• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
"sculpture"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Sculpture)

  • "sculpture" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 121
Order by 
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

Read less
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Sculpture Studies pathway

If you select the Sculpture Studies pathway you could choose options which take different approaches to a range of three dimensional objects across different periods, spanning from the Anglo Saxon period to contemporary explorations of the idea of ‘sculpture’, which during the twentieth century underwent a dramatic series of changes, ranging from early twentieth century notions of ‘direct carving’ and ‘truth to materials’ in the work of Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, to the found, ‘readymade’ objects of the Dadaists and surrealists in Europe, to a wide range of other kinds of three-dimensional objects made from unusual, non-art materials, installation art and other kinds of ‘mixed media’ works from the 1950s in internationally diverse geographic locales.

In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Sculpture Studies. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Sculpture Studies, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Sculpture Studies) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Read less
Ceramics aims to develop individual abilities within the subject, whether through practice or historical or theoretical study. Approaches range from sculpture and installation to studio ceramics and design for products. Read more
Ceramics aims to develop individual abilities within the subject, whether through practice or historical or theoretical study. Approaches range from sculpture and installation to studio ceramics and design for products. The course is distinctive in offering you the opportunity to specialise in ceramics as a medium allied to a breadth of possibilities, and establishing negotiated individual modes of practice.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

We offer Ceramics full or part time, lasting one year (3 trimesters) FT, 6 trimesters PT. Your first two trimesters is made up of taught sessions and assessed projects, the Master’s Project in the final trimester is by negotiated project only. Completion of the first 2 modules on the course lead to the award of the Postgraduate Certificate, completion of the first 4 modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. Subsequent completion of the MA double module leads to the award of MA.

In the first trimester you will undertake a module in research methodologies in conjunction with students from other design disciplines. You will be establishing and initiating your studio based creative practice through individual and group tutorials and critiques. This teaching covers issues of technique together with aesthetic and design ideas and their interpretation and context within contemporary practice. This approach to studio work will be further developed in the second trimester, alongside an individual analysis of the relevant theoretical, cultural and social context for your work. The four modules taken in the first two trimesters lead to the postgraduate diploma (PGDip).

The final trimester, leading to the MA, comprises an individually negotiated and self-initiated body of work building on knowledge and skills already acquired. You will be supervised by tutorial through to completion. The project will be selected from options giving an emphasis either to individual expression or a more design-based approach.

DISTANCE LEARNING ROUTE

Students may opt to take some or all of the modules on this course by distance learning. Teaching and tutorial support will be delivered via a combination of computer-based learning and campus visits, with assessment matched to the particular interests and needs of individual students.

This route is open to all students on the course. You may pursue both practice based and/or historical approaches to the study of ceramics by this means. The route will be of particular interest to those geographically distant from Bath, or who would find attending campus regularly difficult. The technology used is simple and accessible. You will need access to a computer linked to the internet as materials are delivered through a standard web browser. We welcome enquiries from anyone interested in this option, and will be delighted to answer any questions you may have.

MODULES

Research Methodologies - This module is intended to provide students with a strong sense of methodological purpose when thinking in, through and about their practice. Research Methodologies will outline established models of academic enquiry - both practical and intellectual - proposing ways to gather, analyse and communicate a wide range of data and ideas.

Initiating Creative Practice - A practice module, where students produce work based upon a programme negotiated and agreed with staff, designed to set an agenda and working plan.

Developing Creative Practice - A practice module, where students make work based on visual research on a programme negotiated and agreed with staff to develop studio work, awareness and understanding of relevant concepts.

Analysis of Contemporary Context - A module where the practitioner engages in a contextual consideration of their work by referring to cultural, critical, theoretical and historical perspectives employing advanced research methods alongside development of a proposed programme for the final MA module.

Advanced Studio Practice - You are expected to submit a comprehensive body of creative ceramic work which meets the agreed objectives, accompanied by documentation of visual and other research. It should include a written evaluation of the ‘journey’ and outcomes of your project, and aspirations for future developments.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Theoretical elements will be delivered as a concurrent contextualisation of your practical work along with study of the relevant research methodologies. In this way your practical work is firmly based in the theoretical and critical awareness of its context and potential market.

Ceramics students have workspaces in well equipped workshops, including CAD facilities. There is an excellent glaze laboratory and a range of electric and gas-fired kilns, including outdoor firing facilities for salt and raku. There is also a dedicated space and kilns for large-scale work. All students have access to workshops in photography, sound and video, etching and litho, as well as the specialist Art and Design library.

TUTORS

• Jane Gibson Mdes RCA (design and ceramic production and curating)
• Keith Harrison MA RCA (time-based installation)
• Nick Lees MA Cardiff (tableware, ceramic sculpture, critical writing)
• Jo Dahn MA PhD UWA (history and theory)
• Graham McLaren PhD RCA

These staff will be supported by an extensive team of part-time staff, whose wide range of expertise is available on a regular basis. There are also 3-4 visiting artists each year.

• Marion Brandis MA (public art, commissioned projects)
• Steve Brown MA (ceramic print)
• Ian Byers BA (ceramic sculpture)
• Helen Harris BA (photography)
• Simon Hulbert MA (gallerist, potter)
• Penny Grist BA (printmaking)
• Aimee Lax MA (ceramics)
• Malcolm Ross-White (drawing)
• Zeita Scott MA (tableware, studio ceramics)
• Sasha Wardell MA (tableware and giftware)
• Professor Takeshi Yasuda (tableware, studio ceramics)

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Typical career destinations include exhibiting, ceramic design and museum work, arts administration, public art and research.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The four taught modules in trimesters one and two are assessed through studio exhibition of work with a supporting statement, or the presentation of a document, accompanied in both cases by evidence of appropriate research. The final module for the MA is assessed through exhibition or exposition, according to the nature of the work, of all work for the module or a record of it, addressing the issues agreed in the initial proposal. There are no written examinations.

Read less
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow sound artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the sound artist and musician/composer in 21st century art practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/composition-and-sonic-art/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA Composition and Sonic Art is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, seven practice rooms including a band room (with PA and drum kit), an ensemble practice room and a drum room, two music studios, a music technology room and a research room for postgraduate students. Students also have access to pianos and practice areas elsewhere in the University.

Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all music students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

Music Technology and IT
The Music Technology room houses 12 PC workstations running Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project, alongside general internet, email and office software. Other computer networked facilities are also available.

The music studios are based in the basement of the Richard Hamilton Building. The facilities consist of two large single user electroacoustic studios, two sound proof booths; access to Adobe Audition; Pro-Tools; Cubase Studio and Logic; workstations running Pure Data; Max/MSP; Hyperprism; GRM Tools; CDP; a range of sound-recording equipment; along with the possibility of using the two studios together as separated recording and control rooms. One studio has a pair of Genelec 1037C Shielded Active Monitoring Speakers and the other studio has a pair of Genelec S30C Active Monitoring Speakers.

Sonic Art Research Unit Room
This is a space for postgraduate students and research staff engaged in Composition; Sonic Art; or Sound Art practices to use. There are two Apple Macs running Logic alongside a range of powered speakers, mixing desks; electronic components for the creation of bespoke devices; microphones for field and instrumental recording; and a range of digital recording devices.

Field trips

You are given the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their seocnd year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semster 2. In Year 2 they work through the summe ron their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practising sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Contemporary Arts offers a comprehensive introduction to creative strategies and practice-based research methodologies for developing innovative contemporary arts and enabling an in depth development of your concerns and interests. It provides an excellent basis for both doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow artists to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the artist in 21st century arts practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/contemporary-arts/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA in Contemporary Arts is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, music practice rooms and a research room for postgraduate students. Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all arts students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

- Arts related workshops and IT
Contemporary Arts students have access to well equipped workshops run by technical specialists in Artists’ Books, Printmaking, Photography, Video and a range of processes including casting, metalwork and woodwork. General internet, email and office software are available as well as workstations with more specialist programmes including Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project.

Field trips

You have the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam;or the Vilnius Art Academy.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - Mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their second year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semester 2. In Year 2 they work through the summer on their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

This unique programme enables students to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes them well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector and to work as practising artists.

Many Contemporary Arts master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level continue as practising artists whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within art galleries and museums; teaching further or higher education; new technologies; arts administration; arts and regeneration, conservation.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music offers a comprehensive introduction to creative strategies and practice-based research methodologies for developing innovative contemporary arts and music and enabling an in depth development of your concerns and interests. It provides an excellent basis for both doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the artist and musician/composer in 21st century arts practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/contemporary-arts-and-music/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA in Contemporary Arts and Music is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, music practice rooms and a research room for postgraduate students. Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all arts students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

- Arts-related workshops and IT
Contemporary Arts and Music students have access to well-equipped workshops run by technical specialists in Artists’ Books, Printmaking, Photography, Video and a range of processes including casting, metalwork and woodwork. General internet, email and office software are available as well as workstations with more specialist programmes including Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project.

Field trips

You have the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their second year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semester 2. In Year 2 they work through the summer on their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

This unique programme enables students to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes them well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector and to work as practising cross artform practitioners.

Many Contemporary Arts and Music master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level continue as practising cross artform practitioners and sound artists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within performance, festival management, new technologies; arts administration; arts and music teaching, arts for health, acoustic ecology, and as community cross artform activists.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Read less
Still accepting applications for 2016/17. The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. The two-year structure provides students with sustained periods of studio-based activity, with dissertation requirements coming early in the second year of study. The emphasis on practice is nonetheless informed and supported by theoretical and professional Study Units throughout the academic year. Whether specialising in a single discipline or working across media, MFA students will have time to develop and expand their studio work to the highest standards, bringing in relevant historical, theoretical and professional perspectives.

::MFA students can expect::

- Support in consolidating studio practice to a level appropriate for accomplished practitioners
- Access to facilities, workshops and expertise for the fabrication of artworks relating to the individual student's ambitions
- Opportunities to employ innovative approaches to studio practice through which conceptual ideas are tested and informed by use of selected media
- To gain a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research and scholarship
- To develop originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the Visual Arts
- To consolidate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of current debates in contemporary art practice
- To further develop aptitude for professional practice, independent research or employment, including opportunities for public exhibition
- To possess independence, self-reliance, as well as promotional enterprise skills, motivated toward professional practice or employment

::Learning Environment::

- Large individual studio spaces
- An excellent staff-to-student ratio with the possibility for weekly tutorial support
- A specialised programme of lectures, seminars and workshops
- Input from regular Visiting Lecturers and artists
- Expert support for a dedicated team of workshop technicians
- Professional development provision for gallery visits and other external events
- Contact with a regular series of professional Artists-in-Residence based in the Visual Arts studios throughout the academic year
- An immersive environment with rich connections to art history, particularly Surrealism, through the legacy of college founder Edward James

Programme Aims

The MFA programme Aims and Learning Outcomes are consistent with the descriptors for a
qualification at QAA Level 7, as defined in the QAA Quality Code for Higher Education (Part A,
Chapter 1).

The programme aims are to provide:

Practical:

1. Provide a stimulating and supportive learning environment for students to develop their
creative, intellectual and material practices

2. Provide facilities and support through which students can further develop their skills and fluency
to an advanced level as accomplished practitioners, gaining a comprehensive understanding of
techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

3. Enable students to achieve a comprehensive understanding and detailed knowledge of key
aspects of their field of study, as well as creative originality in their application

4. Encourage and support advanced experimental, creative approaches to studio work, much of
which is at, or informed by, the forefront of academic discipline, field of study or area of
professional practice (QAA Quality Code Part A, Chapter A1, p12)

Theoretical:

1. Provide a stimulating environment where advanced research methods and critical practices can
be articulated and where a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to personal
research and advanced scholarship can flourish

2. Increase student’s ability to deploy accurately advanced techniques of analysis and inquiry within
their chosen discipline

3. Enable students to articulate an advanced critical understanding of studio practice and its
contexts within contemporary visual art culture, much of which is informed by the forefront of
art practice and theory

Professional:

1. Provide support for personal and professional development, including development and
application of transferable skills such as self-management, decision-making, communication,
collaboration, problem solving, IT and research skills

2. Educate students to possess independence, self-understanding, self-reliance motivated toward
future learning, practice or employment

Facilities

All full-time Visual Arts students are provided with a large individual workspace in the Edward James Studios. In addition to specialist spaces dedicated to Painting and Drawing, Sculpture and Tapestry and Textile-based work, the studios also include Seminar Room, a materials and tool store, a small photographic darkroom, bookable exhibition and research spaces, plus an IT suite with digital editing software. A self-contained Print Room offers specialist facilities for etching, aquatint, monoprinting, woodblock and linocut. Students can work on a large-scale in the Sculpture Courtyard, which is also suitable for work in stone carving.

Students are encouraged to collaborate with other College departments - particularly the full-time programmes in the School of Conservation - making the most of the wide range of specialist knowledge, materials and equipment that is available. The Short Course programme also allows students to access a wide range of visiting tutors and specialist techniques that can further enhance their studies.

West Dean House and Estate offers students access to ambitious exhibition opportunities and unique research material. Students are able to submit site-specific proposals throughout the year and are encouraged to take part in the annual Open House event. The Edward James Collection is an outstanding resource for full-time students, given them access to a range of significant, even iconic, works of art as an ongoing source of inspiration and research.

The College's Arts and Conservation Library gives students access to thousands of specialist books, journals and databases to support their studies.

The Main House also contains West Dean Tapestry Studio, one of the world's leading producers of hand-woven tapestry. As well as having close contact with the expertise of Master Weavers and designers, students have access to the studio's Dye Rooms, a specialist facility for the dyeing of yarn. Find out more about the professional Tapestry Studio here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-creative-arts/tapestry-studio

Read less
The course is designed to enable you to strengthen your position as an artist with a move from undergraduate study or re-entry at postgraduate level characterised by an increased depth of research and increasingly sophisticated, critically reflexive, material practice. Read more
The course is designed to enable you to strengthen your position as an artist with a move from undergraduate study or re-entry at postgraduate level characterised by an increased depth of research and increasingly sophisticated, critically reflexive, material practice.

The programme supports the development of your visual research process and enables a testing ground of methods, genres, concepts and contexts that challenge the boundaries and relationship between theory and practice.

Course content
The MA Fine Art is a broad, studio-based programme with an open and inclusive approach to fine art practice. The programme encourages both specialist and cross-disciplinary approaches enabling students to extend and deepen their knowledge and application of fine art practice.

The curriculum is structured on Practice as Research, through which specialist studio disciplines are developed within cultural, aesthetic and socio-political contexts supporting the creative exploration of ideas through practical skills, research methodologies, theoretical and analytical frameworks. This places individual practice at the centre of the programme. Studio-based modules run throughout the programme and maintain the dynamic interrelation between visual research, concepts and theory. Studio research can be developed within: painting, textiles, sculpture (including ceramics), printmaking and digital media.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time taught including dissertation £5670.00.

Part time - 30 credit module fee £945.00. Dissertation fee £1890.00

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees for 2017 are £12,360.00

Our facilities
Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

The Art department are situated in the dedicated artOne building comprising outstanding studio and workshop facilities. It is an exciting place to study, providing a dynamic and supportive learning environment for the production of original new art work.

The well-equipped workshops and studios provide environments for you to create experimental, inventive and ambitious work. The main studio space in the purpose built artOne building provides individual studio spaces for all students as well as bookable spaces for installation, performance and projection work. If you are doing studio practice modules, you will be allocated a personal studio base in which you can carry out your self-directed projects and art work.

All students also have access to workshop areas and technical support in the key disciplines of the Fine Art programmes. The workshops reflect the range of options across the various degree programmes. A distinctive aspect of the department is that of individualized working areas in the studio space.

Where this can take you
The course provides the opportunity to concentrate on a specific area of research.

Potential Careers

Professional artist
Art teacher, educator, or technician
Art administration and management in galleries and museums
Art therapy (with extra professional qualification) and art community work
Art journalism
Curator

Work placements
Recent students have worked on site-specific commissions, community arts projects, and work placements with local galleries and museums, residencies in schools, and even creating their own virtual gallery. The experience is invaluable in terms of working to time and budgetary constraints, and in dealing with the public.

Indicative modules
Distinctive features of the course:

Practice-based Fine Art research in Painting, Sculpture (including Ceramic), Textiles, Printmaking and/or New Media and technologies
Opportunities to work with nationally recognised arts researchers
Development of professional working practices
All students may leave with a fully functioning website for their own work (the emphasis being on the development of an existing site rather than building one from scratch)
Theory and Research Methodologies linked to practical studio work
Full time students offered studio space
Use of 'artOne' BA studio facilities for full and part time students in the summer period.
Optional modules:

The development of fully functioning websites for students' own work
Share in collaborative work through 'Practising Arts with New Technologies' module.

Teaching and Assessment
To gain an MA students need to complete four out of five modules plus the Independent Exhibition. This is an independent research project, and is largely practical, culminating in a professional context exhibition.

Read less
This course provides you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment. Read more
This course provides you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment.

It will support you to acquire advanced specialist knowledge and practical experience of working with different contemporary fine art media and its conceptual and theoretical relevance, and importance, including (but not limited to); painting and sculpture, printmaking, conceptual and social practices, intervention, performance, film, video, photography (digital and analogue), sound art, new-media, digital-media and installation.

This course draws on the School’s considerable research reputation and professional expertise in the areas of painting, photography, performance, film and video, sculpture, installations, public art and print-making. You get the chance to benefit from field trips and gallery visits.

On completion of the course, your practical work will be exhibited and publicised in a group MA exhibition.

What happens on the course?

Typical modules include:
- Studio Practice
- Theory and Contemporary Practice
- Audience and Display
- Studio Practice and its Methodologies
- Master’s Project in Fine Art

Why Wolverhampton?

The Fine Art Course provides a studio intensive programme supported through theoretical and contextual lecture series, studio based seminar critique and individual tutorials. The ethos of the course is to provide students with the time and space to develop ideas and practice towards the final off-site MA exhibition; this includes the structure of personal research and the development of the critical and/or theoretical emphasis behind your work in order to understand the methodological framework of your working practice.

You will have time to reappraise and analyse previous work, develop new ideas in relation to your practice and it’s theoretical underpinning then consolidate those ideas practically. Finally you will bring those ideas and your work to resolution and focus towards the MA exhibition. The course provides students with the knowledge, ambition and structure in order to proceed towards their future career ambitions. Within the programme you will have the opportunity to develop your awareness of exhibition and the display of your work as well as the audiences for that work. The MA Fine Art course will support you in structuring an advanced independent practice, underpinned by sustained critical engagement.

What our students think

Matthew Evans MA Fine Art

Matthew Evans completed his MA Fine Art with distinction and has since received several commissions for his innovative new approach; creating bespoke modern-day coat of arms, including a £10k commission for the The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Birmingham. He has also been selectedfor the New Art West Midlands 2013 Exhibition at Birmingham Art Gallery Museum which showcases the best of West Midland’s graduates.

"As a result of studying the MA course I have grown professionally as an artist. By adopting a ‘take a risk’ attitude I have been able to further refine my artistic practice and anchor it within the most critically interesting areas. By embracing the challenge of diversification, and enjoying the critical dialogue embedded within the course, I have resolved a number of sticking points, and identified areas for future development.

I chose to study my MA at the University of Wolverhampton as I felt I needed to breathe new life into my practise and relished the challenge of experiencing a new exciting creative environment. The artistic facilities on offer to students and the glowing reputations of the SAD staff and support technicians also played a key role in my decision.

What particularly impressed me about the course was not only the availability and approachability of the lecturers but the general sense of cohesion felt as a student. As well as extensive access to lecturers, and the intensively taught aspects of the course, there are many MA excursions that are incredibly beneficial.

As a positive side note, my affinity with the University has continued this September, with me becoming the Fine Art Artist in Residence for this year."

Other student comments:

“The MA has greatly expanded my knowledge of Fine Art.”

“I feel that I’m being supported in my work and that the best of my talent is being encouraged.”

“The lecturers are knowledgeable and enthusiastic and I’m grateful for both their input and the input of the other students”.

“I’m confident it’s setting me up with the right skills and knowledge to succeed in a career within the arts”.

“I’m glad that I made the decision to do the MA; it’s been a positive turning point in my life”.

Career path

There is extensive potential for self-employment as an artist, in areas as diverse as public and community art, environmental art, gallery exhibitions and curating.

You could find employment in the visual arts in one of the creative industries in the private or the public sector.

You will be equipped to take up positions in a wide range of sectors requiring research and presentation skills, team working, the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; and decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations.

You will acquire the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development.

The MA Fine Art gives you the penultimate professional qualification for a career in academia. A PhD research degree is the next step in your development.

Read less
This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management. Read more

Overview

This interdisciplinary programme will equip you with valuable skills and a critical understanding of issues in curatorship, museology and museum management.

You’ll develop your understanding of the ways in which historians and cultural theorists have interpreted and represented architecture, material culture and museums over the past 2,000 years. You’ll look at different methods of display and interpretation and the methodologies behind museum practice and country house collections. Then you’ll choose from optional modules on topics such as cultural theory, sculpture, Hollywood icons or cinema.

At the same time, you’ll develop practical skills. You’ll work on an interpretation project in our Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery and you’ll even undertake a negotiated work placement in your second semester. Supported by the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills for a successful career in the museum and art gallery sector.

All students on the degree become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy opportunities from networking events and links to alumni to conferences, seminars and reading groups.

You’ll study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a national museum, nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many private and charitable museums and galleries.

We’re also a short bus or train journey away from everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Bronte Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. Students who study part-time will attend on one day per week each year. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

A set of core modules form the bedrock of the programme, introducing you to the concept of the ‘museum’ and the ways in which Western museums have represented and interpreted history and historical material.

You’ll also use contemporary theory to consider 20th-century museum practice and key questions around curatorship, museology and museum management. The role of the curator, funding and sponsorship and the display and interpretation of objects are among the topics you’ll cover.

Your core modules will give you the chance to apply your theoretical knowledge and gain practical skills. You’ll take part in an interpretation project in the University’s Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery, as well as completing a work placement in an external arts or heritage organisation.

All MA students in the School take two core modules which develop the research skills to complete research projects such as your essays and dissertation. This will build to our unique MA Symposium in Semester 2, where you present some of your own research across interdisciplinary panels, and a dissertation which enables you to undertake research in a topic of interest to you.

Read less
Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Read more
Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Test out your ideas in a professional environment and gain invaluable experience of exhibiting, curation and collaboration.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fine-art

Overview

Our Master’s course will allow you to investigate a range of approaches used in fine art, from painting, sculpture, and printmaking, to more contemporary media such as photography, video, digital media, installation, sound and performance.

You’ll spend much of your time working and researching independently - but you’ll also learn about recent theories, contexts and practices in lectures, seminars and one-to-one tutorials.

We’ll give you the chance to test out your ideas in a professional environment, and to pick up important transferable skills for your career through group and individual presentations and critiques, exhibiting, curation and critical writing.

Here at Cambridge School of Art, you’ll be supported by lecturers who are themselves experienced artists. So as well as having access to artists who are working across many disciplines at the forefront of contemporary art practice, you’ll receive invaluable advice and direction for your future career.

Teaching times: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10am-5pm (full-time); Wednesdays 10am-5pm in Year 1 and Tuesdays 10am-5pm in Year 2 (part-time).

Careers

As well as preparing you for work as a practising artist, you’ll pick up skills and knowledge that will equip you for other roles. Our past students now enjoy careers in further and higher education, museum and gallery management, public arts projects, artist in residence schemes and fellowships opportunities, both in the UK and abroad.

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Fine Art.

Our links with local art organisations, such as Aid & Abet, Changing Spaces, Wysing Arts Centre and Cambridge Artworks, will give you the chance to take part in professional exhibitions, portfolio reviews and live projects.

You’ll also have access to events such as Creative Front Futures, which will give you a taste of the different creative industries, and be able to take part in Fine Art Professional Practice and networking initiatives for both students and alumni.

Our Fine Art Research Unit (FARU) runs fortnightly lectures that will give you a chance to hear contemporary artists and staff talk about their work, and engage in debates about art practice. Recent speakers have included Phillip Allen, Juan Bolivar, Rebecca Fortnum, Danny Rolph, Hayley Newman, Günter Herbst, David Kefford, Cally Spooner, Tim Ellis, Andrew Grassie, Lilah Fowler, Jemima Brown, Caroline Wright and Matthew Derbyshire.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Acts and Discourses
Fine Art: Critical Practice
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

On most of our core modules, you’ll demonstrate your progress through visual research outcomes supported by a written evaluative statement, except for the Master’s Dissertation where you’ll submit a 6,000-word contextual essay.

Specialist facilities

You’ll have the chance to experiment with many different art forms, making use of our MA studios, printmaking and 3D/sculpture workshops, photography dark rooms, and computer suites for video production and digital imaging. You’ll also have access to three brand new Mac suites with Adobe Creative Suite software, plus high-quality 27-inch monitors.

If you're a full-time student, you'll have an individual studio space to work in. If you're part-time, you'll need your own external studio facility, but may be able to negotiate some temporary on-site space for specific projects. Whether you're full-time or part-time, you'll be based in our MA studios and we'll encourage you to make full use of them both during and outside of formal teaching times. You can also arrange to use the studios on weekday evenings and at weekends during term-time.

Read less
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Read more
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Each student is able to individually tailor their programme of study, and can choose to complete the course with either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation as the final project for this postgraduate course.

Why study Fine Art and Humanities at Dundee?

This programme combines studio art and masters level modules in the humanities (such as Philosophy, English or Film Studies). It embraces all forms of Fine Art practice - traditional and contemporary - and celebrates the inherent diversity in each year's participants. You will be encouraged to read critically and analytically, and to develop abilities in conducting high level discourse in critical, contextual and theoretical thinking. This combination of skills is extended through lively debate, which strengthen each individual's self-evaluation, reflective practice and cumulative progression. Throughout the course, you will be supported by a supervisor and dedicated tutorials, which add to the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding as personal study evolves.

Research led teaching

This course draws upon both the School of Humanities and Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design's (DJCAD) diverse, unique and internationally acclaimed research. In the RAE (Research Assessment Exercise) DJCAD was rated as the top institution in Scotland for research in art and design, and one of the best in the whole of the UK.

Aims of the Programme

This course aims to develop your understanding, knowledge and skills in a personal programme of interdisciplinary study and to provide research skills and methods relevant to both Fine Art and Humanities research-based practices. It encourages ambitious investigation and enquiry through individual research, planned from the outset to achieve either a creative exhibition or major written dissertation, either of which are informed by a synthesis of critical and conceptual studies in art and humanities.

Students should have interdisciplinary backgrounds at undergraduate level, and have demonstrated work in both creative (e.g. studio) and academic areas. For example, you may have an honours degree in English, Film Studies or Philosophy and have engaged in creative practices such as photography, video, drawing, sculpture, or painting on your own. Other students may have dual honours degrees or have taken our Art, Philosophy and Contemporary Practices BA.

Postgraduate culture

Students benefit from both the DJCAD and Humanities public lecture programmes. Speakers in collaboration with Dundee Contemporary Arts brings invited artists and professionals from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Students are also encouraged to attend speaker presentations in English, Film and Philosophy, a University wide Lecture Series and vibrant external community for events.

The start date is September each year and the course lasts 12 months full-time.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes, studio tutorials and demonstrations.

In Humanities, one-on-one supervision of a literature review, initial outlines and drafts, leading to a dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, research assignments and feedback, and tutorial sessions.

In art, the basis of most exchange is conducted as individual and group tutorials, aided by studio demonstrations, guest lectures, peer critiques, and written reflections.

What you will study

The academic year is divided into three semesters each comprising teaching and assessment weeks. (The first week of semester 1 is entitled 'Induction Week, when activities for new students are planned and diagnostic workshops take place to establish students strengths and weaknesses.)

In Humanities, students may select a Masters level module from one of the following areas of study: English; Film Studies; Philosophy; Gender, Culture and Society; Theatre Studies; History or Comics. Specific modules are offered in topical and period areas of study.

In Art & Media studio practice, students may work in any area of specialisation, including: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Artist Books; Photography (digital or chemical); Sculpture; Installation; Performance Art; Sound Art; or Time-based art and Digital Film. Teaching will be provided on a tutorial basis from academic staff, all of whom are professional artists.

In addition, each student will take a general two-semester module entitled 'Applying Critical and Cultural Theory'.

Depending upon chosen outcome - either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation - the following pattern would apply:

Option A - Studio-based Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in DJCAD, Semester 2 in Humanities
Or

Option B - Written Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in Humanities, Semester 2 in DJCAD
Semester 3 occurs during the summer months, and is spent on realising the outcome that the student has selected (see Option A and B above). Assisted by an academic supervisor, either the dissertation or body of creative work will be produced and submitted for assessment.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be conducted for each module by module tutors. The assessors will employ a variety of styles specific to the module. Most commonly an oral presentation with the project and supporting work will be utilised for production and practice modules. Written components take the form of reflective reports, programme of study reports, essays and in the case of academic outcome, a formal dissertation (15-20,000 words).

Careers

Graduates of this course will find that their options are increased from having acquired several methods of research and learning. Two distinctive skill sets and areas of knowledge provide a real advantage in the employment market. Careers for prospective graduates may include teaching, publishing, arts administration, community arts, curation, journalism and criticism, and professional art practices which are enhanced by academic challenge.

Read less
Designed in conjunction with our partners in industry, this course is aimed at creating a new landscape of postgraduate computer animation tuition, ensuring that the voice of business is embedded at the heart of the curriculum. Read more
Designed in conjunction with our partners in industry, this course is aimed at creating a new landscape of postgraduate computer animation tuition, ensuring that the voice of business is embedded at the heart of the curriculum.

During the course you will develop advanced technical and professional animation production skills, in addition to the centrality of teamwork required for an industry that is becoming increasingly specialised with new roles and functions emerging all the time.
With industry assistance through Skillset, we are able to nurture emerging talent by seeding the growth of this new industry-facing
course.

The distinctive and explicit curriculum has been designed to build the appropriate depth of both subject-specific and generic skills to allow graduates to develop their career in a fast-moving and increasingly specialised industry.

The course consists of compulsory modules in Computer Animation Production, CGI Foundation – Animation / Still Image and Acquisition for VFX. You will then have the opportunity to choose from optional modules in rigging and creature effects, digital sculpture, CGI lighting and look development and effects animation.

What You Will Study

The distinctive and explicit curriculum has been designed to build the appropriate depth of both subject-specific and generic skills to allow graduates to develop their career in a fast-moving and increasingly specialised industry.

The MA Computer Animation course includes the following module structure:

Acquisition for VFX
CGI Foundation (Still image)
CGI Foundation – Animation
Computer Animation Production
Rigging & Creature Effects (option)
Digital Sculpture (option)
Effects Animation (option)
CGI Lighting & Look Development (option)
Research Methods, or Creative & Cultural Entrepreneurship (option)

How You Will Study

Studio and workshop tutorials are supplemented by visiting computer animation artists and practitioners lectures, seminars, discussion groups and presentations. All Staff are active in research, consultancy or employed within the animation Industry.

Course assessment is primarily through submitted project responses and a supporting portfolio of production resources.

Learning Through Employment

Learning Through Employment is a University of South Wales framework that offers students who are already in employment the opportunity to gain credits towards a postgraduate qualification.

The programme is structured so that the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement with your work activities, underpinned by the appropriate academic knowledge and skills.

All postgraduate courses in the Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries offer students the opportunity to undertake a 60 credit Learning Through Employment Research Project as an alternative to a traditional final dissertation, major project or production.

The focus of the project is an individual, organisational problem solving, knowledge-based approach.

As such, it has been is designed for practicing professionals to provide them with the tools to succeed in the workplace.

This truly flexible approach means that projects can be based on an agreed area of work, benefiting students and employers, and because the majority of the project is carried out in the workplace, it can potentially be undertaken anywhere in the world.

Possible Career Options

This specialist postgraduate Computer Animation course focuses on the higher level skills that will enable graduates to operate successfully across a range of roles within the Animation industry.

Read less
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Modern and Contemporary Art pathway

If you select the Modern and Contemporary Art pathway you could choose options focusing on a wide range of works ranging from painting, sculpture and architecture, to photography, installation, performance and contemporary works engaging with new media and the digital. You will study works of art from geographically diverse regions, from the international rise of ‘pop art’ across the globe from the 1960s, to the arts of the Americas, and art from west and east Europe from the early twentieth century to the present day. As well you will be introduced to a range of formal, methodological and theoretical ways of thinking, writing and talking about the work of art in this period.

In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Modern and Contemporary Art. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Modern and Contemporary Art, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Modern and Contemporary Art) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

Read less
The MA Visual Arts combines advanced studio-based work, contextual studies and critically reflective research, allowing students to increase the sophistication of their work in preparation for the transition to professional practice. Read more
The MA Visual Arts combines advanced studio-based work, contextual studies and critically reflective research, allowing students to increase the sophistication of their work in preparation for the transition to professional practice. The MA is an intensive programme of study that includes taught units and an independent project comprising practical and theoretical work.

::MA students can expect::

- Support in further consolidating studio practice to a level appropriate for accomplished practitioners
- Access to facilities, workshops and expertise for the fabrication of artworks relating to the individual student's ambitions
- Opportunities to employ innovative approaches to practical making through which conceptual ideas are tested and informed by use of selected media
- To gain a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research and scholarship
- Develop originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the Visual Arts
- To consolidate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of current debates in contemporary art practice
- To further develop aptitude for professional practice, independent research or employment, including opportunities for public exhibition
- To possess independence, self-reliance, as well as promotional enterprise skills, motivated toward professional practice or employment

::Learning Environment::

- Large individual studio spaces
- An excellent staff-to-student ratio with the possibility for weekly tutorial support
- A specialised programme of lectures, seminars and workshops
- Input from regular Visiting Lecturers and artists
- Expert support for a dedicated team of workshop technicians
- Professional development provision for gallery visits and other external events
- Contact with a regular series of professional Artists-in-Residence based in the Visual Arts studios throughout the academic year
- An immersive environment with rich connections to art history, particularly Surrealism, through the legacy of college founder Edward James

Facilities

All full-time Visual Arts students are provided with a large individual workspace in the Edward James Studios. In addition to specialist spaces dedicated to Painting and Drawing, Sculpture and Tapestry and Textile-based work, the studios also include Seminar Room, a materials and tool store, a small photographic darkroom, bookable exhibition and research spaces, plus an IT suite with digital editing software. A self-contained Print Room offers specialist facilities for etching, aquatint, monoprinting, woodblock and linocut. Students can work on a large-scale in the Sculpture Courtyard, which is also suitable for work in stone carving.

Students are encouraged to collaborate with other College departments - particularly the full-time programmes in the School of Conservation - making the most of the wide range of specialist knowledge, materials and equipment that is available. The Short Course programme also allows students to access a wide range of visiting tutors and specialist techniques that can further enhance their studies.

West Dean House and Estate offers students access to ambitious exhibition opportunities and unique research material. Students are able to submit site-specific proposals throughout the year and are encouraged to take part in the annual Open House event. The Edward James Collection is an outstanding resource for full-time students, given them access to a range of significant, even iconic, works of art as an ongoing source of inspiration and research.

The College's Arts and Conservation Library gives students access to thousands of specialist books, journals and databases to support their studies.

The Main House also contains West Dean Tapestry Studio, one of the world's leading producers of hand-woven tapestry. As well as having close contact with the expertise of Master Weavers and designers, students have access to the studio's Dye Rooms, a specialist facility for the dyeing of yarn. Find out more about the professional Tapestry Studio here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-creative-arts/tapestry-studio

View some of the work exhibited at Divergence, the West Dean Visual Arts Summer Show 2015 - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-creative-arts/gallery

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X