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Masters Degrees (Screen)

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This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both full-time and part-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories.

It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in film exhibition and archival practice, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media and MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway).

HIGHLIGHTS

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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This 18-month full time MA in Screen Acting offers students professional training in acting for a range of screen based industries. . Read more

This 18-month full time MA in Screen Acting offers students professional training in acting for a range of screen based industries. 

Students are taught by working industry professionals and great emphasis is placed upon working to ‘real-world’ briefs, to ‘real-world’ deadlines and in a professional environment within a state of the art media technology facility.

For the first 12 months (24 for P/T) students will engage with lectures, research, analysis and skills development classes as they enhance their specialist and collaborative understanding. With a focus on story craft and character development you will continually engage with traditional acting and devising classes as you progress a fuller understanding of screen based narratives and the demands of the numerous forms of screen acting you may be required to collaborate in.

Underpinned by a company mentality and traditional visceral acting methodology classes, students will also be trained in Motion Capture Performance, Combat for the Screen and Voice for the Screen, as they gain a deep applied knowledge of the opportunities for the contemporary screen actor. Working closely with other Masters students they will gain valuable on-set experience through the numerous film production projects produced within the department each year.

This programme recognises the significant place the performer has in MoCap for cinema and gaming, the demands for combat and armoury awareness and the opportunities offered for voicing animated characters, voice overs for advertising and ADR.

Collaborating with students studying Film Production, 3D Animation and Screenwriting, students are encouraged to devise and produce their own work as they prepare to enter this highly competitive professional field.

Analysis and reflection will play a significant role in your training throughout as you learn about the dynamic between Director and Actor, the importance of the ‘frame’ and shot composition and the professional expectations of the screen based professional industries.

Intense and physically dynamic workshops will cover an extended understanding of the implementation in Motion Capture environments that includes using head rigs to capture facial expression and performance. Combat training sessions will introduce actors to the safe use of a range firearms from muskets to automatic rifles, and weapons such as swords and axes. Highly qualified specialist armourers and combat coordinators, with a wealth of experience in film and television drama and re-enactments, lead these training sessions and will introduce students to risk assessment and health and safety, as expected within this highly specialised area.

Audio work related to screen based content can range from voice over for advertising, automated dialogue replacement and voicing characters for animation. You will be specifically skilled within a professional recording environment in these crafts, which will be complimented by vocal lessons and dialect training provided by experienced tutors from this field.

Students will enter into a collaborative practice programme, engaging with industry professionals and drawing on teaching expertise within the Creative & Digital Technologies Department. Important elements of the programme will be supported by external experience at the BFI, International Film Festivals and Conventions.

During the final 6 months of the programme students will engage with self-directed independent study as they create and produce their major research project. 

This project will be supported through mentoring and staged draft submissions and can be a combination of artefacts, a single large-scale specialist production supported by critical reflective analysis or a significant and appropriate dissertation piece.

Where this can take you

This MA programme will enable you to start your career across a number of industries utilising acting and performance for the moving image in their content.

The creative industries of gaming, TV, film and advertising all require well trained and professionally aware performers for the numerous hours of content produced.

You will also have the opportunity to consider further study and enter the academic research environment through a Professional Doctorate pathway.

Work placements

Our established relationships with a number of commercial companies engaged with, or commissioning, content will allow for you to gain work placement opportunities.

Working collaboratively with both commercial and non commercial partners within the Engineering and Digital Technology Park, students will have direct access to industry on a regular basis.

Indicative modules

  • Analysis, Practice & Technique (20 credits)
  • Specialist Craft Skills (40 Credits)
  • Performance Projects (60 credits)
  • Research and the Industry (20 credits)
  • Independent Study: Specialist Project or Research Project (40 credits) 

Teaching

You will be taught by a range of experts in the fields of acting, voice, motion capture, combat and weaponry. You will also have access to award winning filmmakers covering a range of craft areas such as screenwriting, animation, directing and producing. Students will get access to industry experts providing mentoring and master classes.

Class sizes are expected to range from 1-2-1 sessions with mentors, 20 in taught sessions, 20-30 in collaborative and research sessions shared with other MA students.

Summative assessment will take the form of written and practical coursework, presentations & screenings, portfolio and project work.

Students must achieve 90 credits in year 1 to progress to year 2. A total of 180 credits are required to be awarded the MA.

Assessment

Formative assessment in the Creative & Digital Technologies Department is carried out through peer to peer and tutor feedback on work either through submission, workshops or tutorials. Regularly across all modules.

Feedback on submitted work can be accessed through our VLE digitally or by collected hard copies of work from the Administration Office.

We endeavour to complete marking and feedback on all assessed work within a 3 week period though some modules, due to complexity of assessment, may take slightly longer. 



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MA Screen Acting course specializes in giving the actor a rigorous and intense conservatoire training focused on delivering performance for the screen. Read more

Introduction

MA Screen Acting course specializes in giving the actor a rigorous and intense conservatoire training focused on delivering performance for the screen. Whether on film or television or other recorded media such radio. The student will be involved in many filmed projects including a final short film professionally produced as well as professionally shot show reel material. The course also gives the student a full programme of professional preparation with current industry professionals, including casting directors, agents, producers.

Content

MA Screen: Acting prepares you for work in film and television and related fields by bringing together the key artistic knowledge and skills that are needed to give a truthful and exciting performance on screen. MA Screen: Acting is delivered in close collaboration with MA Screen: Directing, Writing.

At the heart of the postgraduate course is the growth of individual creativity, achieved through constant opportunities for working on camera-based projects with colleagues from other pathways. Course components include acting skills and practice, the creation and production of filmed dramas (shot in the studio and on location), and in-depth preparation for the profession (including interview and audition techniques).

Distinctive features of MA Screen: Acting are:

An intense conservatoire training for the screen

A performance-led approach to recorded drama

A company operating model

The acquisition of a deep understanding of the processes leading to the creation and communication of recorded drama

A professional learning model that prepares you for direct entry into the world of work

A focus on creative solutions to the technical aspects of production

A mentoring scheme connecting students with experienced professionals

Concentration on professional preparation with leading industry professionals

Structure

MA Screen: Acting lasts 60 weeks over 15 months and is structured as units - class-based to begin with, but becoming increasingly project-geared over time. This postgraduate course is intensive. You'll be expected to commit 30 hours per week to classes, rehearsals and shoots, and to your own independent preparation and learning.

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This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. Read more

This programme, available in both part-time and full-time study modes, offers you a broad-based understanding of how film, television and other screen media have developed and interacted across their varying histories. It also gives you the opportunity to specialise in chosen areas of those media histories, in order to personalise your MA studies towards specific intellectual interests and future career hopes. The programme is unique in the way that it combines rigorous academic study with creative and practical opportunities, the latter offered both within certain option modules and via the two-month work placement.

This intermixing of the academic and the practical also enables you to take your interests further, into further postgraduate study, towards a career in teaching or into possible work opportunities in many areas of the media industries.

The programme has two other pathways: MA Film and Screen Media (European Pathway) and MA Film and Screen Media with Film Programming and Curating.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

COURSE STRUCTURE

The programme consists of the compulsory module Screen Media: History, Technology and Culture, a choice of option modules, a research project or placement and a dissertation.

The compulsory module is designed to introduce you to the basic methodologies and issues involved in the area concerned, as well as research skills and methods. The option modules allow you to pursue specific interests and areas of research.

A unique feature of the programme is the placement, which offers you the experience of working in a prominent media company or institution. Alternatively you can complete a research project which gives you the chance to undertake independent research and reflect on research methodologies.

You will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

COMPULSORY MODULES

INDICATIVE OPTION MODULES

DISSERTATION MA FILM AND SCREEN MEDIA

You will also have the option to take an intercollegiate module offered at another college of the University of London through the Screen Studies Group.



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In today’s visual world it’s not just actors who need to perform professionally in front of the camera; many other professionals including journalists, politicians and business leaders are frequently called upon to present themselves and their ideas on camera. Read more
In today’s visual world it’s not just actors who need to perform professionally in front of the camera; many other professionals including journalists, politicians and business leaders are frequently called upon to present themselves and their ideas on camera.

This course is intended for individuals who want to perform, or present in a variety of situations, including fictional drama and factual programming and who might have some previous experience in acting, presenting and public speaking.

Through a mixture of work-based learning and theory, this course will help build your confidence, advance your communication and presentation or acting skills enabling you to perform at a professional standard before the camera.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/screen-performance-and-communication-techniques

Course detail

• Develop your individual performance skills based on up-to-date practices and techniques of working before the camera.
• Gain the confidence to communicate your ideas with clarity and promote your screen performance skills within the media industry enabling you to stand out from the competition
• Build professional contacts from participating in a range of different masterclasses run by experts working within the media industry making you well-placed to take up work placements or employment within established casting/production companies, or to audition for screen-based productions.
• Learn how to operate recording and editing facilities to support the final presentation of your showreel
• Benefit from a course where you graduate with a showreel of a professional standard which showcases your skills and personal approach to screen performance and is tailored to cover a gap in the screen-based media market.

Modules

• Working before the Camera
• Practice-Based Research Methods for Performance to Camera
• Industry Approaches and Practice
• Professional Practices in the Workplace
• Screen Performance Final Project

Assessment

Assessment is primarily performance based, in addition you must submit a portfolio of work, which will include a written diary/report to demonstrate your research inquiry, plan, video documentation of and ability to analyse your performance processes.

For your assessment you will also produce an individual performance show-reel in a specified genre (i.e. interview, acting or presenting) and a screen-based final project that will culminate your acquired performance skills from the course. The latter will be accompanied by a contextual study, which will document your research-based insights.

At all stages you will receive detailed relevant feedback on your work, both as an individual and on the role you perform within the group, which enables you to incorporate the elements of this into your work as you progress through their course. This is crucial to your academic and professional progression. Individual lecturers offer the opportunity to discuss any feedback in more detail.

Careers

The course opens up may career opportunities for postgraduates pursuing a professional career in acting and presenting for television, or film, or the Internet. It would also benefit you if you wish to pursue a career in journalism, politics, and business, and in the course of your work are frequently called upon to appear and present themselves and their ideas before a camera.

The curriculum includes a range of different masterclasses from established practitioners working within the media industry and opportunities for work-based learning placements.

During these masterclasses you can advance your skills and network leading, in some instances, to employment, or additional work placements within established casting/production companies, or to auditions in order to cast screen-based productions.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. Read more
The MPhil in Film and Screen Studies at Cambridge provides advanced training in study of the theory and history of film and other screen media in a vibrant interdisciplinary context. The moving image is explored in relation to the development of modern and contemporary culture, and to the history and theory of other media (literature, music, the visual arts, architecture, the digital). Students are immersed in a research environment that emphasises work on geopolitics, early cinema, art cinema and the avant garde, theory, aesthetics, and gender and sexuality. The programme consists of a core course, taken in the first term, which provides the foundation for further study; two optional modules, taken in the second term, which combine the analysis of film and screen media with the analysis of their social and cultural milieus, or else undertake the study of these forms in a comparative context; and a dissertation. Although not all students may wish to progress to higher research, this MPhil programme is designed to prepare for continuation to PhD work. This preparation includes the academic and research training provided by the course content itself but also advice and support with PhD applications, funding applications and the drafting of a research proposal.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmmmmpsmc

Course detail

By the end of the programme students will have:

1. developed a deeper knowledge of the history and theory of film and other screen media in cultural context;
2. developed an understanding of the debates which have shaped that field of study, and of current research methods;
3. acquired and consolidated intensive specialist knowledge of their chosen research areas and skills appropriate to advanced study in those areas;
4. demonstrated independent judgement, based on their own research
5. participated effectively in seminar discussions and research events;
6. learnt how to plan independent research in order to produce written work of a high standard to a clearly defined deadline.

Format

The Screen Media MPhil is a nine-month course that runs from October to June of any given academic year. It is classified as a research Master's. Students are expected to submit coursework and a thesis during the year, as follows:

Michaelmas Term: Core Course

During the first term of study, students attend weekly seminars and film screenings designed to give them a broad insight into moving image theory and culture. Half of the Core Course focuses on combining the study of classical and contemporary film and visual theory; the other half hones in on specialized historiographic and theoretical problems in the study of moving image media. The Course is, thus, both intensively grounding and intellectually expansive. At the end of this term, students submit one 4,500-word essay. The essay focuses on a specific theoretical framework or critical approach. Two hours of individual supervision are provided.

Lent Term: Modules

Screen Media students can choose from a range of module options. Some focus on the moving image, others are shared with different MPhils (e.g. European Literature & Culture, or Criticism and Culture) and other departments and Faculties within the University, such as Architecture & History of Art, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, English, and Latin American Studies, among others. (The list of modules can change from year to year depending on the availability of academic staff.)

During Lent Term, students attend weekly group seminars led by the module covenor, lasting around 1.5 to 2 hours per week per module. In addition, two hours of individual supervision (per essay) will be provided as students draft their module essays. Essays are submitted at the end of Lent Term.

Lent term modules may include:

- Modern and Contemporary French and Francophone Culture: Articulations of the Real
- Avant Garde and Experimental Cinemas
- The Modern City
- New Commitments: Literature, Cinema and Culture in Italy, 1960 to present
- Urban Cinematics
- Deconstructing Film
- Online Video: Creation, Consumption, Revolution
- Surveillance
- Latin American Film and Visual Arts

Assessment - Easter Term

During this term, students write a thesis. Theses must, according to the criteria laid down by the Board of Graduate Studies, 'represent a contribution to learning'. Theses must be written in English. The arrangements for their preparation are similar to those for the essays. Titles are chosen by students, in consultation with module convenors and/or prospective supervisors, and then have to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee.

Topics and precise thesis titles must be submitted by a specific deadline in Lent Term. Up to this point the Course Director is the titular supervisor of MPhil students, but once the thesis topics are approved, a specialist supervisor is appointed for each student. Students are entitled to up to four hour-long sessions with their supervisor. (In the event that a thesis is co-supervised, a candidate may expect two hours of individual teaching from each supervisor. Only one supervisor should comment on the full draft of the thesis.)

Research Events

Students are expected to take part in fortnightly research events that take place across the Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Leading scholars in film and screen studies will deliver lectures and also meet with students in master class seminars. Students are asked to compile an (unassessed) dossier of critical responses to these events. Participation in these events allows students to engage intensely but also informally with innovative researchers.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).
Applications to the MPhil are automatically considered for AHRC funding, however you must apply by the relevant funding deadline.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING FOR SCREEN

MA Acting for Screen is a training that focuses on acting in film, television and other screen-related media. Students will explore the expressive potential of performance and enhance their understanding of the relationship between performers and camera. The course is primarily for those who have had previous training or professional experience in theatre, film or television. It will build on the existing
skills of students and focus on the specific needs of the year group. Drawing on the expertise of Central’s permanent staff team and specialist professionals from the industry, the programme aims to encourage the development of creative artists with the flexibility to work across performance mediums.

Across the first two terms, students will follow rigorous training in acting, which will concentrate on core skills: voice, body and creative interpretation. The principles of the study derive from psychophysical methods, particularly the techniques of Michael Chekhov and Stanislavski. The emphasis of the training is on producing actors who have a high level of creative skills and have developed flexible
and adaptable bodies and voices, with the necessary technique to apply to a screen context.

The range of classes across these terms will include screen technique; this will essentially examine the distinction between screen and live performance. It will also cover visual storytelling, working in, and adapting to, shot size, cheating, hitting the mark, shooting contemporary scenes from television and film, and the preparation of different styles of work, including soap, drama and comedy.

Acting classes will interrogate the body and provide students with a toolbox of exercises. There is a specific focus on relaxing the body and working with ease, developing the imagination, unpicking habits, creating character, and investigating the inner life. Voice and dialect classes will encourage an understanding of the voice as an instrument and will work with a variety of text including poetry, verbatim,
classical and contemporary material. In the area of movement, there is exposure to forms, which may include jazz and historical forms of dance, physical acting approaches including Suzuki, Lecoq, yoga, and chi kung. Other classes include sight-reading, textual analysis, casting, and mock auditions led by casting directors, actors and directors. Professional preparation will involve guidance on selecting photographs, writing CVs, self-marketing and online promotion.

ASSESSMENT

Modes of assessment include practical assignments, reflective writing, presentation, written and practice-based research. For the
independent project there is an option to make a film, write a dissertation or compile a portfolio, which would include a case study
of a filmmaker and an extended research enquiry.

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Programme description. This is a one-year, research and compositional performance-based MSc with a focus on practices for composing music and sound for the screen. Read more

Programme description

This is a one-year, research and compositional performance-based MSc with a focus on practices for composing music and sound for the screen.

The focus of the compositional investigations will include film/TV music as well as current computer multimedia production practices, such as for music videos, commercials, video games and web pages. You will become proficient in the technical, artistic and intellectual demands of composing music and sound for use in TV/radio/ film and other media environments, such as the internet. You will be able to experiment with new styles in media, and receive practical experience and timely feedback in collaborating with others.

The programme also provides an opportunity for students to enhance business and management skills in the media industry as they pertain to music and sound.

The Edinburgh Film Music Orchestra, an ensemble run by students and staff of the programme, currently performs film music and often features performances of compositions by MSc Composition for Screen students.

Programme structure

This programme is structured around four compulsory courses and two option courses. You will also complete a final project by creating a music composition for a screen-media environment, along with an accompanying written essay component.

Learning outcomes

Goals and outcomes of the programme include:

  • Development of compositional skills, especially those related to musical/dramatic association with the screen.
  • Update and enrich student’s current electronic music and media skills, including notational software, sequencer software, hardware and mixing, and media synchronisation and production methods.
  • Develop a portfolio and demo reel for scoring work through experience in media music projects.
  • Become familiar with collaborative processes when working with others in a media music environment.
  • Learn to observe and research processes in media music and improve abilities to communicate those processes with others.
  • Develop a resourcefulness and self-sufficiency that will enable you to undertake music for screen projects in a professional atmosphere.

Career opportunities

The rise of the internet and other multimedia platforms for film has significantly improved career prospects for composers. Your degree will not only set you apart from the competition, it will also provide you with a network of peers and industry professionals who can assist you in getting your work to the screen.



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Introduction. This postgraduate course prepares you for work in film and television and related fields by bringing together the key artistic disciplines and skills needed to make high quality filmed drama. Read more

Introduction

This postgraduate course prepares you for work in film and television and related fields by bringing together the key artistic disciplines and skills needed to make high quality filmed drama. You will explore in detail Stanilavisky's unique scene study methodology which lies at the heart of Drama Centre’s conservatoire training. From storyboard to working on the subtext with the actors on set you will be enabled to develop your own distinct artistic voice.

Content

At the heart of MA Screen: Directing is the growth of individual creativity, achieved through constant opportunities for working on camera-based projects with colleagues from other pathways. You will work on two filmed productions, in our film studio and on location. Supported by a professional producer, director of photography and editor. You will take an active part in a Mike Leigh type devising project where you will help shape the story's stimulated by the characters that the actors develop over nine weeks of intense rehearsal. You will understand the rhythm of a working film set and develop the confidence to use your own voice on future projects, confident in the knowledge that you know how to work creatively with actors. You will be given in depth preparation for the profession including interview technics and wide range of lectures from visiting professionals, such as agents, casting directors, working producers and directors.

Structure

MA Screen: Directing lasts 45 weeks over 12 months and is structured as units - class-based to begin with, but increasingly project-geared over time. This postgraduate course is intensive. You'll be expected to commit 35 hours per week to classes, rehearsals and shoots, and to your own independent preparation and learning.

Students who come to MA Screen: Directing expect a focused experience with a high level of autonomous learning. The MA course's practical elements contribute to the intensity of the experience, sharpening your professional ability to deliver on time, on budget and at an appropriate level.

MA Screen: Directing has a small intake. It collaborates closely with MA Screen: Acting to give you a broader understanding of the needs of the actor. Because we believe empathy with acting and actors is an integral part of directing, the early part of the MA course in particular engages with the discipline of acting.

Traditionally, screen director training fails to address the challenges of working with performers. Our Directing Pathway confronts that challenge while developing your individual approach and creative voice. The pathway features a programme of acting skills, an extended programme of directing skills, two filmed drama projects, a devised project, and an extended programme of professional preparation.

The MA course culminates in a series of short film projects produced in collaboration with the student actors. Projects are screened for an invited industry audience that includes agents and casting directors



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This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. Read more

This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. These routes allow students to combine vocational, theoretical and practice-based modules as preferred.

Theoretical modules involve study of British, American, European, Far Eastern and Middle Eastern Cinemas. Here, students will examine how film and television texts produced in these regions relate to their historical, social, and cultural contexts through a variety of critical and theoretical approaches, which range from aesthetics as cinematic discourse to the implications of terrorism for film and its audiences.

Vocational choices, which are available throughout, include Teaching Film and Media, Becoming an Academic, Film Festivals, Film Festivals Independent Study (that offer opportunities to attend a film festival, and to be involved in film festival organisation) and Film Journalism, supported by expert film critics, that develops skills required for the writing of film reviews and articles in journals such as Sight and Sound.

There are practice-based options to undertake experimental and documentary film production, and scriptwriting.

What happens on the course?

Full time students normally attend lectures for 9-11 hours per week, and part-time students attend 3-6 hours per week, depending on module choices. Most modules run on Thursdays so that a full time student might expect to attend from 10am – 9pm on Thursdays

Students are assessed via a diverse range of assignments including:

  • Formal Essay
  • Film Review
  • Film Festival Analysis
  • Film Festival Organisation
  • Student led seminar
  • Student presentation
  • Journal article
  • Lesson plan
  • Construction of ‘A level’ teaching plan
  • Annotated bibliography
  • Essay Plan
  • Conference Paper Proposal
  • Research/Funding Proposal
  • Submission of draft thesis chapters
  • Film Production
  • Scriptwriting
  • Thesis

Course Specific Cost:

Course costs are at the usual MA rate with 20% discount for UoW graduates. The module Film Festivals requires an additional flat rate cost of £350 to over hotel, travel and festival entrance fee to a national/international Film Festival. Any additional cost for attendance at a film festival will be met by the university

Why Wolverhampton?

Most of the modules are delivered at Light House Media centre which houses 2 purpose built cinemas. Otherwise, teaching is at other appropriate venues on City Campus. All teaching on the MA Film and Screen is informed by staff expertise, with their research directly underpinning each module. This expertise is reflected in the significant number of high-quality publications produced by Film and Media Staff who contributed successfully to REF2014.

Who will teach you on this course:

  • Dr Fran Pheasant-Kelly, Reader in Screen Studies, Faculty of Arts and Course Leader MA Film and Screen: teaches Space, Place and Culture in American Cinema, Screens of Terror, Becoming an Academic, and Far Eastern Cinemas
  • Dr Stella Hockenhull, Reader in Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Picturing Britain and Screening Horror
  • Dr Eleanor Andrews, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, Course Leader BA Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Screening the Holocaust and Beyond
  • Dr Gavin Wilson, Lecturer in Film and Television Production, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Festivals
  • Dr Peter Robinson, Principal Lecturer and Head of Marketing, Innovation, Leisure and Enterprise, University of Wolverhampton Business School
  • Dr Aleksandra Galasinska, Reader in Discourse and Social Transformation, Faculty of Arts: teaches Poetics and Practices of Polish Cinema
  • Dr Maria Urbina, Senior Lecturer in Multi-media Journalism, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Journalism

What our students think

One student commented on module 7FI014 Teaching Film and Media: This course was the best course I have attended - the teaching was comprehensive and I found the content to be some of the most useful I have experienced throughout my time at university. This was a relatively new subject and I found the work challenging - dealing with new concepts and ideas, but the most important parts for me was to understand where students are educationally before they arrive in University and to develop some of the skills to engage students in their learning experience. I can't express how useful, engaging and interesting this was, I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in teaching at higher education as well as further education.

Career path

In addition to facilitating competence in a range of intellectual and social skills that will be advantageous to the majority of occupations, an MA in Film and Screen is academically relevant to careers in the arts and media, leading to employment in arts administration, film archiving, film and media research, film journalism, film festival management, lecturing and teaching. A specific and unique advantage of this course is a module enabling new lecturers to deliver Film Studies and Media to AS/A2 level. It also provides suitable grounding for doctoral research in film, television and film history.

What skills will you gain?

The course offers theoretical, vocational and practice-based options throughout and you will gain a broad range of academic, vocational and transferable skills that are vital to academic employability and to the screen industries, such as the ability to organise film festivals, present papers at conferences, and publish both journalistic film reviews and scholarly publications. Core modules include Teaching Film and Media which offers unique training for teachers and lecturers in Film and Media Studies, and Becoming an Academic whereby you will acquire a range of academic skills entailing, for example, the ability to write a journal article, academic book, and funding bids. As part of your MA programme, you will independently conduct a research project to a publishable standard, which will provide good opportunities for research-based writing in various contexts. You will also develop event management skills for academic events, such as film festival programming, film curation and the organisation of post-graduate symposia.



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This MA will develop your skills and creative vision in documentary production. It enhances your understanding of the historical context and contemporary modes of documentary production against a backdrop of the wider issues in media production. Read more

This MA will develop your skills and creative vision in documentary production. It enhances your understanding of the historical context and contemporary modes of documentary production against a backdrop of the wider issues in media production.

This Masters, a pathway of the MA Filmmaking, will encourage your understanding of the politics, aesthetics and ethics of documentary production, and the nature and diversity of documentary practice in contemporary society.

What we offer

The programme is housed in a new purpose-built media facility equipped with state-of-the art teaching spaces including a range of digital cameras, Avid Media Composer, Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere Film Editing suites, Animation, Digital Special Effects, Pro Tools Audio Postproduction suites.

You will be able to make your own documentaries, learning and refining research, interviewing, self-shooting and editing techniques – but also have the unique opportunity to be part of a programme that includes specialised producers, cinematographers, editors, sound recordists and sound designers, so that you can develop the scope and range of your filmmaking by collaborating with them.

You work on at least two films during the year, culminating in a major production towards the end of the degree. In addition you can attend classes in related disciplines such as Cinematography and Editing and may collaborate with students across other specialisations on film projects. This framework is designed to provide you with a breadth of filmmaking knowledge combined with a high level of expertise in your chosen filmmaking discipline.

The MA encourages you to develop

  • an awareness of documentary production techniques, ethics and aesthetics
  • specific filmmaking and production management skills
  • technical skills (including camera, lighting and sound editing)
  • an understanding of the workings of the media and their broad cultural and social impacts

Our former students have gone on to win awards including:

They've also launched their own film festivals, worked on critically acclaimed films and documentaries, and have had their work screened at the London International Documentary Festival, National Geographic's All Roads Film Festival and Open City, the London Documentary Festival.

Modules & structure

How you will learn

You will be taught the skills to be able to self-shoot and edit, but will also have the chance to work with specialised camera-people, editors and producers. You complete several short films and exercises, then make your own 15-25 minute documentary, during which you will fully explore research methods, visual and thematic storytelling, experimental and multi-platform formats and much more.

For two terms you will spend a full day a week in specialised contact with your specific programme convenor, plus a further day in Screen Lab working with colleagues across the programme in a Talent Campus-style project-led learning structure with:

  • Masterclassess
  • Pitches
  • Role-plays
  • Exercises aimed at using your skills specialism in a variety of live shoot situations

You will also have a variety of research projects to undertake, as well as other module options.

Screen Lab

You will also advance your collaborative skills by working in teams with both fiction and documentary producers and cinematography, sound and edit students, on a variety of projects and at least three scheduled films across the year.

You will leave the programme with a diverse portfolio of work that may span a variety of formats – essay or diary film, web and multi-platform content, activist or campaign film, longer form feature-documentary 

Screen School options

As well as your Screen Documentary specialism, you will undertake three short courses to enhance your other skills and critical approaches. 

Skills & careers

If you are passionate about fashioning an exciting career for yourself as a filmmaker in an environment that promotes innovative filmmaking, this course is for you.

Our alumni are active in the film, media and cultural industries around the world, working and winning awards as documentary producers and directors.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Why study at Roehampton. Study film, television, and new media alongside world-leading scholars in the field. Undertake innovative research alongside regular study trips to film festivals, galleries and cinemas across London. . Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Study film, television, and new media alongside world-leading scholars in the field.
  • Undertake innovative research alongside regular study trips to film festivals, galleries and cinemas across London. 
  • Learn to produce ‘video essays’, in which you may opt not only to write about films but also to edit footage and create your own original audio-visual criticism.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018).

Course summary

Study film and screen cultures while immersing yourself in the creative culture of London at film festivals, studios, galleries and pop-up cinemas. Our MA combines the study of mainstream and experimental film, contemporary television and the video-essay form, and includes the option to produce either a written or audio-visual dissertation.

This cutting-edge MA offers the opportunity for advanced studies in television and new media. Taught by leading figures in the field, the course allows you to engage with the most up-to-date research and to explore new approaches to audio-visual scholarship. 

The programme includes first-hand engagement with cultural institutions across the city. Building on our links with festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, this MA is not only about studying film theory but also about immersing yourself in the wealth of screen-related events and institutions the capital has to offer. In recent years, our students have been on trips to the London Film Festival, the British Film Institute, the Scalarama Cult Film Festival, the British Artists' Film & Video Study Collection, and the Tate Modern. 

As a student you will also become a member of the Centre for Research in Film and Audiovisual Cultures (CRFAC) which means you will be able to engage with new and emerging research by attending a range of guest talks, conferences, media masterclasses and research seminars led by industry professionals. In recent years students have attended an exclusive preview of comedian and producer Omid Djalili’s film We Are Many, and gained advice on how to be a success in the filmmaking industry from BBC producer and director Jonathan Taylor, and the producer of Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Gareth Wiley.

Content

You’ll develop your independent critical thinking by engaging in the programme’s four main areas:

1.Screen Cultures of London

In a series of visits to festivals, studios, cinemas and galleries, you will gain first hand engagement with cultural institutions across London.

2.Cult and Quality Television

You will interrogate the dynamic role of television within the shifting media landscape, focusing on contemporary US television drama.

3.Essay Films and Video Essays

You will combine history, theory and practice, be introduced to the Essay Film form and be equipped with the necessary skills to make your own video essays.

4.Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web

You will undertake an in-depth examination of contemporary cinema through a global lens, taking in a variety of international films from big budget spectacles through to online films and mash-ups. 

You will also choose between an academic dissertation and an audio-visual dissertation. The academic dissertation gives you the opportunity to deepen your research skills and knowledge about a topic of particular interest to you. The audio-visual dissertation will provide the opportunity to undertake an innovative combination of theory and practice through the production of an extended audio-visual essay alongside a written critical reflection.

Here are some of the varied range of modules we currently offer:

  • Screen Cultures of London
  • Cult and Quality Television
  • Essay Films and Video Essays
  • Transnational Cinemas from the Multiplex to the Web
  • Dissertation

Career options

Careers in cinema and festival programming, media research, curatorship and distribution. The MA also functions as a pathway to a PhD for those pursuing a career in academia.

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Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme. Read more

Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme

If this degree were a film we’d be watching the beginning and the end. We think, like Walter Benjamin, that it’s in these moments – in their inception and their obsolescence – that you see the utopian possibilities of a form or social movement. 

The questions we ask

Are we in the midst of a beginning? What can we learn now from visual culture’s past? What’s happening to our bodies when we play a video game? What are the gestures involved in everyday life? How do our bodies relate to technology?

These are the kinds of topics we analyse on this MA. We want to go beyond the borders of a traditional film studies degree so we go back to the beginning of film history to explore what it meant to fashion yourself in an image, or for a society to see itself in an image. Then we explore how images gain meaning now, and where they’re going next. 

The processes we use

We’re interested in the evolution of the image, but also image culture. As photographs and films constitute more and more of our communication, we encourage students to try to put their thought into audio-visual form for some modules. 

For the MA’s Media Arts Pathway, you can make your own piece of work and submit it as part of the final project, the dissertation. Production values are not the focus for us. We’re interested in what you do with an idea.

The approach we take

We think learning is about trying to get hold of something you don’t know yet; wrestling with ideas you’re unsure of so as to work critically and imaginatively across multiple media forms. While we do look at films, we also investigate such things as contemporary gallery work, the city’s screens, computer and phone interactivity to reconsider our relationship to images.

We study our heritage of image taking and making not just to discover how that relationship has changed over time, but also to find jumping off points for own experimentation and try to create something new. 

As part of the University of London you also have the chance to explore one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other universities. Find out more on the Screen Studies Group website.

Modules & structure

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway

The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway

The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

  • two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
  • option modules to the value of 60 credits
  • a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

Our graduates go on to work in areas such as programming and curating, film and video distribution, and film and television criticism, but many also create their own careers. Twenty per cent of our graduates pursue PhD degrees. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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The Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies offers an exceptionally stimulating environment, where interdisciplinary research flourishes across film, television and media topics, including journalism, media history, the creative industries, memory studies and practice-led research. Read more
The Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies offers an exceptionally stimulating environment, where interdisciplinary research flourishes across film, television and media topics, including journalism, media history, the creative industries, memory studies and practice-led research. Our research aims for critical engagement with technologies, old and new, and poses theoretical, aesthetic and political questions associated with the rise of digital media.

The department is characterised by a strong research ethos, which has been enhanced by the foundation of the Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image, directed by Professor Laura Mulvey. Along with Birkbeck Interdisciplinary Research in Media and Culture (BIRMAC) BIMI brings together the research interests of staff across the College and offers a stimulating range of events for staff and students as well as support for PhD students. The department also hosts the London Screen Study Collection, a unique archival resource of films about London.

The research environment of the department benefits externally from the activities of the Vasari Research Centre, and from its participation in the London University Screen Studies Group, which is an umbrella organisation covering all aspects of screen study across the colleges of the University of London.

In addition to the Birkbeck Library, research students have access to the nearby Senate House Library, various libraries of the University of London colleges, the British Library, as well as other specialist collections and institutions in central London, including the British Film Institute library. They may also take advantage of practical film-making opportunities offered through the Derek Jarman Lab.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

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The Advanced Television and Film – Script to Screen program at Centennial College offers a comprehensive, in-depth and hands-on understanding of what goes into developing and producing quality feature films and TV shows. Read more
The Advanced Television and Film – Script to Screen program at Centennial College offers a comprehensive, in-depth and hands-on understanding of what goes into developing and producing quality feature films and TV shows.

This multidisciplinary, two-semester post-graduate Advanced Television and Film program — facilitated by the School of Communications, Media, Arts and Design in the hub of Toronto's film and television district — is especially beneficial for writers, directors, producers, editors, actors and other film and television craftspeople who want to expand their knowledge of the industry.

The major focus of the program's first semester is on creating, pitching, outlining, developing, drafting and polishing production-ready short film scripts. During the second semester, you have the opportunity to prepare, perform in, shoot and/or post a number of these shows.

Additionally, the Advanced Television and Film - Script to Screen program sees you deconstructing classic films, television shows and scripts of all genres. The program also provides opportunities to receive advanced instruction from industry professionals in your major and minor areas of craft interest along with extensive employment information.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-The Advanced Television and Film – Script to Screen program is unique among the few other post-graduate film and television offerings currently available in the Greater Toronto Area.
-Instead of streaming you into master classes immediately, the first semester ensures that you obtain a solid working knowledge of everyone's role on a film or television production.
-The amount of foundational lessons included in the offering allows you to better collaborate, improvise, problem-solve and empathize with your fellow cast and crew members.
-The program focuses on dramatic filmmaking, comedy and several other genres. The program does not, however, include documentary filmmaking.
-The time and effort devoted to script development in the first semester and production and post-production in the second results in higher quality student films than are customarily produced — at a time when student films continue to be key to gaining a foothold in the business.

Career Outlook
-Director
-Assistant director
-Trainee assistant director
-Personal assistant to the director
-Cinematographer
-Camera operator
-Assistant camera operator
-Lighting and grip department technician
-Lighting or grip assistant
-Dolly grip
-Audio technician
-Assistant audio technician
-Producer
-Associate producer
-Production manager
-Production coordinator
-Assistant production coordinator
-Production assistant
-Location coordinator or assistant
-Office assistant
-Personal assistant to the producer
-Screenwriter
-Script coordinator/story department coordinator
-Trainee/junior story editor/story researcher
-Personal assistant to the showrunner
-Script reader
-Editor
-Assistant editor
-Sound editor
-Assistant sound editor
-Personal assistant to the series lead/star

Areas of Employment
-Production companies
-Broadcast networks
-Other industry-related organizations

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