviours & Behaviour Change

Qualitative Research and Analysis

Quantitative Research and Analysis

Research Ethics and Governance

Year 3 module

Research Project

Why Stirling

In the most recent Research Excellence Framework, the Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport was ranked 1st for health research in Scotland and 12th in the UK, showcasing our commitment to produce world-leading research that improves health and reduces health inequalities.

Stirling is one of only two UK universities ranked in the top 50 by the QS World University Rankings, for universities under the age of 50. This recognises universities that have established a strong position in international ranking tables in an impressively short period of time.

The University of Stirling was awarded the Queen’s Anniversary Prize in 2013 for its public health research.

Awards

It is possible to achieve:

·        Postgraduate Certificate in Public Health (60 credits – 3 modules)

·        Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health (120 credits – 6 modules)

·        Master of Public Health (120 credits plus a research project of 60 credits)

What is the credit level?

All modules are at level 11 within the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF). 180 credits points are awarded for the course of study. All core and optional modules are worth 20 credits, with the research project worth 60 credits.

Entrance requirements

A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2:1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant relevant work/life experience, are also encouraged to apply.

Course start date

This course is 100% online and only available part time over three years. There are three possible start dates: September, January or May (although a September start date is recommended).

Get in touch

Tony Robertson, Course Director Telephone: UK +44 (0) 1786 466360

Email:

Website: http://stir.ac.uk/public-health

Join our Twitter community: @StirMPH



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Tralee is currently seeking to recruit a high calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master of Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Read more

Tralee is currently seeking to recruit a high calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master of Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Graduates holding a relevant Level 8 Honours Degree (second class honours or higher) are invited to submit an application. The successful applicants will be awarded a stipend of €700 per month for a maximum period of 18 months and the Institute will waive full fees for this funding period. Postgraduate students are expected to complete their studies full-time at the Institute.

Biography of Principle Supervisor

Dr Oscar Goñi received his Degree in Chemistry from the University of Navarra (Spain), an MSc in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Complutense University of Madrid (Spain) and completed his PhD in Plant Protein Biochemistry at ICTAN-CSIC (Spain) and Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). Dr Goñi has previously worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Max Planck Institute of Plant Breeding Research (Cologne). He is a protein biochemist with experience in the purification and characterization of functional proteins, enzymology and development of protein biomarkers. Dr. Goñi currently holds the position of Postdoctoral Researcher with Shannon ABC / Brandon Bioscience and specialises in the development of enzyme activities for the production of macro-algae derived oligosaccharides and chitin/chitosan derived oligosaccharides for crop protection and yield enhancement. 

Research Project Abstract

The United Nations’ and Agriculture Organization predicts that by 2050 the world will need to produce 70 percent more food than it does currently. Along with improving food storage and transport, increasing crop yields is seen as a primary solution. Salinity is one the major environmental stresses affecting crop production, particularly in arid and semi-arid areas. Most of the vegetable crops are salt sensitive, growing poorly in salinized soils due to the accumulation of toxic ions from prolonged irrigation regimes. A meaningful approach to increase crop yield and counteract salt stress would be the use of protein hydrolysate-based biostimulants, which are gaining interest worldwide. Nowadays, more than 90% of the protein hydrolysates market in agriculture is based on products obtained through chemical hydrolysis of proteins from animal origin. The production and use of new vegetable derived-protein hydrolysates with high plant biostimulant activity has become the focus of much research interest due to their lack of plant phytotoxicity, absence of degraded or biologically inactive amino acids or compatibility in the production of food for vegetarians. The commercial partner, Deltagen UK, aims to commercialise protein hydrolysate biostimulants with superior salinity inducing tolerance. The aim of this research is the development of an innovative system to produce protein hydrolysates from the defatted by product meals of flax, lentil and sesame seeds with the ability to biostimulate plant tolerance to salt stress. Novel protein hydrolysates will be produced using a cocktail of suitable proteases, they will be applied to tomato plants (cv. Micro-Tom) in a controlled growth room under salt stress conditions. Treatments will be assessed by comparing classic phenotypical parameters. Plant tissue will also be saved in order to assess other biochemical and molecular parameters such as stress related proteins and osmoprotectant metabolites.

Research Context (Technical Merit & Impact)

The beginning of 21st century is marked by global scarcity of water resources, environmental pollution and increased salinization of soil and water. An increasing human population and reduction in land available for cultivation are two threats for agricultural sustainability. It has been estimated that worldwide 20% of total cultivated and 33% of irrigated agricultural lands are afflicted by high salinity. It has been projected that more than 50% of the arable land would be salinized by the year 2050. Use of optimized farm management practices such as shifting crop rotation or better irrigation systems can ameliorate yield reduction under salinity stress. However, its implementation is often limited because of cost and availability of good water quality. Several salt-tolerant varieties have been released, the overall progress of traditional breeding has been slow and has not been successful, as only few major determinant genetic traits of salt tolerance have been identified. The utilisation of agro-food processing wastes to generate value added products is an extremely convincing argument as it makes commercial and environmental sense. In addition, it is an excellent, demonstrable example of the European circular economy in action, a key objective of the H2020 research programme, turning waste into value and ultimately food for a growing population.

Research Methodology

Three process variables will be studied in order to obtain the maximum degradation of seed proteins: incubation time, temperature and the initial concentration of meal protein. The Response Surface Methodology (RSM) will be used to reduce the cost and duration of experiments and allow for the observation of any interacting factors in the final process response. Amino acid and monosaccharide composition will be determined by sensitive high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) according previous bibliography. Molecular weight distribution of protein hydrolysates will be characterized by protein electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The plant trials will involve 2 separate sets of experiments under unstressed and salt-stressed conditions respectively. Experiments will be carried out in a growth room with different concentration rates of different protein hydrolysates and the tomato variety Micro-Tom will be used. This extensive factorial experiment will be assessed by fruit yield, fruit quality, chlorophyll (SPAD measurement), MDH content (cell membrane integrity) and levels of protective compounds (proline and soluble carbohydrates). The presence of stress proteins such as HSPs will be determined using immunoblotting techniques (Western blot). RT-qPCR is another advanced laboratory technique that will be emp



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IT Tralee is currently seeking to recruit ahigh calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master by Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Read more

IT Tralee is currently seeking to recruit ahigh calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master by Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Graduates holding a relevant Level 8 Honours Degree (second class honours or higher) are invited to submit an application. The successful applicants will be awarded a stipend of €700 per month for a maximum period of 18 months and the Institute will waive full fees for this funding period. Postgraduate students are expected to complete their studies full-time at the Institute.

Biography of Principle Supervisor

Mr Quille received his Degree in Chemistry of Pharmaceutical Compounds from University College Cork in 2007. He has since completed an M.Sc in Biotechnology in the Shannon ABC laboratories at IT Tralee on a project entitled: The preparation of an alginate with a hydrophobic moiety that retains its biocompatibility and immunosuppressive properties while remaining suitable for cellular encapsulation. He has previously worked in Astellas as a Process Technician and in Shannon ABC as a Biochemical Technician. He currently holds the role of Research Scientist with Shannon ABC. Previous projects include developing a commercial focus to the use of bioassays in the assessment of different components of seaweed and the impact of seasonality. He has worked on the FP7 funded project NatuCrop where he oversaw extensive tomato growth room, glasshouse and field trials. Results of his work have been presented at a number of conferences all over Europe and in Brazil. He is currently working on a Horizon 2020 project. 

Research Project Abstract

Crop productivity relies heavily on nitrogen fertilisation which in itself requires huge amounts of energy to produce. Also excess applications of nitrogen to the land is detrimental to the environment therefore increasing plant nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is essential in the promotion of sustainable agriculture. The use of seaweed and seaweed extracts in agriculture is well documented. The most popular and well researched type of seaweed extract commercially available is an Ascophyllum Nodosum extract (ANE). Ascophyllum is a brown seaweed that is native to the waters of Ireland as it grows best in the North Atlantic basin. Seaweed extracts have been described to enhance seed germination and establishment, improve plant growth, yield, flower set and fruit production, increase resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and improve postharvest shelf life. Previously a seaweed extract when combined with a fertiliser regime increased the productivity and oil content and accelerated maturation (colour and firmness) of the olive fruits from olive trees. Oil-Seed Rape (OSR; Brassica napus) is a member of the Brassicaceae family that is grown for its oil content. It requires extensive nitrogen fertilisation, however it has a poor N-harvest index meaning a lot of nitrogen is lost in the straw rather than transported to the pod. The aim or our study is to apply 4 commercially available ANE’s to winter and spring crops of OSR (different varieties) in a controlled growth room and glasshouse and finally in a field setting under different fertiliser regimes. Treatments will be assessed by comparing fresh weight, dry weight, and seed/oil yield and oil quality. Plant tissue will also be saved in order to assess other parameters such as flavonol accumulation, nitrate reductase, gene expression (NRT2) and photosynthetic parameters.

Research Context (Technical Merit & Impact)

600,000 Ha of OSR is planted in the UK and Ireland alone every year, recommended input of nitrogen is 200 kg (0.2 tonnes) per Ha meaning 120,000 tonnes of nitrogen every year. As OSR only has an N-harvest index of 0.6, representing 48,000 tonnes lost, which is a massive financial loss as well as potentially environmentally detrimental. In determining the effect of ANE’s on NUE current research focuses on the outcome, i.e. is yield increased, rather than investigate the method by which the yield has increased. This research is aimed a filling some void of knowledge here by linking phenotypic differences to biochemical and genetic data of treated plants in order to assign a potential mode of action.

Research Methodology

While ANE’s have been shown to increase nitrogen assimilation, extensive growth trials, especially in economically important crops (such as OSR) which investigate their role in affecting NUE are scarce and are only seemingly becoming popular in recent years. However considering the increased price of nitrogen, the additional interest in biostimulants (ANE’s in particular), the need to feed a growing population and coupled to the environmental damage of excess nitrogen this can be considered a ‘hot topic’. Plant (glasshouse and field setting) trials will be conducted and analysed for phenotypic data (photosynthetic measurements, yield). Materials from these plant trials must then be harvested, extracted and saved for biochemical and genetic determination. Lab-based techniques employed include protein extraction, western blotting and spectrophotometry, RT-PCR and HPLC. This 3 pronged approach from assessing phenotype to the biochemical level and finally to the gene level will provide evidence on mode of action of the ANE’s potential impact on NUE in OSR.



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The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. Read more
The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. It is designed to acquaint students with all aspects of the research process and to introduce them, mainly through active participation, to a wide variety of research techniques.

This enables students either to qualify for posts involving such skills in academic or research settings or, subject to the approval of the Higher Degree Committee of the University, to transfer to a course leading to a PhD.

The course is also highly relevant to those entering such professional fields as educational or clinical psychology where research skills form an important part of job requirements.

Course structure
Instruction in basic research methods, as applied to selected research fields among those listed below, will be given by means of lectures, tutorials and seminars. Emphasis will be placed throughout on practical exercises in the laboratory and in appropriate field settings such as schools and hospitals.

Course components are:
• Quantitative methods – including statistical methods and computing
• Ethical and professional issues
• Survey research methods and questionnaire design
• Interviewing and assessment methods
• Language and discourse analysis
• Observational methods and use of video in the laboratory and in the field
• Cognitive-developmental research methods
• Practical research skills: oral presentation; critical analysis; grant application.

During the last stage of the course, students will be required to design an empirical study and present a thesis on it of not more than 20,000 words.

Assessment
Final assessment will be based on coursework and the thesis. An oral examination may be held at the discretion of the Board of Examiners.

It is expected that some students will subsequently continue the investigation pursued in their thesis work with a view to obtaining a PhD.

Start date and duration
The course commences at the beginning of the academic session in late September/early October and is of 12 months’ duration on a full-time basis only.

Entry requirements
The entry requirements will normally be a first or second class Honours degree in Psychology, or an equivalent qualification recognised for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society.

The Department
The Department offers facilities for postgraduate study and research in a number of fields focusing around the following main areas:
• Interactive Learning
• Developmental and Educational Psychology
• Road Use Behaviour
• Applied Social psychology
• Cognitive Neuropsychology

The Department has two Research Centres within it. The Centre for Research into Interactive Learning has a broad remit concerned with:
• Learning through peer interaction
• Expert-novice interaction
• Interaction with and around computers

The Centre for Applied Social Psychology carries out strategic and policy-oriented research into, amongst other topics:
• Use and misuse of illicit drugs
• Health and eating
• Problems of alcohol use in society
• Human factors and safety
• Aids

How to apply
Application forms may be obtained from:

The Secretary, Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1QE

Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2581
Fax: +44 (0) 141 548 4001
Email:

Further details can be viewed at http://www.strath.ac.uk/Departments/Psychology/

Contact details
For further information please contact:

Prof Kevin Durkin
Course Director
Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2574
Email:

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The one-year CEMS Masters in International Management (CEMS MIM) degree aims to develop multicultural and multilingual managers with a key understanding of European issues and the skills to thrive in tomorrow’s business environment. Read more
The one-year CEMS Masters in International Management (CEMS MIM) degree aims to develop multicultural and multilingual managers with a key understanding of European issues and the skills to thrive in tomorrow’s business environment. It’s a natural choice for high achieving students who possess the potential and desire to take on a senior international management role.With course offerings and business projects designed jointly by faculty and corporate partners, the CEMS MIM programme bridges university education and practical management, offering insights into leadership best practice.

The programme facilitates international mobility, with each student spending one semester at the ‘home’ university and one semester at a partner university. Ultimately a fast track to success internationally, the unique features of the CEMS MIM include a ten-week internship overseas, skills seminars, and completion of a Group Business Project.

Students participating on the CEMS MIM at UCD Smurfit School will pursue the MSc in International Management. Graduates, on successfully meeting the requirements for both degrees, are awarded the CEMS Masters in International Management and an MSc in International Management.

Applicants must meet the following criteria:

• A minimum second class honours (2.1) in business or related discipline
or
• An honours Higher Diploma in Business Studies

Plus students should demonstrate fluency in three languages including mother tongue, as stipulated by CEMS.

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The MSc in Biomedical Science (via Distance Learning) is ideal for those interested in earning a Master’s degree while continuing to work. Read more

About the Programme

The MSc in Biomedical Science (via Distance Learning) is ideal for those interested in earning a Master’s degree while continuing to work. Developed for working graduates of engineering, technology or science who wish to upskill or change career direction, the 14 module course will introduce students to interdisciplinary research using technologies and skills from scientific, engineering and clinical disciplines. Modules include: Molecular & Cellular Biology, Anatomy (gross and histology), Innovation & Technology Transfer, Biomaterials, Molecular & Regenerative Medicine, Pharmacology & Toxicology, Tissue Engineering, Stereology, Biomechanics, Project Management, Experimental Design and Data Analysis, Monitoring for Health Hazards at Work, Lasers & Applications, Product Development, Validation and Regulation. Course contributors include senior academics, industry experts and scientists who are actively engaged in research in all areas of biomedical science.
The NUI Galway programme is based within the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science (NCBES), an interdisciplinary centre of research excellence with a primary focus on five research themes that include; Biomedical Engineering, Cancer, Infectious Disease, Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (see http://www.ncbes.ie for more details).

Career Opportunities

Current participants work in medical device and pharmaceutical companies including Boston Scientific, Abbott, Medtronic, Elan, Stryker, Allergan, Advanced Surgical Concepts, Pfizer, and Tyco Healthcare. Whether industry- or healthcare-based, precise job descriptions vary from sales, to R&D engineers. Completion of this new distance-learning biomedical science programme will broaden career prospects of new graduates and those who have already joined the work force.
As a current participant has said, “I feel the course has enhanced my position in my company, as well as opening up other career opportunities. It is a course well-worth pursuing,” Dermot, Senior Process Development Engineer.

A Prime Location

The NUI Galway campus offers students the vibrancy and activity of a bustling community with over 40,000 students. Offering an extensive range of academically-challenging undergraduate and postgraduate degrees and diplomas of international quality, NUIG’s programmes provide students with opportunities for personal and academic development, as well as equipping them with the skills and knowledge necessary to embark on successful careers. The University's long-standing policy of innovative programme development ensures that the teaching programmes respond to the ever-changing needs of employers and of the economy.
Being a University City, Galway is a lively energetic place throughout the year. The University, situated close to the heart of Galway, enjoys an intimate relationship with the city and during the academic year, 15% of the population of the city are students. A compact, thriving city, Galway caters to youth like few other places can. The University's graduates have played a pivotal role in all areas of the development of Galway, including the arts, industry and commerce.

Programme Delivery

The course is delivered over two years, based on a blended learning format; a mixture of face-to-face contact (approximately 9 hours per module) in addition to 12-18 hours per week of self-directed study combined with e-tutorial on-line support. Students attend on-campus lectures/tutorials on a Friday afternoon and/or Saturday, approximately once every 5 weeks. The final module of year one consists of practical experimentation, when students obtain hands-on experience of a range of biomedical and engineering techniques. Students are required to attend 3-4 practical sessions during this module. Completion of a research project (preferably at place of work) is also required. Semester 1 exams are held in January and Semester 2 exams are held in June. Students will also be required to produce a thesis based on a research project preferably carried out at their place of work.

Minimum entry requirements

Second Class Honours in any science, engineering, medical or technology discipline. Candidates with a general (ie non-honours), or third class honours, B.Sc./B.E. can still apply provided they have at least three years relevant work experience.

Apply

Apply online at http://www.pac.ie (look for college of science postgraduate course code GYS19). Selection is based on the candidate’s academic record at an undergraduate level and their relevant work experience.

First-hand Testimonials

“The masters in distance learning is ideal for anyone who wants to continue with their education without having the full time commitment of other courses that are 9-5, 5 days a week. The modules undertaken during the courses are varied and regardless of a physics or biology background the work is challenging without being too involved. The lab work is excellent-getting to work with new and exciting technologies the module notes are excellent and the tutors and lectures are brilliant.” Sinead, Physicist, self-employed
"A great course. Hard work, but fun. Well designed to meet the needs of the biomedical/medical device industry. It has added hugely to my understanding of the body, its function and the requirements of medical devices and the materials which go into them. I feel that it has expanded my horizons hugely." Martin, Senior Quality Engineer, Boston Scientific

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