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Masters Degrees (Scientific Computation)

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Overview. Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering. Read more

Overview

Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering.

By its very nature, scientific computing is a fundamentally multidisciplinary subject. The various application areas give rise to mathematical models of the phenomena being studied.

Examples range in scale from the behaviour of cells in biology, to flow and combustion processes in a jet engine, to the formation and development of galaxies. Mathematics is used to formulate and analyse numerical methods for solving the equations that come from these applications.

Implementing the methods on modern, high performance computers requires good algorithm design to produce efficient and robust computer programs. Competence in scientific computing thus requires familiarity with a range of academic disciplines. The practitioner must, of course, be familiar with the application area of interest, but it is also necessary to understand something of the mathematics and computer science involved.

Whether you are interested in fundamental science, or a technical career in business or industry, it is clear that having expertise in scientific computing would be a valuable, if not essential asset. The question is: how does one acquire such expertise?

This course is one of a suite of MScs in Scientific Computation that are genuinely multidisciplinary in nature. These courses are taught by internationally leading experts in various application areas and in the core areas of mathematics and computing science, fully reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of the subject. The courses have been carefully designed to be accessible to anyone with a good first degree in science or engineering. They are excellent preparation either for research in an area where computational techniques play a significant role, or for a career in business or industry.

Key facts:

- This course is offered in collaboration with the School of Computer Science.

- It is one of a suite of courses focusing on scientific computation.

- The School of Mathematical Sciences is one of the largest and strongest mathematics departments in the UK, with over 60 full-time academic staff.

- In the latest independent Research Assessment Exercise, the school ranked 8th in the UK in terms of research power across the three subject areas within the School of Mathematical Sciences (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and operational research).

Modules

Advanced Techniques for Differential Equations

Computational Linear Algebra

Operations Research and Modelling

Programming for Scientific Computation

Scientific Computation Dissertation

Simulation for Computer Scientists

Stochastic Financial Modelling

Variational Methods

Vocational Mathematics

Data Mining Techniques and Applications

Mathematical Foundations of Programming

English language requirements for international students

IELTS: 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any element)

Further information



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The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Read more
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Covering topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques, it produces graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well-equipped to proceed to doctoral research or directly into employment in industry, the professions, and the public service. It also provides training for the academic researchers and teachers of the future, encouraging the pursuit of research in computational methods for science and technology disciplines, thus being an important gateway for entering PhD programmes containing a substantial component of computational modelling.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpscm

Course detail

The MPhil in Scientific Computing has a research and a taught element. The research element is a project on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. The taught element comprises of core lecture courses on topics of scientific computing and elective lecture courses relevant to the science or technology topic of the project. Most of the projects are expected to make use of the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

The students will attend lecture courses during Michaelmas Term (some courses may be during Lent Term) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for continuation to a PhD programme or employment, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners who are working with the participating Departments and may be sponsoring the research project.

There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively.

Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments on the core courses 25%; written examinations on the elective courses 25%.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project.

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core lectures are on topics of high performance scientific computing numerical analysis and advanced numerical methods and techniques. They are organized by the Centre for Scientific Computing and are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their dissertation and for their general education in scientific computing.

In particular, their objective is to introduce students to the simulation science pipeline of problem identification, modelling, simulation and evaluation - all from the perspective of employing high-performance computing. Numerical discretisation of mathematical models will be a priority, with a specific emphasis on understanding the trade-offs (in terms of modelling time, pre-processing time, computational time, and post-processing time) that must be made when solving realistic science and engineering problems. Understanding and working with computational methods and parallel computing will be a high priority. To help the students understand the material, the lecturers will furnish the courses with practical coursework assignments.

The lectures on topics of numerical analysis and HPC are complemented with hands-on practicals using Linux-based laptops provided by the course (students may bring their own), as well as on the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

Appropriate elective lecture courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor. While every effort is made within the Departments to arrange the timetable in a coherent fashion, it is inevitable that some combinations of courses will be ruled out by their schedule, particularly if the choices span more than one department.

Continuing

For continuation to a PhD programme in Scientific Computing, students are required to gain a Distinction (overall grade equal or greater than 75%).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Read more

Overview

The development of new materials lies at the heart of many of the technological challenges we currently face, for example creating advanced materials for energy generation. Computational modelling plays an increasingly important role in the understanding, development and optimisation of new materials. This four year Doctoral Training Programme on computational methods for material modelling aims to train scientists not only in the use of existing modelling methods but also in the underlying computational and mathematical techniques. This will allow students to develop and enhance existing methods, for instance by introducing new capabilities and functionalities, and also to create innovative new software tools for materials modelling in industrial and academic research. The first year of the CDT is a materials modelling option within the MPhil in Scientific Computing (please see the relevant entry) at the University of Cambridge and a range of additional training elements.

The MPhil in Scientific Computing is administered by the Department of Physics, but it serves the training needs of the Schools of Physical Sciences, Technology and Biological Sciences. The ability to have a single Master’s course for such a broad range of disciplines and applications is achieved by offering core (i.e. common for all students) numerical and High Performance Computing (HPC) lecture courses, and complementing them with elective courses relevant to the specific discipline applications.

In this way, it is possible to generate a bespoke training portfolio for each student without losing the benefits of a cohort training approach. This bespoke course is fully flexible in allowing each student to liaise with their academic or industrial supervisor to choose a study area of mutual interest.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:
- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Teaching

The first year of the CDT has a research as well as a taught element. The students attend lecture courses during the first five months (October-February) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for a successful completion of the PhD, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a materials science topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners. Most of the projects are expected to make use the University’s High Performance Computing Service (for which CPU time for training and research has been budgeted for every student).

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core courses are on topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques; they are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in scientific computing.

Appropriate elective courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor.

Depending on the materials science application of the research topic, students will follow one of the following two numerical methodology options: a) Continuum methods based on systems of partial differential equations (PDEs, e.g. finite-difference, element or volume methods); or b) atomistic approaches, which can be based on classical particle-based modelling (e.g. molecular dynamics) or on electronic structure- based methods (e.g. density functional theory). The students who take the atomistic modelling options will attend a 12-lecture course before continuing to classical particle-based methods or electronic structure methods. Irrespective of the numerical methodology option, students will attend lecture courses on High Performance Computing topics and elements of Numerical Analysis.

In addition to the comprehensive set of Masters-level courses provided by the MPhil and across the University in the field, which will be available to the CDT students, it will also be possible for students to take supplementary courses (not for examination) at undergraduate level, where a specific need is identified, in order to ensure that any prerequisite knowledge for the Masters courses is in place.

Moreover, depending on their background and circumstances, students may be offered places in the EPSRC-funded Autumn Academy, which takes place just before the start of the academic year (two weeks in September).

Funding Opportunities

Studentships funded by EPSRC and/or Industrial and other partners are available subject to eligibility criteria.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphpdcms

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Mathematics underlies some vital situations in practical life. Game theory, with roots in mathematics, statistics and economics, is routinely applied to understanding and predicting human behaviour. Read more
Mathematics underlies some vital situations in practical life.

Game theory, with roots in mathematics, statistics and economics, is routinely applied to understanding and predicting human behaviour. Problems of protection of digital information against piracy are closely related to aspects of set systems. And the RSA cryptosystem, used on computers all over the world, depends on classical results of number theory.

Our MSc Mathematics covers many aspects of discrete mathematics and their potential use in practice, and provides you with options in:
-Optimisation
-Machine learning
-Data mining
-Statistics

Our interdisciplinary research recognises that mathematics, including what can be very abstract mathematics, is an essential part of research in many other disciplines.

Our Department of Mathematical Sciences has an international reputation in many areas including semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology.

This course can also be studied to a PGDip level - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.essex.ac.uk/courses/details.aspx?mastercourse=PG00538&subgroup=2

Our expert staff

Our Department of Mathematical Sciences is a small but influential department, so our students and staff know each other personally. You never need an appointment to see your tutors and supervisors, just knock on our office doors – we are one of the few places to have an open-door policy, and no issue is too big or small.

Our staff have published several well-regarded text books and are world leaders in their individual specialisms, with their papers appearing in learned journals like Communications in Algebra, Studia Logica, International Journal of Algebra and Computation, SIAM Journal in Optimization, IEEE Evolutionary Computation, Computers and Operations Research, Ecology, Journal of Mathematical Biology, and Journal of Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology.

Specialist facilities

-Unique to Essex is our renowned Maths Support Centre, which offers help to students, staff and local businesses on a range of mathematical problems. Throughout term-time, we can chat through mathematical problems either on a one-to-one or small group basis
-We have our own computer labs for the exclusive use of students in the Department of Mathematical Sciences – in addition to your core maths modules, you gain computing knowledge of software including Matlab and Maple
-We host regular events and seminars throughout the year
-Our students run a lively Mathematics Society, an active and social group where you can explore your interest in your subject with other students

Your future

Key employability skills you gain from this course include analytic reasoning, problem solving, techniques of discrete mathematics and an understanding of application areas of these techniques, algorithm design and implementation, and data analysis.

Our graduates are highly sought after by a range of employers and find employment in financial services, scientific computation, decision making support and government, risk assessment, statistics, education and other sectors.

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MSc by Dissertation. We have an international reputation in many areas such as semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology, and our staff are strongly committed to research and to the promotion of graduate activities.

We additionally work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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In recent years, finance has been one of the areas where high-calibre mathematicians have been in great demand. Read more
In recent years, finance has been one of the areas where high-calibre mathematicians have been in great demand. With the advent of powerful and yet economically accessible computing, online trading has become a common activity, but many have realised that a certain amount of mathematics is necessary to be successful in such fields.

One of our most popular courses, MSc Mathematics and Finance allows those with a background in mathematics to study finance. Since finance routinely involves modelling and evaluating risk, asset pricing and price forecasting, mathematics has become an indispensable tool for this study.

You explore topics including:
-Models and mathematics in portfolio management
-Risk management in modern banking
-Financial modelling
-Actuarial modelling
-Applied statistics

Our interdisciplinary research recognises that mathematics, including what can be very abstract mathematics, is an essential part of research in many other disciplines.

Our Department of Mathematical Sciences has an international reputation in many areas including semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology.

This course can also be studied to a PGDip level - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.essex.ac.uk/courses/details.aspx?mastercourse=PG00610&subgroup=2

Our expert staff

Our Department of Mathematical Sciences is a small but influential department, so our students and staff know each other personally. You never need an appointment to see your tutors and supervisors, just knock on our office doors – we are one of the few places to have an open-door policy, and no issue is too big or small.

Our staff have published several well-regarded text books and are world leaders in their individual specialisms, with their papers appearing in learned journals like Communications in Algebra, Studia Logica, International Journal of Algebra and Computation, SIAM Journal in Optimization, IEEE Evolutionary Computation, Computers and Operations Research, Ecology, Journal of Mathematical Biology, and Journal of Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology.

Specialist facilities

-Unique to Essex is our renowned Maths Support Centre, which offers help to students, staff and local businesses on a range of mathematical problems. Throughout term-time, we can chat through mathematical problems either on a one-to-one or small group basis
-We have our own computer labs for the exclusive use of students in the Department of Mathematical Sciences – in addition to your core maths modules, you gain computing knowledge of software including Matlab and Maple
-We host regular events and seminars throughout the year
-Our students run a lively Mathematics Society, an active and social group where you can explore your interest in your subject with other students

Your future

There is undoubtedly a shortage of mathematicians in general, and an even greater one of those with knowledge of finance.

Our course produces graduates with a sound background in mathematics and finance. Key employability skills include computing, use of algorithms, data analysis, mathematical modelling and understanding financial statements.

Our graduates are highly sought after by a range of employers and find employment in financial services, scientific computation, decision making support and government, risk assessment, statistics, education and other sectors.

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MSc by Dissertation. We have an international reputation in many areas such as semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology, and our staff are strongly committed to research and to the promotion of graduate activities.

We additionally work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods
-Financial Modelling
-Mathematics of Portfolios
-Research Methods in Finance: Empirical Methods in Finance
-Stochastic Processes
-Applied Statistics (optional)
-Bank Strategy and Risk (optional)
-Bayesian Computational Statistics (optional)
-Combinatorial Optimisation (optional)
-Derivative Securities (optional)
-Economics of Financial Markets (optional)
-Financial Derivatives (optional)
-Ordinary Differential Equations (optional)
-Partial Differential Equations (optional)
-Statistical Methods (optional)
-Metric Spaces

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Mathematics is the language that underpins the rest of science. Our Department of Mathematical Sciences has an international reputation in many areas like such as semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology. Read more
Mathematics is the language that underpins the rest of science. Our Department of Mathematical Sciences has an international reputation in many areas like such as semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology.

Graduate Diplomas last for six to nine months (full-time) and include the modules and assessed work of a Masters, without a dissertation. Our Graduate Diploma in Mathematics gives you training in basic mathematics techniques if your first degree contained only a modest amount of mathematics, so that you can proceed to a Masters in mathematics.

At Essex, Mathematics has truly broad reach; we are working on projects ranging from the economic impact of the behaviour of dairy cows, to understanding crowd behaviour through modelling a zombie apocalypse, to circular Sudoku and other puzzles. Our interdisciplinary research recognises that mathematics, including what can be very abstract mathematics, is an essential part of research in many other disciplines.

You therefore gain an exceptional range of knowledge and skills that are currently in demand in mathematically oriented employment; in business, commerce, industry, government service, education and in the wider economy.

Our expert staff

Our Department of Mathematical Sciences is a small but influential department, so our students and staff know each other personally. You never need an appointment to see your tutors and supervisors, just knock on our office doors – we are one of the few places to have an open-door policy, and no issue is too big or small.

Our staff have published several well-regarded text books and are world leaders in their individual specialisms, with their papers appearing in learned journals like Communications in Algebra, Studia Logica, International Journal of Algebra and Computation, SIAM Journal in Optimization, IEEE Evolutionary Computation, Computers and Operations Research, Ecology, Journal of Mathematical Biology, and Journal of Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology.

Specialist facilities

-Unique to Essex is our renowned Maths Support Centre, which offers help to students, staff and local businesses on a range of mathematical problems. Throughout term-time, we can chat through mathematical problems either on a one-to-one or small group basis
-We have our own computer labs for the exclusive use of students in the Department of Mathematical Sciences – in addition to your core maths modules, you gain computing knowledge of software including Matlab and Maple
-We host regular events and seminars throughout the year
-Our students run a lively Mathematics Society, an active and social group where you can explore your interest in your subject with other students

Your future

Our graduates are highly sought after by a range of employers and find employment in financial services, scientific computation, decision making support and government, risk assessment, statistics, education and other sectors.

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MSc by Dissertation. We have an international reputation in many areas such as semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology, and our staff are strongly committed to research and to the promotion of graduate activities.

We additionally work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Applied Statistics (optional)
-Bayesian Computational Statistics (optional)
-Combinatorial Optimisation (optional)
-Complex Variables and Applications (optional)
-Contingencies I
-Contingencies II
-Cryptography and Codes
-Finance and Financial Reporting (optional)
-Financial Derivatives (optional)
-Graph Theory (optional)
-Introduction to Numerical Methods (optional)
-Linear Algebra (optional)
-Mathematical Biology (optional)
-Mathematical Methods (optional)
-Mathematics of Portfolios (optional)
-Modelling Experimental Data (optional)
-Nonlinear Programming (optional)
-Ordinary Differential Equations (optional)
-Partial Differential Equations (optional)
-Project: Mathematics (optional)
-Quantum Mechanics (optional)
-Real Analysis (optional)
-Statistical Methods (optional)
-Statistics II (optional)
-Stochastic Processes (optional)
-Survival Analysis (optional)
-The Laws of Physics (optional)
-Vector Calculus (optional)

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Train in the methods and techniques needed to apply mathematics to the real world. Gain exposure to different disciplines and industries. Read more

Train in the methods and techniques needed to apply mathematics to the real world. Gain exposure to different disciplines and industries.

You’ll study interdisciplinary applied mathematics and modern scientific computing, with an emphasis on problem solving. You will gain an understanding of different disciplines and industrial problems. The course links mathematics with engineering, biology and other sciences, and gives students direct contact with industry.

You will develop an awareness of modern applications of mathematics in an interdisciplinary environment. You will get professional level training in mathematical methods, mathematical modelling, scientific computation and other applied techniques, combining both theory and applications.

The course specialises in interdisciplinary applications of mathematics, notably in industry and mathematical biology. You’ll have the opportunity to choose from a wide scope of interdisciplinary units, ranging from astrophysics over cryptography to computational chemistry.

You can choose to do a three month project which can be linked to industry or a six month work placement with a company. The placement route offers a chance to experience first-hand how mathematics can be applied in industry.

You will benefit from the close interactions that the department has with many industrial companies, who come and work with students and help to run projects.

Our graduates have gone on to further research in Lausanne, Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt, and have taken up academic posts in Malaysia, Sweden, Germany, Canada, US and in the UK.

Recent employers of Bath graduates include British Aerospace, Network Rail, Pfizer, Barclays Capital and Powergen.

Why study Mathematical Sciences with us?

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), 88% of our research in all areas (Pure and Applied Mathematics, Statistics and Probability) was rated world leading/internationally excellent. The results of REF 2014 confirm the excellence of the research carried out in the Department of Mathematical Sciences.

- The most recent assessment of the quality of research being done in academic departments across the UK, (RAE 2008), confirms that our research activity is at the forefront of international excellence

- We have a fully-supported professional placement programme.

- The National Student Survey 2016 - 91% satisfaction with Mathematical Sciences.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-2018/taught-postgraduate-master-s-courses/msc-modern-applications-of-mathematics/

Career opportunities

Our graduates have gone on to further research in Lausanne, Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt, and academic posts in Malaysia, Sweden, Germany, Canada, the US and in the UK. Recent employers of Bath graduates include:

British Aerospace

Network Rail

Powergen

Barclays Capital

BNP Paribas

Pfizer

AstraZenaca

MBDA UK Ltd

ATASS

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/math-sci/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/science/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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The Architectural Computation MRes offers a self-directed route which concentrates on research skills, for those intending to take a doctoral degree or those looking to take their existing architecture and computating experience to a higher level. Read more

The Architectural Computation MRes offers a self-directed route which concentrates on research skills, for those intending to take a doctoral degree or those looking to take their existing architecture and computating experience to a higher level. The programme can be taken alone or as the first year of Virtual Environments, Imaging and Visualisation (VEIV) EngD.

About this degree

On completion of the programme, students will be able to use computational techniques in architecture, understand and predict the consequences of their design actions through computational processes, integrate their predictions into the design process, and carry out self-sufficient research into new methods and processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of taught modules (30 credits), research skills modules (30 credits) and research projects (120 credits).

Core modules

  • Computational Analysis
  • Computational Synthesis
  • Research Skills (A)
  • Research Skills (B)
  • Computational Research Project

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

Students complete project reports for the research projects listed above.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops and seminars as well as individual and collaborative projects. Time is dedicated to studio sessions with experienced tutors who have a track record of research into architecture and computation. Assessment is through unseen examination, a 3,000-word term paper and project reports.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Architectural Computation MRes

Careers

After completing the programme, many graduates go on to join leading architectural and engineering practices, either directly with design teams or with specialist modelling groups.

Employability

Our MRes concentrates on your research skills, offering a self-directed route if you are intending to undertake a doctoral degree or are looking to take your existing architecture and computing experience to a higher level. Alumni have joined (or founded) cutting-edge emerging digital design practices such as United Visual Artists and Moving Brands, or they have moved into academic research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together dozens of scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future. Located in London, we are at the heart of the world's largest cluster of creative architects and engineering firms and with all the resources of a world city to hand.

The Architectural Computation programme at UCL offers a unique perspective on the application of technology to the built environment. The programme team, drawn from the Space Syntax Laboratory - the originator of the discipline - comprises both architects and experts in artificial intelligence.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Architecture

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The techniques we use to model and manipulate data guide the political, financial and social decisions that shape our modern society and are the basis of growth of the economy and success of businesses. Read more
The techniques we use to model and manipulate data guide the political, financial and social decisions that shape our modern society and are the basis of growth of the economy and success of businesses. Technology is growing and evolving at an incredible speed, and both the rate of growth of data we generate and the devices we use to process it can only increase.

Data science is a growing and important field of study with a fast-growing number of jobs and opportunities within the private and public sector. The application of theory and methods to real-world problems and applications is at the core of data science, which aims especially to use and to exploit big data.

If you are interested in solving real-world problems, you like to develop skills to use smart devices efficiently, you want to use and to foster your understanding of mathematics, and you are interested and keen to use statistical techniques and methods to interpret data, MSc Data Science at Essex is for you. You study a balance of solid theory and practical application including:
-Computer science
-Programming
-Statistics
-Data analysis
-Probability

Our Department of Mathematical Sciences has an international reputation in many areas including semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology.

You also benefit from being taught in our School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, who are ranked Top 10 in the UK in the 2015 Academic Ranking of World Universities, with more than two-thirds of their research rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

The collaborative work between our departments has resulted in well-known research in areas including artificial intelligence, data analysis, data analytics, data mining, data science, machine learning and operations research.

Our expert staff

Our Department of Mathematical Sciences is a small but influential department, so our students and staff know each other personally. You never need an appointment to see your tutors and supervisors, just knock on our office doors – we are one of the few places to have an open-door policy, and no issue is too big or small.

The academic staff in our School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering are conducting world-leading research in areas such as evolutionary computation, brain-computer interfacing, intelligent inhabited environments and financial forecasting.

Specialist staff working on data analytics include Dr Paul Scott, who researches data mining, models of memory and attention, and artificial intelligence, and Professor Maria Fasli, who researches data exploration, analysis and modelling of complex, structured and unstructured data, big data, cognitive agents, and web search assistants.

Specialist facilities

-Unique to Essex is our renowned Maths Support Centre, which offers help to students, staff and local businesses on a range of mathematical problems. Throughout term-time, we can chat through mathematical problems either on a one-to-one or small group basis
-We have our own computer labs for the exclusive use of students in the Department of Mathematical Sciences – in addition to your core maths modules, you gain computing knowledge of software including Matlab and Maple
-We have six laboratories that are exclusively for computer science and electronic engineering students
-All computers run either Windows 7 or are dual boot with Linux
-Software includes Java, Prolog, C++, Perl, Mysql, Matlab, DB2, Microsoft Office, Visual Studio, and Project
-You have access to CAD tools and simulators for chip design (Xilinx) and computer networks (OPNET)
-We also have specialist facilities for research into areas including non-invasive brain-computer interfaces, intelligent environments, robotics, optoelectronics, video, RF and MW, printed circuit milling, and semiconductors
-We host regular events and seminars throughout the year
-Collaborate with the Essex Institute of Data Analytics and Data Science (IADS) and the ESRC Business and Local Government (BLoG) Data Research Centre of the University of Essex
-The UK Data Archive and the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at Essex contribute to our internationally outstanding data science environment

Your future

With a predicted shortage of data scientists, now is the time to future-proof your career. Data scientists are required in every sector, carrying out statistical analysis or mining data on social media, so our course opens the door to almost any industry, from health, to government, to publishing.

Our graduates are highly sought after by a range of employers and find employment in financial services, scientific computation, decision making support and government, risk assessment, statistics, education and other sectors.

We also offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MSc by Dissertation. We have an international reputation in many areas such as semi-group theory, optimisation, probability, applied statistics, bioinformatics and mathematical biology, and our staff are strongly committed to research and to the promotion of graduate activities.

We additionally work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation (optional)
-MSc Project and Dissertation (optional)
-Applied Statistics
-Machine Learning and Data Mining
-Modelling Experimental Data
-Text Analytics
-Artificial Neural Networks (optional)
-Bayesian Computational Statistics (optional)
-Big-Data for Computational Finance (optional)
-Combinatorial Optimisation (optional)
-High Performance Computing (optional)
-Natural Language Engineering (optional)
-Nonlinear Programming (optional)
-Professional Practice and Research Methodology (optional)
-Programming in Python (optional)
-Information Retrieval (optional)
-Data Science and Decision Making (optional)
-Research Methods (optional)
-Statistical Methods (optional)
-Stochastic Processes (optional)

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This multidisciplinary area is the study of computational systems that use ideas and gain inspiration from natural systems. Read more

This multidisciplinary area is the study of computational systems that use ideas and gain inspiration from natural systems. The MRes programme explores current topics in natural computation, such as evolutionary algorithms, co-evolution, evolutionary design, nature-inspired optimisation techniques, evolutionary games, novel learning algorithms, artificial neural networks and theory of natural computation.

There is an increasing need from industry for professionals with knowledge of natural computation techniques. Our graduates develop a solid foundation to pursue a research and development career in industry or further studies.

Course details

The MRes is a Masters degree by research. This means that you are taught core principles and then develop these skills by doing interesting, innovative research, supported by academic staff and peers. This is structured so that you learn how to plan, organise and manage your time; you learn what it is to be a scientific researcher; you help contribute to the development of new knowledge; you learn intellectual skills such as argumentation, exposition, and reasoning; and you develop as an individual by improving your communication skills, writing, collaborative working and creativity.

The mini project module consists of a research project on the in-depth investigation of a chosen topic coming from industry (strongly encouraged) or academia.

The compulsory Research Skills module provides you with the basis of transferable knowledge and skills necessary for a successful research-oriented career in industry or academia, with a particular orientation to computing-based disciplines.

Your research thesis project consists of solving a substantial problem using natural computation techniques (including hybrid techniques). Industrial co-supervisors are used whenever appropriate, and you will be required to apply the knowledge and skills you have acquired to solve a difficult problem.

Learning and teaching

This innovative MRes programme is led and run primarily by the world-leading Natural Computation Group and CERCIA in the School of Computer Science. The group has over 40 full-time researchers, including teaching staff, research fellows and associates, PhD students, and academic visitors.

Taught modules are assessed by a mixture of written examinations and continuous assessment. The first semester mini-project is assessed by a written report. Your thesis will be examined by an internal and an external examiner.

Employability

Career opportunities

We have strong links with industry, especially through CERCIA, including Honda, BT, Thales, Unilever, GSK, Rolls Royce, etc. We encourage MRes students to carry out their research projects in collaboration with our industrial partners, and opportunities also exist for students to do their project work within a company.

University Careers Network

Preparation for your career should be one of the first things you think about as you start university. Whether you have a clear idea of where your future aspirations lie or want to consider the broad range of opportunities available once you have a Birmingham degree, our Careers Network can help you achieve your goal.

Our unique careers guidance service is tailored to your academic subject area, offering a specialised team (in each of the five academic colleges) who can give you expert advice. Our team source exclusive work experience opportunities to help you stand out amongst the competition, with mentoring, global internships and placements available to you. Once you have a career in your sights, one-to-one support with CVs and job applications will help give you the edge.

If you make the most of the wide range of services you will be able to develop your career from the moment you arrive.



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Postgraduate combined research and teaching degree programme Applied Mathematics MRes. This programme involves both taught classes in Applied Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. Read more

Postgraduate combined research and teaching degree programme Applied Mathematics MRes:

This programme involves both taught classes in Applied Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree.

The MRes can be used as the first phase of our fast track PhD programme, in which the MRes thesis is extended over a further period of two years into a PhD thesis.

Course details

This programme involves both taught classes in Applied Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. The minimum period of registration is 12 months. 

The MRes is an ideal preparation for entry into a PhD programme. Indeed, the MRes programme can be used as the first phase of our fast track PhD programme. This is an excellent option for well-qualified mathematics students who do not have all the necessary mathematical background to start immediately on a PhD in their area of choice. In the fast track programme the MRes thesis is extended over a further period of two years into a PhD thesis. 

Each MRes student is assigned a project supervisor who will act as director and mentor in the preparation of the MRes thesis. This gives each student the opportunity to work one-to-one with mathematicians who are international experts in their fields. 

In addition to the assessed elements of the course, students are expected to play a full part in the research life of the School. The School has an active seminar programme, and organises international conferences in all areas of mathematics.

Related links

Learning and teaching

These courses are approximately one-third course work and two-thirds dissertation. The dissertation is completed under the direction of a project supervisor which gives our students the opportunity to work one-to-one with a leading expert in their field. 

A regular programme of seminars and conferences takes place within the School in a wide range of subjects. Currently thriving at Birmingham are the following research groups:

  • Applied Mathematics: applied analysis, mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, hydrogen energy, fuel cells and their applications, numerical analysis and scientific computation
  • Pure Mathematics: algebra, analysis, combinatorics and logic
  • Theoretical and Computational Optimization: mathematical theory and methods applicable to managerial decision-making
  • Statistics: time series analysis, multivariate statistics, kernel and wavelet based nonparametric smoothing methods, econometrics and medical statistics

Employability

This programme gives comprehensive training in mathematics and areas appropriate to professional development and research foundations. The MRes is an ideal preparation for entry into the PhD programme at Birmingham. In fact, the MRes programme can be used as the first phase of our ?Fast-track? PhD programme.

University Careers Network

Preparation for your career should be one of the first things you think about as you start university. Whether you have a clear idea of where your future aspirations lie or want to consider the broad range of opportunities available once you have a Birmingham degree, our Careers Network can help you achieve your goal.

Our unique careers guidance service is tailored to your academic subject area, offering a specialised team (in each of the five academic colleges) who can give you expert advice. Our team source exclusive work experience opportunities to help you stand out amongst the competition, with mentoring, global internships and placements available to you. Once you have a career in your sights, one-to-one support with CVs and job applications will help give you the edge.

If you make the most of the wide range of services you will be able to develop your career from the moment you arrive.



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Postgraduate combined research and teaching degree programme Management Mathematics MRes. This programme involves both taught classes in Management Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. . Read more

Postgraduate combined research and teaching degree programme Management Mathematics MRes:

This programme involves both taught classes in Management Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. 

The MRes can be used as the first phase of our fast track PhD programme, in which the MRes thesis is extended over a further period of two years into a PhD thesis.

Course details

This programme involves both taught classes in Management Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. The minimum period of registration is 12 months. 

The MRes is an ideal preparation for entry into the PhD programme at Birmingham or at any other UK university. Indeed, the MRes programme can be used as the first phase of our fast track PhD programme. This is an excellent option for well-qualified mathematics students who do not have all the necessary mathematical background to start immediately on a PhD in their area of choice. In the fast track programme the MRes thesis is extended over a further period of two years into a PhD thesis. 

Each MRes student is assigned a project supervisor who will act as director and mentor in the preparation of the MRes thesis. This gives each student the opportunity to work one-to-one with mathematicians who are international experts in their fields. 

In addition to the assessed elements of the course, students are expected to play a full part in the research life of the School. The School has an active seminar programme, and organises international conferences in all areas of mathematics.

Related links

Learning and teaching

These courses are approximately one-third course work and two-thirds dissertation. The dissertation is completed under the direction of a project supervisor which gives our students the opportunity to work one-to-one with a leading expert in their field. 

A regular programme of seminars and conferences takes place within the School in a wide range of subjects. Currently thriving at Birmingham are the following research groups:

  • Applied Mathematics: applied analysis, mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, hydrogen energy, fuel cells and their applications, numerical analysis and scientific computation
  • Pure Mathematics: algebra, analysis, combinatorics and logic
  • Theoretical and Computational Optimization: mathematical theory and methods applicable to managerial decision-making
  • Statistics: time series analysis, multivariate statistics, kernel and wavelet based nonparametric smoothing methods, econometrics and medical statistics

Employability

This programme gives comprehensive training in mathematics and areas appropriate to professional development and research foundations. The MRes is an ideal preparation for entry into the PhD programme at Birmingham. In fact, the MRes programme can be used as the first phase of our Fast-track PhD programme.

University Careers Network

Preparation for your career should be one of the first things you think about as you start university. Whether you have a clear idea of where your future aspirations lie or want to consider the broad range of opportunities available once you have a Birmingham degree, our Careers Network can help you achieve your goal.

Our unique careers guidance service is tailored to your academic subject area, offering a specialised team (in each of the five academic colleges) who can give you expert advice. Our team source exclusive work experience opportunities to help you stand out amongst the competition, with mentoring, global internships and placements available to you. Once you have a career in your sights, one-to-one support with CVs and job applications will help give you the edge.

If you make the most of the wide range of services you will be able to develop your career from the moment you arrive.



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Postgraduate combined research and teaching degree programme Pure Mathematics MRes. This programme involves both taught classes in Pure Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. . Read more

Postgraduate combined research and teaching degree programme Pure Mathematics MRes:

This programme involves both taught classes in Pure Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. 

The MRes can be used as the first phase of our fast track PhD programme, in which the MRes thesis is extended over a further period of two years into a PhD thesis.

Course details

This programme involves both taught classes in Pure Mathematics and a substantial MRes thesis which accounts for almost two-thirds of the total degree. The minimum period of registration is 12 months. 

The MRes is an ideal preparation for entry into the PhD programme at Birmingham or at any other UK university. Indeed, the MRes programme can be used as the first phase of our fast track PhD programme. This is an excellent option for well-qualified mathematics students who do not have all the necessary mathematical background to start immediately on a PhD in their area of choice. In the fast track programme the MRes thesis is extended over a further period of two years into a PhD thesis. 

Each MRes student is assigned a project supervisor who will act as director and mentor in the preparation of the MRes thesis. This gives each student the opportunity to work one-to-one with mathematicians who are international experts in their fields. 

In addition to the assessed elements of the course, students are expected to play a full part in the research life of the School. The School has an active seminar programme, and organises international conferences in all areas of mathematics.

Related links

Learning and teaching

These courses are approximately one-third course work and two-thirds dissertation. The dissertation is completed under the direction of a project supervisor which gives our students the opportunity to work one-to-one with a leading expert in their field. 

A regular programme of seminars and conferences takes place within the School in a wide range of subjects. Currently thriving at Birmingham are the following research groups:

  • Applied Mathematics: applied analysis, mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, hydrogen energy, fuel cells and their applications, numerical analysis and scientific computation
  • Pure Mathematics: algebra, analysis, combinatorics and logic
  • Theoretical and Computational Optimization: mathematical theory and methods applicable to managerial decision-making
  • Statistics: time series analysis, multivariate statistics, kernel and wavelet based nonparametric smoothing methods, econometrics and medical statistics

Employability

This programme gives comprehensive training in mathematics and areas appropriate to professional development and research foundations. The MRes is an ideal preparation for entry into the PhD programme at Birmingham. In fact, the MRes programme can be used as the first phase of our ?Fast-track? PhD programme.

University Careers Network

Preparation for your career should be one of the first things you think about as you start university. Whether you have a clear idea of where your future aspirations lie or want to consider the broad range of opportunities available once you have a Birmingham degree, our Careers Network can help you achieve your goal.

Our unique careers guidance service is tailored to your academic subject area, offering a specialised team (in each of the five academic colleges) who can give you expert advice. Our team source exclusive work experience opportunities to help you stand out amongst the competition, with mentoring, global internships and placements available to you. Once you have a career in your sights, one-to-one support with CVs and job applications will help give you the edge.

If you make the most of the wide range of services you will be able to develop your career from the moment you arrive.



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The Architectural Computation MSc provides a comprehensive understanding of the skills required to create generative, emergent and responsive forms, through exposure to real programming environments. Read more

The Architectural Computation MSc provides a comprehensive understanding of the skills required to create generative, emergent and responsive forms, through exposure to real programming environments. Taught by architects and experts in artificial intelligence, students benefit from studio sessions with tutors who have experience of research in this field.

About this degree

On completion of the programme, students will be able to use computational techniques in architecture, understand and predict the consequences of their design actions through computational processes, integrate their predictions into the design process, and carry out self-sufficient research into new methods and processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), the choice between two streams of optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

Core modules

  • Computational Analysis
  • Computational Synthesis
  • Design as a Knowledge-Based Process
  • Introduction to Programming for Architecture and Design
  • Morphogenetic Programming

Optional modules

There are two streams of optional modules:

  • Embodied and Embedded Technologies
  • Digital Interaction

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report related to the main themes of the programme, typically involving the development of an interactive installation or a system to improve the design process.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops and seminars as well as individual and collaborative projects. Assessment is through unseen examination, coursework (including 3000-word essay, learning log, digitally fabricated piece and documentation, short video piece, and physical piece with video documentation) practical exercises and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Architectural Computation MSc

Careers

After completing the programme, most graduates go on to join leading architectural and engineering practices, either directly with design teams or with specialist modelling groups. Alumni have also joined (or founded) cutting-edge emerging digital design practices such as United Visual Artists and Moving Brands, or moved into academic research.

Employability

Our MSc provides a full learning experience with set projects and structured learning. It can be taken by those without any computational experience or those looking for industry-applicable skills. 

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Located in London, we are at the heart of a large cluster of creative architects and engineering firms, next to the UK's seat of government and finance and with all the resources of a world city to hand.

The new architecture coming out of the Bartlett is characterised by a high level of invention and creativity. The school is internationally known as a centre for innovative design.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Architecture

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Read more

This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of problems, on the analytical and numerical techniques for a solution and the computation of useful results.

By the end of the course students should be able to formulate a well posed problem in mathematical terms from a possibly sketchy verbal description, carry out appropriate mathematical analysis, select or develop an appropriate numerical method, write a computer program which gives sensible answers to the problem, and present and interpret these results for a possible client. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for all these parts in the problem solving process, and on the fact that they frequently interact and cannot be carried out sequentially.

The course consists of both taught courses and a dissertation. To complete the course you must complete 13 units.

There are four core courses which you must complete (one unit each), which each usually consist of 24 lectures, classes and an examination. There is one course on mathematical methods and one on numerical analysis in both Michaelmas term and Hilary term. Each course is assessed by written examination in Week 0 of the following term.

Additionally, you must choose at least least one special topic in the area of modelling and one in computation (one unit each). There are around twenty special topics to choose from, spread over all three academic terms, each usually consisting for 12 to 16 lectures and a mini project, which culminates in a written report of around 20 pages. Topics covered include mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, perturbation methods, numerical solution of differential equations and scientific programming. 

You must also undertake at least one case study in modelling and one in scientific computing (one unit each), normally consisting of four weeks of group work, an oral presentation and a report delivered in Hilary term.

There is also a dissertation (four units) of around 50 pages, which does not necessarily need to represent original ideas. Since there is another MSc focussed on mathematical finance specifically, the MSc in Mathematical and Computational Finance, you are not permitted to undertake a dissertation in this field.

You will normally accumulate four units in core courses, three units in special topics, two units in case studies and four units in the dissertation. In addition, you will usually attend classes in mathematical modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills during Michaelmas term.

In the first term, students should expect their weekly schedule to consist of around seven hours of core course lectures and seven hours of modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills classes, then a further two hours of lectures for each special topic course followed. In addition there are about three hours of problem solving classes to go through core course exercises and students should expect to spend time working through the exercises then submitting them for marking prior to the class. There are slightly fewer contact hours in the second term, but students will spend more time working in groups on the case studies.

In the third term there are some special topic courses, including one week intensive computing courses, but the expectation is that students will spend most of the third term and long vacation working on their dissertations. During this time, students should expect to work hours that are equivalent to full-time working hours, although extra hours may occasionally be needed. Students are expected to write special topic and case study reports during the Christmas and Easter vacations, as well as revising for the core course written examinations.



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