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Masters Degrees (Screen Media)

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This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories.

It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in film exhibition and archival practice, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media and MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway).

HIGHLIGHTS

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in chosen areas of those media histories, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway) and MA Film and Screen Media with Film Programming and Curating.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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This international programme is an intensive and comprehensive exploration of the history of audio-visual and moving picture media, from the early 1800s to the present day. Read more
This international programme is an intensive and comprehensive exploration of the history of audio-visual and moving picture media, from the early 1800s to the present day. It encourages you to explore a wide variety of media in historical, sociological, aesthetic and anthropological terms, by drawing on distinct intellectual traditions of our European partners presented by the European experts in the field.

This innovative and flexible programme uniquely combines our strengths and experience in postgraduate teaching with the European excellence offered through our exchange programme with leading universities in France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Belgium and the Netherlands.

While abroad, your choice of modules will depend on the partner institution you attend. Each university has a specific strength and specialism, which should guide your choice of university as the year abroad aims to help you develop and deepen your particular film and media interests.

Our partner institutions

Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3
Università degli Studi di Udine
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano
Université de Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense
Université de Liège
Ruhr Universität Bochum
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt
Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona
Université Lille 3
Università degli Studi Roma 3
University of Amsterdam
Université de Montréal.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
The only such MA in the country that includes an international exchange with a set of prestigious European partners.
An introduction to key historical moments in film and related media history.
A wide range of option modules at Birkbeck, partner institutions and associated colleges of the University of London - build your own personal pathway.
Renowned UK and European tutors teaching their specialist subjects, and invited speakers who are leading figures in all aspects of the film and media field.
You will research culture with a large doctoral community, and guidance for the development of doctoral projects is enhanced by the European exchange programme and award-winning film centre with its state-of-the-art, professionally equipped cinema.
The purpose-built Centre for Film and Visual Media Research in Gordon Square houses teaching facilities and research projects that follow on from the AHRC Centre which Birkbeck co-ordinated in 2000-2005, and offers exceptional screening and reference opportunities.
The Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image was founded in 2012 to coordinate research in film and media across the College.
In addition to the Birkbeck Library, you will have easy access to the nearby University of London Library, the British Film Institute and the British Library, as well as other specialist collections and institutions in central London.
You will be encouraged to attend other lectures and screenings of interest organised by various research centres at Birkbeck and the University of London.
We attract a rich programme of visiting scholars and practitioners. There is a self-access centre for audio-visual materials and we have well-equipped computer facilities, including a multimedia laboratory.

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The Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies offers an exceptionally stimulating environment, where interdisciplinary research flourishes across film, television and media topics, including journalism, media history, the creative industries, memory studies and practice-led research. Read more
The Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies offers an exceptionally stimulating environment, where interdisciplinary research flourishes across film, television and media topics, including journalism, media history, the creative industries, memory studies and practice-led research. Our research aims for critical engagement with technologies, old and new, and poses theoretical, aesthetic and political questions associated with the rise of digital media.

The department is characterised by a strong research ethos, which has been enhanced by the foundation of the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, directed by Professor Laura Mulvey. Along with Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Research in Media and Culture (BIRMAC) BIMI brings together the research interests of staff across the College and offers a stimulating range of events for staff and students as well as support for PhD students. The department also hosts the London Screen Study Collection, a unique archival resource of films about London.

The research environment of the department benefits externally from the activities of the Vasari Research Centre, and from its participation in the London University Screen Studies Group, which is an umbrella organisation covering all aspects of screen study across the colleges of the University of London.

In addition to the Birkbeck Library, research students have access to the nearby Senate House Library, various libraries of the University of London colleges, the British Library, as well as other specialist collections and institutions in central London, including the British Film Institute library. They may also take advantage of practical film-making opportunities offered through the Derek Jarman Lab.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology. Read more

The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology.

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you can explore transformations in media, culture and society through the practice of contemporary digital communication. You will work with one or more of the following to create installations, apps and single- and multi-screen work that's responsive to the continually changing digital landscape:

  • Animation
  • Photography
  • Video and other forms of moving image
  • Software and web design
  • Hybrid forms of image making

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. The programme is co-convened by Professor Joanna Zylinska and Daniel Rourke, and you will be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. In the past these have come from GoogleThe Science Museum and N1creative.com. There is also £6,000 bursary available for UK students studying this course. Find out more about the Stationers' Postgraduate Bursary Scheme on our departmental awards page.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

  • the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
  • the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
  • multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary 

MA Digital Media students have access to the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, currently a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As well as accessing a series of podcasts, students are offered reading groups and a masterclass with Professor Sarah Kember co-author of the book Life After New Media on which the course is based.

Modules & structure

Overview

The programme consists of:

  • Two compulsory core modules
  • Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
  • Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
  • The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Core modules

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work for image-making.

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

  • media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
  • research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
  • media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)


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The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. Read more
The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. The moving image is explored in relation to the development of modern and contemporary culture, and to the history and theory of other media (literature, music, the visual arts, architecture, the digital). Students are immersed in a research environment that emphasises work on geopolitics, early cinema, art cinema and the avant garde, theory, aesthetics, and gender and sexuality. The programme consists of a core course, taken in the first term, which provides the foundation for further study; two optional modules, taken in the second term, which combine the analysis of film and screen media with the analysis of their social and cultural milieus, or else undertake the study of these forms in a comparative context; and a dissertation. Although not all students may wish to progress to higher research, this MPhil programme is designed to prepare for continuation to PhD work. This preparation includes the academic and research training provided by the course content itself but also advice and support with PhD applications, funding applications and the drafting of a research proposal.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmmmmpsmc

Course detail

By the end of the programme students will have:

1. developed a deeper knowledge of the history and theory of film and other screen media in cultural context;
2. developed an understanding of the debates which have shaped that field of study, and of current research methods;
3. acquired and consolidated intensive specialist knowledge of their chosen research areas and skills appropriate to advanced study in those areas;
4. demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research
5. participated effectively in seminar discussions and research events;
6. learnt how to plan independent research in order to produce written work of a high standard to a clearly defined deadline.

Format

The Screen Media MPhil is a nine-month course that runs from October to June of any given academic year. It is classified as a research Master's. Students are expected to submit coursework and a thesis during the year, as follows:

Michaelmas Term: Core Course

During the first term of study, students attend weekly seminars and film screenings designed to give them a broad insight into moving image theory and culture. Half of the Core Course focuses on combining the study of classical and contemporary film and visual theory; the other half hones in on specialized historiographic and theoretical problems in the study of moving image media. The Course is, thus, both intensively grounding and intellectually expansive. At the end of this term, students submit one 4,500-word essay. The essay focuses on a specific theoretical framework or critical approach. Two hours of individual supervision are provided.

Lent Term: Modules

Screen Media students can choose from a range of module options. Some focus on the moving image, others are shared with different MPhils (e.g. European Literature & Culture, or Criticism and Culture) and other departments and Faculties within the University, such as Architecture & History of Art, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, English, and Latin American Studies, among others. (The list of modules can change from year to year depending on the availability of academic staff.)

During Lent Term, students attend weekly group seminars led by the module covenor, lasting around 1.5 to 2 hours per week per module. In addition, two hours of individual supervision (per essay) will be provided as students draft their module essays. Essays are submitted at the end of Lent Term.

Lent term modules may include:

- Modern and Contemporary French and Francophone Culture: Articulations of the Real
- Avant Garde and Experimental Cinemas
- The Modern City
- New Commitments: Literature, Cinema and Culture in Italy, 1960 to present
- Urban Cinematics
- Deconstructing Film
- Online Video: Creation, Consumption, Revolution
- Surveillance
- Latin American Film and Visual Arts

Assessment - Easter Term

During this term, students write a thesis. Theses must, according to the criteria laid down by the Board of Graduate Studies, 'represent a contribution to learning'. Theses must be written in English. The arrangements for their preparation are similar to those for the essays. Titles are chosen by students, in consultation with module convenors and/or prospective supervisors, and then have to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee.

Topics and precise thesis titles must be submitted by a specific deadline in Lent Term. Up to this point the Course Director is the titular supervisor of MPhil students, but once the thesis topics are approved, a specialist supervisor is appointed for each student. Students are entitled to up to four hour-long sessions with their supervisor. (In the event that a thesis is co-supervised, a candidate may expect two hours of individual teaching from each supervisor. Only one supervisor should comment on the full draft of the thesis.)

Research Events

Students are expected to take part in fortnightly research events that take place across the Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Leading scholars in film and screen studies will deliver lectures and also meet with students in master class seminars. Students are asked to compile an (unassessed) dossier of critical responses to these events. Participation in these events allows students to engage intensely but also informally with innovative researchers.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).
Applications to the MPhil are automatically considered for AHRC funding, however you must apply by the relevant funding deadline.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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From analysing the theories of intellectual heavyweights such as Foucault and Bourdieu, to unpicking a global campaign, explore the hinterland between the big three promotional professions and the media and society on this innovative MA. Read more

From analysing the theories of intellectual heavyweights such as Foucault and Bourdieu, to unpicking a global campaign, explore the hinterland between the big three promotional professions and the media and society on this innovative MA.

Right now the roles within public relations, advertising and marketing are converging. So this MA isn’t about studying ads – it’s about becoming a professional who can understand the dynamics of power that exist between these professions, and critically intervene in today’s media landscape. 

At its core this masters looks at how we can better serve society by improving communications across these disciplines, and how we can develop as professionals who can adapt within a challenging media world. You’ll learn how to reflect on the intellectual theories of the past and apply them to the present, so you plan the first decade of your career.

The questions we explore

We want you to understand the power struggles that exist between these three professions so we look at public relations, advertising and marketing as inter-related disciplines, drawing on theoretical and professional debates around issues such as globalisation and homogenised consumption. We also discuss current industry expectations looking at the crossovers that exist between creativity, management and strategy.

We’ll tackle some of the big things that are changing when it comes to the way the world works - aspects such as globalisation, the control of knowledge, digital technologies, and the way content is created. You’ll also get an introduction to media and cultural theory, which lies at the intersection between the promotional professions, media and society.

The processes we use

This is a theory-based programme, but it also offers vocational elements, so you can take practice-based options in subjects ranging from online journalism and social media campaigning, to design methods and media law and ethics. You'll also get the latest insights from industry professionals across a range of sectors through our visiting speaker series in the Spring.

The approach we take

We take fields such as sociology, anthropology media and cultural studies to understand how public relations, advertising and marketing get together, where they overlap and where the tensions lie. This means we might take an anthropological perspective on how the promotional professions work together to develop a product – not just in terms of its messaging – but in terms of how it was conceived and came to market in the first place.

It’s important to mention that this isn’t a business studies-style MA; it’s a rigorous, academic programme investigating promotional workers and their use of media in today’s campaigns and debates. 

Modules & structure

Throughout the core components of the degree, you'll examine the very wide range of ways in which public relations, advertising and marketing is represented in society, together with the skills and techniques enacted by practitioners in their day-to-day roles. You will be encouraged to develop your critical and analytical skills, but also to think creatively and become more confident in your aesthetic judgment.

Goldsmiths prides itself on its innovative and critical approach, and you will be encouraged to immerse yourself in its wider intellectual environment in order to deepen your understanding of the cultural infrastructure surrounding branding and promotional media.

Core modules

Option modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Department of Media and Communications.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

From account executives to digital copywriters and from product managers to media planners and sponsorship coordinators, our graduates enhance their careers by working across disciplines, across countries, and across everything from social media and content generation, from sponsorship and events marketing, to corporate communications or government communications.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Emerging technologies and practices in trnsition. This Research Master's programme in. Media, Art and Performance Studies. Read more

Emerging technologies and practices in trnsition

This Research Master's programme in Media, Art and Performance Studies is an interdisciplinary and internationally oriented research-based programme which offers an advanced training in academic research skills appropriate for today's highly dynamic and interdisciplinary field of media, visual arts and performance.

Cultural trnsformations

Contemporary media, art and performance increasingly play with and transcend disciplinary boundaries. Intermedial and performative practices both produce and critically investigate cultural transitions in today’s mediatized and performative culture. Such synergies invite to explore how emerging forms of media, art and performance – while historically and culturally embedded - interact with and relate to social and cultural transformations.

Emerging media, art and performance

As a student of this programme, you will be introduced to and specialise in new research areas and methodologies, necessary for investigating emerging media, performance and contemporary art forms within today's rapidly changing culture. In relation to this you will also reflect on the role of the Humanities in both academic and public debates.

A mediatized culture and society

Central concerns in this programme are, amongst others:

  • the role and meaning of (visual) media in a mediatised society, inter- and transmedial practices in theatre, dance, film, television, digital media and visual arts 
  • spectator- and usership, the performative turn in contemporary arts and media
  • technology, materiality and corporeal literacies
  • game, play and activism
  • changing institutions, mobile and/or location-based media, urban interfaces, navigational screen-based practices
  • art and media ecologies

Comparative approach

We approach this broad field from a range of comparative and intermedial perspectives, focusing primarily on the dynamics of change and exchange between media, contemporary arts and performance within a culture and society in transition.

Research questions

In this programme you will reflect on questions such as how media have developed from the time of early cinema up to current new media art; how the definition of 'live' has changed alongside these mediatised cultural forms. How has the performative turn changed the ways we think about audiences? How do media technologies facilitate new methods of self-staging and social performance? What is the influence of media and technology on way we curate and educate in museums and archives and other cultural institutions.

In this age of selfies, datafication, (self-) staging and re-staging, and playful learning, you will examine how various media, art forms, and performance have been used for critical analysis, civic engagement, entertainment and educational purposes. You will do this by asking how digital technologies, dramaturgical and artistic strategies alter ways of dealing with knowledge production and distribution, and how these transitions have contributed to and also ask for new methods of research.

How does the ubiquity of media technology change our understanding of the world and our sense of self within it, as well as how we communicate and act?

After graduation

This programme will train you as a researcher within the field of Media, Contemporary Art and Performance Studies, to either prepare you for a PhD position, or for research-oriented positions in professional contexts of cultural institutions such as archives, museums, art institutions, theatres, for education, (non-)governmental organisations, or in creative industries.

After completing the programme:

  • You have acquired knowledge of the history and the state of the art in media, visual art and performance practice and research, as well as insight in current public, academic and critical debates.
  • You will know how to employ an intermedial and historically informed comparative approach for studying emergent media, art and performance practices, and how to use and develop research methodologies related to this perspective.
  • you’ll have the skills to critically investigate relations and transitions in the field of media, art and performance and are trained to communicate research outcomes to fellow researchers and other professionals, as well as to a general audience.
  • You are equiped with the advanced knowledge level necessary to compete in the academic and professional field.
  • You will have the ability to effectively communicate theoretical insights that will contribute to the field, as well as having broader social and cultural relevance.
  • You are able to reflect upon the social and ethical implications of developments within the field of media, art and performance and contemporary humanities research.

The Research Master’s is aimed at excellent students from both the Netherlands and overseas, who have a background in the history and theory of contemporary art, or media and performance studies with a focus on theatre, dance, film, television, and/or digital media.

Alumni of the Media, Art and Performance Studies Research Master’s have been successful in obtaining PhD positions in various prestigious international programmes. Graduates also find their way to other job markets. For example in the domain of curation, dramaturgy, or media consultancy.



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We welcome proposals for research in any area connected with media, communications, digital media, cultural theory and practice. We give priority to those with proposals for research within the areas of interest of . Read more

We welcome proposals for research in any area connected with media, communications, digital media, cultural theory and practice.

We give priority to those with proposals for research within the areas of interest of our staff.

Research degrees in this department have two elements:

  • the research work that you carry out individually under supervision
  • a programme of taught courses, which brings you into contact with other students within Goldsmiths

Supervisors and their students form loose research teams, sometimes on a joint basis with another group. When you apply, please indicate your intended research area and any preference for a particular supervisor.

You'll be assessed by a thesis and viva voce.

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths

Research

Having celebrated its 35th anniversary in 2013, Goldsmiths’ Department of Media and Communications is one of the oldest and largest media departments in the UK. It is also unique in its diversity of approaches to, and articulations of, the disciplinary conjunctures around media and culture.

The department has equal research strengths in media and communications and in cultural studies research, in humanities and in social sciences approaches, and in theory- and practice-driven work. Its work spans a wide range of topics and modes of enquiry – from philosophical studies of technology and human life to sociological investigations of media production and use; from issues of identity, embodiment and becoming to post-feminism, queer theory and critical race studies; from global screen studies and transnational investigations of media and culture to news’ role in contemporary democracy.

The Department’s research falls into five main strands which make up our research groupings:

(1) Media and Democracy: building on the work of the Leverhulme programme on the media’s contribution to democracy, including the changing nature of journalism and political communication; studying globalisation in relation to issues of diaspora and nationhood 

(2) Economy, Culture and Communication: investigating communication and discourse in finance and financial media; everyday representations and understandings of the economy and economic life; creative labour, neoliberalism and organisational practices in the arts and cultural industries; the impact of the promotional professions (branding, PR, marketing) on the economy, culture and society

(3) Media Futures: bringing together humanities and social sciences approaches to understanding the changing role of media technologies and global media flows in society, economy and science 

(4) Gender, Feminism and Contemporary Cultures: connecting the long tradition of work within the Department on culture, representation, embodiment and affect to its specific strengths in gender, race, sexuality and labour in national and international contexts 

(5) Screen Cultures and Media Arts: consolidating the long-standing focus on screen cultures within the Department, as concentrated within the Leverhulme programme, combined with an exploration of media arts such as photography, video, digital imagining, sound and performance.

Many of the projects undertaken within the Department are collaborative in nature - such as the work conducted under the umbrella of Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre, funded with a 2006 Leverhulme grant to study the design and significance of various contemporary media spaces. Members of the Department have also received funding from AHRC, British Academy, British Council, Carnegie Trust UK, Council for British Research in the Levant, ESRC, EPSRC, Guggenheim Foundation, Higher Education Academy, Hong Kong Research Grants Council, JISC, London Centre for Arts and Cultural Exchange, Media Trust and Open Society Foundation.

As well as working on collaborative projects, members of the Department have published many books with high-impact international presses, on a diverse range of topics: affect and emotion, artificial intelligence, bioethics, the body and experience, branding, broadcasting, democracy, film history, the future of journalism, media geographies, the mediation of power, post-feminism, postcolonial politics, sound and video cultures.

Members of the Department edit leading academic journals, including Body and SocietyCulture Machine and its sister project, Photomediations Machine), Global Media and CommunicationInternational Journal of Cultural StudiesSubjectivity and photographies.

Recent research projects

Find out more about research in the Department of Media and Communications

Skills & careers

We aim to develop students who are able to express themselves creatively and self-critically in theoretical and/or practice work. You'll develop research skills, presentation skills, an understanding of the workings of the media and their broad cultural and social impacts and an understanding of the pleasures of media consumption.



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The Master of Research (MRes) degree prepares you for study at MPhil/PhD level. We welcome proposals for research in any area connected with media, communications, and cultural theory and practice. Read more

The Master of Research (MRes) degree prepares you for study at MPhil/PhD level.

We welcome proposals for research in any area connected with media, communications, and cultural theory and practice.

The programme combines taught modules in research methodology with a 20,000-word dissertation, and offers advanced-level training to appropriately qualified students. 

We give priority to those with proposals for research within the areas of interest of our staff.

You will be assessed through your research dissertation, and a portfolio of two essays.

Research

Having celebrated its 35th anniversary in 2013, Goldsmiths’ Department of Media and Communications is one of the oldest and largest media departments in the UK. It is also unique in its diversity of approaches to, and articulations of, the disciplinary conjunctures around media and culture.

The Department has equal research strengths in media and communications and in cultural studies research, in humanities and in social sciences approaches, and in theory- and practice-driven work. Its work spans a wide range of topics and modes of enquiry – from philosophical studies of technology and human life to sociological investigations of media production and use; from issues of identity, embodiment and becoming to post-feminism, queer theory and critical race studies; from global screen studies and transnational investigations of media and culture to news’ role in contemporary democracy. 

The Department’s research falls into five main strands which make up our research groupings:

(1) Media and Democracy: building on the work of the Leverhulme programme on the media’s contribution to democracy, including the changing nature of journalism and political communication; studying globalisation in relation to issues of diaspora and nationhood 

(2) Economy, Culture and Communication: investigating communication and discourse in finance and financial media; everyday representations and understandings of the economy and economic life; creative labour, neoliberalism and organisational practices in the arts and cultural industries; the impact of the promotional professions (branding, PR, marketing) on the economy, culture and society

(3) Media Futures: bringing together humanities and social sciences approaches to understanding the changing role of media technologies and global media flows in society, economy and science 

(4) Gender, Feminism and Contemporary Cultures: connecting the long tradition of work within the Department on culture, representation, embodiment and affect to its specific strengths in gender, race, sexuality and labour in national and international contexts 

(5) Screen Cultures and Media Arts: consolidating the long-standing focus on screen cultures within the Department, as concentrated within the Leverhulme programme, combined with an exploration of media arts such as photography, video, digital imagining, sound and performance.

Many of the projects undertaken within the Department are collaborative in nature - such as the work conducted under the umbrella of Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre, funded with a 2006 Leverhulme grant to study the design and significance of various contemporary media spaces. Members of the Department have also received funding from AHRC, British Academy, British Council, Carnegie Trust UK, Council for British Research in the Levant, ESRC, EPSRC, Guggenheim Foundation, Higher Education Academy, Hong Kong Research Grants Council, JISC, London Centre for Arts and Cultural Exchange, Media Trust and Open Society Foundation.

As well as working on collaborative projects, members of the Department have published many books with high-impact international presses, on a diverse range of topics: affect and emotion, artificial intelligence, bioethics, the body and experience, branding, broadcasting, democracy, film history, the future of journalism, media geographies, the mediation of power, post-feminism, postcolonial politics, sound and video cultures.

Members of the Department edit leading academic journals, including Body and SocietyCulture Machine and its sister project, Photomediations Machine), Global Media and CommunicationInternational Journal of Cultural StudiesSubjectivity and photographies.

Recent Research Projects

Skills & careers

The Department of Media and Communications aims to develop students who should be able to express themselves creatively and self-critically in theoretical and/or practice work. 

You'll also develop: 

  • an understanding of the workings of the media and their broad cultural and social impacts
  • an understanding of the pleasures of media consumption

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. Read more
The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. If you are a filmmaker, freelance media producer, or an independent media artist seeking to develop advanced skills and learn key industry practices for building your career, the MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts has been specifically designed for you. Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and world leading academics in film, television and digital media theory.

Why this programme

-Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and academics in film, television and digital media theory.
-Glasgow offers a vibrant context for filmmaking and media arts practice. Key cultural events include the Glasgow Film Festival and Glasgow International(a biennial international festival of contemporary art).
-This broad-based and flexible programme allows you to work across a variety of platforms.
-Recognising that the programme will attract a diverse range of creative individuals, we offer a variety of software and hardware options. Our purpose designed Media Lab is equipped with Avid, Adobe Creative Cloud (including Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Dreamweaver) and Final Cut Pro. We are able to equip students for projects with a range of cameras and sound and lighting equipment.
-The city is the home of BBC Scotland, STV and a lively community of independent media producers (television companies, sound studios and design companies) and numerous micro-businesses in the creative industries. It is also home to the internationally significant Glasgow Museum of Modern Art as well as venues renowned for exhibitions of emerging and established screen-based artists such as Tramway, The Centre for Contemporary Art and The Arches. In addition, the city is famous for its live music venues, galleries and artist run studio spaces offering an excellent and supportive environment for creative artists.
-The programme is taught in the Gilmorehill Centre which offers a purpose built Media Lab, its own cinema as well as a Media Archive which has more than 6,000 holdings, complementing the Library’s extensive collection of film, television and media art books and periodicals. The Centre is home to the international journal Screen and hosts the journal’s annual conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in the conference as well as to engage with guest speakers from the academy and media industries throughout the year.

Programme structure

The programme will offer a combination of formal lectures, practitioner led workshops, seminar discussions, screenings and one-on-one tutorials.

The practical elements of the course will feature high levels of support and direction in relation to pre-production materials, including developing pitches and storyboards as well as hands on support in relation to delivery of the individual film/media art projects.

Industry workshops are designed to give you the skills and knowledge needed in contemporary screen-based media contexts, while history and theory courses are offered to link industry practice with cutting edge theory in the field.

The programme has 4 components:
-Two core practical workshops: Running in Semester 1 and Semester 2, these are led by a practitioner in our purpose built Media Lab and are designed to provide hands on support in the production of your film or media art projects. They also incorporate sessions led by industry professional that are designed to pass on key industry experiences and skills vital to a successful career in the industry.
-The core academic option Experimental Art and Media: This course covers the history and theory of experimental art and filmmaking, including the topic of practice-as-research. It is designed to provide a critical foundation for your filmmaking and/or media arts practice.
-You will also choose one course, selected from a range of academic options that draw on the research expertise of the subject team.
-A practice-based dissertation, where you have the opportunity to develop, with support from technical and academic supervisors, a large-scale film or media arts self-directed project.

Career prospects

The programme will equip you with the ability to develop a career as a media producer, with a particular focus on low-budget productions for film and television. You will have the opportunity to explore and develop freelance industry practices and a portfolio of skills enabling you to work as an independent practitioner in today’s creative industries.

It is an innovative programme that teaches artistic, technical and professional skills and is designed to support graduates that are interested in working for large media companies or who may wish to pursue their own independent filmmaking and/or media arts practice. The programme also offers the research preparation necessary to successfully pursue a practice-based PhD.

You will learn things such as how to make films or media art pieces on low-budgets, how to take an idea from pitch to production, how to manage and sustain workflows, the processes involved in applying for arts funding, how to enhance your public profile and the processes involved in administering a start-up company.

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The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. Read more

The MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts is designed to deliver a portfolio of skills required in contemporary screen-based production contexts. If you are a filmmaker, freelance media producer, or an independent media artist seeking to develop advanced skills and learn key industry practices for building your career, the MSc in Filmmaking and Media Arts has been specifically designed for you. Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and world leading academics in film, television and digital media theory.

Why this programme

  • Through practical workshops, industry master classes, and history and theory courses you will have the opportunity to learn from industry professionals, media artists, and academics in film, television and digital media theory.
  • Glasgow offers a vibrant context for filmmaking and media arts practice. Key cultural events include the Glasgow Film Festival and Glasgow International(a biennial international festival of contemporary art).
  • This broad-based and flexible programme allows you to work across a variety of platforms.
  • Recognising that the programme will attract a diverse range of creative individuals, we offer a variety of software and hardware options. Our purpose designed Media Lab is equipped with Avid, Adobe Creative Cloud (including Premiere Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Dreamweaver) and Final Cut Pro. We are able to equip students for projects with a range of cameras and sound and lighting equipment.
  • The city is the home of BBC Scotland, STV and a lively community of independent media producers (television companies, sound studios and design companies) and numerous micro-businesses in the creative industries. It is also home to the internationally significant Glasgow Museum of Modern Art as well as venues renowned for exhibitions of emerging and established screen-based artists such as Tramway, The Centre for Contemporary Art and The Arches. In addition, the city is famous for its live music venues, galleries and artist run studio spaces offering an excellent and supportive environment for creative artists.
  • The programme is taught in the Gilmorehill Centre which offers a purpose built Media Lab, its own cinema as well as a Media Archive which has more than 6,000 holdings, complementing the Library’s extensive collection of film, television and media art books and periodicals. The Centre is home to the international journal Screen and hosts the journal’s annual conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in the conference as well as to engage with guest speakers from the academy and media industries throughout the year. 

Programme structure

The programme will offer a combination of formal lectures, practitioner led workshops, seminar discussions, screenings and one-on-one tutorials.

The practical elements of the course will feature high levels of support and direction in relation to pre-production materials, including developing pitches and storyboards as well as hands on support in relation to delivery of the individual film/media art projects.

Industry workshops are designed to give you the skills and knowledge needed in contemporary screen-based media contexts, while history and theory courses are offered to link industry practice with cutting edge theory in the field.

The programme has 4 components:

  • Two core practical workshops: Running in Semester 1 and Semester 2, these are led by a practitioner in our purpose built Media Lab and are designed to provide hands on support in the production of your film or media art projects. They also incorporate sessions led by industry professional that are designed to pass on key industry experiences and skills vital to a successful career in the industry.
  • The core academic option Experimental Art and Media: This course covers the history and theory of experimental art and filmmaking, including the topic of practice-as-research. It is designed to provide a critical foundation for your filmmaking and/or media arts practice.
  • You will also choose one course, selected from a range of academic options that draw on the research expertise of the subject team.
  • A practice-based dissertation, where you have the opportunity to develop, with support from technical and academic supervisors, a large-scale film or media arts self-directed project.

Career prospects

The programme will equip you with the ability to develop a career as a media producer, with a particular focus on low-budget productions for film and television. You will have the opportunity to explore and develop freelance industry practices and a portfolio of skills enabling you to work as an independent practitioner in today’s creative industries.

It is an innovative programme that teaches artistic, technical and professional skills and is designed to support graduates that are interested in working for large media companies or who may wish to pursue their own independent filmmaking and/or media arts practice. The programme also offers the research preparation necessary to successfully pursue a practice-based PhD. 

You will learn things such as how to make films or media art pieces on low-budgets, how to take an idea from pitch to production, how to manage and sustain workflows, the processes involved in applying for arts funding, how to enhance your public profile and the processes involved in administering a start-up company. 



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Smartphones and social media, digital networks and big data, gamification and mobile platforms – new media continue to change the way we live, work and communicate. Read more

Smartphones and social media, digital networks and big data, gamification and mobile platforms – new media continue to change the way we live, work and communicate. This programme interrogates the impact of digital technologies on individuals and society, and provides you with the skills and knowledge to be able to think critically and creatively about new media.

Working both individually and in teams, you will learn about diverse digital media techniques and processes, including coding and hacking, web design, mapping and visualisation, scraping and mining, interactive narratives, animation, digital ethnography, action research, prototyping and iterative design, representation, and more. Through an applied, hands-on approach, you will gain an understanding of the social, cultural and economic roles of new media, and explore what it is like to work in the new media industries.

With a range of optional modules to choose from, you will also be able to expand your knowledge into areas such as multimedia journalism, cinema and photography, political and promotional communication, feminism and the media, and many more. Taught by expert practitioners and researchers, you will gain the knowledge and skills to thrive in this dynamic, fast-paced sector.Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Depending on your previous experience, you may need to take the module New Media Production Skills to develop your knowledge of visual design software, HTML, CSS, PHP, WordPress, Javascript and animation. The module isn’t assessed so it will appear in your transcript, but won’t count towards your classification.

In each semester you’ll study core modules that build your knowledge of new media contexts and practice. You’ll consider the relationship between new media and contemporary culture and the interactive forms and practices that are emerging. Then you’ll gain practical production, project management and critical skills and respond to new media briefs in collaborative projects.

You’ll then have the chance to broaden your approach with your choice of optional modules, from photography and cinematics to political communication, television narratives and public relations in society.

To demonstrate the skills you’ve gained, you’ll also undertake a major independent project. You can choose to submit a dissertation and take classes on research methods throughout the year, or you can work on a sustained, practical new media project with a written element.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Digital Practices 30 credits
  • New Media Independent Project 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • New Media Production Skills 10 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study (New Media) 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • New Media Independent Project 60 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read New Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read New Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll be taught in a mixture of practical workshops, lectures and small group seminars which allow you to discuss your reading and present some of your research to other students. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, allowing you to practice your skills and deepen your knowledge.

Assessment

We also use a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. They’re likely to include practical projects, essays, reports, group and individual presentations and case studies among others.

Career opportunities

This programme is still relatively new, and digital media are rapidly growing, evolving and expanding.

People with high-level production and project management skills in new media will be in high demand for decades to come, and this programme will equip you with the knowledge and skills to thrive in a wide – and rapidly expanding – range of careers in new media practice.

These could include digital marketing, animation, web design and development, social media, analytics, PR and consultancy among others. You’ll also be well prepared for future research in this young and fast-changing field.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The media play an important role in entertaining and informing the public – but they also make up a huge industry that employs thousands of people worldwide. Read more

The media play an important role in entertaining and informing the public – but they also make up a huge industry that employs thousands of people worldwide. This programme will give you an insight into both aspects of the media industries, as you analyse their cultural and economic dimensions.

You’ll explore the full range of media production, from individual bloggers to huge corporations. Taking an international approach, you’ll study the development of contemporary media to understand current trends. It’s a truly interdisciplinary programme, drawing on communication and cultural studies, economics, anthropology, business and management studies, sociology, politics, law, literature, art history and music.

Guided by leading researchers in the field, many of whom are involved in our Media Industries Research Centre, you’ll gain an insight into how television, film, music, online media, newspapers, magazines and advertising are produced, and what it’s like to work in each industry.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

You’ll develop your knowledge of the full range of media industries through core modules that run in each semester.

You’ll be introduced to issues and debates in media studies as well as the impacts of developments such as digitalisation and marketisation. Then you’ll explore the organisational dynamics of industries such as television, film, music, digital media, newspapers, magazines and advertising to consider what it’s like to work in them.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

Alongside the compulsory modules, you’ll be able to tailor the programme to suit your own interests by selecting from a range of optional modules on topics such as television narrative, identity and media, political communication, cultural policy, international film industries and public relations, among others.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • The Media Industries 30 credits
  • Media Production Analysis 30 credits 

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Cultural Policy: Models and Debates 30 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Media Industries MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Media Industries MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

We use different methods to assess your progress, depending on the modules you choose. These are likely to include essays, video or photography work, presentations or project work and reports.

Career opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a variety of careers in the management and production of media content, both in the UK and worldwide. You’ll also be equipped to work in communications in broader contexts such as communications and media policy, PR or other cultural and creative industries.

You’ll also be well placed to pursue your research at PhD level, and even pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. Read more

The MA in Film Studies at the University of Manchester is a flexible programme of study, providing students with opportunities to study areas of film theory, history and culture, as well as aspects of applied practice. It caters for students wishing to enhance their artistic and professional careers as well as those seeking to prepare for doctoral study. The course provides opportunities for students who are relatively new to the subject area to establish a foundation in the discipline as well as those who wish to pursue further study. It prepares students for doctoral study and/or employment in film, screen media and creative industries, as well as those who wish to employ their knowledge of screen media and practice in educational, social and community settings.

The course thus builds on extensive links between the University of Manchester and professional contexts and communities in Manchester and the North West. It encourages the research and practice of film in academic and creative contexts, in particular with engagement in non-traditional and/or community sites, combining artistic and academic exploration with a focus on social responsibility, critique and transformation.

Programme Director: Dr Felicia Chan (  )

Teaching and learning

The MA Film Studies programme offers a solid foundation in theoretical and critical film studies, built on staff expertise and specialisms from form and theory to historical and cultural approaches to national cinemas to the politics of identity, gender and sexuality, and film music as well as practice, for students who may wish to pursue the discipline at postgraduate level for personal or professional development. It also offers opportunities for research and practice in aspects of and approaches to applied Film Studies, for students who may be interested in pursuing more practice-based and socially engaged research, for example, using film production and audio-visual methodologies for research, knowledge exchange and community engagement. This involves acquiring practical skills in addition to theoretical knowledge, such as documentary film-making, sound design, film curation and programming, that could be applied to education, community and activist contexts, as well as work placement opportunities.

Following a mandatory first semester of two core modules, students are free to construct their MA programme from a diverse range of options, including established study options within School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, a directed reading or practice option (enabling you to pursue a specific area of research with the careful supervision of specialist staff), and a work placement option. Study options vary from year to year depending on staff availability.

Students are taught in seminars, small group tutorials, workshops and surgeries, offering opportunities for lively and engaged discussions. One-to-one supervision is offered on all dissertations. Assessment is primarily by written assignment, also there will also be opportunities for those interested in practice as research.

Coursework and assessment

Written coursework in each taught 30 credit taught module is constituted by a 6,000 word essay, or its equivalent, constituted by a combination of various kinds of written work, including essays, log books, evaluation reports, project critiques and practice analysis. The dissertation is constituted by a 15,000 word project on a topic chosen in consultation with the dissertation supervisor.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This Masters degree teaches and develops a range of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a wide range of career options. Previous MA students have continued to take up PhD study with us, and many of these have gone on to academic and teaching careers in further and higher education institutions. Others have gone on to work for the BBC, in independent television production companies, festivals, film education and other areas of the film and screen media industry.



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