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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Research Project in Environmental Biology

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

MSc Project

+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems

Research Project

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Physics Project

+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Modelling Earth Systems

Satellite Remote Sensing

Climate Change – Past, Present and Future

Geographical Information Systems

Conservation of Aquatic Resources

Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium

a number of CW and pulsed laser systems

scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

a Raman microscope

a 72 CPU parallel cluster

access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.



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The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Read more
The MPhil programme in Scientific Computing is a full-time 12-month course which aims to provide education of the highest quality at Master’s level. Covering topics of high-performance scientific computing and advanced numerical methods and techniques, it produces graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well-equipped to proceed to doctoral research or directly into employment in industry, the professions, and the public service. It also provides training for the academic researchers and teachers of the future, encouraging the pursuit of research in computational methods for science and technology disciplines, thus being an important gateway for entering PhD programmes containing a substantial component of computational modelling.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcphmpscm

Course detail

The MPhil in Scientific Computing has a research and a taught element. The research element is a project on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. The taught element comprises of core lecture courses on topics of scientific computing and elective lecture courses relevant to the science or technology topic of the project. Most of the projects are expected to make use of the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

The students will attend lecture courses during Michaelmas Term (some courses may be during Lent Term) and then they will undertake a substantial Research Project over the next 6 months (from March to the end of August) in a participating Department. The research element aims to provide essential skills for continuation to a PhD programme or employment, as well as to assess and enhance the research capacity of the students. It is based on a science or technology topic which is studied by means of scientific computation. Research project topics will be provided by academic supervisors or by the industrial partners who are working with the participating Departments and may be sponsoring the research project.

There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively.

Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments on the core courses 25%; written examinations on the elective courses 25%.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of numerical methods, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
- demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project.

The taught element comprises core lecture courses on topics of all aspects of scientific computing, and elective lecture courses relevant to the topic of the research project. There is equal examination credit weighting between the taught and the research elements of the course, which is gained by submitting a dissertation on the project and by written assignments and examinations on the core and elective courses, respectively. Weighting of the assessed course components is as follows: Dissertation (research) 50%; written assignments 25%; written examinations 25%.

The core lectures are on topics of high performance scientific computing numerical analysis and advanced numerical methods and techniques. They are organized by the Centre for Scientific Computing and are taught and examined during the first five months (October-February). Their purpose is to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their dissertation and for their general education in scientific computing.

In particular, their objective is to introduce students to the simulation science pipeline of problem identification, modelling, simulation and evaluation - all from the perspective of employing high-performance computing. Numerical discretisation of mathematical models will be a priority, with a specific emphasis on understanding the trade-offs (in terms of modelling time, pre-processing time, computational time, and post-processing time) that must be made when solving realistic science and engineering problems. Understanding and working with computational methods and parallel computing will be a high priority. To help the students understand the material, the lecturers will furnish the courses with practical coursework assignments.

The lectures on topics of numerical analysis and HPC are complemented with hands-on practicals using Linux-based laptops provided by the course (students may bring their own), as well as on the University’s High Performance Computing Service.

Appropriate elective lecture courses are selected from Master’s-level courses offered by the Departments of the School of Physical Sciences, Technology or Biological Sciences. The choice of courses will be such as to provide the students with essential background knowledge for completing their theses and for their general education in the materials science application of the project. They are decided in consultation with the project supervisor. While every effort is made within the Departments to arrange the timetable in a coherent fashion, it is inevitable that some combinations of courses will be ruled out by their schedule, particularly if the choices span more than one department.

Continuing

For continuation to a PhD programme in Scientific Computing, students are required to gain a Distinction (overall grade equal or greater than 75%).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering. Read more

Overview

Scientific computing is a new and growing discipline in its own right. It is concerned with harnessing the power of modern computers to carry out calculations relevant to science and engineering.
By its very nature, scientific computing is a fundamentally multidisciplinary subject. The various application areas give rise to mathematical models of the phenomena being studied.

Examples range in scale from the behaviour of cells in biology, to flow and combustion processes in a jet engine, to the formation and development of galaxies. Mathematics is used to formulate and analyse numerical methods for solving the equations that come from these applications.

Implementing the methods on modern, high performance computers requires good algorithm design to produce efficient and robust computer programs. Competence in scientific computing thus requires familiarity with a range of academic disciplines. The practitioner must, of course, be familiar with the application area of interest, but it is also necessary to understand something of the mathematics and computer science involved.

Whether you are interested in fundamental science, or a technical career in business or industry, it is clear that having expertise in scientific computing would be a valuable, if not essential asset. The question is: how does one acquire such expertise?

This course is one of a suite of MScs in Scientific Computation that are genuinely multidisciplinary in nature. These courses are taught by internationally leading experts in various application areas and in the core areas of mathematics and computing science, fully reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of the subject. The courses have been carefully designed to be accessible to anyone with a good first degree in science or engineering. They are excellent preparation either for research in an area where computational techniques play a significant role, or for a career in business or industry.

Key facts:
- This course is offered in collaboration with the School of Computer Science.
- It is one of a suite of courses focusing on scientific computation.
- The School of Mathematical Sciences is one of the largest and strongest mathematics departments in the UK, with over 50 full-time academic staff.
- In the latest independent Research Assessment Exercise, the school ranked 8th in the UK in terms of research power across the three subject areas within the School of Mathematical Sciences (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and operational research).

Modules

Advanced Techniques for Differential Equations

Computational Linear Algebra

Operations Research and Modelling

Programming for Scientific Computation

Scientific Computation Dissertation

Simulation for Computer Scientists

Stochastic Financial Modelling

Variational Methods

Vocational Mathematics

Data Mining Techniques and Applications

Mathematical Foundations of Programming

English language requirements for international students

IELTS: 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any element)

Further information



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Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Read more

Scientists and engineers are tackling ever more complex problems, most of which do not admit analytical solutions and must be solved numerically. Numerical methods can only play an even more important role in the future as we face even bigger challenges. Therefore, skilled scientific programmers are in high demand in industry and academia and will drive forward much of the future economy.

About this degree

This programme aims to provide a rigorous formal training in computational science to produce highly computationally skilled scientists and engineers capable of applying numerical methods and critical evaluation of their results to their field of science or engineering. It brings together best practice in computing with cutting-edge science and provides a computing edge over traditional science, engineering and mathematics programmes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), is also offered.

Core modules

  • Computational and Simulation Methods
  • Numerical Methods
  • Numerical Optimisation
  • Research Computing with C++
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Techniques of High-Performance Computing

Optional modules

Options include a wide selection of modules across UCL Engineering and UCL Mathematical & Physical Sciences.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and hands-on programming and includes a variety of short programming projects, delivered as part of the taught component. Students are encouraged to participate in scientific seminars, for example, weekly seminars at the UCL Centre for Inverse Problems. Assessment is through examinations, assignments, small projects and the dissertation, including a computer programme.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Scientific Computing MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

We expect our graduates to take up exciting science and engineering roles in industry and academia with excellent prospects for professional development and steep career advancement opportunities. This degree enables students to work on cutting-edge real-life problems, overcome the challenges they pose and so contribute to advancing knowledge and technology in our society.

Employability

Students develop a comprehensive set of skills which are in high demand both in industry and academia: professional software development skills including state-of-the-art scripting and compiled languages; knowledge of techniques used in high-performance computing; understanding and an ability to apply a wide range of numerical methods and numerical optimisation; a deeper knowledge of their chosen science subject; oral and written presentational skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a global reputation for excellence in research and is committed to delivering impact and innovations that enhance the lives of people in the UK, across Europe and around the world. UCL is consistently placed in the global top 20 across a wide range of university rankings (currently 7th in QS World University Rankings 2018). Furthermore, the Thomson Scientific Citation Index shows that UCL is the second-most highly cited European university and 12th in the world.

Our wide-ranging expertise provides opportunities for groundbreaking interdisciplinary investigation. World-leading experts in the field and students benefit from a programme of distinguished visitors and guest speakers in many scientific seminars. In this way a network of collaborators, mentors and peers is created, which students can access in their future career.

This degree has been designed to balance a professional software development and high performance computing skills with a comprehensive selection of numerical mathematics and scientific subjects, culminating in a scientific computing dissertation project. The dual aspect of a science and computing degree enables students to tackle real-life problems in a structured and rigorous way and produce professional software for their efficient solution.



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One image tells more than a thousand words. It is not surprising that in biomedical sciences traditionally illustrations are created to enable communication between scientist and author, teacher and student, or physician and patient. Read more
One image tells more than a thousand words
It is not surprising that in biomedical sciences traditionally illustrations are created to enable communication between scientist and author, teacher and student, or physician and patient. Art and science come together in scientific illustration.

Your future expertise
When you graduate, you are a specialist who makes accurate visualisations of topics from the clinical, medical and biological domain. You have the skills to use a wide range of traditional and digital visualisation techniques.

Best of two top universities
The Master Scientific Illustration is an international study programme in which you will meet students from European countries and beyond. Unique in Europe. It is cooperation between the Faculty of Arts at Zuyd University of Applied Science in Maastricht and the Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences at Maastricht University.

Language
English/Dutch. The lecturers also speak German.

The teaching programme

Training in technical skills
Your training has a strong emphasis on the application of conventional imaging techniques in conjunction with photography, video and computer techniques for accurate two-dimensional display of three-dimensional structures. Additional training in digital three-dimensional reconstruction and modelling is given in workshops. You acquire a broad theoretical basis as well as practical experience in working with medical techniques such as dissection, processing of microscopic and macroscopic serial sections and working with medical imaging techniques such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

Becoming a scientific storyteller
To be able to create a scientifically correct image, you must not only be a good craftsman, but also an outstanding 'storyteller' and communicator. You must be capable of communicating with specialists from different scientific fields, understanding the scientific problem and then be able to convert it into visualisation for a specific target audience. Creating images for patient education requires a different approach than creating images for a group of medical specialists. For this reason you will not only be trained in anatomy and medical nomenclature but you’ll also be guided in the field of communication. Furthermore, by means of practical assignments (including illustrating a surgical procedure) you will build up experience in making abstractions and schematisations of the reality to create an image that tells the scientific story in the best possible way.

The themes
The teaching programme is build up in three themes:

- Man
- Animal
- Human and Animal Surgery

Each of the themes consists of three to five components and each component involves one or more assignments, which deal with various aspects of scientific illustration and in which various traditional visualisation techniques are practised and applied. The assignments are graded in terms of complexity, leading up to the level required for professional practice.

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Communicating science is a challenging topic, where you may need to explain the structure of a leaf to a seven year old one day, and report the very latest research to the world via scientific journals the next. Read more
Communicating science is a challenging topic, where you may need to explain the structure of a leaf to a seven year old one day, and report the very latest research to the world via scientific journals the next.
These both rely on subject knowledge and an ability to effectively communicate complex scientific theories to others.

This MSc will help you to build your subject knowledge of Chemistry while also enhancing your ability to communicate science, with a focus on writing for scientific publication or communication in the media. You’ll gain a Master’s level education in technical chemistry modules and develop key research skills by completing a research project in one of our world-class research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment.

By the end of the course you’ll have advanced chemical knowledge and the skills to prepare you for a career in research, scientific writing, science education or science communication.

Structure

The course spans 1 year, the first 20 weeks are lecture-based, providing you with a diverse toolbox in chemistry and scientific writing and leading onto a 24 weeks research project in chemistry.
Term 1 and Term 2:
-Writing Extended Scientific Articles
-Writing Focuses Scientific Articles and Reports
-Communicating Science to Different Audiences
-Transferrable Skills
-5 other MSc level modules from the wide selection offered by the Chemistry Department
Research Project:
-Immerse yourself in a real research project, supervised by our renowned academics

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This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in specialised translation in the scientific, technical and medical areas. Read more

This MSc is designed to provide first-class training in specialised translation in the scientific, technical and medical areas. The programme offers you the opportunity to develop your translation and language skills, to deepen your understanding of the workings of language as an essential tool of communication and to gain vital experience in the rapidly developing area of translation technology.

About this degree

By focusing on the translation of scientific, technical and medical texts, you'll be equipped with the skills needed for professional work in the translation industry and for research in translation studies. You'll practice translation in specific language pairs and will become conversant with computer-based translation technology which has been transforming the way in which professional translators work.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of 6 core modules (90 credits), 2 optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Language & Translation
  • Translation Technologies 1
  • Medical Translation
  • Scientific & Technical Translation
  • Translation Technologies 2
  • Language & Automation

Part-time students take set core modules in year one and year two.

Optional modules

Students choose two optional modules from the list below:

  • Subtitling
  • Localisation
  • Professional Skills for Translators
  • Subtitling for the Deaf & the Hard-of-Hearing
  • Audio Description for the Blind & the Partially Sighted
  • Translating for Voiceover & Dubbing
  • Topics in Audiovisual Translation
  • Crisis Translation
  • Translation Theory
  • Corpora for Translation

Part-time students take optional modules in year two.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-words consisting of either an annotated translation or a critical discussion of a theoretical aspect of translation.

Teaching and learning

The degree programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, interactive practical seminars, practical translation assignments and hands-on experience with a wide range of translation tools and technology. Assessment is carried out through essays, project work, take-home translation assessments and in-class tests.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Specialised Translation (Scientific, Technical and Medical) MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Most students find challenging and rewarding work within the translation industry on completion of the degree. Some are working as in-house and freelance translators, while others are active as project managers, translation tools experts and computational linguists in organisations such as Xerox, Amazon, SDL International, Expedia, Hogarth, Cannon, SDI-Media, ITR, VSI and Deluxe to name but a few. In addition, the MSc is designed to serve as a basis for a Translation Studies PhD.

Employability

Translation is a dynamic and rapidly developing profession, which calls for linguistically talented people with a clear understanding of the issues involved in cross-cultural transcoding and who are able to utilise the latest computer-based tools. 

On completion of this MSc, you will be well placed for a fast-track progression in your chosen career. We aim to make you highly attractive to employers within the translation industry and the world of communications, an to international institutions such as the United Nations and the European Union. In addition, the skills acquired through taking this MSc will be highly relevant if your aim is to establish yourself as a freelance translator.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of London, UCL is excellently placed to offer opportunities for networking and to establish professional contacts. At UCL we prepare you for the professional world by performing different roles within the translation workflow and by translating specialised texts on the widest possible variety of material, ranging from medical reports and research papers to user guides, product documentation, patents, technical specification, audiovisual programmes and web pages.

We organise a wide range of activities which offer you a unique opportunity for informal contact with professional translators, translation agencies and leading academics. We also work closely with industry partners to ensure that the programme possesses the maximum professional relevance.

You will enjoy working with a team of renowned academics and professional translators, which has gained an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research.



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Do you want to become an expert in communicating scientific concepts? Whether you’re preparing for a career in scientific writing, education or communication, this course is the one for you. Read more
Do you want to become an expert in communicating scientific concepts? Whether you’re preparing for a career in scientific writing, education or communication, this course is the one for you. Run between our Centre for Applied Linguistics and Faculty of Science, you can choose from over 50 modules and tailor the course to your specific scientific skills and interests.

You’ll enhance your communication and English Language skills, learning to convey advanced technical scientific concepts for journals, classrooms, or the media. You’ll also undertake a bespoke research project, gaining excellent research experience using our state-of-the-art equipment in an interdisciplinary environment.

By the end of the course, you’ll have gained advanced knowledge in your chosen fields and learned to communicate with a broad range of audiences too. You’ll be well positioned to take on a number of career paths from publishing and teaching, to taking on a PhD.

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As an interdisciplinary centre we offer relevant modules run by other departments as well as the Centre’s own modules. The list of modules offered is reviewed annually and is dependent on those offered by each department. Read more
As an interdisciplinary centre we offer relevant modules run by other departments as well as the Centre’s own modules. The list of modules offered is reviewed annually and is dependent on those offered by each department.

This MSc provides an exciting mixture of fundamental methods and cutting-edge applications of Scientific Computing. Formal training covers software engineering for both workstations and high-performance computers, and underpinning algorithms. You may then choose a project within one of the many interdisciplinary Scientific Computing research groups at Warwick.

Our interdisciplinary focus gives you access to a breadth of expertise across the natural sciences at Warwick. You will benefit from extra contact time with staff and other students, while also being able to work across departments in accordance with your subject interests. Recent graduate destinations include the financial and IT sector. A large proportion of our MSc students continue on to a PhD programme in a science discipline and others have advanced to roles in IT development, modelling and consultancy.

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The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are… Read more
The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are brought together to deliver a one-year Master’s degree combining an in-depth multidisciplinary scientific programme with a global perspective on the commercial opportunities and business practice necessary for the successful exploitation in the rapidly developing fields of nanotechnology and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

The programme is intended for those with a good first degree in the physical sciences and engineering who wish to develop research skills and a commercial awareness in micro- and nanotechnology. It combines cutting-edge science with business practice skills, giving students knowledge and experience of a range of disciplines. This should enable students graduating from the course to evaluate the scientific importance and technological potential of new developments in the field of the field of Micro and Nanotechnology and provides an unparalleled educational experience for entrepreneurs in these fields.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmne

Course detail

Students will:

- be able to develop a discipline-specific terminology to describe and discuss relevant aspects of Micro and Nanotechnology, as well as Business;
- be able to develop their scientific writing skills through lab reports, literature survey, project dissertation, and scientific communication skills through oral presentations;
- be able to develop independence and critical thinking, as well as project management skills;
- have the opportunity develop team project skills.

Format

The programme is modular in structure and lasts ten months. It is envisaged that students attend all modules, which consist of no more than 16 hours of lectures per module with additional discussion groups and personal study time. The students will be examined on all core modules and may select which elective modules they are examined on. The modules are taught in the first two terms and will be followed by formal examinations. The modules are drawn from Science and Technology, Business Management and Innovation strands and so cover the many complexities involved in the processes of discovery and exploitation.

Written or oral feedback is provided after completion of assessed course work. In addition students must sit a mock exam at the beginning of the Lent Term; detailed individual feedback is provided by the Course Directors, who are also available for consultation throughout the academic year.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words in length (including tables, figure legends and appendices, but excluding bibliography) on a major project, involving (i) in-depth scientific research (following a literature survey in the same scientific field), or (ii) an in-depth case study concerned with a topic in science, business, ethics, law or policy (related to the topic covered during the literature survey). The assessment will include a viva voce examination.

No more than eight essays, each of not more than 3,000 words in length, covering the fields of science, ethics, law, and policy, and the interface of micro- and nanoscience and business.

A literature survey report of not more than 5000 words in length on a scientific topic, to be followed by either a major research project in the same field, or a business, ethics, law, or policy-related case study, concerning the scientific topic.

Course work, which may include written work, group work, and class participation.

Two unseen written examination papers, which may cover all core and elective scientific subjects prescribed in the syllabus.

Five practical assessments.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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What is the Master of Biomedical Sciences all about?. Biomedical sciences underwent a spectacular evolution during the past decades. Read more

What is the Master of Biomedical Sciences all about?

Biomedical sciences underwent a spectacular evolution during the past decades. New diseases such as bird flu arose, whereas others such as AIDS and diabetes have expanded. At the same time, researchers are discovering new ways to fight these diseases. The human genome has been decoded, gene technology is steadily growing, immunotherapy has been introduced for the treatment of several cancers and the first steps in the direction of stem cell therapy have been made. The laboratories at KU Leuven and University Hospital Gasthuisberg deliver cutting edge work in the field of disease and development of new therapies, stretching from bench to bedside. The Master of Biomedical Sciences at KU Leuven allows students to live this journey themselves, hands on.

Do you dream of working on the frontline of the ongoing battle for a better understanding of human health and diseases? Are dedicated to applying this knowledge to better prevention and treatment options? Then this programme is for you. During the two master's years you will be truly immersed in scientific biomedical research. By doing scientific research in a domestic or foreign laboratory, you will gain thorough know-how, strengthen your scientific skills and learn the newest scientific methods. All of these skills and accumulated knowledge will be applied in the most important part of the master's programme: your master's thesis.

Objectives

The main goal of the curriculum is to train researchers in biomedical sciences by providing a rigorous scientific training based on the acquisition of knowledge, the collection and interpretation of information and the use of modern research techniques. This is expected to stimulate the critical thinking and independence required to address a specific research question related to (dys)function of the human body and its interaction with the environment. Furthermore, the curriculum provides broad, intellectually rigorous training allowing for a wide array of job opportunities in industry, research centres and society.

The aims of the curriculum follow the educational principles of KU Leuven, important among which is the independence of the student. For the acquisition of knowledge, the university uses its own high-quality interdisciplinary scientific research. KU Leuven aims to be a centre of critical thinking where, in addition to factual knowledge, people are stimulated to identify, define and solve problems.

The quality of the curriculum is guaranteed due to the strong interconnection between education and research in the Biomedical Sciences in the broadest sense. The faculty commits itself to a future-oriented educational project in an academic setting that is at once intellectually stimulating, socially supportive and student friendly.

Career perspectives

Internationalisation has become an integral part of the profile of researchers in biomedical sciences. International exchange is the key to opening mindsets to global solutions in health and disease. Graduates can expect to embark on international-level careers in very diverse areas touching on human health.

First and foremost, biomedical scientists are prepared for a personal career full of exciting scientific research in academic or pharmaceutical laboratories dedicated to improving knowledge in human health and finding prevention strategies and cures for diseases. Beyond this, there are many different directions open to you.

Many graduates go on to careers in consultancy, policy, sales and marketing, communication and management in areas related to human health, such as the pharmaceutical industry, scientific writing agencies, regulatory agencies and government administration. Graduates find rewarding work in a wide variety of sectors: the pharmaceutical industry, the academic or educational world, healthcare, the environmental sector and food inspection, among others.

Programme graduates are in high demand in the pharmaceutical and medical industry. As a biomedical scientist, for example, you provide thoroughly prepared research, which is a crucial phase in the development of new drugs and other medical products. It is also possible to cooperate with the set-up and follow-up of preclinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry. The programme gives you the perfect profile for clinical trial design, as well as the monitoring and conducting of these trials, on both the business and clinical sides of the process.

You can also work for service companies that deliver or develop products or equipment to the medical sector. Positions in government are also open to you, especially in the area of public health. Some biomedical scientists choose to specialise in the legislation around patents and the protection of biomedical discoveries, and others begin careers as biology, chemistry or biotechnology teachers. Additionally, there is a current need for experts who can clearly communicate scientific information and research results to non-specialists and the general public.



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Environmental change affects everyone on the planet and sustainably managing a changing natural environment is one of the 21st century’s most pressing challenges. Read more
Environmental change affects everyone on the planet and sustainably managing a changing natural environment is one of the 21st century’s most pressing challenges. This course will develop your theoretical knowledge and practical skills, enabling you to begin to meet these challenges in your chosen career.

You will learn about the changes happening to the environment at different spatial scales and will develop your understanding of the concepts used to manage environmental change, from site-based project management to sustainable development.

You will also learn about the legal and economic context of the environment, exploring how the environment can be integrated into a range of policy sectors.

Each of the topics you cover will draw upon the latest scientific literature and teaching from leading academic researchers.

Why choose this course?

• Study how the integration of environmental science, biotechnological methods and project management can help with the sustainable management of environmental, biodiversity and ecosystem services
• Explore the principles and methodologies of environmental biotechnology, and gain the ability to critically evaluate and identify technologies applicable for the sustainable management of global environmental change
• Develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the biological, ecological and socio-economic drivers of global environmental change, and how these are inter-related
• Gain the ability to evaluate methods of managing environmental change at local and global levels, including legislative, voluntary and economic management
• Benefit from the opportunity to choose a career with environmental consultancies, biotechnological research organisations, and national and international government agencies and non-governmental bodies.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/environmental-management

Course detail

In a rapidly changing world, there has never been a greater need for people to sustainably manage the environment. Whether you are a recent graduate seeking career opportunities in the environmental sector, or a more experienced professional looking to develop your range of competencies, MSc Environmental Management provides you with the knowledge and skills necessary for success.

Developing and demonstrating a wide range of abilities in both taught and project work, our graduates go on to a diverse range of careers in government, NGOs, business and industry, as well as further study leading to PhD. At the University of Bedfordshire, you will develop practical skills in our well-equipped new laboratories and be taught by staff with expertise in ecology, biotechnology, management and environmental microbiology, enabling specialist tuition and supervision of your practical work.

Modules

• Environmental Project Management
• Environmental Management and Sustainability
• Global Environmental Change
• Environmental Biotechnology
• Environmental Research Project

Assessment

Practical reports are a key assessment type used throughout the course as they reinforce professional standards of presenting scientific reports, practice your ability to interpret data and to place experimental results within a broader scientific context, develop your ability to relate experimental results to theory, and teach you to apply the scientific method.

Consultancy-style reports develop your writing for non-academic professional audiences.

End of year exams are included in all units (except the project) with essay-style questions focused on integration and evaluation of understanding.

Oral presentations to small groups or to examiners in a viva voce setting and academic poster presentations (a standard style of scientific conference presentation) will develop your portfolio of communication skills.

Case studies are used within assessments where appropriate to provide real-world and employment-centred context to the assignments.

Careers

Lecturing staff are actively engaged in scientific research, so our teaching and the course are directly informed by our research knowledge and activities.

Many of the skills you will develop are applicable to professions away from the subject itself. The ability to research complex information, analyse data and write professional reports are highly valued and our students are encouraged to think about potential careers in a wide variety of sectors.

Key aspects of the course that emphasise employability of our graduates include:
• Training in key techniques relevant to employment within the environmental sector, including awareness of relevant health and safety, legal and ethical considerations. Training and practice in the scientific method that underpins all scientific research (developing novel hypotheses, testing these by experiment, accurately interpreting data and understanding error, and drawing valid conclusions).
• Practice in professional standards of reporting, including laboratory reports using the standards of professional research publications, preparation of scientific conference posters, and written and oral presentations. You will also develop your writing in a professional consultancy style, providing you with the opportunity to learn the subtle differences required when writing for different professional audiences.
• Maintenance of laboratory or field diaries and research diaries following standard practice within the sector.
• Guest lectures from external speakers from academic and industry.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Read more

This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of problems, on the analytical and numerical techniques for a solution and the computation of useful results.

By the end of the course students should be able to formulate a well posed problem in mathematical terms from a possibly sketchy verbal description, carry out appropriate mathematical analysis, select or develop an appropriate numerical method, write a computer program which gives sensible answers to the problem, and present and interpret these results for a possible client. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for all these parts in the problem solving process, and on the fact that they frequently interact and cannot be carried out sequentially.

The course consists of both taught courses and a dissertation. To complete the course you must complete 13 units.

There are four core courses which you must complete (one unit each), which each usually consist of 24 lectures, classes and an examination. There is one course on mathematical methods and one on numerical analysis in both Michaelmas term and Hilary term. Each course is assessed by written examination in Week 0 of the following term.

Additionally, you must choose at least least one special topic in the area of modelling and one in computation (one unit each). There are around twenty special topics to choose from, spread over all three academic terms, each usually consisting for 12 to 16 lectures and a mini project, which culminates in a written report of around 20 pages. Topics covered include mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, perturbation methods, numerical solution of differential equations and scientific programming. 

You must also undertake at least one case study in modelling and one in scientific computing (one unit each), normally consisting of four weeks of group work, an oral presentation and a report delivered in Hilary term.

There is also a dissertation (four units) of around 50 pages, which does not necessarily need to represent original ideas. Since there is another MSc focussed on mathematical finance specifically, the MSc in Mathematical and Computational Finance, you are not permitted to undertake a dissertation in this field.

You will normally accumulate four units in core courses, three units in special topics, two units in case studies and four units in the dissertation. In addition, you will usually attend classes in mathematical modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills during Michaelmas term.

In the first term, students should expect their weekly schedule to consist of around seven hours of core course lectures and seven hours of modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills classes, then a further two hours of lectures for each special topic course followed. In addition there are about three hours of problem solving classes to go through core course exercises and students should expect to spend time working through the exercises then submitting them for marking prior to the class. There are slightly fewer contact hours in the second term, but students will spend more time working in groups on the case studies.

In the third term there are some special topic courses, including one week intensive computing courses, but the expectation is that students will spend most of the third term and long vacation working on their dissertations. During this time, students should expect to work hours that are equivalent to full-time working hours, although extra hours may occasionally be needed. Students are expected to write special topic and case study reports during the Christmas and Easter vacations, as well as revising for the core course written examinations.



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The MSc in Archaeological Science is designed to provide a broad theoretical and practical understanding of current issues and the techniques archaeologists use to investigate the human past. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Science is designed to provide a broad theoretical and practical understanding of current issues and the techniques archaeologists use to investigate the human past. Its purpose is to provide a pathway for archaeologists or graduates of other scientific disciplines to either professional posts or doctoral research in archaeological science. It focuses particularly on the organic remains of humans, animals and plants which is a rapidly developing and exciting field of archaeometry. Major global themes such as animal and plant domestication and human migration and diet will be explored integrating evidence from a range of sub-disciplines in environmental and biomolecular archaeology Students taking this course will study and work in a range of environmental, DNA, isotope and dating laboratories alongside expert academic staff.

The aim of this programme is to equip students to:
-Devise and carry out in-depth study in archaeological science
-Analyse and interpret results
-Communicate scientific results to a variety of audiences
-Develop the inter-disciplinary skills (cultural and scientific) to work effectively in archaeology

Students will gain a critical understanding of the application of scientific techniques to our study of the human past, and receive intensive training in a specific area of archaeological science. Students will examine the theory underpinning a range of scientific techniques, as well as the current archaeological context in which they are applied and interpreted. This will be achieved through a broad archaeological framework which will educate students to reconcile the underlying constraints of analytical science with the concept-based approach of cultural archaeology. Students will therefore examine both theoretical and practical approaches to particular problems, and to the choice of suitable techniques to address them. They will learn how to assess the uncertainties of their conclusions, and to acknowledge the probable need for future reinterpretations as the methods develop. Following training in one specific archaeological science area of their choice, students will be expected to demonstrate that they can combine a broad contextual and theoretical knowledge of archaeology with their detailed understanding of the methods in their chosen area, through an original research dissertation.

Course Structure

The course consists of four taught modules of 30 credits each and a 60 credit research dissertation. Students will study two core modules in Term 1 and two elective modules in Term1/2 followed by a research dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
-Topics in Archaeological Science
-Research Dissertation

Optional Modules:
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Plants and People
-Animals and People
-Chronometry
-Isotope and Molecular Archaeology
-Practical Guided Study

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among archaeologists in a specific area or on a particular theme. Seminars and tutorials then provide opportunities for smaller groups of student-led discussion and debate of particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours.

Practical classes and workshops allow students to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Archaeological Science with guidance from experienced and qualified scientists in Archaeology. Finally, independent supervised study enables students to develop and undertake a research project to an advanced level. Throughout the programme emphasis is placed on working independently outside the contact hours, in order to synthesise large datasets and to develop critical and analytical skills to an advanced level.

The balance of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and the ability as independent learners and researchers. In Terms 1 and 2 the emphasis is upon students acquiring the generic, practical skills and knowledge that archaeological scientists need to undertake scientific study in archaeology whilst examining and debating relevant archaeological theory and the 'big questions' to which scientific methods are applied. They also study a choice of specific areas creating their individual research profile and interests.

Students typically attend three hours a week of lectures, and two one hour seminars or tutorials each week. In addition, they may be required to attend three-four hours a week of workshops or practicals based on lectures. The practical work complements desk-based analytical skills which are intended to develop skills applicable within and outside the field of archaeology. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare effectively for their classes, focus their subject knowledge and develop a research agenda.

The balance shifts into Term 3, as students develop their abilities as independent researchers with a dissertation. The lectures and practicals already attended have introduced them to and given them the chance to practice archaeology research methods within specific fields of study. Students have also engaged with academic issues, archaeological datasets and their interpretation which are at the forefront of archaeological research. The dissertation is regarded as the cap-stone of the taught programme and an indicator of advanced research potential, which could be developed further in a professional or academic field. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have ten one-hour supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular theme or area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. They also interact with scientific lab staff as they carry out their research.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet with their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend..

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What's the Master of Psychology all about? . Students of the research master will obtain. a thorough training in statistics and research methodology. Read more

What's the Master of Psychology all about? 

Students of the research master will obtain:

  • a thorough training in statistics and research methodology
  • the in-depth study of the basic disciplines of psychology, supplemented with a specialization in perception, cognition and language, emotion, cross-cultural psychology, neuroscience, learning psychology, or quantitative psychology.

In addition to individual and group-based coursework, students become immersed in ongoing multidisciplinary research at the faculty.

Hands-on expertise

  • Master’s thesis: You conduct independent psychological research in line with your own interests. Topics can range from fundamental to applied and frequently lead to publication in scientific peer-reviewed journals.
  • Internship: You complete an internship (120 days) at one of our faculty research groups or one of many top universities and institutes worldwide.

International

Acknowledging the increasing importance of international research experience in scientific and career development, students may complete their internship at one of the research groups of the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences at KU Leuven, or they can complete part or all of their internship outside Leuven. Internship coordinators and faculty members help students locate and arrange internships at international research groups around the world.

Our students have conducted their internships at top universities and institutes worldwide, including:

General objectives

  • Students will acquire advanced knowledge of the basic domains of psychological research. They will understand how research results are established, from the conception of research questions to the dissemination of results.
  • Students will become proficient to gather relevant information from the research literature, critically evaluate information, and actively use this information to generate novel research and theory. They will learn how to deal with questions about psychological functioning in an independent and scientific way. This will involve analyzing concrete problems, asking critical questions, designing and implementing appropriate methodologies and interventions, and developing well-reasoned arguments about their social views.
  • Students will be prepared to independently develop their skills in psychology as a science and as an evidence-based practice.

General learning outcomes

  • Students can gain insight in theory and research in the basic domains of psychology and their chosen areas of specialization.
  • Students can critically examine scientific developments in psychology and argue their scientific views and decisions. They can apply this knowledge the analysis of specific psychological problems.
  • Students know and understand the methodology of behavioral science research, both in terms of general principles and data analysis, its potential and limitations. They can apply this knowledge both in the processing of their own research data and in the critical reading of that of others.
  • Students acquire a general scientific attitude, effective communication and reporting skills, personal maturity and sensitivity to ethical and moral issues associated with psychology and the scientific profession.

Career perspectives

The primary purpose of the Master of Psychology: Theory and Research is to prepare students to pursue a PhD project. Many of our graduates go on to pursue academic careers at top universities. The programme also provides a solid background for international careers in a variety of other settings, which may include:

  • scientific research and policy functions in research institutes
  • somatic and mental health treatment institutions
  • centres for educational research and counselling
  • insurance providers
  • government agencies
  • pharmaceutical, food, and medical technology industries.


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