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This programme focuses on the creative, analytical and professional aspects of script writing, in the context of the contemporary film, television and radio industries- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-script-writing/. Read more
This programme focuses on the creative, analytical and professional aspects of script writing, in the context of the contemporary film, television and radio industries- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-script-writing/

The MA Script Writing is accredited by Skillset (further to the Department's accreditation as a Skillset Media Academy) and currently receives funding to support some student bursaries.

The programme is ideal if you already have some writing experience, but want to develop professional skills and expertise as screen or radio script writers.

Develop your writing and story ideas

It's geared towards developing each student's own writing and distinctive voice, to enable you to pitch for employment and production funding in a highly competitive industry. The programme will help you develop your own story ideas to end up with a second draft dialogue script as the major part of your portfolio. It's a very intensive course designed to take your writing as far and as fast as it's possible to go within twelve months. Only about twelve students are accepted each year.

There is no preferred medium (film, television or radio), genre or style. That is up to you. There tends to be a wide range of students in terms of age, background and writing experience. But it is not a programme for students who want to try writing, but for those who are committed to developing their writing skills.

You complete the programme with a feature film or equivalent television or radio script. You also gain knowledge of the film, television or radio industries and some of the contacts necessary to market your projects.

A supportive and stimulating environment

The teaching for the practice courses (long form script, short script and script editing) takes place in workshops in which students share their own work and comment on each others. The programme is designed to provide a supportive, stimulating and constructively critical environment for all students to do their very best work.

Once you have made your application, if you would like to find out more about what its like actually being on the MA, please email the programme convenor to arrange a visit to meet some of the current students.

Programme highlights include

-All scripts in the short script module receive a reading from professional actors. These scripts are also eligible for the Goldsmiths Short Script Competition, from which four are chosen for MA Filmmaking students’ final productions each year – and shown at BAFTA
-There is a mentorship scheme in place whereby students select and approach a mentor with the support of the programme convenor
-Specially invited industry speakers for the Olive Till memorial lecture each year. These have included Sir Alan Parker, the late Anthony Minghella, Michael Winterbottom, Gurinder Chadha, Danny Boyle, Stephen Frears, Paul Greengrass, Noel Clarke and Tim Bevan. Also there are visiting guest lecturer and masterclasses from Linda Aronson, Stewart Till, and others.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Julian Henriques.

Modules & Structure

A core course is designed to give you the skills and understanding required to develop your Treatment for a feature film or equivalent television or radio script. The course is taught mostly with workshops, in which you present and discuss your own work with other students in a supportive environment. There are also class exercises, lectures, screenings, master classes, seminars and individual tutorials.

Starting in the Spring Term, the course then develops your Treatment into a second draft feature script (or its equivalent).

You'll then be able to pick from a selection of option modules.

Assessment

You are assessed on your portfolio, which consists of your long form treatment and second draft feature script or equivalent, your 4,000-word Reflection essay on this script, linked to issues in Media and Culture and a radio script adapted from a source text. In addition, depending on your options, your portfolio could also include a 10-12 page short script or script-editing proposal and coverage. Other modules are assessed by 5-6,000-word essays.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. Read more
Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. This programme is designed for committed writers who wish to complete significant pieces of work and generally broaden their experience as writers.

Course Overview

The MA in Creative and Scriptwriting provides the opportunity to specialise in creative writing for film, TV or theatre. The overall aim of the programme is to equip students with the ability to hone their screen, dramatic or other writing skills, with a particular understanding of commercial contexts and to develop areas of creativity at an advanced level. In all cases the emphasis is on developing the individual student's creative expression. There is no attempt to impose a house style.

The programme provides the opportunity to work with internationally recognised dramatists and screen writers as well as with writers with expertise in other genres of creative writing. The dissertation element of the programme will enable you to develop a full script, reflecting both creative and commercial imperatives, building upon exercises in dramatic writing developed through the screenwriting and workshop modules.

The MA has responded to the explosion of online publishing by supporting students in publication and promotion. The course is delivered by a mixture of professional writers and academics who prepare you for the realities of a hugely competitive market. You will learn how to prepare manuscripts, to approach publishers, and, increasingly important, to market yourself.

The School and the University support a number of reading and social events in which students are encouraged to participate. We also support the student-led design, production, publication and promotion of the well-received online journal The Lampeter Review. As a result of this activity several former students now work in publishing and we are proud of our excellent track record of student publishing success.

Modules

-Approaches to Creative Writing
-Writing Workshop: Research and Writing
-Writing Workshop: Writing and Context
-Writers World
-Screenwriting
-Creative Project (Dissertation)

Key Features

-The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.
-Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize-winning authors.
-The MA programmes also offer students the opportunity to write and discuss their work through the medium of Welsh should they wish to do so.
-The programme is based upon an established pool of expertise in related concerns, and covers a range of projects undertaken over a number of years.
-Staff are active publishers and practitioners in their own right

Assessment

There are no examinations. All modules are assessed by original creative assignments supported by reflective and developmental material: logs, journals, treatments, reviews proposals. The Creative Project provides the opportunity for students to develop a substantial piece of work to publishable standard.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the digital journal, The Lampeter Review
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start. Read more
Our MLitt in Writing Practice and Study is like no other Creative Writing course in the UK. Small, bespoke and intimate, it offers you an experience that gets you writing from week one and has you feeling like a "real" writer from the very start.

Why study Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

This degree gives you the opportunity to translate creative interests into a fully accredited postgraduate programme of study, with flexibility and individual needs built into its delivery. It has been created and is directed by Professor Kirsty Gunn, an award winning international author whose work has been translated and published in a number of territories all over the world.

Our programme is distinctive in its approach and teaching, and highly engaged in the world of contemporary publishing, offering students the opportunity to meet with writers and publishers from around the UK and beyond and to take part in our varied and exciting range of literary activities, from performing their own work to being "showcased" at our Literary Festival.

You will learn how to:
Create and develop your own writing practice through a series of creative and practical workshops
Present and talk about your own work with authority and confidence - in the context of literary studies and a knowledge of the creative marketplace.
Read others' writing with sensitivity, intelligence and critical awareness.
Build a significant folio of creative work and develop this into work of a standard that is ready for formal presentation.
Each module can be studied separately, or as part of a full degree or diploma that can be taken part time or full time.

We can guarantee that your writing during the course of your programme will be productive, intellectually stimulating and highly creative.

What's so good about Writing Practice & Study at Dundee?

In addition to producing a range of finished work for assessment during the year, you will also learn about the details of publishing, finding agents, setting your work in a context and making the important connection between the scale and shape of your writing and your aspirations for it. You'll have the opportunity to undertake specialist master classes with top-name authors, and go on visits to sites of special interest for the creative student - in the past these have included the D'Arcy Thomson Museum and the Scottish Poetry Library.

Literary Dundee

With an annual Literary Festival, regular and varied literary salons, poetry workshops, readings from internationally renowned and local authors, and much more, the events organised under the umbrella of Literary Dundee complement the course perfectly.

"Studying for an MLitt gave me the time and opportunity to work on my debut novel which was published soon after I graduated. I found the teaching and supportive environment to be invaluable during that time and it has had a great impact on my confidence since."
Zoe Venditozzi - graduated MLitt 2012

Zoe's novel is Anywhere's Better Than Here, published by Sandstone Press Ltd

How you will be taught

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a fulltime basis.

This programme is varied in delivery and content, comprising four-hour writing workshops to seminars to individual tutorials, helping you to develop practical, intelligent and highly creative methods by which you can approach your writing.

What you will study

During the first two semesters (September to December and January to April), students take the following core modules:

Creating Writing*
Studying Writing
Each student also selects two optional modules (40 credits each) from a list available each year. The currently available modules are:

Publishing Writing
Performing Writing
Refining Writing
Writing, Texts & Books
Planning Writing
You will then (from May to September) go on to undertake a dissertation worth 60 credits. You develop the theme or idea for your dissertation over the year, with the help of tutors.

*Creating Writing may be taken on a stand-alone basis.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by creative folio (6,000 words) and accompanying essay (2,500 words), or two essays.
Assessment for the research-led modules is normally by essay (2,000-2,500 words or 2,500-3,000 words).
The dissertation or creative manuscript has a word limit of 15,000, and includes a reflective piece of writing (3,000 words).
All students must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Our graduates go on to be involved in a range of exciting literary activities - that range from publication of creative work to participation in national festivals and reading events. Recent students' successes include a first novel coming out with Sandstone this year, a placement in Canongate Publishing, Writers' Awards from Creative Scotland and the Scottish Books Trust, and the performance of a play. Our ex-students tend to stay part of our literary and creative community at Dundee after they have finished their formal studies with us - for as much as we believe in involving participants as fully and creatively as we can while they are with us, so do we not like to see them go!

This alone, makes our programme distinctive and individual and the very opposite of a large, more anonymous school. As a result our students are highly proactive and fully creatively engaged in the publishing and cultural world after they receive their degree.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, graduate

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Read more

ABOUT THE MA/MFA WRITING FOR STAGE AND BROADCAST MEDIA

The MA and MFA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media offers students vocational training in writing drama across a range of different media contexts. Although the primary focus is on writing for television, film, theatre and radio, Central also runs
optional units in writing for new music theatre and, in collaboration with MA Applied Theatre, writing with and for communities. The course provides the opportunity for students to develop the core competencies and skills of the dramatist to explore their own ‘voice’ and develop their confidence as dramatists, and to appreciate the specific media contexts within which professional writers work.

Key features are: practice-based enquiry into techniques and processes for writing for stage and screen; a series of writing projects to engage with different styles and formats of production; associated study of writing techniques and issues of
performance in relation to theatre, cinema, television and other relevant contexts.The MA and MFA are taught in group sessions and through individual tutorials. During these sessions participants will consider the fundamentals of dramatic writing. Indicatively, these will include structure, narrative, dramatic action, genre, character, dialogue and rhetorical effect.

Students will study different approaches to writing including individual authorship, group writing and writing to specific briefs. Students will attend masterclasses, seminars and workshops that focus on particular modes of writing for different production contexts, and will be part of a writers’ group, providing peer support in developing their writing. Their vocational work is complemented by individual research and appropriate theoretical discussion and enquiry. Students will address historical, theoretical and critical contexts within which traditions of dramatic writing have evolved.

Students will engage in a range of projects that test and develop their skills as a writer of drama. Indicatively, these will include forming a team of writers to evolve a television series, writing a short play script for a staged reading, writing a short
film script, writing a radio play and developing and writing a complete dramatic script for production in a particular medium (stage, radio, television, music theatre, or film).

ASSESSMENT

This is through peer assessment, practical assignments, essays, scheme of research, presentations, and the submission of a practitioner portfolio, including personal insights, research, the student’s own scripted material and a plan for professional
development.

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The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer. Read more

Overview

The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer.

Working with published writers from within and outside the University, the Keele Writing MA offers participants an opportunity to improve their writing and to bring it up to publishable standard while learning more about the critical and intellectual context in which their work is situated.

Students on the Keele Writing MA also participate directly in the development and maintenance of the events, publications, workshops and short courses which constitute Keele’s vibrant writing culture – typically through opting to gain experience in one of the areas in which writers often establish a secondary income – reviewing, editing and teaching.

You can study full-time or part-time for this MA. It is also possible to take short courses in Creative Writing, delivered as part of our MA programme, as well as Certificate and Diploma-level courses in the subject.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/creativewriting/

Course Aims

- To provide opportunities for the practice and study of creative writing at an advanced, publishable level

- To provide a supportive and constructively critical environment in which students can work with published writers and their peers to improve their writing

- To provide students with the necessary skills to write at an advanced, publishable level

Course Content

The course is delivered as three stand-alone taught modules. In addition students complete a Portfolio of original work. Students will have the opportunity to take any single module as a short course or to combine two modules and be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or to complete four modules and receive a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits).

The contents of each module are summarised below.

The Writer as Critic, The Critic as Writer (30 Credits) is the core compulsory module, and looks at questions of influence, the critical process of reading other writers’ work and the cultural context in which a writer lives and works. Students will study contemporary examples of script, poetry and fiction.

Writing Fiction (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing short fiction and novels, with structured reading and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Writing Poetry (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing poetry, with structured reading, discussion and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Life Writing (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on forms of writing such as auto/biography and memoir.

The Writer in the Community (30 Credits) is a project-based module which offers students the opportunity to create and deliver a professional project of a type commonly undertaken by writers. Possible projects include: designing and delivering creative writing workshops; mentoring less experienced writers; steering a literary editing project; setting up and putting on a literary event; or creating a web-based literary resource.

The Portfolio (90 Credits) is the compulsory Dissertation-level module, taught through a series of individual supervisions. Students develop a portfolio of original writing to a professional standard through the production of either a complete piece of written work or a substantial part of a complete piece of written work, e.g: a collection of poetry; a collection of short stories; a short novel; or a substantial part of a longer novel.

Teaching & Assessment

The core 30-credit module (The Writer As Critic, The Critic As Writer) is assessed by written assignments and a presentation. The optional 30-credit modules (Writing Prose, Writing Poetry, Life Writing, The Writer in the Community) are assessed by a portfolio of work and a critical commentary that reflects on the contents of the portfolio. The 90-Credit dissertation-level Portfolio is assessed by a substantial portfolio of original writing and a commentary.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The course includes traditional elements for a postgraduate programme in Creative Writing, such as writing workshops, intensive tutorial-based supervision and a range of guest speakers. Read more
The course includes traditional elements for a postgraduate programme in Creative Writing, such as writing workshops, intensive tutorial-based supervision and a range of guest speakers. In addition, the MA provides both literary context and practical professional experiences. The Workshop Space: Craft and Pedagogy examines how and why we workshop. It explores questions of authority, taste and trust. You will lead part of a writing workshop and devise writing exercises for your fellow writers. While it provides a strong literary context for students, the literary material is examined and analysed from a writer’s point of view. The module Working as a Writer offers practical, independent experience. Students can pursue either publications or design, implement and complete an independent creative project with an outside organisation.

The modules we currently offer are:
-Writing Workshop I: Creative and Critical Processes
-The Workshop Space: Craft and Pedagogy
-Writing Workshop II: Creative and Critical Processes
-Working as a Writer
-Creative Writing Dissertation

Why choose this course?

The MA in Creative Writing offers a range of distinct creative practices and theoretical approaches. It aims to develop professional skills in the area of Creative Writing by giving students the opportunity to implement their creative practice more broadly in professional settings. With up-to-date, relevant skills, understanding and knowledge, graduates of this MA will be prepared for employment in a variety of fields, such as working creatively with organisations, professional writing and other related professions. The MA can be taken as a one-year full time course or a two-year part-time course.

Teaching methods

Writing workshops are the primary mode of delivery for the programme, led by experienced Creative Writing professionals. The workshops focus on craft, art and developing students’ writing. Each student will have a supervisor and regular tutorials will supplement their workshop-based sessions. A guest lecture series provides further professional contexts for the students.

All modules except the Dissertation are 30 credits. The Dissertation is 60 credits. Part time students will take the People and Places and Working as a Writer modules in the first year and the Writing Workshop I and Writing Workshop II modules in their second year. The Dissertation will be completed in semester C of their second year.

Structure

Modules
-Creative Writing Dissertation
-People and Places: Writing Communities
-The Writing Workshop 2: Creative and Critical Processes
-The Writing Workshop1: Creative and Critical Processes
-Working as a Writer

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The Diploma in Script Development is the only comprehensive vocational programme in script development in the UK. - 16 Month Course. Read more
The Diploma in Script Development is the only comprehensive vocational programme in script development in the UK.

Quick Facts

- 16 Month Course
- Part-time
- Course starts in September
- Next intake: September 2016
- UK and EEA applicants only

- The world's first Diploma course in Script Development.
- Taught programme and practical development project with a screenwriter.
- Part-time, evening course.
- Access to new screenwriters.
- Regular Industry speakers.

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/script-development

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

We are looking for people who:

- Already work in development and feel they may benefit from a structured course in story theory and working practice in order to build their confidence and resources
- Already work in the film industry and are keen to develop or hone their skills when working with scripts and writers, to get the best work from those writers
- Are new producers keen to get an edge on finding and nurturing new writing talent
- Have experience in other creative industries and would like to explore script development and believe that they can bring new experience and ideas to the process of developing scripts and cultivating writers
- Have a passion for film, a love of storytelling, can demonstrate initiative, and have an enthusiasm for, and a commitment to, working collaboratively

If you are not an EEA National, you must already be in possession of a UK visa valid for the duration of this course.

COURSE OVERVIEW

16 Month - part-time course. This course commences in September each year.

A unique programme, the Diploma in Script Development is the only comprehensive vocational course in script development in the UK. This course offers a brilliant opportunity to grow the skills to develop for film and TV. It was launched in 2003 and has since trained some 150 people, most of which are successfully working in the UK or international film industry as developers for film and/or TV drama projects or as creative producers and a few are successfully writing drama.

The Diploma offers the most comprehensive contemporary overview and on-going practical learning in an intensive professional environment. The programme combines lectures, seminars and workshops alongside talks and panel discussions with current industry practitioners, as well as supervised practical work with a screenwriter. Guest speakers for the current year have included Reno Antoniades, Julia Short, Sam Lavender, Jonathan Asser and Matthew Bates.

There are continuous written assignments (some assessed, some not) throughout the taught section of the programme which are mostly practical and designed to be useful to a career in development, as well as other areas of the film industry.

The programme consists of 30 taught sessions of 2 hours each held during term-time on a weekday evening (from 7pm - 9pm) running from September - July.

The Final Project element of the Diploma is a six-month supervised development project, which begins at the beginning of the summer when students are paired with a screenwriter. The delivery of all assessed material for the Final Project is due in December.

The course design offers a collaborative experience for students as well as a total immersion in the art and craft of development for the duration of the programme. Whilst the course is full-on it is not full-time; it requires commitment to one evening taught classes through regular term times and completing relevant assignments, but it is entirely possible to combine this course with full-time work so long as you have the necessary desire and commitment!

ADVISORY PANEL

With an advisory panel including Amma Asante – Writer/Director, Beverley Booker – Head of Development – Drama – Sky, Celine Haddad - Senior Film Executive - Creative England, Dan MacRae, Head of UK Development – Studio Canal, Emily Feller – Producer – Red Productions, Jamie Hewitt – Script Editor – BBC Drama , Joe Oppenheimer – Commissioning Editor – BBC Films, Marilyn Milgrom – Script Consultant, Peter Ansorge – Producer, Robyn Slovo – Producer, Rose Garnett – Head of Development – Film4 and Yael Shavit -Director / Script Editor, the Script Development Diploma will give you the inside track on what the industry needs from its developers of the future.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

The NFTS want to encourage applications from the brightest and best talent out there….from all backgrounds. We are actively seeking to redress imbalances within the Industry by encouraging applications from under-represented groups, and have bursaries of £1500 on offer to 5 of the successful candidates. Bursaries will be awarded to stand out talent who can demonstrate that without this funding they would not be able to afford the course, or who can demonstrate they bring a unique and distinct perspective to the course.

CURRICULUM

The programme covers:

- Story and Genre Theory
- Script analysis and script report writing
- Assessing and developing screenwriting craft skills
- Negotiating development meetings
- Detailed story development practice
- Assessing treatments and other short documents
- Adaptations - including legal and copyright issues
- The Industrial environment - development in its context
- Guest speakers from the public sector, agents, lawyers, independent producers
- Europe and the role of international film festivals
- Distribution and Marketing

The Final Project:
At the beginning of the summer term, students are paired with a new screenwriter for a Final Development Project. Over six months, the student and writer will work together through two drafts and two development meetings. This project is closely supervised and intended to be a useful and practical experience for both the developer and the writer.

TUTORS

Angeli Macfarlane provides development consultancy to British, European, Australian and US production companies. She works with writing and directing talent including Mat Whitecross for Mint Pictures, Gabriel Range on Outlaw Prophet for Sony TV - in production April 2014, Anthony Byrne and Natalie Dormer for 42, Emily Ballou for BBC Scotland, Fran Poletti for Salon Pictures and Joan Sauers for Screen Australia. She is also co-producer for Altered Image on feature Costa Rica, written by Jake Arnott and Amber Trentham and Lust for Life, by Robin French.

Ludo Smolksi is a development consultant and script editor, having worked recently on Jon S Baird’s Filth, adapted from the Irvine Welsh novel, and Bruce Goodison’s Leave to Remain (LFF 2013). He works regularly for directors such as Martin Wallace (Small Creatures) and Zam Salim (BAFTA-winning Up There) and currently consults for Metrodome Distribution, Pistachio Pictures and Wingbeat Pictures among others.

APPLY WITH

We would like you to write a short piece (750 words max) telling us about a film or TV drama you wish you had developed. Please include:

- The reasons you have chosen this piece.
- A brief description of the main story line and the protagonist’s story arc.
- Your ideas around what you think might have improved the script.

HOW TO APPLY

The application deadline has now passed, however there may still be a chance to apply. Please contact registry via email stating your name, course of interest and contact details:

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Most drama writers move between media so that's what we do; join us to learn about writing for theatre, film and television. Read more
Most drama writers move between media so that's what we do; join us to learn about writing for theatre, film and television.

Who is it for?

This programme is suitable for writers who want to develop their practice and complete a full length piece of work, or for experienced playwrights who wish to gain a familiarity with writing for the screen, or experienced screenwriters who wish to gain a grounding in theatre writing. It is also suitable for writers who while continuing with their own practice, will work in development roles in the film, TV, theatre and related industries such as literary agencies.

The programme has been designed, with input from a range of playwrights and screenwriters, to provide the optimum environment for students to complete a full length play or feature film script to a high standard.

Objectives

Creatively stimulating, challenging and above all practical, this innovative two-year programme provides a supportive and thought-provoking environment for playwrights and screenwriters to explore their ideas, develop their craft and finish a full-length work to a high standard.

You will develop as a writer and sharpen your understanding of what's working and what isn't. No single style or genre is prescribed; the ethos of the programme is excellence and diversity. You will get to understand writing choices in the work of leading playwrights and screenwriters. You will work with actors and directors from London's new writing theatres, and receive guest talks from agents, producers and artistic directors.

By the end of the course, you will have taken a full-length play, screenplay or television pilot through a number of drafts, working as professional writers do. This play or screenplay will be your calling card. You will receive a performed reading of an extract of your work and a professional script report.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught and run by professional working writers. Teaching is based around a mix of practical workshops, seminars and lectures. All this is supported by one-to-one tutorials and by independent study: notably reading and preparing presentations on set texts and performing set writing exercises. As the course progresses, the emphasis shifts to independent study and is supported by workshops and one-to-one tutorials.

You will be mentored by a professional working playwright or screenwriter for the whole of Year Two.

Central to this Creative Writing MA course is the requirement to finish a full-length play or screenplay. The course culminates in a showcase of your work to an audience of industry professionals and other interested parties.

The biggest names in the worlds of film, television and theatre visit the course and visiting lecturers include:
-Dr Terry Bailey (TV Writer, director and producer. He has worked internationally and with the BBC. His play, Grave Men, Near Death, was staged last year.)
-Penny Gold (writer, dramaturg, director and producer. She has worked in theatre, television, film and radio).
-Jim Hill (writer and director of popular television drama and is perhaps best known as the co-creator of the successful series Boon).
-David Lane (professional playwright and dramaturg, and has been a Literary Associate to established London and regional new writing companies such as Soho Theatre & Writers' Centre and Theatre and Beyond in Brighton).

Assessment includes participation in lectures, seminars and workshops; of work on presentations; set exercises and own script proposal.

Modules

You will take three modules (Writing Workshop, Dramatic Writing and Storytelling) and be taught for six hours a week*. There will be tutorials alongside this in all 3 terms. You will create a 10 minute film as well as a 10 minute play.

In the second year you choose to write either a full length play, or screenplay, or a pilot for an original television series (along with the series "bible" and synopses for several episodes). In addition to this you will participate in workshops.

Year 1
-Writing Workshop
-Dramatic Writing
-Storytelling

Year 2
-Own Play or Script
-The Production Business

Career prospects

Many of our graduates go on to have their work performed professionally and have won many awards and nominations. Some examples from 2016 include:
-Aisha Zia, who received a grant from Brookleaze and her play ‘Besieged’ is on at the Arcola Theatre.
-Dianna Hunt, Her play ‘One Woman's Slide: A Blues’ has been programmed in the Talawa Arts Festival.
-Cheryl White, whose films include Before Babel (2013) which won Best Short at the Kent and Rye Film Festival International film festival 2015; Winner of Best Film and Most Innovative Film at WOW Festival 2014.
-Louisa Hayford, who did a ten week paid internship at the Coronation Street story department as part of the ITV Coronation Street Original Voices scheme.

Some of our first year students have also had their work picked up professionally.

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The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. Read more
The UK has a world leading comedy pedigree, but no industry recognised comedy training course - until now. The new 18 month part-time NFTS Diploma in Writing and Producing Comedy will enable students to develop all forms of scripted and unscripted comedy including, sitcoms, sketch shows, and panel shows for radio and tv. The course is run in partnership with Channel 4.

Quick Facts

- 18 Month Course
- Part-time
- Course starts in January
- Next intake: January 2017
- UK and EEA applicants only

- The world's first Diploma course in Writing and Producing Comedy.
- Delivered in partnership with Channel 4
- Part-time, evening course
- Regular Industry speakers
- Develop and write an original show and make a taster tape.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/diploma/writing-and-producing-comedy

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in January each year. Students will be taught by NFTS writing and producing tutors supported by guest sessions from the people responsible for some of the UK’s most iconic UK shows including Peep Show, Father Ted, Have I Got News for You, Spitting Image, Horrible Histories and Green Wing.

The course advisory board includes:

Ash Atalla – The Office, Cuckoo, Trollied
Dawson Bros – The Peter Serafinowicz Show, That Mitchell & Webb Look, Big School
Sam Bain - Peep Show, Fresh Meat, Rev
Richard Boden – Blackadder, 'Allo 'Allo, IT Crowd
Gregor Cameron – Katy Brand’s Big Ass Show, Fighting Talk
Saurabh Kakkar – Head of Development – Comedy – Big Talk
Graham Linehan – Father Ted, IT Crowd, Count Arthur Strong
Arabella McGuigan – Smack the Pony, Brass Eye
Caroline Norris - Horrible Histories, The Armstrong & Miller Show, Dead Ringers
John O’Farrell – Spitting Image, Have I Got News For You, Novelist
Richard Preddy – Green Wing, Campus
Lucy Robinson - Co-Founder Little Comet Film & TV/Head of Comedy Brothers and Sisters
Helen Spencer -Salford Comedy Festival, Salford Sitcom Showcase, Jesting About
Lorna Watson & Ingrid Oliver – Watson & Oliver

The course is part-time (one evening a week and occasional Saturdays) over eighteen months and is delivered in central London. You will be expected to spend at least 8 hours a week working on assignments for the course. You will leave the course with a portfolio of material developed during the course, this could include a ten-minute taster tape of an idea you have developed, or a full script and some sketches and one-liners.

Specifically you will learn about:

- Comedy landscape
- Radio comedy
- Sketches
- Panel shows and formats
- Characterisation
- Story structure
- Narrative TV comedy
- Script editing
- Topical one-liners
- Outlines and treatments
- Pitching
- Commissioning processes
- Working with performers
- Compliance issues
- Working with writers
- Writing briefs

Students graduate able to:

- generate comedy programme ideas
- write or produce a narrative comedy, sketch show or comedy entertainment show
- pitch ideas to commissioning editors
- work with writers and help them develop their ideas

So you think you’re funny? Apply Now!

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

The NFTS want to encourage applications from the brightest and best talent out there….from all backgrounds. We are actively seeking to redress imbalances within the Industry by encouraging applications from under-represented groups, and have bursaries of £4650 on offer to 2 of the successful candidates. Bursaries will be awarded to stand out talent who can demonstrate that without this funding they would not be able to afford the course, or who can demonstrate they bring a unique and distinct perspective and voice to the course.

CURRICULUM

The course is made up of a number of modules and workshops, you learn by ‘doing’ as well as understanding theory and developing a variety of practical and creative skills.

Module 1: Writing and producing sketch shows
 A sketch needs a premise, a core funny idea that is its reason to exist. As soon as a sketch begins, the audience looks for this premise and it needs to be apparent. You will learn how this works by writing sketches for different shows and getting feedback on them from established sketch performers and producers. You will have your material read by experienced sketch performers, and the chance to have your material performed for an invited audience.

Module 2: Topical one-liners, formats and panel shows. Topical one-liners for Have I Got News for You, The News Quiz and other topical shows is often the entry point for writers. You will learn by a mixture of practice, theory and feedback, the basics of writing topical jokes. You will learn how to develop your own format or panel show idea.

Module 3: Radio Comedy 
Many comedy writers and producers have worked in both television and radio with many shows starting out on radio and moving to television. It is the entry point for many established comedy writers and producers. You will develop and test your skills by developing material for Radio 4 and pitch ideas to radio comedy producers.

Module 4: Writing/Producing an existing sitcom 
You will learn about writing for a situation and a bunch of characters that already exist, concentrating on pitching appropriate story ideas to the creators of those shows. You will also learn about script editing and how to give notes.

Module 5: Writing a TV narrative comedy 
You will develop an idea for a television narrative comedy (sitcom), pitch it, and write the first draft of a script.

Module 6: Graduation project 
Working on your own, or in a pair, you will develop a sitcom, comedy drama or sketch show for TV or radio. You will write one episode, and either shoot a taster tape or have some scenes performed by professional actors or produce a radio show.

NFTS BENEFITS

Comedy course participants will have full access to the NFTS’ optional creative stimulus strands, including: Passport to Cinema (weekly screenings of classic and pre-release films in the state-of-the-art campus cinema); and NFTS Masterclasses (major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include Graham King (producer, Hugo, The Departed), Guy Ritchie (Director, Sherlock Holmes), Danny Boyle (Director, Slumdog Millionaire) and Ian Livingstone (former President and CEO, Eidos).

TUTORS

Many of the people on the course advisory board will also teach on the course. In addition the course is supported by Channel 4 commissioners and executives.

APPLY WITH

- Two TV or radio sketches of no more than 400 words each. One of these should be set on a polar landscape.
- An outline for a comedy series, no more than 600 words
- Two short proposed story outlines for an existing sitcom. Each of the 2 episode outlines should be no more than 200 words. The sitcom we want you to write for is Bluestone 42
Each of your 2 stories should have a beginning, middle and an end. Make sure you do your background research and ensure you understand how Bluestone 42 operates as a sitcom

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR WRITING AND PRODUCING COMEDY COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=656

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Read more
Our courses allow you to advance your creative ability through practice, discussion and revision. You will further your awareness of writing processes, professional writing and publishing. Our staff have received national and international recognition for their work. You will work with them to prepare creative work for submission and publication.

Our courses provide a unique opportunity to develop and hone your creative writing skills. We teach creative writing in four strands:
-Prose writing
-Poetry
-Scriptwriting, with a unique emphasis on writing for radio
-Creative non-fiction, with a unique emphasis on memoir writing, essay writing and biography

The courses will introduce you to a wide range of subjects and areas in which writers are working professionally. You will build your awareness and broaden your knowledge of writing opportunities. You will also consider ways of matching your skills to jobs.

You will explore the many ways in which writing is produced, distributed and promoted to audiences. Our guest speakers are practitioners and/or associated with the world of publishing and performance. Working with them, you will explore the roles and importance of:
-Agents
-Editors
-Reviewers
-Social media
-New technology in contemporary publishing

The Newcastle Centre for Literary Arts (NCLA) offers you the opportunity to get involved in our writing community. Our readings and events feature poets, playwrights and novelists. Past speakers include:
-Kazuo Ishiguro
-Val McDermid
-Seamus Heaney

Delivery

At the centre of courses are writing workshops. We offer workshops in:
-Prose
-Poetry
-Scriptwriting
-Creative non-fiction

All our classes take place in the early evening.

You will develop your creative writing through our taught sessions and individual consultations. Our small seminar groups and one to one supervision gives you close contact with your tutors, who are all writing practitioners.

Those who complete the PGCert can choose to transfer to the second year of our part time MA.

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As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. Read more
As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. In addition to this, there are regular visits by other writers. The final taught module includes a session given by agents and editors. Staff are also willing to advise on professional issues of placing work.

The MA in Creative Writing is designed to give students a structure within which they can develop both their writing and imaginative critical skills, experimenting with the wide range of possibilities available to the contemporary writer. It is possible to write prose fiction (the novel or short story), poetry and drama. We are interested in literary fiction in all its forms.
Our MA Creative writing students 'read as writers', explore their reading in group discussions and engage in writing exercises designed to enlarge and stimulate their practice.
In the intensive MA workshops, students share work, learn to write to deadlines, learn how to redraft, polish, edit imaginatively and find the creative thread which, when followed, reveals how their own writing will achieve its optimum level.
All written assignments are accompanied by the writing of a commentary on the process; the commentary speeds and makes explicit a writer's discoveries, and so aids future practice.
Recent guest readers include: Simon Brett, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Vicki Feaver, Ed Hogan, Susanna Jones, Adam Marek, Bernard O'Donoghue, Michele Roberts, Jo Shapcott, Robert Shearman, Matthew Sweeney and Nick Warburton.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00


Many of our writers go on to publish and win prizes. For instance, Isabel Ashdown's novel Glasshopper, written during the MA, was hailed as one of the five best debut novels of 2009 in The Observer. MA graduate Wendy French won the £5000 2010 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. These are just two recent examples of the success of our graduates.

The annual Publishing Panel of six specialists has regularly welcomed literary agents from agencies such as David Godwin Associates, Rogers, Coleridge and White, United Artists, Greene & Heaton, Janklow and Nesbitt, RAFT and Lucy Luck Associates. Agents join literary editors for a discussion of the publishing world today and how to approach an agent or editor. We have welcomed literary editors from Penguin/Hamish Hamilton, Chatto&Windus, Myriad Editions, Simon & Schuster, Pighog Press, the Frogmore Papers and producers from BBC Radio.

Student Successes

Jane Rusbridge’s first novel, The Devil’s Music, was published by Bloomsbury in the summer of 2009. It is described as ‘a beautifully told story of family secrets and betrayal, involving knots, Harry Houdini and the shifting landscape of memory.’ The novel was started as part of her MA dissertation project. Jane's second novel, Rook, was published in 2012 and was a Guardian Readers' Book of the Year. Jane has won or been placed in several national and international short story competitions, including the WritersInc ‘Writer of the Year’ award (2005), the Ilkley literature Festival competition (2005), the Bluechrome Short Story competition (2005), the Bridport (2003, 2005) and the Fish Prize (2006). Jane's website can be found at http://janerusbridge.co.uk/

All these stories were written while studying on the MA. MA assignment poems have featured in The Interpreter's House, Red Hot Fiesta, New Beginnings, First Time, and the Surrey Poetry Competition anthology. Jane’s story ‘Sputnik’ was published in Mslexia (2006) and ‘The Devil’s Music’ – a chapter from the novel – was published by Route (2006).

On the Third Day by Kate Betts won Channel 4’s ‘The Play’s The Thing’ script-writing competition in 2006. The play was performed in The New Ambassadors Theatre, London. Michael Billington, renowned theatre critic for The Guardian, wrote, ‘Betts reveals a bold theatrical sense’ and ‘a gift for wry humour’ while Charles Spencer of The Telegraph praised the ‘emotional candour and generosity’ of the script. Kate featured each week in the major Channel 4 serial documentary, The Play’s The Thing.

Bethan Roberts' fourth novel, Mother Island (Chatto and Windus), was winner of Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Award in 2015. Bethan's first novel, The Pools, which evolved from her MA dissertation, was published by Serpent's Tail in the summer of 2007.

While on the MA, Bethan was selected for the prestigious Arvon/Jerwood mentoring scheme for writers under 35. Entry was highly competitive, with only 9 creative writers chosen from MA courses throughout the country. As part of the scheme, Bethan completed her novel under the guidance of an experienced novelist. Bethan has also published short stories, all written for the MA, including 'Family Portrait' (MsLexia, 16, 2003). She won The Olive Cook Award (Society of Awards) for another short story in 2006. Bethan's website can be found at http://bethanrobertswriter.co.uk/

Gabrielle Kimm wrote her first novel, My Last Duchess (Sphere 2010) on the MA in Creative Writing. Since then Sphere have gone on to publish The Courtesan’s Lover (2012) and The Girl with the Painted Face (2013). Gabrielle's website can be found at http://gabriellekimm.co.uk/

Indicative modules
The MA comprises four taught modules and a creative dissertation:

The Writing Studio enables writers to experiment in any genre prose, poetry or drama, while exploring key features of those genres. This first module also serves as induction to the MA and to the distinctive methods of the 'Chichester workshop'.

Metaphor and the Imagination encourages innovation and experimentation, pushing writers beyond their usual boundaries.

Sources and Transformations engages writers with the essential writerly skills of transforming both outer research and inner biographical concerns into fiction.

Launching the Manuscript encourages autonomy, sustaining the longer project, learning about the publishing industry and includes guest readers and the publishing panel.
The Manuscript (a creative dissertation of 20,000) allows writers to develop a longer piece of work through one to one tutorials with a tutor as a consultant reader.

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Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. Read more
Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. This programme is designed for committed writers who wish to complete significant pieces of work and generally broaden their experience as writers.

Course Overview

The MA in Creative Writing is designed for committed writers who wish to expand their range and complete significant pieces of publishable work.

The overall aim of the programme is to equip students with the ability to hone their writing skills and to develop areas of creativity at an advanced level, while the practical benefits offered by the module will enable students to pursue careers as professional writers, editors and publishers A focus on the ability to communicate clearly through precise language prepares students for a range of careers, from writing-based advertising or journalism, to related professions such as publicity or arts administration.

Throughout the programme you will have the opportunity to develop your writing across a range of fields, expanding your repertoire by trying unfamiliar modes and genres.

The MA has responded to the explosion of online publishing by supporting students in publication and promotion. The course is delivered by a mixture of professional writers and academics who prepare you for the realities of a hugely competitive market. You will learn how to prepare manuscripts, to approach publishers, and, increasingly important, to market yourself.

The School and the University support a number of reading and social events in which students are encouraged to participate. We also support the student-led design, production, publication and promotion of the well-received online journal The Lampeter Review. As a result of this activity several former students now work in publishing and we are proud of our excellent track record of student publishing success.

Modules

-Approaches to Creative Writing
-Writing Workshop: Research and Writing
-Writing Workshop: Writing and Context
-Writers' World
-Screenwriting
-Creative Project (Dissertation)

Key Features

-The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.
-Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially workshopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize-winning authors.
-The MA programmes also offer students the opportunity to write and discuss their work through the medium of Welsh should they wish to do so.
-The programme is based upon an established pool of expertise in related concerns, and covers a range of projects undertaken over a number of years.
-Staff are active publishers and practitioners in their own right.

Assessment

There are no examinations. All modules are assessed by original creative assignments supported by reflective and developmental material: logs, journals, treatments, reviews proposals. The Creative Project provides the opportunity for students to develop a substantial piece of work to publishable standard.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the digital journal, The Lampeter Review
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. Read more
This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. All our tutors are award winning writers with an insight into what it takes to make it in the industry. We aim to turn out writers who understand the structure and craft of drama, have a finished script they can use as a calling card, know the industry in all its variety, and can pitch and sell their work.

The MA is taught in seventeen weekends of intensive workshops. It is not, however, ‘low residency’. There are as many hours of teaching as on Bath Spa University’s established MA in Creative Writing.

The course is taught at our beautiful Corsham Court campus where we have state of the art performance, capture and editing facilities. Our students also have opportunities to see their work for the stage performed and to shoot excerpts from their screenplays. We work closely with the School of Music and Performing Arts, and their students will have the opportunity to help act in and produce our work.

Although this is an intellectually challenging postgraduate course, there is no ‘academic’ side detached from the working side. Everything theoretical is geared to help the students as writers.

The MA in Scriptwriting also offers each of its students a free copy of Final Draft scriptwriting software, a must for professional Scriptwriters.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is full-time from October to September, or part-time over two years, and is taught in modules. The first trimester runs from October to January and there are two modules, each delivered in three intensive weekends.

One is the module on Dramatic Structure. This aims to give you an understanding of the full range of ways that plays and scripts can work. You are introduced to dialogue, character, genre, and the different media. But the emphasis is on how to tell a story - a well made plot. Students will read and view widely, but the academic side is not separate from the working side. This module is to help you write.

The other module in the first trimester is a workshop in Writing Theatre and Radio. This is delivered in three intensive weekends. All of the time is devoted to the students’ own work, and much of the time we work on our feet. At the end of the trimester each student finishes a 45 to 60 minute play or radio script, and a 3,000 word essay that explains the structure of that script.

The second trimester, from February to June, also has two modules. One is Professional Skills, again over three intensive weekends. All our experience is that the ability to write alone is not enough to make your way in the various industries of theatre, television, film and radio. You also need to be able to pitch, and to talk intelligently and flexibly about your own work and others’. One of our tutors facilitates this module, and various industry professionals come in for a day each to inform, rehearse and challenge you.

The other module this trimester is Workshop in Screenwriting, also over three weekends. Here you write a script for film or television. We pay particular attention to genre, to the visual and time requirements of the screen, and to writing for particular markets. At the end of this trimester each student finishes 50 to 60 minutes of TV, or a short film script, or a treatment for a full-length film plus at least 45 minutes of polished script.

The third trimester runs from June to the end of September. Here there is only one double module, the Final Script Workshop. The workshops meet over five intensive Saturdays.

In this module each student writes a full length play, a full length film script, or the equivalent in television or radio. This script can be a development and reworking of earlier pieces, but will often be completely new work. At the end of September students submit this script.

The final assessment is based on four things. The most important is this script. The second is a 1,500 word essay explaining exactly where in the market it is aimed and how it is shaped to fit that niche. The third is a cold pitch for this script. When we speak of the market, we are thinking quite broadly. Some students will want to write for Hollywood, British independent films, soap operas, or theatre. Others will want to write radio plays, documentaries, puppet shows, theatre in education, training videos or school plays. The emphasis is, however, always on getting your work to a stage where it is ready to be produced. The fourth is a practical realisation of a short excerpt of an original work stage, screen or radio play. Students are expected to co ordinate this realisation themselves with advice and support from their tutor and using the University’s resources.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

All courses will be taught by intensive workshops. Over the years we have found this is far and away the most productive way of teaching writing. It is particularly suited to scriptwriting, which is very much a social and collective art.

Tutors and visiting professionals:
All of our tutors are writers working in the industry. Among those working on the course will be:

• Ursula Rani Sarma (Course Director) writer for theatre, radio and screen
• Steve May who writes radio and novels
• Lucy Catherine who writes theatre, television and film
• Robin Mukherjee who writes theatre, television and film
• Hattie Naylor who writes film, theatre, radio and opera libretti
• Jonathan Neale who writes theatre, radio and novels

In the second semester we have visits from several professionals in the industry. Each conducts a one-day workshop with students, outlining the industry and giving them rigorous practice in pitching their work. Typically, we will have an agent, a TV producer, a radio producer, a theatre director or literary manager, and a film script editor.

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On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively. Read more
On this commercially focused course you'll develop the core skills you need to write flexibly and effectively.

Whether it's fiction, non-fiction, marketing copy, magazine features or screenplays, you'll learn how to tailor your work to competitive and fast-moving markets, developing a high-quality portfolio along with the confidence and professionalism you need to forge a successful career.

The course is taught entirely by practising writers and editors, and you'll also benefit from Falmouth's outstanding connections across the writing and publishing sector, with opportunities to learn from many leading writers and publishing industry insiders. Through a wide range of projects, live briefs and assignments, you'll discover your strengths as a writer, explore media and audience, and learn how to develop and pitch your ideas – all setting you up to excel as a professional writer.

The MA has a strong reputation for giving talented writers the skills needed to build a viable career. That's because we recognise that only by working to exacting, real-world standards can you rise to the tough demands of life as a writer.

You'll be immersed in the world of writing from the outset, learning how to create compelling narratives and voices before going on to apply these techniques to the specialist areas of your choice. You'll gain in-depth understanding of the content industry, and of how to raise your own professional profile within it. You'll be part of a lively and supportive community of fellow writers.

On graduation you'll be primed to tackle the writing industry head on – with a portfolio and accomplished working style ready to impress potential employers and meet any writing challenge.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/professionalwriting

Building professional experience

From day one, you'll be supported in shaping your work for publication. Many students succeed in placing work in both local and national publications while still on the course.

During the second half of the MA, you'll be encouraged to identify and undertake writing-related work experience that can feed into your industry-focused research project.

In previous years, students have secured placements with many leading publishers, media organisations, copywriting agencies, magazines and newspapers, often leading to ongoing work after graduation.

How the course is taught

The MA is structured around a mix of seminars, lectures, real-world briefs and practical workshops, along with your own self-managed work. You'll work individually and in teams, collaborating with other media professionals and developing your own projects and business ideas. Critiquing will form a valuable part of your learning experience.

As successful practising writers themselves, your tutors will expect you to take a disciplined and professional approach to your work.

Course outline

The full-time MA course runs over 45 weeks. If you're interested in developing an MA project related to your job, this may well be possible.

Enhanced learning opportunities

We are delighted to host the Writers in Residence programme. Matt Haig is Writer in Residence in 2015 whilst Lionel Shriver joined us in 2014 and Owen Sheers, poet and playwright, was here in 2013. Philip Marsden, novelist and non fiction writer launched the scheme in 2012.

Students have the opportunity to attend the London Book Fair and Port Eliot Festival.

The course is delivered across three study blocks:

- Study Blocks 1 & 2

You'll start by developing your core writing skills across a range of formats, then choose two specialist options from a selection that includes Fiction, Non-fiction, Scriptwriting, and Business & Editorial Writing – building a portfolio that showcases your abilities.

To help guide your choice of specialism, you'll take a module that looks at how writers work in different areas of the content industry. You'll also learn how to use the web and social media to build a profile as a writer.

After completing your specialist options, you'll take a module in research skills. As part of this, you'll carry out industry-focused research and develop a proposal for a longer creative project – your MA project.

- Study Block 3

In the final part of the course, you'll work independently on this project, supported by a specialist tutor. To accompany your project, you'll write a contextual essay focusing on an aspect of your writing practice.

Facilities

- Our library offers access to a wide range of online resources
- Our Media Centre has industry-standard audio/video recording and editing equipment
- Course-specific Virtual Learning Environment

Assessment

- Formal assessment and feedback at the end of each module
- Final assessment is largely based on your extended creative project, which is accompanied by a contextual essay

Careers

Our graduates have forged careers across the publishing and content industry. Potential careers include:

- Full-time author
- Entertainment blogger
- App content creator
- Freelance journalist
- Website editor
- Business writer
- Script editor
- Press officer
- Playwright

Interview and selection process

When you apply, we will ask you to send us a sample of your work along with your application. This could be an unpublished (or published) short story, screenplay, report, journalistic feature, novel extract or anything else that demonstrates your aptitude for writing. If the course team feels you have potential, we'll invite you to interview. We value meeting you in person but Skype interviews can be arranged if this isn't possible.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

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The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Read more
The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development.

Why this programme

-Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms.
-We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors.

Programme structure

The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK.

The programme structure covers:

Semester 1
-Creative workshops and guest speakers
-Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1)
-Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1)

Semester 2
-Creative workshops and guest speakers
-Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2)
-Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2)

These courses have been developed to:
-Encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
-Provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
-Familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing.
-To help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed.

Background

‎Among its alumni the University of Glasgow includes some notable writers, from Robert Henryson in the fifteenth century, to James Boswell, Tobias Smollett and Adam Smith in the eighteenth. It was in the twentieth century that Glasgow’s place as a centre of creativity was established. It numbers among its many writer-graduates William Boyd, James Bridie, John Buchan, A.J. Cronin, Janice Galloway, Alasdair Gray, Janice Hally, James Herriot, James Kelman, Helen MacInnes, Alistair MacLean, William McIllvanney, Edwin Morgan and Alexander Trocchi.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards.

Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker.

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