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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a Foreign Language (EFL). Read more

This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular, those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

Outcomes

The aims of the programme are:

  • Analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing
  • Explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment
  • Evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework
  • Develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning
  • Provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Full time

Year 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Part time

Year 1

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Year 2

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Careers

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.



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This route is intended for applicants with a background in foreign language education. Applicants will typically have a good honours degree in a foreign language or applied linguistics. Read more
This route is intended for applicants with a background in foreign language education. Applicants will typically have a good honours degree in a foreign language or applied linguistics. Some prior professional involvement in an aspect of the field of L2 education is preferred (for instance, in teaching, assessment or teacher training). The route aims to combine in-depth critical understanding of the main currents of conceptual thinking in the literature on second language learning with practical training in aspects of L2 empirical research.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmpesl

Course detail

The aims of the route are:

- To examine key theoretical perspectives which have influenced recent research in second language education and to relate these to the wider context of educational research.
- To analyse and develop effective methodologies in conducting empirical research in second language teaching and learning in schools and communities.
- To develop critical skills with respect to the literature on research in second language teaching and learning, focusing mainly on core readings which provide instructive examples of empirical research.
- To investigate the language education issues in an international and comparative perspective. All students will receive individual supervision in the planning and analysis of an L2-related empirical project of their choice which will form the centre piece of their thesis and which will draw on different strands of the theoretical and methodological components of the taught units.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Research in Second Language' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Each term, written work is submitted and formative feedback is provided. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions (three times a term). At the end of each term, supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

- Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.
- Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
- Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MPhil in Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This route is intended for applicants with a background in foreign language education. Applicants will typically have a good honours degree in a foreign language or applied linguistics. Read more
This route is intended for applicants with a background in foreign language education. Applicants will typically have a good honours degree in a foreign language or applied linguistics. Some prior professional involvement in an aspect of the field of L2 education is preferred (for instance, in teaching, assessment or teacher training). The route aims to combine in-depth critical understanding of the main currents of conceptual thinking in the literature on second language learning with practical training in aspects of L2 empirical research.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmeesl

Course detail

The aims of the route are:

- To examine key theoretical perspectives which have influenced recent research in second language education and to relate these to the wider context of educational research.
- To analyse and develop effective methodologies in conducting empirical research in second language teaching and learning in schools and communities.
- To develop critical skills with respect to the literature on research in second language teaching and learning, focusing mainly on core readings which provide instructive examples of empirical research.
- To investigate the language education issues in an international and comparative perspective. All students will receive individual supervision in the planning and analysis of an L2-related empirical project of their choice which will form the centre piece of their thesis and which will draw on different strands of the theoretical and methodological components of the taught units.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific educational domain;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Research in Second Language Education' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Written feedback is provided on the thesis by two independent assessors. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions. Supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the Master of Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (e.g.: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MA programme is aimed at those who wish to develop critical understanding about issues in Second Language Education around the world. Read more
This MA programme is aimed at those who wish to develop critical understanding about issues in Second Language Education around the world. The course will help you to understand key theoretical issues and debates related to English as an International Language, policy making, planning, teaching and learning second languages and innovation, both in the international and national arenas.

We welcome those who are qualified teachers and practitioners or graduates new to studying this field. Whatever your background, if you have experience of learning a second language and an interest in second language education, the MA programme will help you to further develop knowledge about current issues and trends in policy development and practice.

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The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. Read more

The Second World War attracts more academic, media and public interest than any other event in history, and it is an integral part of school and further/higher education curricula. This programme will enable you to study the subject in detail, to update your knowledge, and to become familiar with the use of personal accounts, including interviews and testimonies. You will be taught by experts in the field, and you will carry out your own research in your favourite area.

You will study in depth some of the key issues in the military, political, and social history of the Second World War, such as strategy, diplomacy and politics of Axis and Allied forces, the war in the air, the victory campaign in the West, and the war in the East, including life under German occupation, the fate of societies under the conditions of total war, and last but not least, the Holocaust.

Why Wolverhampton?

Our part-time Master’s programme will enable you to explore the history of the Second World War. Special consideration will be given to military conflicts, societies at war, and the Holocaust.

You will be guided by a team of historians with the highest international reputation, led by Professor John Buckley and Professor Johannes-Dieter Steinert. The team includes Professor Gary Sheffield, Professor Stephen Badsey; and you will in addition be taught by other international scholars such as Professor John Gooch, Professor Martin Alexander, and Dr Peter Gray.

You will benefit from our international scholarly activities, among them the multidisciplinary conference series “Beyond Camps and Forced Labour. Current International Research on Survivors of Nazi Persecution” (Imperial War Museums, London), “Children and War: Past and Present” (in association with the UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict), battlefield tour/study trips to Normandy and the Low Countries and the University of Wolverhampton’s oral history programme and archive.

Career path

Successful completion of the course will enhance your career prospects and could lead to a specialised career in museums, education, armed forces, or as a battlefield guide, along with more general arts-related careers.

It will be particularly relevant to researchers, teachers, journalists, political and central government professionals, civil servants, military professionals, charity and campaign workers.

Attainment of the MA degree could also lead to doctoral research.

What skills will you gain?

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate critical and analytical understanding of key issues and debates in the history of the Second World War and Holocaust.
  • Demonstrate the ability to negotiate, design and undertake independent research based on primary sources.
  • Exercise critical, evaluative and analytical skills in relation to historiographical debates and sources.
  • Communicate effectively at an appropriate level for a Masters programme.


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The degree project should constitute an advanced and specialised study in the main subject for second-cycle studies. The course is designed as a studio within urbanism studies, with special focus on public places and urban spaces. Read more
The degree project should constitute an advanced and specialised study in the main subject for second-cycle studies. The course is designed as a studio within urbanism studies, with special focus on public places and urban spaces. The degree project is a project work that synthesises all results of earlier courses. After completed degree project, the student should be able to (1) show knowledge of the disciplinary foundation of the chosen subject area understanding in current research and development and advanced method knowledge (2) demonstrate the ability to search, collect and integrate knowledge in a systematic way and identify his/her needs of additional knowledge (3) demonstrate the ability to identify, analyse, assess and handle complex phenomena, issues and situations also with limited information (4) demonstrate the ability to plan and with adequate methods carry out qualified assignments within given time frames and to evaluate this work (5) demonstrate the ability to, orally and in writing, in dialogue with different groups clearly account for and discuss his/her conclusions and the knowledge and arguments underlying them (6) demonstrate the ability to make assessments considering relevant scientific, social and ethical aspects and (7) show such skills that is required to participate in research and development or to work independently in other qualified activities. A main part of the studies, at least 30 credits of which 15 credits with specialisation should be completed before the degree project may be started for second-cycle studies within the main field of study. It falls on examiner to ensure that the student has the specialisation that is intended above. Exemption can after assessment be granted by the director of first and second cycle education.

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This program develops an awareness of current thought and practice in TESL education. TESL graduate students gain experience and understanding in such areas as. Read more

This program develops an awareness of current thought and practice in TESL education. TESL graduate students gain experience and understanding in such areas as: current issues in TESL theory and practice, second language acquisition, second language reading and writing, language socialization, language and identity, second language assessment, discourse analysis, critical applied linguistics, and research methods.

The MA program has a research emphasis and includes a thesis, whereas the MEd program has a professional emphasis and includes the option of a major paper. Each program requires a minimum of 30 credits of approved graduate work, at least 24 of which must be numbered 500 or above.



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This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. Read more
This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. You will study the process of learning and the use of second languages. The programme allows you to focus your research on your language of choice, for instance Dutch as a second language, but also French, German, Swedish, Chinese, or any other language.
You will approach second language acquisition from many different angles, including psychology, social interaction and language teaching. You will be introduced to the field of linguistics, language acquisition and language teaching theory.
The program focuses especially on Dynamic System Theory, which explains how cultural differences become bodily differences. You will learn about the social, cultural and political processes that play a role in using a language or that may cause the use of a second language to decline. You will explore didactic applications of recent research and theoretical developments, and learn about computer assisted language learning.

Why in Groningen?

The MA Applied Linguistics at the University of Groningen is a unique programme focussing on the processes involved in second language learning, as well as teaching theories. The programme encompasses various fields of study, as learning and using a second language may be approached from many different angles. Students will explore and discuss the factors that relate to second language development, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching, and culture.

In addition to theoretical and teaching paradigms, students will also take classes in the research practices and methodology essential for conducting applied linguistics studies and research. These classes will act as the foundation from which students will be able to conduct their own applied linguistics research in the form of the MA thesis in Semester 2.The MA Applied Linguistics is a truly international programme, welcoming students from all over the world. The classes are taught entirely in English, and students are encouraged to use their own language experiences as the basis for their individual linguistic enquiries and research.Our degree programme is small, which means that students benefit from small, intimate classes and close collaborative relationships with the other students as well as instructors.

Job perspectives

After completing this programme, you can pursue a career in research, or set up language teaching projects. You are also equipped to take positions on the European level that deal with issues of language policy.

Job examples

- Linguist (L2)
- language research
- language education
- language policy
- language testing
- curriculum development
- publishing

Research in Applied Linguistics focuses on the process of learning and using a second language. It covers various fields of study because learning and using a second language can be approached from many different angles, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching and culture.

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The Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) program will prepare you to teach students in the United States and throughout in the world. Read more
The Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) program will prepare you to teach students in the United States and throughout in the world. A campus-wide focus on cultural diversity will introduce you to a community of learners in a local context. You will learn the intricacies of linguistics and teaching from specialists who have lived, worked and taught throughout the world. You will have the opportunity to put your skills to work in an assistantship at St. Cloud State's English as a Second Language Program or the Intensive English Center, a program that trains more than 100 English language learners from more than 15 countries each year. These two centers offer 50 assistantships each year.

Program Highlights

Courses available in the on campus and online.
The licensure program is available on campus or online.
22 percent students are from diverse U.S. backgrounds and 28 percent are international students.
Graduates receive professional credentials.
The on-campus program can be taken in conjunction with a K-12 ESL licensure for the state of Minnesota.
50 graduate assistantships available for qualified applicants.
The federally-sponsored TEACH Grant program offers up to $4,000 per year for students seeking K-12 ESL licensure​.
1+1 options offered in conjunction with partner institutions in Germany, Peru and Korea.

Program Distinctions

​Graduates have gone on to teach throughout the United States and 19 other countries.
​The program's nine faculty hold the highest degrees in their fields and have a combined 100 years of teaching experience.
More than 300 students have completed the program.
10 percent of graduates continue on for doctoral studies.

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The master of arts in teaching English as a second language is an interdisciplinary program contributed to by the departments of English, Languages and Cultures, Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, and Philosophy. Read more
The master of arts in teaching English as a second language is an interdisciplinary program contributed to by the departments of English, Languages and Cultures, Anthropology and Sociology, Communication Studies, and Philosophy. The program is designed for those preparing to teach English to students whose first language is not English; graduates of this program are also prepared to design ESL/EFL curriculum and to assess the linguistic development of second language students. Also offered is the certificate of preparation in ESL teaching, a graduate program that leads to the Pennsylvania Department of Education’s qualification for teaching ESL PK-12 in the public schools. The certificate courses may be applied toward the M.A. in TESL. Provided that entering students are precertified in a stand-alone area, this certificate qualifies graduates for public school ESL teaching in Pennsylvania. Both the M.A. and certificate programs provide background in linguistics, sociolinguistics and culture, and teaching methodology in TESL.

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The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. Read more
The M.Sc. in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition is a popular course which introduces students to key issues within the field of Applied Linguistics with a focus on topics relating to second language learning. The topics represented within the course draw from some of the related disciplines within Applied Linguistics such as Psycholinguistics, Education (Language Teaching/Learning), Linguistics, and Sociolinguistics. It can be taken either full–time (1 year) or part-time (2 years). The full time course consists of 8 taught modules (4 modules in each of the two years if students choose the part-time route) and 1 research dissertation.

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The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. Read more

Why take this course?

The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. As well as thoroughly reviewing developments in the field, this flexible course allows students to develop their expertise in areas of personal interest.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Extend your knowledge and understanding of learning and teaching as you upgrade your qualifications
Reflect on your teaching practice from theoretical and research-based perspectives
Improve your career prospects

What opportunities might it lead to?

Completion of the course will support further career options, including diversification into educational management or teacher education, among other paths. Many of our graduates have gone on to obtain jobs in universities in the UK and abroad, or have taken on greater responsibility in their existing institutions. Others have also taken advantage of the secure footing for doctoral-level study provided by the programme.

Module Details

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units. You will study:

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Theory and Practice of TESOL: Students consider the theory and practice that informs communicative language teaching and how individual and contextual factors impact on classroom practices and decision making. In so doing, they reflect on their own teaching and learning experiences. The unit also considers issues in curriculum and syllabus design, assessment and teacher education.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

plus two options from:

Using Technology and Corpora in Learning, Teaching and Research: Students are introduced to the ways in which they can make use of technology as both language teachers and language researchers. In particular, the unit focuses on the technological affordances of the internet and language corpora.

World Englishes: The English language has always been characterised by dynamic change. This unit considers the political, ideological and pedagogical aspects of English being used as a global lingua franca.

Analysing, Evaluating and Writing Material: This unit develops students’ abilities to analyse teaching materials, with particular emphasis on the perspectives of discourse, pragmatics and theories of second language acquisition. Students will focus on evaluating and writing material with particular teaching contexts in mind.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) entirely through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block (plus their dissertation). A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Typically each taught unit runs for twelve weeks and has four hours of teaching per week. Teaching takes place in small seminar groups, allowing students to analyse arguments, contribute ideas and ask questions. Tutors are also available to offer guidance to students on an individual basis.

Most units are assessed through at least two pieces of coursework (typically essays), amounting to 6,000 words in total for the unit.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research in teaching and related fields. Possession of a Master's qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position in either the private or public sectors or to diversify a career into areas such as educational management, materials evaluation and production, teacher education or external assessment.

Read less
The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. Read more

Why take this course?

The course is ideal for practicing ELT/EFL/TESOL teachers who wish to continue their professional development and improve their career prospects. As well as thoroughly reviewing developments in the field, this flexible course allows students to develop their expertise in areas of personal interest.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Extend your knowledge and understanding of learning and teaching as you upgrade your qualifications
Reflect on your teaching practice from theoretical and research-based perspectives
Improve your career prospects

What opportunities might it lead to?

Completion of the course will support further career options, including diversification into educational management or teacher education, among other paths. Many of our graduates have gone on to obtain jobs in universities in the UK and abroad, or have taken on greater responsibility in their existing institutions. Others have also taken advantage of the secure footing for doctoral-level study provided by the programme.

Module Details

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units. You will study:

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Theory and Practice of TESOL: Students consider the theory and practice that informs communicative language teaching and how individual and contextual factors impact on classroom practices and decision making. In so doing, they reflect on their own teaching and learning experiences. The unit also considers issues in curriculum and syllabus design, assessment and teacher education.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

plus two options from:

Using Technology and Corpora in Learning, Teaching and Research: Students are introduced to the ways in which they can make use of technology as both language teachers and language researchers. In particular, the unit focuses on the technological affordances of the internet and language corpora.

World Englishes: The English language has always been characterised by dynamic change. This unit considers the political, ideological and pedagogical aspects of English being used as a global lingua franca.

Analysing, Evaluating and Writing Material: This unit develops students’ abilities to analyse teaching materials, with particular emphasis on the perspectives of discourse, pragmatics and theories of second language acquisition. Students will focus on evaluating and writing material with particular teaching contexts in mind.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Applied Linguistics and TESOL: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) entirely through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block (plus their dissertation). A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Typically each taught unit runs for twelve weeks and has four hours of teaching per week. Teaching takes place in small seminar groups, allowing students to analyse arguments, contribute ideas and ask questions. Tutors are also available to offer guidance to students on an individual basis.

Most units are assessed through at least two pieces of coursework (typically essays), amounting to 6,000 words in total for the unit.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research in teaching and related fields. Possession of a Master's qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position in either the private or public sectors or to diversify a career into areas such as educational management, materials evaluation and production, teacher education or external assessment.

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Study abroad at UC Berkeley, the number one public university in the world. With a wide variety of study options, our diverse programs allow you to customize your learning experience—for either a semester or a full academic year. Read more

Study abroad at UC Berkeley, the number one public university in the world. With a wide variety of study options, our diverse programs allow you to customize your learning experience—for either a semester or a full academic year.

Focus your studies on specific subjects, such as business, environmental design or English literature. Or, choose the courses that most interest you with our Discover program.

Experience life as a U.S. university student with support from our international student services that connect you to all that UC Berkeley has to offer. Take advantage of this study-abroad opportunity to learn from UC Berkeley's renowned professors in a culturally diverse campus—without the complicated admissions process. Current undergraduate students and recently graduated students are eligible to apply.

Do you have prior knowledge of English, but need to improve your language skills to apply to one of our programs? Then this preparatory program is for you. You'll focus on developing your English-language and test-taking skills needed to succeed at UC Berkeley.

BGA-Start is a language program intended to be taken before participating in one of our programs or tracks, which focus on academic subjects as opposed to English language development.

Courses:

You'll take one approved UC Berkeley course and various UC Berkeley Extension courses so that you can focus on your English as a Second Language (ESL) skills and TOEFL test preparation. You'll take a minimum of 12 units and maximum of 18 units total of credit-bearing, in-person courses (online courses are not eligible). Enrollment in all courses is subject to availability.

Suggested course structure: 1 UC Berkeley course +1 TOEFL preparation course + 2 ESL courses + 1 or 2 non-language-focused Extension course(s).

  • UC Berkeley Extension courses—Recommended courses include:
  • TOEFL preparation
  • Two to three ESL courses in academic reading and writing, listening and speaking (required)
  • Courses related to major or subject of interest (optional)
  • UC Berkeley Courses—To view available courses, select the academic term and then the subject you are interested in. Upon acceptance into the program, we'll work with you to choose an appropriate UC Berkeley course that meets your English proficiency level so that you can succeed.

If you successfully complete the BGA-Start program, you will have the opportunity to join the BGA Discover program or a program track focused on a specific academic subject. You must maintain a 3.0 GPA and receive recommendations from your instructors and the Program Director before being accepted into a BGA program.

UC Berkeley undergraduate and graduate-level courses must be approved in advance. You must meet listed prerequisite requirements to be eligible for any course.



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The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Read more
The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Students on the programme take four taught courses at SOAS during their first year, including a team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts. In addition, students take a text-reading seminar, allowing them to integrate their Chinese reading skills into their disciplinary studies, or an approved language-based course. Further courses can be selected from available disciplines including Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Cinema, Cultural and Regional Studies, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Music, Politics, and Study of Religions.

In their second year, students will undertake an extended period of study at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London.

The programme is aimed at students pursuing careers in the academic world, business, government and the media that require a skill set which encompasses disciplinary rigour, comprehensive area knowledge and cultural and linguistic fluencies. Applicants should have at least intermediate-level proficiency in modern Chinese (HSK Level 4). The language element of the training will be tailored to meet the needs of students’ existing language skills. Alternative elements are available for applicants not in need of further Chinese language training, such as native speakers of Chinese.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/ma-advanced-chinese-studies/

Structure

In the first year at SOAS students on the programme take the team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts Approaches to Chinese Studies - 15PCIC001 and two taught courses (2 Units) from the list given below. In addition, students take a Reading Seminar in Chinese Studies - 15PCIC003 (1 Unit) or an approved language-based course (1 Unit).

In their second year, students will undertake a Period of Postgraduate Study in China (15PCIC004) at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London (Extended Dissertation in Chinese Studies 15PCIC999).

These courses should be chosen in close consultation with the programme convenor.

MA Advanced Chinese Studies - Programme Specification 2014/15 (pdf; 207kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/courses/file93666.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

Lectures and Seminars
Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance.

Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework.

The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers.

Dissertation
A 20,000-word dissertation will be written by each student on this programme after his/her return from China, for submission in September of the second year. The dissertation will be on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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