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Masters Degrees (Screen Translation)

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You’ll learn the theory and practice of screen translation, and gain the technical knowledge and skills needed to work in this specialised area. Read more

About the course

You’ll learn the theory and practice of screen translation, and gain the technical knowledge and skills needed to work in this specialised area. By studying the theory and working on practical subtitling projects, you’ll find out how the profession works and develop an awareness of the linguistic and cultural issues involved.

We’ll help you develop your ability to translate from at least one language (current translation options are: from English into Arabic, Chinese, Polish and Italian or translation from Czech, Dutch, French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish into English).

Your career

Our reputation for excellence means your MA will be highly respected by employers. You’ll develop the skills to work in translation, culture and communication internationally or in the UK. Recent graduates have gone on to work for employers such as SDL, Transact, The Big Word, Kaplan, the University of Leeds, the State University – Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Centre for French and Francophone Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University and as International Projects Director at a South Yorkshire College.

You may also choose to follow in the footsteps of students who have continued to PhD and have been awarded highly prestigious grants for PhD study such as Wolfson and WRoCAH scholarships.

About us

We constantly review and revise our degrees to make sure you keep on top of the latest developments in the field. You’ll learn academic theory and practical skills – and how to relate the two.

Sheffield is at the forefront of modern languages research. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us among the top ten Russell Group universities for impact in this field. Recent projects include e-learning and knowledge exchange with industry, and three initiatives looking at language teaching and learning.

Our facilities

You can practise your English, French, German, Italian or Spanish with native speakers at our Modern Languages Teaching Centre. Our specially designed building has modern spaces for teaching and research. We’re right next to the other arts and humanities departments, and there are lots of opportunities to share ideas.

Core modules

Theory and Practice of Subtitling; Advanced Translation of a Language; Subtitling Project; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Film Translation of Literary Classics; Concepts and Approaches in Intercultural Communication; Critical Reading and Writing at MA Level; Approaches to Translation Genres; Language in Context; Intercultural Communication; International Project Management; Localisation for Linguists; International Management; Localisation
for Linguists.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through lectures, seminars, small-group work and workshops. You’ll be assessed by essays, presentations, practical subtitling projects, translation assignments, a translation exam and a dissertation.

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This programme combines the study of interactions between cultural groups with modern languages – including English – to give you the knowledge and skills for an international career. Read more

This programme combines the study of interactions between cultural groups with modern languages – including English – to give you the knowledge and skills for an international career.

You’ll explore the ways in which cultural groups relate to each other and learn about the role that English plays in different contexts worldwide. But you’ll also have the chance to develop skills in translation, or public speaking and written communication in English. You’ll also focus on topics that suit your interests and aspirations, as you choose from optional modules across disciplines and geographies.

You could study Middle Eastern politics, screen translation, gender and equality in the workplace, language acquisition and Japanese business practice among many others. You could even study a foreign language. If you’re looking for a career with an international dimension, this programme will allow you to develop the knowledge, cultural awareness and practical skills to succeed.

We’re a truly international university, with over 30,000 students from more than 130 countries and a large, diverse team of leading researchers and practitioners.

Our students benefit from this stimulating learning environment while developing their skills in state-of-the-art facilities; as well as our world-class research library, you could practice translation in our Electronic Resource and Information Centre (ERIC), fully equipped with the latest software and translation tools. It’s an excellent place to gain an insight into the relations between cultural groups while gaining valuable practical skills.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll explore key issues in intercultural studies and develop the skills for effective research. You’ll also study the usage and role of English worldwide in different contexts.

Beyond these core modules you’ll shape the course of your studies. You’ll choose from a variety of language-based modules, either developing your specialised translation skills or getting to grips English in professional contexts. You’ll also then build on your knowledge by selecting optional modules from an impressive range, cutting across disciplines to suit your career plans and interests.

By the end of the course in September, you’ll be able to showcase your skills when you hand in your individual project or dissertation.

If you study the programme part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period.

If you want to study a Specialised Translation module, see our list of available language pairs.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

In addition to the compulsory modules below, you will choose to study either Research Methods and Project for MAPLIS (30 credits) or Research Methods and Dissertation for MAPLIS (60 credits).

  • Skills and Issues in Intercultural Studies 30 credits
  • English in International Communication 30 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read Professional Language and Intercultural Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll be taught by leading researchers and practitioners in a variety of disciplines, depending on the modules you choose. As a result you’ll experience a range of learning and teaching methods including lectures, seminars, practical classes and one-to-one tutorials among others.

Assessment

Assessment methods will vary as much as your choice of modules. They could include traditional exams and essays as well as reflective logs, problem-solving reports and group and individual presentations. Translation modules also use translation tests.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed for students who want to develop careers with an international dimension, such as working in multinational corporations, commerce, market research, tourism, the diplomatic service or non-governmental organisations. A postgraduate qualification will also equip you with advanced skills in research, analysis and written and oral communication which will always hold value among employers in a range of industries.

Others have gone into education, or built on their language skills with further training in areas such as translation or interpreting. Many have also pursued further studies, either in Intercultural Studies or related fields.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. Read more
This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. As a student on this innovative programme, you will be taught the skills of film production, working intensively in small groups to explore aesthetic possibilities and gain insights into the craft and industry of screen media. You will also engage with critical perspectives and develop high-level research and analysis skills.

Optional units offer the chance to specialise in different areas of practical film-making and to gain a greater understanding of specific areas around the history and aesthetics of film and television. At the dissertation stage, you will have the opportunity to undertake a placement in creative industry, to undertake an in-depth study of film and television by means of a traditional dissertation, or to produce a mixed-mode investigation through film practice, either individually or in a team, supervised by one or more academic advisers.

The University of Bristol has more than 40 years of experience in this field and the programme draws on the expertise of world-leading scholars, expert practitioners and industry professionals. The Department of Film and Television hosts a series of research seminars and industry masterclasses that are targeted to enrich your studies. Facilities include a 200-seat cinema, production studio, animation and edit suites, seminar rooms and sound rooms.

Bristol is an excellent city in which to study film and television, with its varied cinema, television and digital media spaces, such as the Arnolfini, BBC Bristol, The Cube and Watershed Media Centre. Bristol's Harbourside is home to an array of film festivals, including the Encounters Short Film and Animation Festival, the Slapstick Festival, and the Afrika Eye Festival.

Programme structure

The programme has been designed to develop skills and knowledge cumulatively, while allowing you the opportunity to tailor your learning to your specific areas of interest.

In the first semester, you will be taught skills and techniques of formal analysis and practical film-making, providing the foundation for optional units across the year, such as Writing and Directing, Screen Histories, Television Forms and Making Short Fiction. Other options include Translation for Subtitling (Chinese-English), Screen Style and Aesthetics, and Making Short Fiction.

In the second semester, you will gain knowledge of research methods relevant to the dissertation stage, which includes the opportunity to undertake a placement in the film/TV industry, write an extended essay or produce a piece of practice (normally a short film) accompanied by individual written reflection.

Careers

Graduates of film and television at Bristol have taken up careers as film-makers, programme researchers, senior academics and broadcasting executives.

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The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. Read more
The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. The programme is unique in the way it encourages exploration of relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories. The module ‘Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature’ provides theoretical and methodological skills while the programme’s other units focus on specific areas such as literatures in African languages and contemporary African literature in English.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/

Structure

All students are required to write a 10,000-word dissertation in the field of their major course, which allows them to carry out a substantial piece of independent academic work on a selected topic. The dissertation is taken in either the core module or in the module ‘Selected Topics’.

Students must take the core module plus two modules from list A or B. List B modules assume a linguistic competence in the chosen language equivalent to that acquired in a first degree.

Not all modules listed below may be offered every year, and new modules may become available. For an up-to-date list of modules on offer, please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Some modules may be taught in other departments of the School.

- Core Module
Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year

- List A: Pan-African Modules
Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
Research Methods In Translation Studies - 15PLIH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017

- List B: Language-specific Modules
Practical translation from and into Swahili - 15PAFC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Directed Readings in an African Langauage - 15PAFC147 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 26kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/file80692.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. The course is formulated within two tracks:

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse
range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the
problems that contemporary societies now face. The MA African Literature can lead to further study and research, however there is also a range of opportunities in fields such as:

- Education
- Publishing
- Archive work
- Arts Management
- Media

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Research profile. As one of the few centres for the study of modern Scandinavian languages in the UK, we offer a programme that can cater to a wide range of research interests, covering all Scandinavian countries. Read more

Research profile

As one of the few centres for the study of modern Scandinavian languages in the UK, we offer a programme that can cater to a wide range of research interests, covering all Scandinavian countries.

Our academic staff are able to offer supervision on a broad variety of subjects, including:

  • 19th and 20th century literature
  • cultural relations and transfer
  • language history and dialectology
  • literary translation
  • onomastics
  • place and identity
  • Scottish–Scandinavian historical relations

In addition, you have the opportunity to undertake interdisciplinary research in areas such as comparative literature, film studies, translation studies, cultural studies and Scottish studies.

Thanks to our place in the diverse School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures, we are also able to cater for interdisciplinary research programmes.

Training and support

In order to encourage immersion in your research, we celebrate the major Scandinavian festivals, screen regular films and generally make the atmosphere as Scandinavian as possible. We are fortunate in being able to attract many Scandinavian visitors and speakers, including prominent authors and academics.

We encourage you to participate in our very active social and cultural life. We collaborate closely with the many Scandinavian bodies active in Edinburgh, such as the Danish Cultural Institute, the Norwegian Consulate General, the Scottish-Swedish Society and the Scottish-Finnish Society.

In addition, we have a partnership with the Georg Brandes International PhD School for Scandinavian Literature, Art and Linguistics, which is affiliated to the Department of Scandinavian Studies and Linguistics at the University of Copenhagen. This collaboration provides funding for our staff and students to attend and contribute to international workshops and seminars at the University of Copenhagen.



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This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies. Read more
This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of aspects of Russian and/or East European literature and culture, including art, film, philosophy, and linguistics. They gain key research skills, enabling them to solve problems of conflicting sources or interpretations, locate primary and secondary materials, and use research aids and resources effectively.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core module
-Literary and Cultural Theory

Optional modules - up to 90 credits of optional modules. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from other SSEES MA Programmes or from other UCL MA Programmes.
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
-Freedom Death and Love: Polish Fiction 1918–2005 (language prerequisite)
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
-The 19th-Century Russian Novel
-The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Modules
-Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
-Comparative Literary Studies
-Translation Studies
-Comparative Literature Modules

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations, film viewings and private study. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academe. Some of our graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PhD Russian Literature, University College London (UCL)
-Publishing Assistant, Sheldrake Press
-Language Producer, Unspecified Language Production Company
-Freelance Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Business Consultant, Grit 3 Group and studying MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, University College London (UCL)

Employability
Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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