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Masters Degrees (Scriptwriting)

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Our MA Scriptwriting is an intensive, practical course designed to produce professional writers and compelling scripts. It will take your writing to the highest level, and allow you to develop clear strategies for professional success. Read more
Our MA Scriptwriting is an intensive, practical course designed to produce professional writers and compelling scripts. It will take your writing to the highest level, and allow you to develop clear strategies for professional success. With a combination of expert guidance and peer-group workshopping, we encourage you to develop your unique voice while meeting the demands of a highly competitive industry.

We cover all media, including theatre, radio, film and television, and offer extensive training in professional skills. By the end of the course, you’ll have a comprehensive portfolio of original work, a finished script to professional standards, industry connections and a fully realised showcase presentation.

COURSE STRUCTURE

You’ll hone your writing for performance skills, while also acquiring the necessary professional knowledge needed to negotiate the industry.

Alongside completing a minimum of three polished scripts for theatre, radio and TV/film, you’ll meet scriptwriting agents and industry specialists and learn how best to pitch your work in a highly competitive field.

We recognise the importance of equipping you, as a scriptwriter, with the knowledge of how to produce your work. You’ll have the opportunity to record your own radio plays, stage your theatre pieces and shoot and edit your TV/Film projects within our supportive environment.

MODULES

In Craft, you'll learn the key components of a script, including structure, characterisation, visual storytelling and dialogue.

Writing for Theatre and Radio is a comprehensive guide to writing for these important media. You’ll prepare a script for each.

Develop your professional writing career in Professional Skills. Learn to prepare proposal documents, to pitch ideas, and to make connections in the industry.

Screenwriting is an in-depth course in writing for film and television. You’ll prepare a single script for either medium.

In Showcase Presentation, you'll write and produce a finished 15 minute piece in any narrative media for public presentation.

In Final Script, you'll prepare a calling card script in the medium of your choice, taken to the highest professional standard.

For more information on modules you can view the course handbook via our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-scriptwriting/

TEACHING METHODS

The course is modular and can be undertaken as either full or part-time study. Part-time students take the Dramatic Structure and Writing for the Screen modules in their first year and Theatre and Radio, Professional Skills and Final Script in their second year.

Modules are taught over three weekends of intensive tutor-led workshops.

ASSESSMENT

You’ll be assessed by coursework and practical presentation. In the first two trimesters work will be assessed as work in progress. Your final assessment is based on three assignments: a final script (60%); a practical realisation of your work (30%); and a pitch (10%).

For more information on assessment please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-scriptwriting/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Many of our graduates succeed with their career goals. Some have careers as professional Scriptwriters while others work in script editing, theatre and film criticism or education.

Our students have gone on to have their work produced and some have even managed to do this while still completing their MA. Others have found work within the script departments of TV/film and theatre companies while others work as script readers, theatre/film reviewers and as creative writing tutors.

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With a uniquely collaborative emphasis, this course offers opportunities for some of the scripts you develop over the course to be produced, through close collaboration with students from MA Producing for Film and TV, MA Directing for Film and TV and MA Radio Production. Read more

With a uniquely collaborative emphasis, this course offers opportunities for some of the scripts you develop over the course to be produced, through close collaboration with students from MA Producing for Film and TV, MA Directing for Film and TV and MA Radio Production. This equips you with the skills and attitudes required for successful script development processes in the industry. The course is busy, intensive and involves much teamwork alongside individual writing practice.

Throughout the course, you will develop your ideas from concept to industry standard final draft, with a development process that includes research, pitching, presentations, script reading and networking events, workshop groups, tutorials, script editing, and rewriting for production.

You will be encouraged to nurture and reflect on your creative process and originality of voice, and to explore the contexts – critical, creative and industrial that inform scriptwriting today.

The course is taught by scriptwriting professionals and theorists, alongside an exciting programme of industry guest speakers. The course is suitable for students who have previously developed their own creative writing projects within humanities or media production courses or with relevant professional experience. You may have an undergraduate qualification in a related subject or may be able to show your suitability for this programme of study through associated work-experience or evidence of and outputs from other related activities.

Successful participation in MA Scriptwriting will enable you to emerge from the course as a writer with a distinctive authorial voice, an industry standard portfolio of scripts, experience of writing in formats and genres, and a robust attitude to collaboration and development.



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Utilising the expertise of our expanded Scriptwriting team the course builds on the skill base and reputation of our established undergraduate course and boasts improved facilities as a result of the move to our £15 Million Media Factory development with state-of-the-art facilities. Read more
Utilising the expertise of our expanded Scriptwriting team the course builds on the skill base and reputation of our established undergraduate course and boasts improved facilities as a result of the move to our £15 Million Media Factory development with state-of-the-art facilities.

The course offers an in-depth knowledge of writing for radio, television, film and stage with emphasis on current industry practice and employability, equipping students with the most appropriate practice skills. Students will have the opportunity to participate in the writing of a full length feature film that is actually produced. Students will also be contenders for the new Matt Greenhalgh Award. The course is ideally located with access to local radio and the North West’s vibrant live grassroots theatre and new BBC production base.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The Scriptwriting Skills modules on the MA course are all freshly written and completely up-to-date. Critical theory will be embedded into a wider range of modules. This will further develop the critical underpinning of a student’s practical work and their dissertation. This will ensure critical theory gains greater relevance to the practical elements of the course. These skills will develop gradually throughout the course and will culminate with the triple module in semester three.

The curriculum themes of employability, practice based learning; entrepreneurial skills; developing industry contacts, and sustainability are embedded within the programme and are addressed through relevant topics in the new modules.

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The MA Creative Writing. Scriptwriting addresses dramatic writing across the media with the rigour and professional insight that are the hallmark of our creative writing teaching. Read more
The MA Creative Writing: Scriptwriting addresses dramatic writing across the media with the rigour and professional insight that are the hallmark of our creative writing teaching.

The strand has three core modules. Firstly, Dramaturgy, where we study the core principles of drama as explored from Aristotle to McKee and as embodied in a range of plays, films and TV programmes, from Antigone to Game of Thrones. Alongside this runs Workshop where each week your writing benefits from the scrutiny of fellow writers and workshop leaders such as renowned playwrights Steve Waters and Timberlake Wertenbaker. The process offers you the chance to build an idea from concept to realisation under the keen eye of an industry expert.

Meanwhile for your other module you can choose from a huge inter-disciplinary menu. By Spring you're embarked on your Dissertation benefiting from close supervision as you write a full length drama for the medium of your choice.

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If you want to be a filmmaker this is the place to learn, gain experience and make films you will be proud to have on your show reel. Read more

If you want to be a filmmaker this is the place to learn, gain experience and make films you will be proud to have on your show reel.

As a student on one of the six pathways you'll develop your specialist skill. In addition, you'll also have a range of short optional modules in other production areas of your choosing to give you the kind of flexibility that the industry now expects. The options include script and project development, web drama, online content, and social activist filmmaking, alongside more traditional media such as camera and editing skills. 

Our filmmaking facilities and scheduling are geared around fiction production, as this is a major opportunity that the learning on the programme provides. The ethos of the course is “form follows function.” Your study and practice throughout the year will equip you with the most appropriate means of telling your story in order to connect with an audience. 

Filmmaking is a team activity. Every student is required to work closely with others as part of a creative team to produce their final project. All the programmes also have good contacts and connections with students in the other specialist areas your productions might require, such as music composition, hair and makeup, set design, scriptwriting and of course acting talent.

Filmmaking is very demanding; it requires a lot of commitment, imagination and teamwork. You will be fully stretched on these programmes.

Pathways

This MA has six pathways you can follow: 

The programmes also retain close links with MA Scriptwriting.

The filmmaking programmes are located within a large and very lively Media and Communications Department that is also home for a range of practice MA programmes in radio, journalism and scriptwriting for example.

There is also a range of theory MAs and strong research tradition, with the Department coming top in the entire country on research intensity. This makes for a very stimulating and creative environment. 

The questions we ask

Where is cinema going? Where is TV heading? How and where are people going to watch moving images? What do new audiences want these to look and sound like? What new platforms are on the horizon? How are the traditional craft skills relevant to the digital age?

These are the kinds of questions we’re interested in. And we don’t explore them alone. Our annual Olive Till Memorial debate features world-renowned industry speakers including directors Danny Boyle, Gurinder Chadha and Paul Greengrass, and producers Tessa Ross and Tim Bevan, so you get the best kind of insight while you’re here.

The processes we use

We offer advanced skills training to film school standards. You will work within a building with studio and rehearsal spaces, screening rooms and up-to-date camera, lighting and sound equipment, plus sound and edit suites. And we now have the Curzon Goldsmiths as our on-site cinema so you can showcase your work to the public.

The approach we take

We encourage you to meet filmmakers, work with others, and exchange ideas. The programme includes regular Master classes where students from all the programmes and others come together to learn about current industry trends, new opportunities and ideas with leading figures of the UK film and television industries. But filmmaking is not only about these industries, it also offers a wealth of transferable skills for students interested in all media platforms, including web drama, video games, art gallery installations of all types, interactive mixed media and live performance and music videos.

Modules & structure

All programmes include: 

  • Masterclasses
  • Pitches 
  • Exercises aimed at using your skills specialism in a variety of live shoot situations 

You will also have a variety of research projects to undertake, as well as other module options. The third term will be taken up with your final substantive project, and in writing up a process paper on your work and research over the year. 

There is also a choice of short modules, such as: 

  • Screen Adaptation
  • Principles of Editing
  • Media Law and Ethics
  • The Short Script
  • Politics of the Audio Visual
  • Social Activist Film Making
  • Contemporary Screen Narratives
  • Representing Reality
  • Visual Story Telling
  • The Current Landscape of the UK Media Industries 

In addition students are encouraged to “audit,” (that is, attend but not be assessed on) any other lecture course in the Department – in so far as their timetable allows.

For full module information, refer to the individual pathways.

Skills & careers

From Steve McQueen to Sam Taylor-Wood, Goldsmiths graduates go on to shift the public perception of what makes film matter. And our MA filmmaking graduates are creating award-winning work including Best Cinematography at the NAHEMI Encounters International Film Festival and Best Documentary at the Exposures Film Festival.

The best advice we can give you is to make the most of your time with us. For a whole year you have access to the best in the field: highly qualified, industry-active and award-winning staff and guest speakers.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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This is a wide-ranging MA that combines cultural, historical and industry-specific analysis with critical and theoretical study. It provides an interdisciplinary approach to a range of current and important media contexts and industries covering broadcast, print and digital media modes. Read more

Why take this course?

This is a wide-ranging MA that combines cultural, historical and industry-specific analysis with critical and theoretical study. It provides an interdisciplinary approach to a range of current and important media contexts and industries covering broadcast, print and digital media modes. It offers a range of political, industry-based, and text-based approaches to media and its communication strategies as well as opportunities for you to develop your own interests through the dissertation, industry study, screenwriting project or work placement project.

The degree is taught by a team of experienced lecturers who have researched and published in their specialist areas, and who bring those specialisms to their teaching sessions. This course will enable you to become multi-skilled and knowledgeable in ways that employers are now demanding and will prepare you to apply for jobs in areas such as teaching, publishing, journalism, scriptwriting, film and media management. In addition, the course is ideal preparation for further postgraduate work.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Produce screenplays for film and television while working with a specialist tutor
Be involved in and contribute to our dynamic research culture through your film/TV dissertation
Engage with our researchers and published experts, many of whom have international reputations

What opportunities might ti lead to?

The skills you will develop on this course can prepare you for roles within the media and other creative industries, in particular the film and television industries. Alternatively, many of our graduates find roles within a variety of media industries and a number of them have gone on to study for PhDs or teaching qualifications.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Teaching
Writing
Journalism
Media

Module Details

You will develop a wide range of skills throughout the course such as applying theoretical approaches and using critical skills in close analysis and reading of key film and television texts. All units on this course focus on both film and television, but your final research project can cover both media or specialise in one of these two areas.

Here are the units you will study:

Research Methods (30 credits): This unit covers how to carry out research in film archives, how to do a literature search in film and television, and how to produce a thesis which is well structured and methodologically rigorous.

Media Contexts (30 credits): Investigate the ways in which a wide range of media texts communicate meaning. This unit will use a range of media texts as examples, including film, television, magazines, newspapers, fiction, graphic novels and comics. Theoretical approaches to all these contexts for interpreting and understanding media texts will form an important part of this unit.

Media Politics (30 credits): You will research and explore the various ways in which media reflects and represents political issues and identities.

Media Cultures and Industries (30 credits): You will explore a range of media industries and cultures including audience and fan cultures; film and television industry structures and policies; digital cultures and the scriptwriting industry.

Options to choose from include:

Short screenwriting project (30 credits): A self-directed practical writing project developing a short piece of drama for either film or television.

Industry study (30 credits): An opportunity to engage in an individual study of a media industry.

Short dissertation (30 credits) or Dissertation (60 credits): You will research and write a thesis focused on a defined research topic and/or question.

Programme Assessment

Your learning experience will not only cover the theory of these two media forms but you will also be given the opportunity to produce your own screenplays for film and TV. This is designed to develop more applied skills that will complement the theoretical components of the course.

Assessment is predominantly essay based in order to help you develop advanced research and analysis skills. Some units also involve individual oral presentations, so you can develop presentation skills at a higher level and engage in stimulating, sophisticated academic debates in your seminars.

Student Destinations

This course will enable you to become multi-skilled in ways that employers are now demanding and will help prepare you to apply for jobs in such areas as teaching, publishing, journalism, scriptwriting, film and media management. In addition, it is ideal preparation for further postgraduate work or research at PhD level.

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MA Screenwriting London College of Communication is one of the UK’s leading film and TV scripting courses with a strong reputation in the industry. Read more
MA Screenwriting London College of Communication is one of the UK’s leading film and TV scripting courses with a strong reputation in the industry.

Graduates of MA Screenwriting have gone on to win numerous UK and international awards, work on major film projects in active development, and are writing for a wide range of programmes currently being screened on UK television.
Leading the field, this industry-focused screenwriting course is aimed at developing writers for film, television and/or radio industries. The course will provide you with the opportunity to develop the abilities, knowledge and skills you will need for a career in scriptwriting.
What can you expect?
MA Screenwriting introduces you to the foundations of contemporary scriptwriting practice in a theoretical context. You will develop research methodologies that will become the basis for future practice and analysis.
The course offers you the opportunity to study feature film, television and radio narrative and the development of a script from a short story and research, which lays the foundation for your Major Project.

You will also complete a Collaborative Unit that reflects your specialist interests in scriptwriting and related topics, whilst engaging with the need to understand and communicate with the industry you wish to work in.
In the final term you will undertake a Major Project that allows you to focus on a specialist area of interest that you identified during your development on the course. You will write several drafts of an original screenplay for film or TV, or a TV pilot episode(s) with format documents. In addition, you will engage in peer-to-peer review and the writing of reader reports.

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This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. Read more
This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. This is in both terms of a distinctive philosophy of writing (to answer the question, ‘What kind of writer am I?’), and in terms of the practicalities of making creative work public.

You should have some experience of writing fiction, poetry or prose (although there is not a requirement for this work to have been published), or scriptwriting, and wish to further your skills within the academic context of creative writing as an academic discipline. You will work with a core team of professional writers and other professionals to develop your creative work and nurture an understanding about the nature of your continuing creativity, aiming towards producing a final manuscript for possible publication.

What will I study?

You will begin straight away to experience the benefits of the regular workshops that form an integral part of the programme. You will discuss the work of others on the MA as well as learning from their discussion of your work. You will also receive tutor feedback.

You will study a variety of contemporary literature which will feed into your writing where needed, along with a study of the poetics of contemporary writers (that is, the things writers have written about their own writing philosophies and practices). The aim is to influence your practical development, allowing you to develop your own poetics and philosophy of composition.

In the first weeks of the course you will research markets and outlets for your work and complete submissions of your writing. You will also compile a professional development audit of your activities so far (which may not be extensive, of course). You will be asked to keep a log throughout the programme to enable you to track your development.

How will I study?

The writing workshops are always taught in small groups, but the discussion groups involve seminars with a lecture component.

During the manuscript module (a dissertation) you will work one-to-one with your manuscript supervisor, bringing your months of study to a final creative fruition. All the modules you will take have been designed specifically for writers.

This is not the kind of ‘Creative Writing’ course that requires you to pick from already existing English Literature modules. The modules have been custom-designed for you.

How will I be assessed?

You will present your creative writing with a short example of poetics relating to the piece. You will write about works of contemporary literature and about the poetics of these writers, though you will approach these tasks from the perspective of a fellow-writer. All this work will help you develop towards the final piece of work, The Manuscript. The professional development audit and logs will be marked on a pass / fail basis.

Who will be teaching me?

A team of seven, with extensive experience in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, short stories and scriptwriting teach on the programme. The team will be complemented by visiting speakers and visiting writers.

What are my career prospects?

The thinking behind the professional development strand is that writers seldom exclusively work as writers, but need to learn to combine their principal involvement and passion for literary composition with other activities (whether they are of a literary nature or not).

Of course, as a Masters in a humanities subject you will find this qualification useful in a variety of professional contexts, such as in school teaching, which encourages staff to work at Masters level. It provides a sound basis for further study (e.g. PhD work in Creative Writing).

Previous graduates have gone on to publish with major publishers, win prizes, edit magazines and books, and are active in the pedagogy of Creative Writing as a robust academic discipline.

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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Read more

Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Our staff have received national and international recognition for their work. You will work with them to prepare creative work for submission and publication.

Our courses provide a unique opportunity to develop and hone your creative writing skills. We teach creative writing in four strands:

-Prose writing

-Poetry

-Scriptwriting, with a unique emphasis on writing for radio

-Creative non-fiction, with a unique emphasis on memoir writing, essay writing and biography

The courses will introduce you to a wide range of subjects and areas in which writers are working professionally. You will build your awareness and broaden your knowledge of writing opportunities. You will also consider ways of matching your skills to jobs.

You will explore the many ways in which writing is produced, distributed and promoted to audiences. Our guest speakers are practitioners and/or associated with the world of publishing and performance. Working with them, you will explore the roles and importance of:

-Agents

-Editors

-Reviewers

-Social media

-New technology in contemporary publishing

The Newcastle Centre for Literary Arts (NCLA) offers you the opportunity to get involved in our writing community. Our readings and events feature poets, playwrights and novelists. Past speakers include:

-Kazuo Ishiguro

-Val McDermid

-Seamus Heaney

Delivery

At the centre of courses are writing workshops. We offer workshops in:

-Prose

-Poetry

-Scriptwriting

-Creative non-fiction

All our classes take place in the early evening.

You will develop your creative writing through our taught sessions and individual consultations. Our small seminar groups and one to one supervision gives you close contact with your tutors, who are all writing practitioners.

Those who complete the PGCert can choose to transfer to the second year of our part time MA.

Facilities

The School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics is a lively and diverse community with over 700 undergraduates and 200 postgraduates.

We are based in the Percy Building where the majority of your seminars and tutorials will take place. Our purpose-built postgraduate suite includes several dedicated computer clusters, meeting rooms, a kitchen and lounge area.

You also have access to the award-winning Peter Robinson Library, which has an extensive audio-visual collection.



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COURSE OVERVIEW . Refine your writing across a range of styles and genres. Understand where your work fits in the diverse world of publishing. Read more

COURSE OVERVIEW 

  • Refine your writing across a range of styles and genres
  • Understand where your work fits in the diverse world of publishing
  • Be inspired and encouraged by guest writers, editors and literary agents 

Creative and Critical Writing at Winchester offers you the opportunity to evaluate and improve your creative writing in a dynamic, supportive environment. The programme is taught by professional writers: novelists, scriptwriters, poets and writers of creative nonfiction, as well as cultural critics and playwrights. There are opportunities to meet agents, editors and published writers, and as your knowledge of the publishing industry expands, find out where your work fits within the market. 

You study twentieth century and contemporary literature, which allows you to explore different styles and genres and gain a critical foundation for your own writing while increasing your knowledge of the publishing world. The structure of the programme enables you to focus on one or more genres (for example, fiction, creative non-fiction, scriptwriting or poetry) during the year. 

Throughout the course, you create and workshop your work in an encouraging group of peers, starting in the first semester with a module that focuses on contemporary fiction alongside a module about research and what this means for you as a writer. In the second semester you choose from options including Contemporary Non-Fiction, Contemporary Scriptwriting for Film and Television, Creativity Writing and Teaching and Advanced Contemporary Poetry. Through the Publishing Project you engage with writers, agents and editors through readings and workshops, exploring publishing opportunities for your own work. You can also volunteer at the Winchester Writers’ Festival on campus. 

The Independent Study Preparation module is designed to help you prepare for your Creative Writing dissertation – an independent project of your choice of up to 30,000 words which constitutes nearly half of the MA. This could be the first part of a novel, a collection of short stories, a portfolio of poetry or a script, completed with full tutor support. 

Graduates of the course frequently obtain publishing contracts, while others work in other aspects of publishing, or in teaching, media, the arts and business.

Careers

Graduates are increasingly obtaining publishing contracts, while some go into other occupations which may include publishing, teaching, media, the arts and business.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

Students have the opportunity to volunteer at the Winchester Literary Festival on campus, working with a range of writers, publishers and agents and industry professionals.

Learning and teaching

Start date: September

Teaching takes place: Evenings

The academic staff are professional novelists, scriptwriters, poets and writers of creative non-fiction, as well as cultural critics and playwrights. They are supported by guest writers, editors and literary agents. This course has long enjoyed a vibrant programme of visiting speakers. 

Students have the opportunity to develop their creative work, give and receive feedback in weekly workshops, and work with lecturers who are all practitioners. 

Location 

Taught elements of the course take place at King Alfred or West Downs, Winchester.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

Each module typically comes with a creative writing assignment, or an assignment plus rationale (reflective piece) of approximately 4,000 words in total.

Students undertake a Dissertation between 20,000-30,000 words as part of their independent study with full tutorial support.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures



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This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. Read more

This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. These routes allow students to combine vocational, theoretical and practice-based modules as preferred.

Theoretical modules involve study of British, American, European, Far Eastern and Middle Eastern Cinemas. Here, students will examine how film and television texts produced in these regions relate to their historical, social, and cultural contexts through a variety of critical and theoretical approaches, which range from aesthetics as cinematic discourse to the implications of terrorism for film and its audiences.

Vocational choices, which are available throughout, include Teaching Film and Media, Becoming an Academic, Film Festivals, Film Festivals Independent Study (that offer opportunities to attend a film festival, and to be involved in film festival organisation) and Film Journalism, supported by expert film critics, that develops skills required for the writing of film reviews and articles in journals such as Sight and Sound.

There are practice-based options to undertake experimental and documentary film production, and scriptwriting.

What happens on the course?

Full time students normally attend lectures for 9-11 hours per week, and part-time students attend 3-6 hours per week, depending on module choices. Most modules run on Thursdays so that a full time student might expect to attend from 10am – 9pm on Thursdays

Students are assessed via a diverse range of assignments including:

  • Formal Essay
  • Film Review
  • Film Festival Analysis
  • Film Festival Organisation
  • Student led seminar
  • Student presentation
  • Journal article
  • Lesson plan
  • Construction of ‘A level’ teaching plan
  • Annotated bibliography
  • Essay Plan
  • Conference Paper Proposal
  • Research/Funding Proposal
  • Submission of draft thesis chapters
  • Film Production
  • Scriptwriting
  • Thesis

Course Specific Cost:

Course costs are at the usual MA rate with 20% discount for UoW graduates. The module Film Festivals requires an additional flat rate cost of £350 to over hotel, travel and festival entrance fee to a national/international Film Festival. Any additional cost for attendance at a film festival will be met by the university

Why Wolverhampton?

Most of the modules are delivered at Light House Media centre which houses 2 purpose built cinemas. Otherwise, teaching is at other appropriate venues on City Campus. All teaching on the MA Film and Screen is informed by staff expertise, with their research directly underpinning each module. This expertise is reflected in the significant number of high-quality publications produced by Film and Media Staff who contributed successfully to REF2014.

Who will teach you on this course:

  • Dr Fran Pheasant-Kelly, Reader in Screen Studies, Faculty of Arts and Course Leader MA Film and Screen: teaches Space, Place and Culture in American Cinema, Screens of Terror, Becoming an Academic, and Far Eastern Cinemas
  • Dr Stella Hockenhull, Reader in Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Picturing Britain and Screening Horror
  • Dr Eleanor Andrews, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, Course Leader BA Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Screening the Holocaust and Beyond
  • Dr Gavin Wilson, Lecturer in Film and Television Production, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Festivals
  • Dr Peter Robinson, Principal Lecturer and Head of Marketing, Innovation, Leisure and Enterprise, University of Wolverhampton Business School
  • Dr Aleksandra Galasinska, Reader in Discourse and Social Transformation, Faculty of Arts: teaches Poetics and Practices of Polish Cinema
  • Dr Maria Urbina, Senior Lecturer in Multi-media Journalism, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Journalism

What our students think

One student commented on module 7FI014 Teaching Film and Media: This course was the best course I have attended - the teaching was comprehensive and I found the content to be some of the most useful I have experienced throughout my time at university. This was a relatively new subject and I found the work challenging - dealing with new concepts and ideas, but the most important parts for me was to understand where students are educationally before they arrive in University and to develop some of the skills to engage students in their learning experience. I can't express how useful, engaging and interesting this was, I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in teaching at higher education as well as further education.

Career path

In addition to facilitating competence in a range of intellectual and social skills that will be advantageous to the majority of occupations, an MA in Film and Screen is academically relevant to careers in the arts and media, leading to employment in arts administration, film archiving, film and media research, film journalism, film festival management, lecturing and teaching. A specific and unique advantage of this course is a module enabling new lecturers to deliver Film Studies and Media to AS/A2 level. It also provides suitable grounding for doctoral research in film, television and film history.

What skills will you gain?

The course offers theoretical, vocational and practice-based options throughout and you will gain a broad range of academic, vocational and transferable skills that are vital to academic employability and to the screen industries, such as the ability to organise film festivals, present papers at conferences, and publish both journalistic film reviews and scholarly publications. Core modules include Teaching Film and Media which offers unique training for teachers and lecturers in Film and Media Studies, and Becoming an Academic whereby you will acquire a range of academic skills entailing, for example, the ability to write a journal article, academic book, and funding bids. As part of your MA programme, you will independently conduct a research project to a publishable standard, which will provide good opportunities for research-based writing in various contexts. You will also develop event management skills for academic events, such as film festival programming, film curation and the organisation of post-graduate symposia.



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The skills of storytelling are timeless. Tackle the creative, analytical and professional sides of script writing for film, television and radio on this industry-accredited MA. Read more

The skills of storytelling are timeless. Tackle the creative, analytical and professional sides of script writing for film, television and radio on this industry-accredited MA.

With myriad new media platforms there are more opportunities to create content than ever before. And all these require a script and a story. But how do you get your work to industry-standard and in front of the right people? 

The questions we explore

The main question you have to ask yourself for this MA programme is: do I really need to be a writer more than anything else? That’s quite brutal, but script writing is a tough profession. You’re totally exposed as a creative person, it’s you and the page and the tradition in which you’re working, and that can be a liberating but also uncomfortable place to be. 

The processes we use

The programme is not about learning how to be a writer; it’s about developing and pushing forward your own writing projects as far and as fast as you can within 12 months. You’ll be developing your own voice, learning how to critique the work of others, and getting to grips with marketing your projects. You’ll also be making industry contacts so you can pitch for employment in an extremely competitive industry. 

You’ll cover every aspect of the writing process from getting ideas, maintaining productive writing practices and developing characters and story lines, to presenting your work to an industry standard and pitching your ideas. Writing is a lonely business – that’s why the community of writers that the programme gives you is such a creative advantage.

The approach we take

This is an MA that really focuses on you as the student. There are lectures, but most of the time you’ll be working one-to-one with a writing tutor or within small group workshops (with a maximum of 13 people). 

We keep the course small deliberately. In this way we know your individual work and you know other students’ work through the weekly feedback process. We also believe you don’t know who you are until you’re relating to another person, and ultimately this is what script writing is about: making that connection. 

Modules & structure

A core course is designed to give you the skills and understanding required to develop your Treatment for a feature film or equivalent television or radio script. The course is taught mostly with workshops, in which you present and discuss your own work with other students in a supportive environment. There are also class exercises, lectures, screenings, master classes, seminars and individual tutorials.

Starting in the Spring Term, the course then develops your Treatment into a second draft feature script (or its equivalent).

You'll then be able to pick from a selection of option modules. 

Modules 

The MA is composed of:

You also produce a Reflection Essay (15 credits), and choose option modules to the value of 75 credits from the following list:

Assessment

You are assessed on your portfolio, which consists of your long form treatment and second draft feature script or equivalent, your 4,000-word Reflection essay on this script, linked to issues in Media and Culture and a radio script adapted from a source text. In addition, depending on your options, your portfolio could also include a 10-12 page short script or script-editing proposal and coverage. Other modules are assessed by 5-6,000-word essays.

Skills & careers

MA Script Writing is all about the product. So when you complete this masters, you leave with a whole portfolio of writing, a set of professional skills, a list of industry contacts, and a set of professional friendships through the Goldsmiths Screen School. 

The programme gives you a safe, supportive and stimulating environment to unpack your ideas, get constructive feedback, make mistakes, and find the story you want to tell. In the end though, it’s down to you as an individual to become the writer you want to be.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths

 



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The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production. This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. Read more
The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production.

Course overview

This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. For a stronger emphasis on theory, please see MA Media and Cultural Studies.

If you want to improve your knowledge, build your resume and be involved in high-quality media content, with technical skills that are in demand across the TV and Film industries, then this Masters will give you an edge over people with an honours degree. You will cover areas of 360 commissioning, workflow, moving camera, advanced editing techniques and production management.

If your first degree is not directly related to media production, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course. This ensures that everyone on the course can fully participate in group projects.

‌‌‌‌Media Production (Film and Television) MA has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry.‌

‌Sunderland’s Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research. The University hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS). Our research expertise includes multi-platform production, music and moving image collaborations, independent production, and television aesthetics.

‌‌‌‌Students on this course are elgible to apply for a BAFTA scholarship. Find out more on the BAFTA website.

Sunderland is an accredited training provider for AVID software, which is the industry-leading editing system. We are also part of Avid’s worldwide network of Learning Partners, and as an MA student you will have an option to take an AVID certification that boosts your employability. ‌

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/media-production-television-video-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Media Production 1 (60 Credits)
-Media Craft Skills – these include elements of scriptwriting, editing, camera and lighting and sound techniques
-Deconstruction and reconstruction of advertisements and music videos

Media Production 2 (60 Credits)
-Production Management
-Video for New Media
-Mini Practical Project

Media Production 3 (60 Credits)
-Major Media Project

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

You will work on group production projects which will be supported by workshops, studio sessions, tutorials and seminars, as well as master classes led by industry professionals.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is a centre for excellence in training students, with continual investment in industry-standard equipment.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes multiple Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Blackmagic, Sony EX1 and EX3, with associated location DIT kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations Edit systems, including Avid Media Composer, Protools, Adobe Master Collection, four Colour Grading rooms running DaVinci Resolve. There is also a digital audio postproduction area running the Avid S6 desk with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Other media facilities
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Useful resources for your studies include:
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles in production, media management, marketing, legal and media business.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively. Read more
On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively.

Whether it's fiction, non-fiction, marketing copy, magazine features or screenplays, you'll learn how to tailor your work to competitive and fast-moving markets, developing a high-quality portfolio along with the confidence and professionalism you need to forge a successful career.

The course is taught entirely by practising writers and editors, and you'll also benefit from Falmouth's outstanding connections across the writing and publishing sector, with opportunities to learn from many leading writers and publishing industry insiders. Through a wide range of projects, live briefs and assignments, you'll discover your strengths as a writer, explore media and audience, and learn how to develop and pitch your ideas – all setting you up to excel as a professional writer.

The MA has a strong reputation for giving talented writers the skills needed to build a viable career. That's because we recognise that only by working to exacting, real-world standards can you rise to the tough demands of life as a writer.

You'll be immersed in the world of writing from the outset, learning how to create compelling narratives and voices before going on to apply these techniques to the specialist areas of your choice. You'll gain in-depth understanding of the content industry, and of how to raise your own professional profile within it. You'll be part of a lively and supportive community of fellow writers.

On graduation you'll be primed to tackle the writing industry head on – with a portfolio and accomplished working style ready to impress potential employers and meet any writing challenge.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/professionalwriting

Building professional experience

From day one, you'll be supported in shaping your work for publication. Many students succeed in placing work in both local and national publications while still on the course.

During the second half of the MA, you'll be encouraged to identify and undertake writing-related work experience that can feed into your industry-focused research project.

In previous years, students have secured placements with many leading publishers, media organisations, copywriting agencies, magazines and newspapers, often leading to ongoing work after graduation.

How the course is taught

The MA is structured around a mix of seminars, lectures, real-world briefs and practical workshops, along with your own self-managed work. You'll work individually and in teams, collaborating with other media professionals and developing your own projects and business ideas. Critiquing will form a valuable part of your learning experience.

As successful practising writers themselves, your tutors will expect you to take a disciplined and professional approach to your work.

Course outline

The full-time MA course runs over 45 weeks. If you're interested in developing an MA project related to your job, this may well be possible.

Enhanced learning opportunities

We are delighted to host the Writers in Residence programme. Matt Haig is Writer in Residence in 2015 whilst Lionel Shriver joined us in 2014 and Owen Sheers, poet and playwright, was here in 2013. Philip Marsden, novelist and non fiction writer launched the scheme in 2012.

Students have the opportunity to attend the London Book Fair and Port Eliot Festival.

The course is delivered across three study blocks:

- Study Blocks 1 & 2

You'll start by developing your core writing skills across a range of formats, then choose two specialist options from a selection that includes Fiction, Non-fiction, Scriptwriting, and Business & Editorial Writing – building a portfolio that showcases your abilities.

To help guide your choice of specialism, you'll take a module that looks at how writers work in different areas of the content industry. You'll also learn how to use the web and social media to build a profile as a writer.

After completing your specialist options, you'll take a module in research skills. As part of this, you'll carry out industry-focused research and develop a proposal for a longer creative project – your MA project.

- Study Block 3

In the final part of the course, you'll work independently on this project, supported by a specialist tutor. To accompany your project, you'll write a contextual essay focusing on an aspect of your writing practice.

Facilities

- Our library offers access to a wide range of online resources
- Our Media Centre has industry-standard audio/video recording and editing equipment
- Course-specific Virtual Learning Environment

Assessment

- Formal assessment and feedback at the end of each module
- Final assessment is largely based on your extended creative project, which is accompanied by a contextual essay

Careers

Our graduates have forged careers across the publishing and content industry. Potential careers include:

- Full-time author
- Entertainment blogger
- App content creator
- Freelance journalist
- Website editor
- Business writer
- Script editor
- Press officer
- Playwright

Interview and selection process

When you apply, we will ask you to send us a sample of your work along with your application. This could be an unpublished (or published) short story, screenplay, report, journalistic feature, novel extract or anything else that demonstrates your aptitude for writing. If the course team feels you have potential, we'll invite you to interview. We value meeting you in person but Skype interviews can be arranged if this isn't possible.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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