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This is an intensive, hands-on writing course that is ideal if you want to specialise in dramatic scriptwriting for television and radio. Read more
This is an intensive, hands-on writing course that is ideal if you want to specialise in dramatic scriptwriting for television and radio.

The course is aimed at you if you have scriptwriting potential or wish to develop your television and radio writing skills to professional standards. During your time with us, you will enhance your knowledge of storytelling and the demands of television and radio, with the goal of mobilising your creative potential for the 21st-century scriptwriting marketplace.

Key benefits:

• Study at our MediaCityUK campus in industry-leading facilities
• Participate in masterclasses run by industry professionals
• Work on a one-to-one basis with an experienced professional scriptwriter on your final MA project.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/tv-and-radio-scriptwriting

Suitable for

Students come from a wide range of employment and educational backgrounds but what they all have in common is the potential to be a professional screenwriter. Ideally, you will have a passion for storytelling in all of its forms and a desire to communicate a message creatively to an audience. You will have some awareness of the different TV and radio programme formats and a willingness to share your work and learn from others.

Programme details

This course enables you to develop your professional scriptwriting goals by providing the opportunity for you to learn not just scriptwriting skills but an awareness of the demands of the broadcast industries served by these skills and how to address an audience through genres developed specifically for broadcast media. You will be enabled to work autonomously and in groups to solve problems of storytelling, plot and characterisation and to demonstrate an awareness of the commercial demands of the industries you will serve. The ability to advance your knowledge of scriptwriting and the industries of television and radio are provided on this course and you will also experience the opportunity to develop new skills such as pitching script and story ideas and communicating in more traditional academic formats like essays alongside your existing scriptwriting ability. Issues of employment are addressed in modules where you will develop an appreciation of the existing broadcasting landscape and also through the provision of optional modules in year two which enables you to acquire dedicated training in scriptwriting for genres or working in a collaborative creative environment.

Format

This course is taught on a part-time basis, with teaching delivered on a Thursday evening. The Masters award consists of four core taught modules followed by the MA Project (60 credits). The PgDip requires the completion of four core modules. The PgCert requires completion of the first two core taught modules. All modules are delivered over a 12 week semester.

Module titles

• Storytelling and the Moving Image: The Short Film
• Forms and Genres in Film
• Storytelling and the Moving Image: The Feature Film
• MA Film Project

Assessment

• Scripts (70%)
• Essays (20%)
• Reflective statements/critical analysis (10%)

Career potential

As well as establishing themselves as successful scriptwriters, our graduates have also entered occupations including producer, storyliner, script editor, and story consultant with employers as diverse as Coronation Street, Hollyoaks, EA games, Hat Trick, Sony and SEGA.

Our graduates have predominately entered the scriptwriting and satellite professions in roles such as producer, script editor, storyliner, and story consultant as well as narrative director and narrative and speech design for video games. All of these professions involve knowledge not just of the detail of scriptwriting but also of industry practices and conventions.Richard Smith's Trauma starring Colin Firth and Mena Suvari was, we believe, the first MA script project to progress to feature film production.

Our graduates have worked on Emmerdale, Coronation Street, Shameless, Hollyoaks, The Street, Heartbeat and Doctors and have written plays for BBC Radio 4.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The aim of this degree is to give students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of Scriptwriting as a craft. The expertise of our team allows our students to choose whether to write for film, theatre, TV, trans-media or radio. Read more
The aim of this degree is to give students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of Scriptwriting as a craft. The expertise of our team allows our students to choose whether to write for film, theatre, TV, trans-media or radio.

During your time with us you will be following a programme of study that is designed to connect practice with theory, with the eventual aim of providing you with an extensive portfolio of work that could serve as a calling card for the industry. Here you can write short scripts, adaptations and feature length scripts in the medium of your choice.

Our Scriptwriting degree is a valuable opportunity to achieve a high level academic qualification that combines vocational training with analytical skills. We can help you forge working relationships with professional writers and academics, and to explore potential vocational pathways in writing and/or academia.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/136-ma-scriptwriting

What you will study

The MA Scriptwriting course will include the following elements, though you can choose to specialise in writing for film, theatre, TV or radio:

Script Analysis – The module will identify various methods of script analysis from classical structure to more post-structural models equipping you to differentiate between approaches then apply the approach more suited your personal needs.

Short Script – In this module you are required to write a short drama script – either for theatre, radio or for the screen. As part of the module you will visit a specific location as a creative stimulus; this will form the basis for developing the initial idea and writing the final piece.

Adaptation – The module focuses initially on analysis of case studies of adaptations that will include readings of both the original texts and sources as well as the final adapted forms, before offering approaches to allow students to generate their own adaptations.

Major Project Treatment – This module is designed to teach students how to conceive, structure and write a treatment or outline for their final project. It includes analysis of story structure as well as comprehensive guidance on the techniques of writing and presenting an industry-ready package including a pitch, synopsis and treatment.

Major Project – Students will work with their supervisor through the process of evolving their treatment into a final draft, full-length script. Because the story has already been developed, with structure and character arcs already in place, the emphasis at this stage will be more on writing scenes and crafting dialogue

You will be tutored through these modules, which culminate in a full-length script that showcases the skills you have gained during the course and can potentially act as an industry calling card.

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

Learning and teaching methods

The Full Time course is taught through lectures and seminars held at the Atrium Building coupled and one to one tutorials. We also combine with the Part Time students during a series of intensive residential sessions and master-classes with industry professionals.

Following up from the weekend master-classes the Part Time course employs distance-learning practises, things like Skype tutorials or tutorials via phone or written feedback via e-mail.

The MA Scriptwriting may also be studied through the medium of Welsh.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

USW’s MA Scriptwriting will introduce students to industry professionals and generate a range of networking opportunities. The skills acquired on this scriptwriting course lead either to a career as a writer in film, theatre, TV or radio, or to further academic study at PhD level.

Assessment methods

Learning Through Employment:
Learning Through Employment is a University of South Wales framework that offers students who are already in employment the opportunity to gain credits towards a postgraduate qualification.

The programme is structured so that the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement with your work activities, underpinned by the appropriate academic knowledge and skills.

All postgraduate courses at the University of South Wales’ Cardiff Campus offer students the opportunity to undertake a 60 credit Learning Through Employment Research Project as an alternative to a traditional final dissertation, major project or production.

The focus of the project is an individual, organisational problem solving, knowledge-based approach.

As such, it has been is designed for practising professionals to provide them with the tools to succeed in the workplace.

This truly flexible approach means that projects can be based on an agreed area of work, benefitting students and employers, and because the majority of the project is carried out in the workplace, it can potentially be undertaken anywhere in the world.

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This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. Read more
This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. All our tutors are award winning writers with an insight into what it takes to make it in the industry. We aim to turn out writers who understand the structure and craft of drama, have a finished script they can use as a calling card, know the industry in all its variety, and can pitch and sell their work.

The MA is taught in seventeen weekends of intensive workshops. It is not, however, ‘low residency’. There are as many hours of teaching as on Bath Spa University’s established MA in Creative Writing.

The course is taught at our beautiful Corsham Court campus where we have state of the art performance, capture and editing facilities. Our students also have opportunities to see their work for the stage performed and to shoot excerpts from their screenplays. We work closely with the School of Music and Performing Arts, and their students will have the opportunity to help act in and produce our work.

Although this is an intellectually challenging postgraduate course, there is no ‘academic’ side detached from the working side. Everything theoretical is geared to help the students as writers.

The MA in Scriptwriting also offers each of its students a free copy of Final Draft scriptwriting software, a must for professional Scriptwriters.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is full-time from October to September, or part-time over two years, and is taught in modules. The first trimester runs from October to January and there are two modules, each delivered in three intensive weekends.

One is the module on Dramatic Structure. This aims to give you an understanding of the full range of ways that plays and scripts can work. You are introduced to dialogue, character, genre, and the different media. But the emphasis is on how to tell a story - a well made plot. Students will read and view widely, but the academic side is not separate from the working side. This module is to help you write.

The other module in the first trimester is a workshop in Writing Theatre and Radio. This is delivered in three intensive weekends. All of the time is devoted to the students’ own work, and much of the time we work on our feet. At the end of the trimester each student finishes a 45 to 60 minute play or radio script, and a 3,000 word essay that explains the structure of that script.

The second trimester, from February to June, also has two modules. One is Professional Skills, again over three intensive weekends. All our experience is that the ability to write alone is not enough to make your way in the various industries of theatre, television, film and radio. You also need to be able to pitch, and to talk intelligently and flexibly about your own work and others’. One of our tutors facilitates this module, and various industry professionals come in for a day each to inform, rehearse and challenge you.

The other module this trimester is Workshop in Screenwriting, also over three weekends. Here you write a script for film or television. We pay particular attention to genre, to the visual and time requirements of the screen, and to writing for particular markets. At the end of this trimester each student finishes 50 to 60 minutes of TV, or a short film script, or a treatment for a full-length film plus at least 45 minutes of polished script.

The third trimester runs from June to the end of September. Here there is only one double module, the Final Script Workshop. The workshops meet over five intensive Saturdays.

In this module each student writes a full length play, a full length film script, or the equivalent in television or radio. This script can be a development and reworking of earlier pieces, but will often be completely new work. At the end of September students submit this script.

The final assessment is based on four things. The most important is this script. The second is a 1,500 word essay explaining exactly where in the market it is aimed and how it is shaped to fit that niche. The third is a cold pitch for this script. When we speak of the market, we are thinking quite broadly. Some students will want to write for Hollywood, British independent films, soap operas, or theatre. Others will want to write radio plays, documentaries, puppet shows, theatre in education, training videos or school plays. The emphasis is, however, always on getting your work to a stage where it is ready to be produced. The fourth is a practical realisation of a short excerpt of an original work stage, screen or radio play. Students are expected to co ordinate this realisation themselves with advice and support from their tutor and using the University’s resources.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

All courses will be taught by intensive workshops. Over the years we have found this is far and away the most productive way of teaching writing. It is particularly suited to scriptwriting, which is very much a social and collective art.

Tutors and visiting professionals:
All of our tutors are writers working in the industry. Among those working on the course will be:

• Ursula Rani Sarma (Course Director) writer for theatre, radio and screen
• Steve May who writes radio and novels
• Lucy Catherine who writes theatre, television and film
• Robin Mukherjee who writes theatre, television and film
• Hattie Naylor who writes film, theatre, radio and opera libretti
• Jonathan Neale who writes theatre, radio and novels

In the second semester we have visits from several professionals in the industry. Each conducts a one-day workshop with students, outlining the industry and giving them rigorous practice in pitching their work. Typically, we will have an agent, a TV producer, a radio producer, a theatre director or literary manager, and a film script editor.

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With a uniquely collaborative emphasis, this course offers opportunities for some of the scripts you develop over the course to be produced, through close collaboration with students from MA Producing for Film and TV, MA Directing for Film and TV and MA Radio Production. Read more
With a uniquely collaborative emphasis, this course offers opportunities for some of the scripts you develop over the course to be produced, through close collaboration with students from MA Producing for Film and TV, MA Directing for Film and TV and MA Radio Production. This equips you with the skills and attitudes required for successful script development processes in the industry. The course is busy, intensive and involves much teamwork alongside individual writing practice.

Throughout the course, you will develop your ideas from concept to industry standard final draft, with a development process that includes research, pitching, presentations, script reading and networking events, workshop groups, tutorials, script editing, and rewriting for production.

You will be encouraged to nurture and reflect on your creative process and originality of voice, and to explore the contexts – critical, creative and industrial that inform scriptwriting today.

The course is taught by scriptwriting professionals and theorists, alongside an exciting programme of industry guest speakers. The course is suitable for students who have previously developed their own creative writing projects within humanities or media production courses or with relevant professional experience.

Successful participation in MA Scriptwriting will enable you to emerge from the course as a writer with a distinctive authorial voice, an industry standard portfolio of scripts, experience of writing in formats and genres, and a robust attitude to collaboration and development.

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Utilising the expertise of our expanded Scriptwriting team the course builds on the skill base and reputation of our established undergraduate course and boasts improved facilities as a result of the move to our £15 Million Media Factory development with state-of-the-art facilities. Read more
Utilising the expertise of our expanded Scriptwriting team the course builds on the skill base and reputation of our established undergraduate course and boasts improved facilities as a result of the move to our £15 Million Media Factory development with state-of-the-art facilities.

The course offers an in-depth knowledge of writing for radio, television, film and stage with emphasis on current industry practice and employability, equipping students with the most appropriate practice skills. Students will have the opportunity to participate in the writing of a full length feature film that is actually produced. Students will also be contenders for the new Matt Greenhalgh Award. The course is ideally located with access to local radio and the North West’s vibrant live grassroots theatre and new BBC production base.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The Scriptwriting Skills modules on the MA course are all freshly written and completely up-to-date. Critical theory will be embedded into a wider range of modules. This will further develop the critical underpinning of a student’s practical work and their dissertation. This will ensure critical theory gains greater relevance to the practical elements of the course. These skills will develop gradually throughout the course and will culminate with the triple module in semester three.

The curriculum themes of employability, practice based learning; entrepreneurial skills; developing industry contacts, and sustainability are embedded within the programme and are addressed through relevant topics in the new modules.

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The MA Creative Writing. Scriptwriting addresses dramatic writing across the media with the rigour and professional insight that are the hallmark of our creative writing teaching. Read more
The MA Creative Writing: Scriptwriting addresses dramatic writing across the media with the rigour and professional insight that are the hallmark of our creative writing teaching.

The strand has three core modules. Firstly, Dramaturgy, where we study the core principles of drama as explored from Aristotle to McKee and as embodied in a range of plays, films and TV programmes, from Antigone to Game of Thrones. Alongside this runs Workshop where each week your writing benefits from the scrutiny of fellow writers and workshop leaders such as renowned playwrights Steve Waters and Timberlake Wertenbaker. The process offers you the chance to build an idea from concept to realisation under the keen eye of an industry expert.

Meanwhile for your other module you can choose from a huge inter-disciplinary menu. By Spring you're embarked on your Dissertation benefiting from close supervision as you write a full length drama for the medium of your choice.

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Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. Read more
Humber’s Creative Writing – Comic Scriptwriting graduate certificate program prepares writers to enter the entertainment field with confidence. You will learn the essentials (story, structure, conflict and, most importantly, comic voice) and the business of getting in the door (pitching, dos and don’ts, how to handle rewrites and writing for producers). You will graduate with the satisfaction of knowing that your experience is truly a one-of-a-kind accomplishment.

Students work on a one-to-one basis with an award-winning, internationally acclaimed writer who critiques, supports and helps improve their writing. Program faculty have made millions laugh and have included Joe Flaherty (Second City Television (SCTV), Happy Gilmore, Freaks and Geeks) and David Flaherty (SCTV, Maniac Mansion).

Your experience will span 30 weeks. Correspondence is as close as your fingers are to your laptop. No classroom here – just you and your ideas. Our advisory committee provides regular review and input to our curriculum, ensuring our program is always on the cutting edge of industry developments.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Analyze personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for form and structure and delineate story features such as conflict, crisis and resolution. Students should be able to differentiate between story and plot and compare various types of conflict used in story writing. Students will explore various methods of plotting a work of fiction such as working backward from the climax, working forward from the initial interaction or borrowing from tradition.

• Distinguish the qualities of short stories versus novels.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction for the inclusion of techniques used in creative writing for making narrative an emotional experience. These techniques include the use of significant detail, active voice, and strategies for establishing cadence, rhythm and prose. In addition, students will be expected to be masters of the mechanics of writing and demonstrate the correct use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

• Assess personal and recognized works of fiction for characterization and the techniques used for establishing character credibility and complexity. Students will explore how character motivation is revealed and how characters are presented both directly and indirectly.

• Outline and compare personal and recognized methods for establishing setting and atmosphere in stories as well as techniques used for adjusting narrative time.

• Critique and manipulate the point of view in personal and recognized stories. In their development of point of view, students will develop strategies for deciding who is speaking in their stories and whom they are addressing. In addition, they will determine which techniques best convey the story and determine the best distance between the reader, author and characters. An analysis of point of view also includes the use of spatial and temporal distance and how to include unreliable speakers in the story.

• Evaluate the methods used for developing the theme in personal and recognized stories. They will explore how theme helps dictate the selection and organization of details, style, voice and other elements of the work.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of fiction and creative non-fiction for unity of effect.

• Recognize and revise weak spots in their writing. They will explore common errors and the technical questions writers should ask themselves as they review and revise their work and apply them to an analysis of plot, characterization, style, setting, narration, dialogue, point of view, structure, clarity, length and originality.

• Conduct the required research to authenticate their story and make it come alive. They will be able to select and use a variety of research methods such as the internet, the library, interviews and site visits.

• Evaluate personal and recognized works of poetry for the poetic tools used to shape and focus ideas and feelings and to create texture and vividness in a poem. These techniques include: devise for rhythm; devices for sound; stanza and poem forms; and imagery and figures of speech.

• Develop a plan for marketing their creative writing and handling the business requirements of being a writer. This will include researching the needs and demands of the market, preparing query letters and/or book proposals, identifying suitable publishers for their work, finding and working with agents, negotiating a contract, submitting their work in suitable formats, setting fees where appropriate, and keeping appropriate records. In addition, they will explore some of the legal aspects of being a writer such as copyright and libel. Students will also develop an awareness of writing awards and competitions as well as writer support programs.

• Identify opportunities to publish freelance works of fiction and creative non-fiction to local, national and international magazines, newspapers, television, film, textbooks, and the Internet. This will include the analysis of the research and publication requirements of a variety of publishers, strategies for introducing ideas and personal works to various media and a thorough understanding of the features of freelance contracts. Students will prepare, review and submit works for freelance submissions.

• Evaluate the elements of successful professional writing careers and develop methods for promoting personal works and developing personal relationships with media contacts. This will include exploring ways to make public appearances and provide public readings of personal works. How to manage interviews and participate in a variety of media events will be examined. Public appearances and public speaking.

Modules

Semester 1
• WRIT 5001: Narrative Styles 1
• WRIT 5003: Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5005: Editing for Publication 1
• WRIT 5007: Issues In Contemporary Writing
• WRIT 5009: Freelance Writing

Semester 2
• WRIT 5500: Narrative Styles 2
• WRIT 5501: Advance Character, Plot and Stylistic Development
• WRIT 5502: Editing for Publication 2
• WRIT 5503: The Business Of Writing
• WRIT 5504: The Writer and The Media

Your Career

Think you have a funny premise for a TV show? How about an idea that would make a great movie? If you’ve ever dreamt about writing a comedy, make it happen. And the beauty is, you can write comedy anywhere, any time your schedule allows.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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This is a wide-ranging MA that combines cultural, historical and industry-specific analysis with critical and theoretical study. It provides an interdisciplinary approach to a range of current and important media contexts and industries covering broadcast, print and digital media modes. Read more

Why take this course?

This is a wide-ranging MA that combines cultural, historical and industry-specific analysis with critical and theoretical study. It provides an interdisciplinary approach to a range of current and important media contexts and industries covering broadcast, print and digital media modes. It offers a range of political, industry-based, and text-based approaches to media and its communication strategies as well as opportunities for you to develop your own interests through the dissertation, industry study, screenwriting project or work placement project.

The degree is taught by a team of experienced lecturers who have researched and published in their specialist areas, and who bring those specialisms to their teaching sessions. This course will enable you to become multi-skilled and knowledgeable in ways that employers are now demanding and will prepare you to apply for jobs in areas such as teaching, publishing, journalism, scriptwriting, film and media management. In addition, the course is ideal preparation for further postgraduate work.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Produce screenplays for film and television while working with a specialist tutor
Be involved in and contribute to our dynamic research culture through your film/TV dissertation
Engage with our researchers and published experts, many of whom have international reputations

What opportunities might ti lead to?

The skills you will develop on this course can prepare you for roles within the media and other creative industries, in particular the film and television industries. Alternatively, many of our graduates find roles within a variety of media industries and a number of them have gone on to study for PhDs or teaching qualifications.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Teaching
Writing
Journalism
Media

Module Details

You will develop a wide range of skills throughout the course such as applying theoretical approaches and using critical skills in close analysis and reading of key film and television texts. All units on this course focus on both film and television, but your final research project can cover both media or specialise in one of these two areas.

Here are the units you will study:

Research Methods (30 credits): This unit covers how to carry out research in film archives, how to do a literature search in film and television, and how to produce a thesis which is well structured and methodologically rigorous.

Media Contexts (30 credits): Investigate the ways in which a wide range of media texts communicate meaning. This unit will use a range of media texts as examples, including film, television, magazines, newspapers, fiction, graphic novels and comics. Theoretical approaches to all these contexts for interpreting and understanding media texts will form an important part of this unit.

Media Politics (30 credits): You will research and explore the various ways in which media reflects and represents political issues and identities.

Media Cultures and Industries (30 credits): You will explore a range of media industries and cultures including audience and fan cultures; film and television industry structures and policies; digital cultures and the scriptwriting industry.

Options to choose from include:

Short screenwriting project (30 credits): A self-directed practical writing project developing a short piece of drama for either film or television.

Industry study (30 credits): An opportunity to engage in an individual study of a media industry.

Short dissertation (30 credits) or Dissertation (60 credits): You will research and write a thesis focused on a defined research topic and/or question.

Programme Assessment

Your learning experience will not only cover the theory of these two media forms but you will also be given the opportunity to produce your own screenplays for film and TV. This is designed to develop more applied skills that will complement the theoretical components of the course.

Assessment is predominantly essay based in order to help you develop advanced research and analysis skills. Some units also involve individual oral presentations, so you can develop presentation skills at a higher level and engage in stimulating, sophisticated academic debates in your seminars.

Student Destinations

This course will enable you to become multi-skilled in ways that employers are now demanding and will help prepare you to apply for jobs in such areas as teaching, publishing, journalism, scriptwriting, film and media management. In addition, it is ideal preparation for further postgraduate work or research at PhD level.

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MA Screenwriting London College of Communication is one of the UK’s leading film and TV scripting courses with a strong reputation in the industry. Read more
MA Screenwriting London College of Communication is one of the UK’s leading film and TV scripting courses with a strong reputation in the industry.

Graduates of MA Screenwriting have gone on to win numerous UK and international awards, work on major film projects in active development, and are writing for a wide range of programmes currently being screened on UK television.
Leading the field, this industry-focused screenwriting course is aimed at developing writers for film, television and/or radio industries. The course will provide you with the opportunity to develop the abilities, knowledge and skills you will need for a career in scriptwriting.
What can you expect?
MA Screenwriting introduces you to the foundations of contemporary scriptwriting practice in a theoretical context. You will develop research methodologies that will become the basis for future practice and analysis.
The course offers you the opportunity to study feature film, television and radio narrative and the development of a script from a short story and research, which lays the foundation for your Major Project.

You will also complete a Collaborative Unit that reflects your specialist interests in scriptwriting and related topics, whilst engaging with the need to understand and communicate with the industry you wish to work in.
In the final term you will undertake a Major Project that allows you to focus on a specialist area of interest that you identified during your development on the course. You will write several drafts of an original screenplay for film or TV, or a TV pilot episode(s) with format documents. In addition, you will engage in peer-to-peer review and the writing of reader reports.

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This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. Read more
This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. This is in both terms of a distinctive philosophy of writing (to answer the question, ‘What kind of writer am I?’), and in terms of the practicalities of making creative work public.

You should have some experience of writing fiction, poetry or prose (although there is not a requirement for this work to have been published), or scriptwriting, and wish to further your skills within the academic context of creative writing as an academic discipline. You will work with a core team of professional writers and other professionals to develop your creative work and nurture an understanding about the nature of your continuing creativity, aiming towards producing a final manuscript for possible publication.

What will I study?

You will begin straight away to experience the benefits of the regular workshops that form an integral part of the programme. You will discuss the work of others on the MA as well as learning from their discussion of your work. You will also receive tutor feedback.

You will study a variety of contemporary literature which will feed into your writing where needed, along with a study of the poetics of contemporary writers (that is, the things writers have written about their own writing philosophies and practices). The aim is to influence your practical development, allowing you to develop your own poetics and philosophy of composition.

In the first weeks of the course you will research markets and outlets for your work and complete submissions of your writing. You will also compile a professional development audit of your activities so far (which may not be extensive, of course). You will be asked to keep a log throughout the programme to enable you to track your development.

How will I study?

The writing workshops are always taught in small groups, but the discussion groups involve seminars with a lecture component.

During the manuscript module (a dissertation) you will work one-to-one with your manuscript supervisor, bringing your months of study to a final creative fruition. All the modules you will take have been designed specifically for writers.

This is not the kind of ‘Creative Writing’ course that requires you to pick from already existing English Literature modules. The modules have been custom-designed for you.

How will I be assessed?

You will present your creative writing with a short example of poetics relating to the piece. You will write about works of contemporary literature and about the poetics of these writers, though you will approach these tasks from the perspective of a fellow-writer. All this work will help you develop towards the final piece of work, The Manuscript. The professional development audit and logs will be marked on a pass / fail basis.

Who will be teaching me?

A team of seven, with extensive experience in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, short stories and scriptwriting teach on the programme. The team will be complemented by visiting speakers and visiting writers.

What are my career prospects?

The thinking behind the professional development strand is that writers seldom exclusively work as writers, but need to learn to combine their principal involvement and passion for literary composition with other activities (whether they are of a literary nature or not).

Of course, as a Masters in a humanities subject you will find this qualification useful in a variety of professional contexts, such as in school teaching, which encourages staff to work at Masters level. It provides a sound basis for further study (e.g. PhD work in Creative Writing).

Previous graduates have gone on to publish with major publishers, win prizes, edit magazines and books, and are active in the pedagogy of Creative Writing as a robust academic discipline.

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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Read more
This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. The programme, located in the School of Humanities and Cultural Industries, has become established as one of the leading courses of its kind.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.

The MA in Creative Writing is concerned with imaginative writing, which includes novels, short stories, poetry and non-fiction. The emphasis is upon encouragement, to help you to find and pursue a direction in your writing, and to understand the process of offering a manuscript for publication.

Because of the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who, every year, form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers. Frequent visits by other writers, literary agents, publishers, broadcasters and other professionals connected with writing ensure that students are given plentiful advice about how to place work and make decisions about their careers as writers.

The course is not for the writer whose only interest is in their own work, but rather for the writer who can benefit from working closely with fellow students and with tutors, many of whom are practising and published writers.

In recent years, several current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; Two were long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, three for the Orange Prize, one for the Costa Prize and one for the Guardian First Book Award. One received the Betty Trask Prize; another the Manchester Book Award; another a W.H. Smith New Talent Award. One reached the best-seller lists. Student poets have had their poetry accepted for publication in numerous literary journals, including Ambit, Magma, London Magazine, Poetry Wales, PN Review and The Reader, among others, and have been placed in such competitions as the Bridport, the Frogmore, Mslexia, and Writers Inc. Janklow and Nesbit Ltd, a leading literary agency, awards an annual prize for the best novel or novel in progress by a student on the course.

It is implicit in the course philosophy that critical reading aids the development of writers. Workshops, in which you look constructively at each other’s writing, and context modules, to study the ways in which writers meet certain challenges, are integral parts of the course.

MODULES

The full MA programme consists of two writing workshops, two context modules and the Manuscript (a double module):

Workshop One - You can either start with a general writing workshop in which you experiment with a range of forms, or a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Workshop Two - This is a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Context Modules - These modules examine genres and look at ways in which writers meet challenges from the public world. At least five of the following are offered each term:

• Writing and the Environmental Crisis
• Suspense Fiction
• Contemporary American Writing
• The Writer and Place
• Modernism and Postmodernism
• Writing and Gender
• The Short Story
• Writing and Politics
• Reviewing and Journalism
• Narrative Non-Fiction
• Genres of Television Drama
• The Love Story
• Writing for Young People

The Manuscript - For this module each student brings a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. You are assigned a specialist tutor.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Students take two three-hour seminars a week for the workshop and context modules. The Manuscript is completed between June and September. Students meet tutors regularly during this period. A residential writing weekend is an essential part of the course.

TUTORS

Tutors include prestigious, best selling and award winning writers, such as Gerard Woodward (novelist and poet); Tim Liardet (poet); Tessa Hadley (novelist); Andrew Miller (novelist); Carrie Etter (poet); Samantha Harvey (novelist); Steve May (radio dramatist, playwright and novelist); Richard Kerridge (nature writer); Paul Evans (nature writer); Lucy English (novelist and poet); Mimi Thebo (novelist); Jonathan Neale (novelist, dramatist and non-fiction writer); Tricia Wastvedt (novelist); Celia Brayfield (novelist); Jenni Mills (novelist); Neil Rollinson (poet). In addition you will have the opportunity to meet a wide range of writers, publishers and literary agents.

VISITING WRITERS

Readings and seminars conducted by writers are built into the programme. Visiting writers have included Moniza Alvi, John Burnside, Stevie Davies, Helen Dunmore, Roy Fisher, Peter Flannery, Nick Hornby, Michael Hulse, Emyr Humphreys, Kathleen Jamie, Mimi Khalvati, Toby Litt, Tony Lopez, Benjamin Markovits, Les A. Murray, Tim Pears, Ashley Pharoah, D.B.C. Pierre, Jem Poster, Philip Pullman, Fiona Sampson, Michael Schmidt, Matthew Sweeney and Fay Weldon. There will also be visits from publishers, literary agents and broadcasters. Every year there are opportunities to show work to agents and editors who visit.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment is by coursework only. Each writing workshop is assessed on the basis of a folder of creative writing and an early draft of part of the Manuscript. Each context module is assessed on the basis of an essay and a folder of creative responses. The Manuscript is 35,000–40,000 words (or the equivalent for poetry and scriptwriting).

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The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production. This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. Read more
The state-of-the-art facilities at our David Puttnam Media Centre make Sunderland a compelling choice for media production.

Course overview

This course is for people who want a Masters with a focus on practical skills in media production. For a stronger emphasis on theory, please see MA Media and Cultural Studies.

If you want to improve your knowledge, build your resume and be involved in high-quality media content, with technical skills that are in demand across the TV and Film industries, then this Masters will give you an edge over people with an honours degree. You will cover areas of 360 commissioning, workflow, moving camera, advanced editing techniques and production management.

If your first degree is not directly related to media production, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course. This ensures that everyone on the course can fully participate in group projects.

‌‌‌‌Media Production (Film and Television) MA has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry.‌

‌Sunderland’s Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research. The University hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS). Our research expertise includes multi-platform production, music and moving image collaborations, independent production, and television aesthetics.

‌‌‌‌Students on this course are elgible to apply for a BAFTA scholarship. Find out more on the BAFTA website.

Sunderland is an accredited training provider for AVID software, which is the industry-leading editing system. We are also part of Avid’s worldwide network of Learning Partners, and as an MA student you will have an option to take an AVID certification that boosts your employability. ‌

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/media-production-television-video-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors. Modules on this course include:
Media Production 1 (60 Credits)
-Media Craft Skills – these include elements of scriptwriting, editing, camera and lighting and sound techniques
-Deconstruction and reconstruction of advertisements and music videos

Media Production 2 (60 Credits)
-Production Management
-Video for New Media
-Mini Practical Project

Media Production 3 (60 Credits)
-Major Media Project

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

You will work on group production projects which will be supported by workshops, studio sessions, tutorials and seminars, as well as master classes led by industry professionals.

Facilities & location

Our David Puttnam Media Centre is a centre for excellence in training students, with continual investment in industry-standard equipment.

TV studios
We have two TV studios complete with green rooms and control rooms. Equipment includes multiple Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We also have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems, comprising Blackmagic, Sony EX1 and EX3, with associated location DIT kits, lighting, field monitors and audio mixers.

Digital editing
There are 70 workstations Edit systems, including Avid Media Composer, Protools, Adobe Master Collection, four Colour Grading rooms running DaVinci Resolve. There is also a digital audio postproduction area running the Avid S6 desk with four voiceover booths.

Radio studios
We have five radio studios including a transmission suite for Spark FM, our student-run community radio station. It broadcasts 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, with a target audience of 15-24 year olds.

Other media facilities
There is a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility. We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Useful resources for your studies include:
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles in production, media management, marketing, legal and media business.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively. Read more
On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively.

Whether it's fiction, non-fiction, marketing copy, magazine features or screenplays, you'll learn how to tailor your work to competitive and fast-moving markets, developing a high-quality portfolio along with the confidence and professionalism you need to forge a successful career.

The course is taught entirely by practising writers and editors, and you'll also benefit from Falmouth's outstanding connections across the writing and publishing sector, with opportunities to learn from many leading writers and publishing industry insiders. Through a wide range of projects, live briefs and assignments, you'll discover your strengths as a writer, explore media and audience, and learn how to develop and pitch your ideas – all setting you up to excel as a professional writer.

The MA has a strong reputation for giving talented writers the skills needed to build a viable career. That's because we recognise that only by working to exacting, real-world standards can you rise to the tough demands of life as a writer.

You'll be immersed in the world of writing from the outset, learning how to create compelling narratives and voices before going on to apply these techniques to the specialist areas of your choice. You'll gain in-depth understanding of the content industry, and of how to raise your own professional profile within it. You'll be part of a lively and supportive community of fellow writers.

On graduation you'll be primed to tackle the writing industry head on – with a portfolio and accomplished working style ready to impress potential employers and meet any writing challenge.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/professionalwriting

Building professional experience

From day one, you'll be supported in shaping your work for publication. Many students succeed in placing work in both local and national publications while still on the course.

During the second half of the MA, you'll be encouraged to identify and undertake writing-related work experience that can feed into your industry-focused research project.

In previous years, students have secured placements with many leading publishers, media organisations, copywriting agencies, magazines and newspapers, often leading to ongoing work after graduation.

How the course is taught

The MA is structured around a mix of seminars, lectures, real-world briefs and practical workshops, along with your own self-managed work. You'll work individually and in teams, collaborating with other media professionals and developing your own projects and business ideas. Critiquing will form a valuable part of your learning experience.

As successful practising writers themselves, your tutors will expect you to take a disciplined and professional approach to your work.

Course outline

The full-time MA course runs over 45 weeks. If you're interested in developing an MA project related to your job, this may well be possible.

Enhanced learning opportunities

We are delighted to host the Writers in Residence programme. Matt Haig is Writer in Residence in 2015 whilst Lionel Shriver joined us in 2014 and Owen Sheers, poet and playwright, was here in 2013. Philip Marsden, novelist and non fiction writer launched the scheme in 2012.

Students have the opportunity to attend the London Book Fair and Port Eliot Festival.

The course is delivered across three study blocks:

- Study Blocks 1 & 2

You'll start by developing your core writing skills across a range of formats, then choose two specialist options from a selection that includes Fiction, Non-fiction, Scriptwriting, and Business & Editorial Writing – building a portfolio that showcases your abilities.

To help guide your choice of specialism, you'll take a module that looks at how writers work in different areas of the content industry. You'll also learn how to use the web and social media to build a profile as a writer.

After completing your specialist options, you'll take a module in research skills. As part of this, you'll carry out industry-focused research and develop a proposal for a longer creative project – your MA project.

- Study Block 3

In the final part of the course, you'll work independently on this project, supported by a specialist tutor. To accompany your project, you'll write a contextual essay focusing on an aspect of your writing practice.

Facilities

- Our library offers access to a wide range of online resources
- Our Media Centre has industry-standard audio/video recording and editing equipment
- Course-specific Virtual Learning Environment

Assessment

- Formal assessment and feedback at the end of each module
- Final assessment is largely based on your extended creative project, which is accompanied by a contextual essay

Careers

Our graduates have forged careers across the publishing and content industry. Potential careers include:

- Full-time author
- Entertainment blogger
- App content creator
- Freelance journalist
- Website editor
- Business writer
- Script editor
- Press officer
- Playwright

Interview and selection process

When you apply, we will ask you to send us a sample of your work along with your application. This could be an unpublished (or published) short story, screenplay, report, journalistic feature, novel extract or anything else that demonstrates your aptitude for writing. If the course team feels you have potential, we'll invite you to interview. We value meeting you in person but Skype interviews can be arranged if this isn't possible.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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The Director is central to the creative process in media production and this course has been designed to build and develop your knowledge of the industry, enabling you to step up to the challenge of delivering winning productions. Read more
The Director is central to the creative process in media production and this course has been designed to build and develop your knowledge of the industry, enabling you to step up to the challenge of delivering winning productions. This hands-on course provides many opportunities for practical production across platforms and genres. It will enhance your storytelling skills and build your technical understanding of film, television and transmedia production, developing advanced skills as a director in line with current industry practice.

The Faculty of Media & Communication encourage dynamic collaborations between students across courses. Working with the producing, scriptwriting, cinematography, sound and editing students you will create a showcase of your skills as a visual, creative storyteller. Many of these collaborations have continued beyond the course as students set up their own production companies. This comprehensive course will equip you with the skills to understand and manage the entire production process, from effective planning and pre-visualisation to overseeing creative post-production work alongside our editing students.

Under the guidance of experienced media professionals, you will develop your own directorial flair and style, and will gain a sound theoretical grounding of the social, cultural and intellectual context for media production work. The final production project will allow you to use the technical and directorial skills you have developed to mastermind your own portfolio of work in collaboration with other students within The Faculty of Media & Communication. As an alternative, you can choose a research-based option to undertake a detailed study of an aspect of directing.

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