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Masters Degrees (Script Writing)

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The skills of storytelling are timeless. Tackle the creative, analytical and professional sides of script writing for film, television and radio on this industry-accredited MA. Read more

The skills of storytelling are timeless. Tackle the creative, analytical and professional sides of script writing for film, television and radio on this industry-accredited MA.

With myriad new media platforms there are more opportunities to create content than ever before. And all these require a script and a story. But how do you get your work to industry-standard and in front of the right people? 

The questions we explore

The main question you have to ask yourself for this MA programme is: do I really need to be a writer more than anything else? That’s quite brutal, but script writing is a tough profession. You’re totally exposed as a creative person, it’s you and the page and the tradition in which you’re working, and that can be a liberating but also uncomfortable place to be. 

The processes we use

The programme is not about learning how to be a writer; it’s about developing and pushing forward your own writing projects as far and as fast as you can within 12 months. You’ll be developing your own voice, learning how to critique the work of others, and getting to grips with marketing your projects. You’ll also be making industry contacts so you can pitch for employment in an extremely competitive industry. 

You’ll cover every aspect of the writing process from getting ideas, maintaining productive writing practices and developing characters and story lines, to presenting your work to an industry standard and pitching your ideas. Writing is a lonely business – that’s why the community of writers that the programme gives you is such a creative advantage.

The approach we take

This is an MA that really focuses on you as the student. There are lectures, but most of the time you’ll be working one-to-one with a writing tutor or within small group workshops (with a maximum of 13 people). 

We keep the course small deliberately. In this way we know your individual work and you know other students’ work through the weekly feedback process. We also believe you don’t know who you are until you’re relating to another person, and ultimately this is what script writing is about: making that connection. 

Modules & structure

A core course is designed to give you the skills and understanding required to develop your Treatment for a feature film or equivalent television or radio script. The course is taught mostly with workshops, in which you present and discuss your own work with other students in a supportive environment. There are also class exercises, lectures, screenings, master classes, seminars and individual tutorials.

Starting in the Spring Term, the course then develops your Treatment into a second draft feature script (or its equivalent).

You'll then be able to pick from a selection of option modules. 

Modules 

The MA is composed of:

You also produce a Reflection Essay (15 credits), and choose option modules to the value of 75 credits from the following list:

Assessment

You are assessed on your portfolio, which consists of your long form treatment and second draft feature script or equivalent, your 4,000-word Reflection essay on this script, linked to issues in Media and Culture and a radio script adapted from a source text. In addition, depending on your options, your portfolio could also include a 10-12 page short script or script-editing proposal and coverage. Other modules are assessed by 5-6,000-word essays.

Skills & careers

MA Script Writing is all about the product. So when you complete this masters, you leave with a whole portfolio of writing, a set of professional skills, a list of industry contacts, and a set of professional friendships through the Goldsmiths Screen School. 

The programme gives you a safe, supportive and stimulating environment to unpack your ideas, get constructive feedback, make mistakes, and find the story you want to tell. In the end though, it’s down to you as an individual to become the writer you want to be.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths

 



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Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. Read more
Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. This programme is designed for committed writers who wish to complete significant pieces of work and generally broaden their experience as writers.

Course Overview

The MA in Creative and Scriptwriting provides the opportunity to specialise in creative writing for film, TV or theatre. The overall aim of the programme is to equip students with the ability to hone their screen, dramatic or other writing skills, with a particular understanding of commercial contexts and to develop areas of creativity at an advanced level. In all cases the emphasis is on developing the individual student's creative expression. There is no attempt to impose a house style.

The programme provides the opportunity to work with internationally recognised dramatists and screen writers as well as with writers with expertise in other genres of creative writing. The dissertation element of the programme will enable you to develop a full script, reflecting both creative and commercial imperatives, building upon exercises in dramatic writing developed through the screenwriting and workshop modules.

The MA has responded to the explosion of online publishing by supporting students in publication and promotion. The course is delivered by a mixture of professional writers and academics who prepare you for the realities of a hugely competitive market. You will learn how to prepare manuscripts, to approach publishers, and, increasingly important, to market yourself.

The School and the University support a number of reading and social events in which students are encouraged to participate. We also support the student-led design, production, publication and promotion of the well-received online journal The Lampeter Review. As a result of this activity several former students now work in publishing and we are proud of our excellent track record of student publishing success.

Modules

-Approaches to Creative Writing
-Writing Workshop: Research and Writing
-Writing Workshop: Writing and Context
-Writers World
-Screenwriting
-Creative Project (Dissertation)

Key Features

-The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.
-Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize-winning authors.
-The MA programmes also offer students the opportunity to write and discuss their work through the medium of Welsh should they wish to do so.
-The programme is based upon an established pool of expertise in related concerns, and covers a range of projects undertaken over a number of years.
-Staff are active publishers and practitioners in their own right

Assessment

There are no examinations. All modules are assessed by original creative assignments supported by reflective and developmental material: logs, journals, treatments, reviews proposals. The Creative Project provides the opportunity for students to develop a substantial piece of work to publishable standard.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the digital journal, The Lampeter Review
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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The Master of Professional Writing (MPW) involves taking a core paper, designed specifically to enhance your workplace readiness, as well as elective papers which range across a variety of fields from creative writing to writing for promotional purposes and advertising, for digital media and for scholarly and professional publication. Read more

The Master of Professional Writing (MPW) involves taking a core paper, designed specifically to enhance your workplace readiness, as well as elective papers which range across a variety of fields from creative writing to writing for promotional purposes and advertising, for digital media and for scholarly and professional publication.

If creative writing is your passion, then you will have the opportunity to specialise in this. The Creative Writing Thesis gives selected students the option of producing a manuscript of publishable quality – whether poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction – in a stimulating and supportive workshop environment of fellow writers, and supervised by award-winning authors. The selection of students for the Creative Writing Thesis is by assessment of a portfolio of poetry and prose, and a manuscript proposal outlining the creative project.

When studying towards the MPW you will be able to include a professional writing internship and be offered an on-campus writing mentor, who will provide professional advice and direct you towards writing opportunities.

Industry Connections

The staff contributing to the Professional Writing programme have long-standing relationships with the broader writing community at a number of levels:

  • They have established senior profiles as publishers of creative and scholarly writing, as editors of literary and scholarly materials, and as peer reviewers for local and international journals.
  • The creative writing staff have won significant local and international prizes for short fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.
  • They publish across a wide range of academic and popular media, including reviews, opinion columns, feature articles, works of scholarly reference, book chapters, scholarly articles, researched scholarly editions, and researched books.
  • They are called on to judge local and international literary prizes, and to assess applications for substantial public and private funding for literary grants, including the annual University of Waikato Writers’ Residency (co-funded by Creative New Zealand) and the Sargeson Grimshaw Writing Fellowship.
  • Contributing staff in Screen and Media maintain international networks in scriptwriting and script development.
  • Staff maintain professional links with local and international organisations who co-ordinate, sponsor and enhance the interests of professional writing in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Career Opportunities

MPW graduates will have excellent transferrable skills in devising, producing and editing text. If you include a formal internship in your programme of study, or take up the option of informal professional mentoring, you will make connections in the professional writing community, and enhance your CV with relevant workplace experience.

Potential careers include editing, long-form researched journalism, policy analysis and policy writing, report writing, script writing, speech writing, teaching, website content editing, writing for digital and broadcast media, writing for stage and screen, writing for travel and tourism and writing for public relations and marketing.

Potential employers include biotechnology industries; cultural sector/arts organisations; energy provision sector; higher education sector; libraries and archives; local and district councils; manufacturing and technology; national government, NGOs; non-profit and philanthropic sector; primary industries; print and digital news media; publishing industry; telecommunications; theatre, film and broadcast media production houses; transport, tourism and travel.



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Students have the flexibility to pursue a project that they are passionate about, and to be supported by the expertise of the staff team. Read more

Students have the flexibility to pursue a project that they are passionate about, and to be supported by the expertise of the staff team. This allows for a range of diverse backgrounds in terms of learning experiences, ethnic diversity, disability, gender and age; projects will be developed and tailored to the individual’s learning needs.

All staff members are actively publishing their writing and have won several awards between them for creative outputs. The team have expertise in speculative fiction, historical fiction, scriptwriting, screenwriting, adaptation, poetry, experimental poetry, hybrid forms, horror fiction, literary fiction, creative non-fiction (including memoir and true-crime), and are able to support writing in a number of genres.

The staff team of award-winning writers have an exciting and diverse approach to creative writing and are able to supervise a huge range of proposed projects. Current full-time staff members include: 

In addition, the Creative Writing team at York St John has a strong focus on the relationship between critical theory and creative writing and the intersection of a number of theoretical perspectives with creative practice, including eco-criticism, psychoanalysis, biopolitics and regionality. Members of the team have undertaken interdisciplinary and collaborative research exploring music, memory, medicine, uncanny landscapes and pollination.

Course structure

Creative Writing at York St John University is distinguished by:

  • The integration of writing practice, critical appreciation of texts and employability skills.
  • A focus on contemporary writing.
  • Regular engagement with visiting speakers and writers.
  • Partnerships with local publishers and writing festivals
  • The innovative use of the local and regional landscape in learning and teaching.
  • Research-led teaching.
  • Diverse and inclusive syllabi.
  • Opportunities for students to experience field trips as part of their learning experience.
  • Value added in terms of student achievement.

Routes

The three distinct routes offer focussed, but flexible structures to fulfil a range of motivations. This is distinctive in the UK market:

  • Publication/book route – your aim is to produce a full-length work (e.g. novel, poetry collection, script, biography) for publication/performance/dissemination. The Critical/reflective Commentary will focus on this, whilst the creative submission can be in any form/genre.
  • Community/Heritage route –your aim is to produce a book-length work, performance or account exploring an outreach project with a partner, for example in health, arts, music or heritage. The Commentary may focus on the development and implications of this project, and could incorporate some qualitative/quantitative data or case studies, where appropriate.
  • Critical/theoretical route – your aim is to produce a book-length work in any form (novel, poetry, script). The project has a strong theoretical/critical underpinning, in which the Critical/reflective Commentary explores and analyses a movement, literary theory or other critical idea and the creative work performs a practice-based exploration of the same. Intended for students considering moving onto a PhD, but not exclusively for them.
  • Your final manuscript will comprise 40,000-70,000 words of prose or approx. 1,200 lines of poetry (the aim being a book-length manuscript appropriate to the chosen the form). Writers wishing to produce a script will produce an equivalent ‘time’ length. Your final manuscript will be accompanied by a Critical Commentary of 6,000 words which reflects on the process of composition.
  • Your project will be supported by one to one, expert supervision. This can be undertaken full- or part-time, face to face, online or a blended approach to suit your circumstances.
  • You will take part in a termly Writers’ Workshop to share work in progress with like-minded peers in a nurturing atmosphere.
  • A Residential Writing Retreat offers an opportunity to reflect and focus on your progress amongst a community of writing peers, facilitated by tutors, in a beautiful and inspiring regional or city setting.
  • Close links to agents, publishers, literary events and local arts and heritage organisations will fuel your creativity and hone your employability skills.

Teaching and learning

  • Taught via one to one supervision in three ten-week terms starting in October.
  • Termly peer Writing Workshops.
  • Weekend Residential Writing Retreat in April/May of the final year (with Portfolio Progress presentation assessment worth 20 of the 180 credits).
  • Manuscript submitted in September of the final year.
  • Whilst the learning is independent, but supported, students are encouraged to take a professional approach and attend the variety of events provided by the York Centre for Writing, which include visits from agents, publishers, editors and writers and foster an important sense of belonging and community.

Key Graduate Attributes

  • To have the confidence to research, compose and critically evaluate a substantial, complete body of creative writing for potential publication/exhibition/dissemination
  • To be reflective in relation to their own work and a body of texts, cultural artefacts and cultural contexts.
  • To be aware of, and sensitive to, a range of audiences/readers.
  • To take a professional approach to editing, drafting and critiquing creative work.
  • To have an awareness of the wider role of creative writing in culture.
  • To understand the publishing industry and feel confident in approaching agents, publishers, editors, directors etc.
  • To engage with a writing community, both at a local and national level.
  • To be generous in the support of creative peers within a community of practitioners.

Programme specification

Further information on this course is available in the programme specification. Please note that the programme specification relates to course content that is currently being studied by students at the University. For new programmes, the programme specification will be made available online prior to the start of the course.

Learning support

York St John University works hard to create an inclusive environment for all our students. We offer a range of learning support services to assist students throughout their studies.



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Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start. Read more
Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start.

Why study Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

This degree gives you the opportunity to translate creative interests into a fully accredited postgraduate programme of study, with flexibility and individual needs built into its delivery. It has been created and is directed by Professor Kirsty Gunn, an award winning international author whose work has been translated and published in a number of territories all over the world.

Our programme is distinctive in its approach and teaching, and highly engaged in the world of contemporary publishing, offering students the opportunity to meet with writers and publishers from around the UK and beyond and to take part in our varied and exciting range of literary activities, from performing their own work to being "showcased" at our Literary Festival.

You will learn how to:
Create and develop your own writing practice through a series of creative and practical workshops
Present and talk about your own work with authority and confidence - in the context of literary studies and a knowledge of the creative marketplace.
Read others' writing with sensitivity, intelligence and critical awareness.
Build a significant folio of creative work and develop this into work of a standard that is ready for formal presentation.
Each module can be studied separately, or as part of a full degree or diploma that can be taken part time or full time.

We can guarantee that your writing during the course of your programme will be productive, intellectually stimulating and highly creative.

What's so good about Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

In addition to producing a range of finished work for assessment during the year, you will also learn about the details of publishing, finding agents, setting your work in a context and making the important connection between the scale and shape of your writing and your aspirations for it. You'll have the opportunity to undertake specialist master classes with top-name authors, and go on visits to sites of special interest for the creative student - in the past these have included the D'Arcy Thomson Museum and the Scottish Poetry Library.

Literary Dundee

With an annual Literary Festival, regular and varied literary salons, poetry workshops, readings from internationally renowned and local authors, and much more, the events organised under the umbrella of Literary Dundee complement the course perfectly.

"Studying for an MLitt gave me the time and opportunity to work on my debut novel which was published soon after I graduated. I found the teaching and supportive environment to be invaluable during that time and it has had a great impact on my confidence since."
Zoe Venditozzi - graduated MLitt 2012

Zoe's novel is Anywhere's Better Than Here, published by Sandstone Press Ltd

How you will be taught

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a fulltime basis.

This programme is varied in delivery and content, comprising four-hour writing workshops to seminars to individual tutorials, helping you to develop practical, intelligent and highly creative methods by which you can approach your writing.

What you will study

During the first two semesters (September to December and January to April), students take the following core modules:

Creating Writing*
Studying Writing
Each student also selects two optional modules (40 credits each) from a list available each year. The currently available modules are:

Publishing Writing
Performing Writing
Refining Writing
Writing, Texts & Books
Planning Writing
You will then (from May to September) go on to undertake a dissertation worth 60 credits. You develop the theme or idea for your dissertation over the year, with the help of tutors.

*Creating Writing may be taken on a stand-alone basis.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by creative folio (6,000 words) and accompanying essay (2,500 words), or two essays.
Assessment for the research-led modules is normally by essay (2,000-2,500 words or 2,500-3,000 words).
The dissertation or creative manuscript has a word limit of 15,000, and includes a reflective piece of writing (3,000 words).
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Our graduates go on to be involved in a range of exciting literary activities - that range from publication of creative work to participation in national festivals and reading events. Recent students' successes include a first novel coming out with Sandstone this year, a placement in Canongate Publishing, Writers' Awards from Creative Scotland and the Scottish Books Trust, and the performance of a play. Our ex-students tend to stay part of our literary and creative community at Dundee after they have finished their formal studies with us - for as much as we believe in involving participants as fully and creatively as we can while they are with us, so do we not like to see them go!

This alone, makes our programme distinctive and individual and the very opposite of a large, more anonymous school. As a result our students are highly proactive and fully creatively engaged in the publishing and cultural world after they receive their degree.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, graduate

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Read more

ABOUT THE MA/MFA WRITING FOR STAGE AND BROADCAST MEDIA

The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Although the primary focus is on writing for television, film, theatre and radio, Central also runs
optional units in writing for new music theatre and, in collaboration with MA Applied Theatre, writing with and for communities. The course provides the opportunity for students to develop the core competencies and skills of the dramatist to explore their own ‘voice’ and develop their confidence as dramatists, and to appreciate the specific media contexts within which professional writers work.

Key features are: practice-based enquiry into techniques and processes for writing for stage and screen; a series of writing projects to engage with different styles and formats of production; associated study of writing techniques and issues of
performance in relation to theatre, cinema, television and other relevant contexts.The MA and MFA are taught in group sessions and through individual tutorials. During these sessions participants will consider the fundamentals of dramatic writing. Indicatively, these will include structure, narrative, dramatic action, genre, character, dialogue and rhetorical effect.

Students will study different approaches to writing including individual authorship, group writing and writing to specific briefs. Students will attend masterclasses, seminars and workshops that focus on particular modes of writing for different production contexts, and will be part of a writers’ group, providing peer support in developing their writing. Their vocational work is complemented by individual research and appropriate theoretical discussion and enquiry. Students will address historical, theoretical and critical contexts within which traditions of dramatic writing have evolved.

Students will engage in a range of projects that test and develop their skills as a writer of drama. Indicatively, these will include forming a team of writers to evolve a television series, writing a short play script for a staged reading, writing a short
film script, writing a radio play and developing and writing a complete dramatic script for production in a particular medium (stage, radio, television, music theatre, or film).

ASSESSMENT

This is through peer assessment, practical assignments, essays, scheme of research, presentations, and the submission of a practitioner portfolio, including personal insights, research, the student’s own scripted material and a plan for professional
development.

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The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer. Read more

Overview

The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer.

Working with published writers from within and outside the University, the Keele Writing MA offers participants an opportunity to improve their writing and to bring it up to publishable standard while learning more about the critical and intellectual context in which their work is situated.

Students on the Keele Writing MA also participate directly in the development and maintenance of the events, publications, workshops and short courses which constitute Keele’s vibrant writing culture – typically through opting to gain experience in one of the areas in which writers often establish a secondary income – reviewing, editing and teaching.

You can study full-time or part-time for this MA. It is also possible to take short courses in Creative Writing, delivered as part of our MA programme, as well as Certificate and Diploma-level courses in the subject.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/creativewriting/

Course Aims

- To provide opportunities for the practice and study of creative writing at an advanced, publishable level

- To provide a supportive and constructively critical environment in which students can work with published writers and their peers to improve their writing

- To provide students with the necessary skills to write at an advanced, publishable level

Course Content

The course is delivered as three stand-alone taught modules. In addition students complete a Portfolio of original work. Students will have the opportunity to take any single module as a short course or to combine two modules and be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or to complete four modules and receive a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits).

The contents of each module are summarised below.

The Writer as Critic, The Critic as Writer (30 Credits) is the core compulsory module, and looks at questions of influence, the critical process of reading other writers’ work and the cultural context in which a writer lives and works. Students will study contemporary examples of script, poetry and fiction.

Writing Fiction (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing short fiction and novels, with structured reading and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Writing Poetry (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing poetry, with structured reading, discussion and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Life Writing (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on forms of writing such as auto/biography and memoir.

The Writer in the Community (30 Credits) is a project-based module which offers students the opportunity to create and deliver a professional project of a type commonly undertaken by writers. Possible projects include: designing and delivering creative writing workshops; mentoring less experienced writers; steering a literary editing project; setting up and putting on a literary event; or creating a web-based literary resource.

The Portfolio (90 Credits) is the compulsory Dissertation-level module, taught through a series of individual supervisions. Students develop a portfolio of original writing to a professional standard through the production of either a complete piece of written work or a substantial part of a complete piece of written work, e.g: a collection of poetry; a collection of short stories; a short novel; or a substantial part of a longer novel.

Teaching & Assessment

The core 30-credit module (The Writer As Critic, The Critic As Writer) is assessed by written assignments and a presentation. The optional 30-credit modules (Writing Prose, Writing Poetry, Life Writing, The Writer in the Community) are assessed by a portfolio of work and a critical commentary that reflects on the contents of the portfolio. The 90-Credit dissertation-level Portfolio is assessed by a substantial portfolio of original writing and a commentary.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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About the course. The course includes traditional elements for a postgraduate programme in Creative Writing, such as writing workshops, intensive tutorial-based supervision and a range of guest speakers. Read more

About the course

The course includes traditional elements for a postgraduate programme in Creative Writing, such as writing workshops, intensive tutorial-based supervision and a range of guest speakers. In addition, the MA provides both literary context and practical professional experiences. The Workshop Space: Craft and Pedagogy examines how and why we workshop. It explores questions of authority, taste and trust. You will lead part of a writing workshop and devise writing exercises for your fellow writers. While it provides a strong literary context for students, the literary material is examined and analysed from a writer’s point of view. The module Working as a Writer offers practical, independent experience. Students can pursue either publications or design, implement and complete an independent creative project with an outside organisation.

The modules we currently offer are:

  • Writing Workshop I: Creative and Critical Processes
  • The Workshop Space: Craft and Pedagogy 
  • Writing Workshop II: Creative and Critical Processes
  • Working as a Writer
  • Creative Writing Dissertation

Why choose this course?

The MA in Creative Writing offers a range of distinct creative practices and theoretical approaches. It aims to develop professional skills in the area of Creative Writing by giving students the opportunity to implement their creative practice more broadly in professional settings. With up-to-date, relevant skills, understanding and knowledge, graduates of this MA will be prepared for employment in a variety of fields, such as working creatively with organisations, professional writing and other related professions. The MA can be taken as a one-year full time course or a two-year part-time course.

Teaching methods

Writing workshops are the primary mode of delivery for the programme, led by experienced Creative Writing professionals. The workshops focus on craft, art and developing students’ writing. Each student will have a supervisor and regular tutorials will supplement their workshop-based sessions. A guest lecture series provides further professional contexts for the students.

All modules except the Dissertation are 30 credits. The Dissertation is 60 credits. Part time students will take the People and Places and Working as a Writer modules in the first year and the Writing Workshop I and Writing Workshop II modules in their second year. The Dissertation will be completed in semester C of their second year.

Please contact MA Coordinator,  any questions you may have.

Entry requirements...

A minimum of a 2.2 honours degree, a writing sample and an interview, which may be in person or over the telephone. While all three components are considered, the quality of the writing sample will be weighted most heavily. It may also be possible for a student to be admitted with a non-traditional background on the strength of their writing sample.

The writing sample should consist of approximately 4000 words of prose or script or 80 lines of poetry. The writing sample should be emailed direct to  you have submitted your application. Please contact Jennifer Young if you have queries about the writing sample.



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If you want to become a produced or published writer, or to develop your writing skills, this programme will give you the chance to be tutored by leading and established writers in a supportive and creative environment. Read more

If you want to become a produced or published writer, or to develop your writing skills, this programme will give you the chance to be tutored by leading and established writers in a supportive and creative environment.

The emphasis is on different forms of scriptwriting - playwriting, screenwriting, dramatic writing, writing for film and television, and writing for radio – but you can also develop imaginative writing in other forms, especially prose fiction. Specialist pathways in screenwriting or writing for theatre are open to you.

Whether you’re an aspiring writer, a teacher or simply want to learn more about the writer’s craft, you’ll be working in an environment dedicated to developing new and emerging talent. Our students come from all over the world, and we have a powerful record for developing successful writers and creative leaders. Through our partnership with the West Yorkshire Playhouse, the course is linked to the Playhouse’s own new writing schemes.

Our tutors are professional dramatists and leading researchers with a wide range of expertise. The Programme Director for the MA is the award-winning playwright, screenwriter and producer Garry Lyons, who established the degree in 2006.

Find out more about Garry Lyons

You’ll be based in our landmark building [email protected], with two professional-standard and publicly licensed theatres that regularly host works by students and visiting theatre companies. You’ll be encouraged to use these facilities to try your work out in workshops, rehearsed readings or full productions, and gain experience of practical drama-making.

The programme also benefits from our close links with external organisations. As well as our partnership with West Yorkshire Playhouse, we work with the BBC’s new talent unit, Writers’ Room. Other partners include Opera North, ITV, Screen Yorkshire, the National Media Museum, Creative England, Red Ladder Theatre Company, True North Productions, Chapel FM Radio, Valley Press and many more.

Course content

A core module will introduce you to creative writing research, including the potential of practice-led research. This will help to equip you for the rest of the programme, giving you the tools to reflect analytically on your writing and compare it with existing writing of a similar genre or style.

In Semester 1 you’ll spend time in intensive workshops refining your own short pieces of narrative writing, exploring the principles of storytelling and more experimental approaches. You'll work in a range of forms - from theatre and radio to screenplays and prose - preparing you to specialise as you progress through the degree.

Options in Semester 2 allow you to focus on film and television writing or work on an original project of your own – individually, in collaboration with students from across the School, or based on a two-week placement with an external organisation.

All of this work will culminate with your major project, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme – this could be an extended piece of creative writing, a conventional dissertation, or performance-led research.

Working with West Yorkshire Playhouse

The MA is partnered with West Yorkshire Playhouse, one of the UK’s leading theatres outside London. This links us to the the Playhouse’s new writing schemes. Directors and associate artists from the Playhouse regularly run workshops and masterclasses for us, and we collaborate with the theatre on joint projects such as new writing events and festivals. The Playhouse occasionally offers work experience opportunities for our students to apply for.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Story Workshop 30 credits
  • Research Perspectives (Writing for Performance and Publication) 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Individual Project 30 credits
  • Creative Work 30 credits
  • Performance and Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Writing for Theatre and Radio 30 credits
  • Writing for Film and Television 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Writing for Performance and Publication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Writing for Performance and Publication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our tutors are professional dramatists and academic specialists in a range of genres, with experience of dealing with theatres, agents, production companies, editors and publishers. We also invite guest speakers from the worlds of theatre, broadcasting, film and publishing to share their insights into the creative industries.

You’ll be taught using a range of methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials as well as practical sessions and workshops. Independent study is also a vital component of this degree, allowing you to conduct your own research and develop your own ideas.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed mostly on the basis of your creative writing, including theatre, screen and radio scripts and short prose stories you’ll develop in your modules. To encourage you to reflect on your practice, you’ll also write commentaries on your own work. Core modules may also use assessment methods such as essays and presentations to allow you to demonstrate your knowledge.

Career opportunities

Many students will want to pursue a career as a professional writer. Although this is a fiercely competitive field, this degree is designed to try to help you realise your ambitions. Alternatively, you could use your additional experience and qualification to progress in your current career or pursue a related path within the creative arts.

You’ll also be well equipped for a future in education, arts administration, script editing, literary management, broadcasting, journalism, advertising, the media, publishing, literary agencies, marketing, PT and many other areas.

The programme has established a powerful record for developing successful writers and creative leaders, from playwrights and television writers to novelists, directors and lecturers.



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The MA Creative Writing with English Literary Studies provides a rare opportunity to combine creative and critical writing at Masters level. Read more

The MA Creative Writing with English Literary Studies provides a rare opportunity to combine creative and critical writing at Masters level. It’s your chance to learn from the prize-winning, practising authors who lead our long-established Creative Writing scheme and to engage with a vibrant literary culture.

During your studies you will develop strategies for initiating new work, explore verbal textures and narrative structures, and enhance your knowledge of literary forms and conventions. You will hone your critical and creative skills, employ reflective practice, and learn the art of redrafting, revision and close editing. The nature of research within creative writing practice will also be considered as you evolve your own creative and critical portfolio.

Core modules are Research Methods and Professional Practice, which examine the professional and ethical issues around creative writing and help you to develop your reflective practice skills. Four elective modules are then split between Creative Writing and English Literary Studies - those on offer explore a wide range of literary fields and genres, including Psychogeographies, Short Fiction, Poetry, Landscape Writing, the Lyric Essay, Radio Drama, Modern, Contemporary, Romantic, Victorian and Early Modern Literature.

You will also complete a Creative Writing dissertation, which is a 15,000 creative project (or the equivalent for Poetry or Script Writing) and includes a critically reflective essay of 3-5,000 words. All students deliver a research-based talk at our annual MA Showcase - previous events have been held in partnership with Lancaster LitFest and the Dukes theatre.

Your postgraduate degree prepares you for careers in journalism, publishing, reading development, community arts and public relations, as well as PhD research. The critical and creative skills developed through your studies will also enhance your employability.

Part time and full time study options are available.

Assessment

Combination of coursework, dissertation/portfolio and research methodology portfolio



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The MA Creative Writing is an intensive course which treats your ambition as a writer seriously. Our students come from a range of backgrounds including the arts, teaching, law, journalism, history and writing. Read more

The MA Creative Writing is an intensive course which treats your ambition as a writer seriously. Our students come from a range of backgrounds including the arts, teaching, law, journalism, history and writing. The course is for anyone with an interest in or ambition towards writing.

Some of our most successful students include best-selling author of A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian, Marina Lewycka, T.S. Eliot short-listed poet Frances Leviston and Radio 4 and BBC TV script writer Sharon Oakes.

Our internationally-acclaimed team of published writers teach in all areas of contemporary literary practice. They include

  • Chris Jones – Forward Prize nominee
  • Conor O'Callaghan – poet and novelist
  • Maurice Riordan – poet, former editor of Poetry London and The Poetry Review
  • Julianne Pachico – short story writer and novelist
  • Harriet Tarlo – environmental poet, editor and critic

The E.A Markham Award

The E.A Markham Award means that one student each year will study the course for free. The award covers the full-time study fees and is awarded solely on merit and potential. It is offered in memory of Professor E.A Markham, a respected tutor here who worked to shape the development of this course.

Download the E.A Markham award guidance for more information.

Short course – single modules

If you are not able to commit to the whole course, you can apply to take a single module. Choose a genre from the optional modules listed in the course content and apply as normal. Your portfolio needs to include examples of writing in your chosen genre. The credit you gain for completing one module will count towards the full MA should you choose to pursue this at a later date.

Publications and prizes

The Ictus Prize in Poetry is awarded to the best poetry collection – this consists of a small pamphlet publication. Every year, we publish Matter, a stylish anthology, edited and designed by students, and sold and promoted in bookshops. If you would like to receive a sample copy of this, email the course leader

Course structure

Core modules

  • The contemporary writer
  • The craft: poetry and short story
  • The craft: novel and script
  • The workshop
  • Writing up

Assessment

Submission of written work to specified word lengths with accompanying critical commentaries.

Employability

By enhancing your skills in writing, literary revision and reflection, you are preparing for a number of roles where knowledge of writing and the processes of writing are important such as

  • writers of fiction, poetry, script, children's writing and memoir
  • editing anthologies and journals online and in print
  • teaching creative writing at all levels including schools community groups adult education FE, HE and professional training
  • going on to further research at PhD and postdoctoral level at Hallam and elsewhere
  • writing for online forums writing blogs
  • taking up writers in residence posts
  • theatre in education
  • copyediting, proofreading, ghost-writing
  • organising literary festivals and events
  • scripting advertisements
  • reviewing online and in print


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Who is it for?. Our Creative Writing programme is suitable for writers who want to develop their practice and complete a full length piece of work, or for experienced playwrights who wish to gain a familiarity with writing for the screen, or experienced screenwriters who wish to gain a grounding in theatre writing. Read more

Who is it for?

Our Creative Writing programme is suitable for writers who want to develop their practice and complete a full length piece of work, or for experienced playwrights who wish to gain a familiarity with writing for the screen, or experienced screenwriters who wish to gain a grounding in theatre writing. It is also suitable for writers who while continuing with their own practice, will work in development roles in the film, TV, theatre and related industries such as literary agencies.

Our programme has been designed, with input from a range of playwrights and screenwriters, to provide the optimum environment for students to complete a full length play or feature film script to a high standard.

As the programme is taught in the evening, we welcome applications from mature students with work and family commitments who are committed to writing a full length play or screenplay over two years.

Find out more about our alumni and what they achieved during their time at City, University of London.

Objectives

Creatively stimulating, challenging and above all practical, this innovative two-year Creative Writing programme taught during the evening, provides a supportive and thought-provoking environment for playwrights and screenwriters to explore their ideas, develop their craft and finish a full-length work to a high standard.

You will develop as a writer and sharpen your understanding of what's working and what isn't. No single style or genre is prescribed; the ethos of the programme is excellence and diversity.

You will get to understand writing choices in the work of leading playwrights and screenwriters. You will work with actors and directors from London's new writing theatres, and receive guest talks from agents, producers and artistic directors.

By the end of the course, you will have taken a full-length play, screenplay or television pilot through a number of drafts, working as professional writers do. This play or screenplay will be your calling card. You will receive a performed reading of an extract of your work and a professional script report.

Accreditation

The Creative Writing (Playwriting and Screenwriting) MA is accredited by Skillset, the Creative Industries’ Sector Skills Council which means that students are eligible for the BAFTA Scholarship programme – successful applicants receive a bursary of up to £10,000, a BAFTA mentor, access to BAFTA events, plus a paid work placement at Warner Bros UK.

Industry ties

The course has strong ties with leading playwrights and screenwriters. Recent visiting speakers include:

Richard Bean, Alan Bennett, Ronan Bennett, J Blakeson, Adam Brace, Laurence Coriat, Rib Davies, David Edgar, Martha Fiennes, Andrea Gibb, Tony Grisoni, Stuart Hazeldine, Dennis Kelly, Mike Leigh, Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Patrick Marber, Paul Mayeda Berges, Nicholas McInerny, Anthony Neilson, Diane Samuels, Paul Sirett, Ali Taylor, Sue Teddern, Colin Teevan, Timberlake Wertenbaker, and Roy Williams.

You will have the opportunity to meet agents, producers, directors, and authors on screenwriting. Recent guests have included:

Linda Aronson, Katie Battcock, Matthew Bates, Paul Basset Davies, Camilla Bray, Ruth Caleb, Julian Friedmann, Tony Garnett, Lisa Goldman, Fin Kennedy, Kate Leys, Nick Marston, Margaret Matheson, Jeremy Mortimer, George Perrin, Simon Shaps, David Thompson, Neil Quinn, Mervyn Watson and Katie Williams.

Teaching and learning

Our Creative Writing masters course is taught and run by professional working writers and you will be mentored by a professional working playwright or screenwriter for the whole of year two.

You will be taught intensively for six hours per week in year one and in the second year you choose to write either a full length play, or screenplay, or a pilot for an original television series.

This playwriting and screenwriting course is based around a mix of practical workshops, seminars and lectures. All this is supported by one-to-one tutorials and by independent study: notably reading and preparing presentations on set texts and performing set writing exercises. As the course progresses, the emphasis shifts to independent study and is supported by workshops and one-to-one tutorials.

Central to this Creative Writing masters course is the requirement to finish a full-length play or screenplay. The course culminates in a showcase of your work to an audience of industry professionals and other interested parties.

Assessment

Assessment includes participation in lectures, seminars and workshops; of work on presentations; set exercises and own play or screen script proposal.

Career prospects

Many of our Creative Writing graduates from play and screenwriting go on to have their work performed professionally and have won many awards and nominations. Since the beginning of 2015 over 40 students and alumni have had plays performed.

Some recent examples include

  • Graduate Aisha Zia received a grant from Brookleaze and her new play Besieged was performed at the Arcola Theatre
  • Dianna Hunt, Her play ‘One Woman's Slide: A Blues’ has been programmed in the Talawa Arts Festival.
  • Cheryl White, whose films include Before Babel (2013) which won Best Short at the Kent and Rye Film Festival International film festival 2015; Winner of Best Film and Most Innovative Film at WOW Festival 2014.
  • Louisa Hayford, who did a ten week paid internship at the Coronation Street story department as part of the ITV Coronation Street Original Voices scheme.

Our graduates have had plays performed in London at the Old Vic, Arcola, Old Red Lion, Southwark Playhouse, Globe and White Bear theatres; as well as in Australia, New York, the Netherlands and Afghanistan.



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Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Read more

Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Our staff have received national and international recognition for their work. You will work with them to prepare creative work for submission and publication.

Our courses provide a unique opportunity to develop and hone your creative writing skills. We teach creative writing in four strands:

-Prose writing

-Poetry

-Scriptwriting, with a unique emphasis on writing for radio

-Creative non-fiction, with a unique emphasis on memoir writing, essay writing and biography

The courses will introduce you to a wide range of subjects and areas in which writers are working professionally. You will build your awareness and broaden your knowledge of writing opportunities. You will also consider ways of matching your skills to jobs.

You will explore the many ways in which writing is produced, distributed and promoted to audiences. Our guest speakers are practitioners and/or associated with the world of publishing and performance. Working with them, you will explore the roles and importance of:

-Agents

-Editors

-Reviewers

-Social media

-New technology in contemporary publishing

The Newcastle Centre for Literary Arts (NCLA) offers you the opportunity to get involved in our writing community. Our readings and events feature poets, playwrights and novelists. Past speakers include:

-Kazuo Ishiguro

-Val McDermid

-Seamus Heaney

Delivery

At the centre of courses are writing workshops. We offer workshops in:

-Prose

-Poetry

-Scriptwriting

-Creative non-fiction

All our classes take place in the early evening.

You will develop your creative writing through our taught sessions and individual consultations. Our small seminar groups and one to one supervision gives you close contact with your tutors, who are all writing practitioners.

Those who complete the PGCert can choose to transfer to the second year of our part time MA.

Facilities

The School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics is a lively and diverse community with over 700 undergraduates and 200 postgraduates.

We are based in the Percy Building where the majority of your seminars and tutorials will take place. Our purpose-built postgraduate suite includes several dedicated computer clusters, meeting rooms, a kitchen and lounge area.

You also have access to the award-winning Peter Robinson Library, which has an extensive audio-visual collection.



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This highly successful programme offers specialist pathways in . Playwriting.  and . Dramaturgy. We concentrate on the process of writing for live performance, together with an ongoing evaluation of the work in process. Read more

This highly successful programme offers specialist pathways in Playwriting and Dramaturgy. We concentrate on the process of writing for live performance, together with an ongoing evaluation of the work in process. Through practice and reflection, we enable you to establish a distinctive, individual approach as both a writer and dramaturge. Projects include site-specific work, writing for a specific audience, verbatim theatre and interdisciplinary collaboration.

We support the development of texts for performance, alongside intellectual understanding of the diverse forms and contexts in which live performance can be made and the writer/dramaturge’s role in this. We examine texts from a wide range of periods and cultures. We engage with work that is innovative, or which challenges established notions of practice.

Opportunities to collaborate

Dramaturgs and playwrights study side by side, and examine creative and dramaturgical issues from various perspectives as writers, spectators and creative collaborators. There are opportunities to collaborate on an Interdisciplinary Project with MA Performance Makers and composers from the Department of Music. Final project texts, performed and directed by industry professionals, are presented at the Soho Theatre in London, attended by key industry representatives. Graduates are highly successful in obtaining commissions, dramaturgy posts and artistic directorships. Recent successes include:

  • Tena Štivičić (Three Winters National Theatre 2015)
  • Finn Kennedy (Artistic Director, Tamasha Theatre Company 2015)
  • Melissa Bubnic (Beached at Soho Theatre 2015)

All students receive Professional Orientation and support towards career development.

Modules & structure

Autumn term 

All students take the Writing Projects module: you will work on three diverse, short playwriting projects. Each addresses particular generic issues that relate to writing for live performance, and you will engage with the specific challenges and demands of differing circumstances of text development and production. These will vary from year to year, but they are likely to be selected from the following:

  • Theatre as Event – site-specific performance
  • Authenticity and Live Performance – verbatim theatre
  • Writing for Specific Audiences – children’s/young person’s theatre project
  • Creative Collaboration – multimedia collaboration with MA Performance Making and Studio Composition students from the Department of Music

You will also take the Dramaturgy module, which has two main elements: analysis of dramatic text (these will include classics and modern classics, as well as new plays); and analysis of live performance seen by the group (including some visual, environmental or non-text-based work). During the module you will assemble a portfolio of critical analyses and creative writing projects for assessment.

You will also take one contextual module alongside students from other Masters programmes, to be selected from a list of options that will vary from session to session.

Spring term 

You will develop your work on Dramaturgy with the term-long practical workshop module Creative Intervention in Text. This will examine: translation; adaptation of work from other media for live performance; and the re-writing and/or adaptation of extant plays; planning and curating seasons of performance work. You will assemble a portfolio of creative projects for assessment.

You also start work on your Final Project the personal Dissertation-equivalent project that will be the core of your work for the next six months). Weekly seminars and workshops will examine themes relevant to the range of projects chosen, and a first draft or outline will be produced. Each project will be the focus of individual tutorials, and then a class workshop led by a guest dramaturg, director or playwright as appropriate. You will then plan the next phase of the research or development of your project.

You also take another option from the list of contextual modules shared with students from other Masters programmes.

Summer term 

You will present the second draft of your project for another phase of tutorials and group workshops.

Playwriting projects will then be prepared for some form of public rehearsed reading or scratch performance, in extract form – with the writers involved in all aspects of the work.

Dramaturgy projects will be given practical support of an appropriate, equivalent kind. You will further develop your work, with tutorials and workshops and public presentation of work as appropriate, before writing and submitting the finished project.

Throughout the year, various seminars and workshops will examine diverse issues that affect writers today, and these will be led by visiting professionals as appropriate.

Assessment

We deploy a range of assessment approaches, each appropriate to the module taken. Students taking Writing Projects will submit three short playtexts for assessment. Dramaturgy is assessed by a portfolio of analytic reviews, and Creative Intervention in Text by a series of short creative writing projects and writing exercises. Each of the contextual option modules is assessed by a 4,000 word essay. Final Project leads to the production of a playtext (Playwriting), or a Dissertation or equivalent practical project (Dramaturgy). 

Careers

Numerous playwrights completing this programme receive high-level professional development opportunities, commissions, awards and full-scale productions of their work at major new writing centres in the UK, USA and in continental Europe. Many also work for at least part of the time in the fields of script development (for theatre and television), and in theatre publication.

Recent playwriting alumni include:

  • Ben Musgrave, whose Pretend You Have Big Buildings won the Bruntwood Prize (2006) and received a main house production at the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester
  • Allia V Oswald, whose Dirty Water won the Alfred Fagon Award (2007) and was given a rehearsed reading at the Royal Court Theatre
  • Adam Brace, whose play Stovepipe was a High Tide Festival winner (2008), and was staged recently by the National Theatre and published by Faber

In each of these cases the award-winning play was the writer’s Final Project from this programme.

Dramaturgy alumni work in professional literary management for mainstream and fringe building-based companies, as well as on freelance script development programmes in the UK and internationally. These include:

  • David Lane, who now has an extremely busy career as a freelance dramaturg, teacher and playwright
  • Francesca Malfrin, who is currently developing translation projects of Italian plays with a range of agencies, including the National Theatre Studio


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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more

The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

  • Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
  • We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers
  • Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
  • Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2

  • Creative workshops and guest speakers 
  • Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
  • Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:

  • encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
  • provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
  • familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
  • and most importantly, to help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Your portfolio, consisting of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or script-writing, is at the heart of the summative assessment.

Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students are involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards. 

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.



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