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Masters Degrees (Science Policy)

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Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication. Read more

Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication.

You will develop the skills required to work in a range of sectors, including media, science policy, filmmaking, science outreach, public relations, museums and science centres, science festivals, and other public engagement fields.

Developed by the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the course features masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in a wide range of sectors, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

You will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?

You will consider these and other questions through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and link these to practical skills.

Special features

Real world learning

We bring practitioners into the classroom and enable you to participate in the various forms of science communication that take place in Manchester to complement your academic learning with real life experiences.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements for both individual students and groups.

You will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, professional literatures, and mass media products about science, technology and medicine.

You will also learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events.

We encourage participation and volunteering to help you further your own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Applicants may informally request examples of study materials to help you test your ability to engage effectively with the course from the Course Director.

Coursework and assessment

All units are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. You should expect both written and spoken assessments that use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

You may choose your own topic or medium for many of the assessments. Assessed work also includes a piece of original science communication research.

The final assessment is a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional (the mentored project).

Course unit details

The full-time version of the course runs for 12 months from September. There is also a part-time alternative, covering half the same classes each semester over two years. Part-time study involves a limited number of days' attendance per week and can be combined with part-time employment.

All students take three course units consisting of weekly lectures and discussion seminars:

  • Introduction to Science Communication (30 credits)
  • Communicating ideas in science, technology and medicine (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Contemporary Science and Medicine (15 credits)

All students also attend a series of intensive one-day schools on science communication practice and science policy, with sessions led by invited contributors including journalists, documentary filmmakers, museum professionals, policy analysts, outreach officers and other relevant experts. From these day schools, you will choose two of the following four areas to specialise in for assessed work (although you can sit in on all these units):

  • Science, media and journalism (15 credits)
  • Science museums, Science Centres and Public Events (15 credits)
  • Ideas and issues in science communication studies (15 credits) ¿ Science, government and policy (15 credits)

The course is completed by two more open-ended elements allowing you to specialise towards your preferred interests.

  • The science communication research project (30 credits) gives more scope for independent investigation and includes new research on a particular science communication topic.
  • The mentored project (60 credits), completed over the summer at the end of the course, involves working with support from a science communication professional on developing and analysing an activity close to professional practice.

Our course teaches the current trends in science communication, so details of our units may vary from year to year to stay up to date. This type of change is covered within the University's disclaimer , but if you are in doubt about a unit of interest, please contact us before accepting your offer of a place.

What our students say

Read about graduate Amie Peltzer's experience of the course on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog .

Facilities

You will have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of a dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts. Read more

This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts.

About this degree

The programme provides broad-based training in three disciplines: science policy and governance; science communication, engagement, and evaluation; and sociology of modern science and technology. This programme encourages specialised investigation. It also encourages interdisciplinary integration. Our degree works in dialogue with our sister MSc programme in History and Philosophy of Science, which adds historical and analytical depth to our offer.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits)

Postgraduate Diploma students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: one core (15 credits), four optional (60 credits), and three ancillary (45 credits), studied over one year.

Postgraduate Certificate students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), and three optional modules (45 credits), studied over one year.

Core module

  • Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules

Students must take three modules from a prescribed list of options including:

  • Practical Science Communication and Engagement
  • Curating the History of Science
  • Responsible Science and Emerging Technologies
  • Science in the 20th Century and Beyond
  • Science Policy Beyond Borders
  • Science, Media, and Culture
  • Science, Security, and Social Research
  • Sociology and the Sociology of Science
  • Special Topics Seminar in STS
  • Ancillary Modules
  • Students must take two ancillary modules which may be options from our own degrees:
  • for example, Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century or Knowledge, Evidence,
  • and Explanation in Science, or they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.
  • Module descriptions can be found on the STS website.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work, and project work.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Science, Technology and Society MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training and study for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in several fields, and also provides appropriate training and qualifications sought by individuals pursuing careers in areas such as education, museum and archival curatorship, or administration and policy-making in science, engineering and health care.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Complaints Handler, IPSO (Independent Press Standards Organisation)
  • Copy Editor, Spandidos Publications
  • Export Analyst, U.S. Army Military District of Washington
  • Medical Communications Intern, inVentiv Health
  • Senior Software Engineer, Kano

Employability

The programme offers a range of transferable skills and networking opportunities. No matter whether your career plan looks towards the public or private sector, we can help you build a portfolio of skills and contacts that will give your CV the edge. Highlights of the programme include:

  • the chance to develop practical media skills, including audio production
  • learning to write for different audiences
  • developing your skills in both practical and theoretical science communication, including working in a major London museum
  • to meet and network with policy makers.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.



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Programme description. Our Master of Public Policy (MPP) programme is designed for graduates looking for an advanced professional qualification to provide a launch pad for careers in the public sector, nonprofit sector or international policy community. Read more

Programme description

Our Master of Public Policy (MPP) programme is designed for graduates looking for an advanced professional qualification to provide a launch pad for careers in the public sector, nonprofit sector or international policy community.

The MPP is a theory-based empirically informed and practice-oriented. It aims to:

  • develop analytical and conceptual skills to enable critical evaluation of major policy issues, policy processes, policy implementation and policy linkages
  • examine in detail the political, economic and social context of policy-making at the local, regional, state and international levels
  • develop an in-depth knowledge of specific policy issues
  • provide a thorough training in analytical methods and approaches (qualitative and quantitative) used for policy development and implementation
  • develop an understanding of practical and ethical issues in policy-making
  • enhance knowledge and professional skills for public sector careers
  • provide professional experience through the work placement component

The programme benefits greatly from being located in Edinburgh, Scotland's capital city and seat of government allowing ready access and collaboration with central and local government, parliament, as well as a range of public service and non-profit organisations.

Programme structure

Core courses in first semester give you a grounding in politics, economics and policy analysis; these inform a fourth, a case-based investigation of a specific policy domain. Optional courses (one in first semester and two in the second semester), chosen from across a wide range of graduate courses offered by the School of Social and Political Science, provide specialist understanding of different issues, topics and contexts. The programme culminates in a placement-based dissertation of 8-10 weeks in a policy organisation.

You will be taught using a variety of innovative teaching methods with a focus on providing a strong practice-oriented element to provide you with the skills necessary for a career in the public sector. Classes typically last up to three hours and include academic presentations, student-led discussion and practitioner contributions.

The types of assessment used will include:

  • writing short policy briefs of memos
  • problem-solving tasks
  • individual and group presentations
  • writing analytical reports
  • self and peer assessment
  • developing skills portfolios
  • other varied oral and writing tasks

Work placements/internships

This programme offers an opportunity to undertake a work placement (approximately 8-10 weeks) with a policy organisation. Students undertaking a placement are required to produce a professional analytical report, based on their placement, which explores an existing public policy problem faced by a real-life public or non-profit sector organisation and your recommendations for a strategy to address it.

Placements are not guaranteed and are dependent on overall academic performance as well as the availability of suitable placements. Students who do not undertake a placement will complete a research report in which they will engage with a policy problem, collecting data, and presenting policy recommendations.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have gained skills in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Policy-making processes, including policy development and implementation.
  • Multi-level governance, policy interests, actors and power.
  • Domestic, European and International Policy Arenas.
  • Public Economics and Market Failure.
  • Analytical Methods for Policy.
  • Policy learning and transfer.
  • Theories of policy-making.

Intellectual skills

  • Analytical: involving the ability to analyse and critically evaluate major public policy issues, including their historical evolution; their social, political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions and implications; and their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Methodological: involving the ability to appreciate a variety of methods and approaches available in the analysis of policy, to choose when particular approaches are relevant, and to employ them effectively.
  • Interdisciplinary competence: involving the ability to develop complex arguments using material from different related fields (e.g. politics, social policy, public management, economics, law, geosciences, public health).

Professional/subject-specific/practical skills

  • Ability to critically evaluate factors shaping the policy-making process.
  • Skills in applying theories and insights from scholarly research to practical issues.
  • Ability to write analytical reports regarding policy issues and problems.
  • Practical skills and professional experience gained through the placement.
  • Ability to form a research-driven goal (of an essay, report, presentation), identify methods necessary for a given project, and to complete a project on time.

Transferable skills

  • General analytical: ability to critically evaluate policies and arguments, and to analyse policy documents and datasets.
  • Organisational: ability to complete a project, setting up analytical and research goals, identifying necessary means and ways to completion.
  • Interpersonal: leadership, delegation and team-work or group-work (presentations, joint policy reports, discussions in class).
  • Communications: ability to prepare and present reports, papers and briefs to a mixed audience of academics and practitioners using powerpoint etc.
  • Methodological: ability to evaluate and apply different qualitative and quantitative analytical methods.
  • Reflective: ability to reflect on self-development, progress and skills.

Career opportunities

The MPP is a recognised professional qualification. The combination of academic excellence and practical experience ensure that MPP graduates are well placed for careers in public policy, government, think tanks, consulting firms, NGOs, party politics, and advocacy/lobbying organisations, among others.

The transferable skills you will gain from the programme, and the experience and networking opportunities from the placement, will give you a competitive edge in the employment market whatever your eventual career.

Executive Programme in Public Policy

The University’s Academy of Government also offers an Executive Programme in Public Policy, aimed at mid-career professionals from the public sector, international organisations, business and civil society organisations, on a flexible, credit-accumulation basis:



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This flexible and unique Master's of Public Administration is designed for professionals who want to lead change and navigate decision making at the intersection of science, engineering and public policy. Read more

This flexible and unique Master's of Public Administration is designed for professionals who want to lead change and navigate decision making at the intersection of science, engineering and public policy. The degree combines core content on policy making, analysis and frameworks with the opportunity to focus on areas tailored to your individual interests by selecting two elective modules from across UCL.

About this degree

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to creatively develop policies relevant to science and engineering contexts. Students also study how policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout. Students also gain insights from policy practitioners, industry experts and UCL researchers.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (15 credits), two elective modules (30 credits), and a Major Group Project module (45 credits).

Core modules

Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes.

  • Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
  • Analytical Methods for Policy
  • Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules

Students select one optional STEaPP module from the following:

  • Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
  • Risk Assessment and Governance
  • Communicating Science for Policy
  • Negotiations, Mediation and Diplomacy

Students will then also select two further 15-credit graduate modules from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project

In the Group Project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academics, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning

The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Science, Engineering and Public Policy MPA

Funding

STEaPP will be announcing a limited number of scholarship places for 2018/19. Details to be announced during Summer/Autumn 2017.

To receive further details and updates on scholarships, register your interest or contact

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

This MPA graduates develop the skills and insights to work for a range of policy/strategy focused organisations, including:

  • National and local government
  • Think tanks and consultancies
  • International agencies such as the World Bank, United Nations and other global organisations
  • Multilateral development banks such as the African Development Bank
  • Government offices of innovation and development  
  • Environment agencies
  • Transportation agencies
  • Planning agencies
  • Corporate and institutional sustainability offices
  • Network organisations (e.g C40 Cities)
  • Public water and energy utilities

Employability

Through the MPA programme, students will:

  • gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in innovation, development, science, technology and engineering
  • develop a greater awareness of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policymaking processes
  • learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policy makers and industry experts
  • develop the skills to mobilise technology, science and engineering innovations and expertise to address societal challenges.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Science and engineering are at the center of an increasing number of policy issues that affect every aspect of society. This unique and practical programme offers experiential learning for the skills and knowledge that leaders need to navigate policymaking at the intersection with science and engineering. 

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policymaking process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project on a policy challenge for a real-world client. Example policy areas include resources, energy, waste, transport, or communications

Students will gain the opportunity to network with UCL STEaPP's broad range of international partners, expert faculty and a diverse range of academics and professionals from across the department's MPA and doctoral programmes.



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Many of the most pressing issues facing New Zealand and the world today—climate change, the loss of biodiversity, and how to respond to new technologies—can't be solved using traditional scientific approaches. Read more

Many of the most pressing issues facing New Zealand and the world today—climate change, the loss of biodiversity, and how to respond to new technologies—can't be solved using traditional scientific approaches.

In the age of social media, clickbait headlines and 'fake news', new means of communicating science and engaging different groups and communities are required.

The 180-point Master of Science in Society is a cross-disciplinary programme that combines taught courses, research projects and your choice of final project to give you a practical understanding of the role of science in society.

You'll learn how to engage New Zealanders in conversations about the science that impacts their lives so they can make informed decisions. Find out how you can influence policy change and research priorities.

Broad perspectives

Develop your understanding of contemporary scientific issues, and draw from a range of diverse fields such as philosophy, history and the creative arts to gain a broader and more nuanced perspective on science.

Gain an insight into the range of perspectives different communities have on scientific and environmental issues, and explore the important role of mātauranga Māori and other indigenous knowledge in science decision-making.

The Master of Science in Society is suited to students who are interested in science but don't want to pursue a traditional postgraduate science research programme. If you're interested in more effective public engagement around key scientific issues like conservation and pest eradication, or you're keen to pursue a career in science policy or advocacy, this degree is a good choice for you.

Learn from the best

Learn from award-winning academics and professionals who are leaders in the field of science communication, public engagement with science, natural and social science, the humanities and the arts. You'll also be exposed to a wide range of expertise from across the university and from visiting experts.

How you’ll study

The Master of Science in Society has two parts. The first part takes place in Trimester One, is based on-campus and is compulsory for all students.

In Part 1, you'll focus on developing your critical thinking and communication skills in four taught courses. Look at the theory and practice of science communication, and gain a grounding in contemporary scientific issues and theories. Explore perspectives on science from different cultures and from across the humanities and social sciences.

You'll choose from three of four core 400-level courses, and complete an additional approved course worth 15 points.

The field component of SCIS 589, the Science Communication Project, also takes place during Trimester One.

You'll go on to put your learning into practice in Part 2 by completing your science communication project and a research essay. You'll also choose to do a work placement or a research project, or choose other relevant courses from another discipline of your choice, such as Māori Studies, Public Policy or Conservation Biology.

While working on your final projects you'll be supervised by subject experts from within and outside of the university, and will continue to meet regularly with your fellow students in tutorials or seminar sessions.

Study off-campus

You can complete Part 2 of your Master's remotely if your placement or research project takes place outside Wellington. You'll need to have sufficient internet access to take part in online seminars, lectures and workshops.

Duration and workload

The Master of Science in Society will take you three trimesters (one year) of full-time study, or up to three years if you are studying part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year.

If you're a part-time student, you can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.



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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/cla/publicpolicy. This innovative master of science degree in science, technology, and public policy enables students to work at the intersection of engineering, science, and public policy. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/cla/publicpolicy

This innovative master of science degree in science, technology, and public policy enables students to work at the intersection of engineering, science, and public policy. The program builds on RIT’s strengths as a technological university, enabling students to interact with faculty members and researchers who are working on scientific developments and technological innovations that drive new public policy considerations.

The program is interdisciplinary and draws significantly from disciplines and courses of study in RIT’s colleges of Applied Science and Technology, Business, Engineering, Liberal Arts, and Science. The program is geared toward producing graduates who will make significant contributions in the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors.

All students take a set of policy core courses that emphasize analysis, problem solving, and interdisciplinary approaches. Students work with an adviser to choose electives that focus their policy studies in a particular area, such as environmental policy, climate change policy, healthcare policy, STEM education policy, telecommunications policy, or energy policy. Typical students include those with science or engineering backgrounds seeking to broaden their career opportunities in government or business settings, as well as those with liberal arts undergraduate degrees (e.g., economics) interested in science, technology, and policy issues. Full-time students can typically finish the program in one to two years. The program prides itself on working one-on-one with students to ensure that their educational needs and academic goals are attained.

Plan of study

The program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours and consists of five required core courses, three elective courses, and the completion of a thesis or comprehensive exam. The thesis option allows students to work with a faculty adviser on an independent research project in their area of interest.

- Electives

Students choose three elective courses based on their interests and career goals. Courses may be offered in various colleges throughout the university, including the colleges of Applied Science and Technology, Business, Engineering, and Science. Course selection is completed jointly with a faculty adviser and typically aims to develop a specialized area of interest for the student (e.g., biotechnology policy, environmental policy, energy policy, communications policy, etc.).

International Students

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language TOEFL). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Public Policy (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Public Policy (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Public Policy is designed to provide a high level training in the study of public policy and policy making at international, national and sub-state levels.

Key Features of MA in Public Policy

The MA in Public Policy provides a solid grounding in the key theoretical approaches to the study of public policy, and seeks to develop the knowledge and skills of those wishing to engage in further academic study. At the same time, the Public Policy MA focuses on the necessary skills involved in working in a public policy landscape now increasingly characterised by change and interdependence. Consequently, it will also develop the knowledge and skills of those wishing to, or already, pursuing a career in public policy research, policy advice, lobbying, public sector management or journalism.

The full-time Public Policy course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules and two optional modules. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study is available.

The Swansea programme in Public Policy is uniquely placed to offer students a comprehensive knowledge of public policy in multi-level and comparative settings, with staff well-versed in the theoretical, empirical and methodological understanding of public policy, with specialisms including European Union policy, multi-level governance, political economy, development studies and British and regional politics.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Public Policy is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Public Policy is The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Founded in 1997, the Bush School is ranked in the top 12 percent of the

266 graduate public affairs schools in the USA, according to rankings published in U.S. News & World Report. Located in College Station, Texas, the School’s programmes are housed in the Robert H. and Judy Ley Allen Building, which is part of the George Bush Presidential Library Center on the West Campus of Texas A&M. This location affords students access to the archival holdings of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, invitation to numerous events hosted by the George Bush Foundation at the Annenberg Presidential Conference Center, and inclusion in the many activities of the Texas A&M community. Texas A&M is the sixth-largest university in the USA with 50,000 students. It holds membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities, one of only 61 institutions with this distinction.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Public Policy typically include:

• Governance,Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Comparative Politics in the New World Order

• The Policy Making Process

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Approaching Political Theory: the challenge of democracy

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Civil Society and International Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• State of Africa

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

MA Public Policy Programme Aims

- To develop and advance practical and academic knowledge and understanding of public policy

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, and to improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research and practical skills in public policy relevant to academic, public- and private sector careers in policy-related areas.

Who should Apply for the Public Policy MA?

Students interested in politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International business or a related background. Professionals interested in public policy and administration. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Public Policy.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for public policy graduates, who are well-placed for careers in a variety of sectors in the UK, Europe or internationally. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as government and politics; the public sector; journalism; the diplomatic corps; the armed forces; intelligence and risk analysis; relief and humanitarian organisations; law and finance and international business.



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The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. Read more

The Department of Education will not be recruiting to the MA in Science Education for the academic year 2018/19, as we are undertaking a review of our provision. The text below is for information only.

The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:

-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education

-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education

-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1

-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)

-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Bilingualism

-Citizenship education

-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition

-Discourse Analysis

-Education and social justice

-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice

-Intercultural communication in education

-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading

-Motivation in education

-Teaching and assessing speaking skills

-Teaching and assessing writing skills

-Teaching and learning in schools

-Teaching World English

-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2

-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:

-Approaches to English teaching

-Contemporary issues in teaching

-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse

-Developmental Psycholinguistics

-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language

-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication

-Psychology of language and language learning

-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis

-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education

-Teaching English for academic purposes

-The practice of English language teaching

-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3

Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:

-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)

-An exam in Research Methods in Education

-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit

-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.



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Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme provides you with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that currently shape social sciences. Read more

Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme provides you with a comprehensive overview of the key methodological and philosophical debates that currently shape social sciences. It also provides an opportunity to develop specialised research methods skills in social policy in an internationally renowned department for Social Policy research.

The Social Science Research (Social Policy) programme consists of compulsory and optional modules, delivered across four different academic schools within the University, which means you benefit from an interdisciplinary approach to your studies. The academic schools involved are:

  • School of Social, Political, and Geographical Sciences
  • School of Sport, Exercise, and Health Sciences
  • School of Business and Economics
  • School of Science.

On completion of the Social Science Research (Social Policy) programme, you will have met the MSc training requirements for PhD funding from the ESRC, opening up the possibility of securing PhD funding from the ESRC. Further information regarding the future career prospects associated with this programme can be found below.

The modules are taught by leading researchers selected for their expertise in the taught research methods and topics.

What makes this programme different?

The Social Policy courses in the Department of Social Sciences at Loughborough Universities are consistently rated in the top-15 UK Social Policy courses by national league tables.

The Department of Social Sciences hosts the prestigious Centre for Research in Social Policy (CRSP) which over the past 30 years has developed an international reputation for high quality applied policy research. Most prominently, CRSP is currently involved in the study of the Minimum Income Standard programme.

The School of Social Political and Geographical Sciences is the home to the Centre for Research in Communication and Culture (CRCC). Established in 1991, the centre has since grown to be one of the largest of its kind in the UK. The CRCC’s core topics themes include:

  • Culture, Economy, and Policy
  • Interaction and Discourse
  • Media, Memory, and History
  • Nations, Migrants, and Citizenship
  • Political Communication
  • Social, Political, and Cultural Theory

The programme is in full compliance with the Economic and Social Research Council’s requirements for an MSc in Social Science Research. On completion of the course, you will have met the training requirements for PhD funding from the ESRC, opening up the possibility of securing PhD funding from the ESRC.

Who should study this programme?

  • Individuals wishing to pursue a career in academia
  • Social policy practitioners, who wish to both develop and strengthen their applied research skills
  • Those wishing to conduct research in non-academic public and private sector roles

What you'll study

Our Social Science Research (Social Policy) MSc programme is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are well equipped to progress onto being high level researchers in their chosen field of study.

Modules

Social Science Research (Social Policy) covers a wide range of topics; please visit the website for a full list of modules.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Public Policy at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Public Policy at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Public Policy is designed to provide a high level training in the study of public policy and policy making at international, national and sub-state levels.

Key Features of MA in Public Policy

The MA in Public Policy provides a solid grounding in the key theoretical approaches to the study of public policy, and seeks to develop the knowledge and skills of those wishing to engage in further academic study. At the same time, the Public Policy MA focuses on the necessary skills involved in working in a public policy landscape now increasingly characterised by change and interdependence. Consequently, it will also develop the knowledge and skills of those wishing to, or already, pursuing a career in public policy research, policy advice, lobbying, public sector management or journalism.

The full-time Public Policy course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules and two optional modules. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study is available.

The Swansea programme in Public Policy is uniquely placed to offer students a comprehensive knowledge of public policy in multi-level and comparative settings, with staff well-versed in the theoretical, empirical and methodological understanding of public policy, with specialisms including European Union policy, multi-level governance, political economy, development studies and British and regional politics.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Public Policy typically include:

• Governance,Globalization and Neoliberal Political Economy

• Comparative Politics in the New World Order

• The Policy Making Process

• Politics and Public Policy in the New Wales

• Approaching Political Theory: the challenge of democracy

• Politics in Contemporary Britain

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Critical Security Studies

• Civil Society and International Development

• War, Technology and Culture

• State of Africa

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

MA Public Policy Programme Aims

- To develop and advance practical and academic knowledge and understanding of public policy

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, and to improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research and practical skills in public policy relevant to academic, public- and private sector careers in policy-related areas.

Who should Apply for the Public Policy MA?

Students interested in politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International business or a related background. Professionals interested in public policy and administration. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Public Policy.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for public policy graduates, who are well-placed for careers in a variety of sectors in the UK, Europe or internationally. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as government and politics; the public sector; journalism; the diplomatic corps; the armed forces; intelligence and risk analysis; relief and humanitarian organisations; law and finance and international business.



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IN BRIEF. Enjoy excellent job prospects in the growing field of science communication. This course is delivered in partnership with industry giving you the opportunity to tap into world-class professional networks. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Enjoy excellent job prospects in the growing field of science communication
  • This course is delivered in partnership with industry giving you the opportunity to tap into world-class professional networks
  • Access to state of the art MediaCityUK facilities during the course residential
  • A part-time only course
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Over the last 25 years, science communication has expanded from a field of public intellectuals, celebrity scientists, broadcast media professionals and event producers to a global industry of ground-breaking artists, games developers, disruptive creators, radical curators, social entrepreneurs and citizen scientists. Developed in partnership with industry, this part-time, distance learning course will provide you with the knowledge and skills required to take advantage of excellent job prospects in this growing field.

Studying this MSc will provide you with the opportunity to accelerate your career and become part of a worldwide community which is pushing the boundaries of science communication through new and emerging technologies. You will gain practical and transferable skills informed by theory, a creative portfolio and access to world-class professional networks to progress your career in science communication. You will become mindful of the ethical challenges that new communication systems might pose to achieving sustainable development goals for health and wellbeing, gender equality and communities.

Through a selection of specifically designed modules, you will learn about the importance of involving the public in the co-creation of citizen science projects, explore the increasing trend of locating science within festivals, examine how art and science come together to innovate, and explore digital storytelling strategies for communicating science. Additionally, you will investigate how science writing and journalism has changed in a digital era, and focus on contemporary matters of global concern in science communication. All modules aim for you to develop and enhance your public portfolio through a range of creative projects.

Science communication is an expanding field and, as such, there are many exciting career prospects working in science journalism, public engagement, events production, science publishing and within the media, to name a few. Our academics have strong networks in the field and, as the course is delivered in collaboration with industry experts and professional science communicators, you can be sure that the skills and knowledge you gain are those you need to forge a successful career in the field and stay ahead of the curve. This course aims to bridge the #scicomm digital skills gap in an era where digital fluency, critical thinking, and creative innovation make professionals stand out from the crowd.

COURSE DETAILS

This science communication masters focuses on the areas of communication, media management, public engagement, emerging technologies, global challenges, digital literacy and creative practice.

Features  

  • Course content reflects and connects your needs with industry trends  
  • Digital skills and emerging technologies focus  
  • Become part of a global learning community  
  • Connectivity and access to world-class facilities  
  • Co-delivery with industry practitioners  

Benefits

  • Learn alongside cutting edge researcher-practitioners  
  • Secure a global competitive edge and excellent employment prospects  
  • Gain real world, practical and problem solving experience  
  • Create a portfolio to showcase and help secure future work  
  • Access to a national and international peer and industry network

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

We offer awards to help you study through our:

  • Vice-Chancellor's Excellence Scholarship
  • University of Salford student loyalty discount
  • Country bursary scheme for International students only

There are also other sources of funding available to you.

For more information please see our funding section.

EMPLOYABILITY

This science communication MSc is designed to equip the modern science communicator with the practical skills and theoretical grounding to carry out science communication, public engagement and policy roles in a wide range of institutions, from Universities to science festivals, museums and galleries to research funders, science and health charities, NGOs and science businesses spanning education, entertainment, PR/ advocacy and sustainable development.

Science communication professionals contribute to a wide range of industries including:

  • Media and creative industries;  
  • Science centres and museums;
  • Science education and outreach;
  • Research councils and policymaking.

Graduates could undertake roles (within these sectors and others) such as:

  • Broadcast, Media and Entertainment;
  • Science Journalism;
  • Science Advocacy;
  • Professional Consultancy;
  • Public Relations;
  • Science publishing;
  • Public Engagement; 
  • Public Involvement and Impact; 
  • Knowledge Exchange;
  • Museum education, exhibition and curation;
  • Events production, management.


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About the Programme. The (Master of Advanced Studies). MAS ETH in Science, Technology and Policy. provides natural science and engineering graduates with complementary skills in public policy analysis and policy management. Read more

About the Programme

The (Master of Advanced Studies) MAS ETH in Science, Technology and Policy provides natural science and engineering graduates with complementary skills in public policy analysis and policy management. The programme's focus is building students' ability to situate scientific and engineering knowledge within a broader social, economic, and political context, and analyse policy-making institutions, processes and policy options as well as policy management and evaluation procedures.

While emphasis is on a wide range of skills in policy analysis and management, the programme offers ample opportunities to apply those skills to specific policy areas of interest.The MAS ETH STP will support the creation of a next generation of decision makers and policy leaders truly literate in science and technology as well as policy.

The MAS Programme includes lectures, seminars, case studies, and independent research work, including an extensive policy analysis project. The first half of the programme is designed for full time study, and the second half of the programme can be completed through full- or part-time study in combination with an internship or professional employment.

Objectives

The programme's goal is to complement students' scientific or engineering skills with additional education in public policy analysis and policy management to support successful careers in government, public administration, corporate regulatory and strategy divisions, international organisations, and civil society.

Professional perspectives

The MAS ETH STP programme is for students seeking to combine their science or engineering knowledge with skills in policy analysis and policy management. Potential future employers include: 

  • government departments focusing, for instance, on environmental, telecom, or pharmaceuticals regulation, R&D funding, or export controls on dual-use goods;
  • regulatory, public affairs, and strategy units in technology firms;
  • international organisations, or sections therein focused on technology, innovation, and regulation;
  • civil society organisations focused on science and technology-related issues.


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Programme description. The MSc Health Policy will develop your understanding of, and critical engagement with, key challenges in health policy. Read more

Programme description

The MSc Health Policy will develop your understanding of, and critical engagement with, key challenges in health policy. Both state and non-state actors grapple with how best to promote the health of communities and populations, including the most effective strategies for preventing disease, ensuring efficient and high quality health care, and reducing health inequalities.

These challenges extend beyond the traditional domain of the health sector, requiring engagement with economic and social policy and a range of non-state actors including third sector organisations, commercial interests and international agencies.

The MSc in Health Policy is designed for individuals interested in a wide range of health-related roles including government and international agencies, health advocacy, health administration and health care delivery, consultancies, advisory roles, the commercial sector, and health-related research. Within the programme there is scope for you to specialise in either health systems or health inequalities, or to follow a broad policy stream.

The Health Systems stream is ideal for those seeking to work in health care policy, planning or management, in either the public or private sectors. It will expose you to different models of health care financing, purchasing and delivery, equipping them to engage with key contemporary challenges and debates including how to achieve sustainable health care financing, the role of the state in health care, the appropriate mix of public and private provision, and how best to achieve the goals of equity, efficiency and quality in health care delivery.

The Health Inequalities stream is ideal for those seeking to engage with health disparities both between and within countries, particularly those relating to inequities in social structures and power. In this stream you will explore evidence and policy responses to health inequalities across a range of axes, including class/socioeconomic position, ethnicity/race and gender, and will consider how health and its determinants are shaped by a range of influences including social and economic policy, commercial power and political conflict. This stream is particularly suited to those interested in working in policy, advocacy and research settings with a focus on health equity.

You may also elect to follow a broad policy stream within the MSc Health Policy, rather than specialising in health systems or health inequalities. This stream equips you with an understanding of how health policy fits within broader approaches to social and economic policy, and is particularly suitable for individuals wanting to work in public policy, advocacy or research.

Our students come from countries at all levels of economic development and from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds, with many using the MSc as an investment to develop their careers or move into a more policy-focused role. While the programme has a strong policy focus, it also includes an academic orientation so is good preparation for further research at PhD level.

The MSc programme is situated within the Global Public Health Unit, which is located in University’s School of Social and Political Science rather than a medical school. This reflects our programme’s reach across traditional boundaries, linking policy analysis, public health, social policy, economics, sociology, medicine and epidemiology. The MSc programme offers innovative research-led teaching that draws on academic expertise from all these disciplines, while also benefitting from close links with the Centre for Population Health Sciences in the University's medical college.

Programme structure

You will complete one compulsory course and a number of option courses.

Following the taught courses, you will work towards an independently researched dissertation.

Learning outcomes

This programme is designed to equip you with the knowledge and critical skills you need to play a senior role in health policy, advocacy and research.

Specific aims are to:

  • Have a critical understanding of core concepts and frameworks relevant to health policy and population health.
  • Be aware of key contemporary challenges to health and the role of the state and other actors in seeking to address these.
  • Have a critical awareness of the links between health policy and broader social and economic policies, including the extent to which health objectives may complement or be in tension with other social goals
  • Understand different models of health care financing, purchasing and delivery, and be able to draw on these in critically appraising the roles of different actors in the development and implementation of health policy and in a diverse range of health systems reforms (Health Systems stream)
  • Understand the social determinants of health and health inequalities, and apply this understanding in critically evaluating different approaches to improving health and reducing health inequalities (Health Inequalities stream)

Career opportunities

This programme is intended to equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to pursue employment positions in policy, advocacy and research roles relevant to health policy. Most students use the MSc as an investment to develop their careers or move into a more policy-focused area, including jobs with health agencies or consultancies, government departments, international organisations and third sector organisations. By combining an advanced degree from a world-leading university with expertise in an innovative field relevant to multiple policy agendas, students who successfully complete our programmes are well placed to secure interesting positions within an often very competitive area.

Our graduates in recent years have moved on to a range of exciting employment and research positions. These include positions with health departments and other government ministries in both high-income and developing countries; with agencies and donor organisations working in health care and health promotion; with international organisations and consultancy; research positions examining health systems for the European Union and other levels of regional governance; and employment in commercial sector organisations including pharmaceutical and other health-related companies.

All students have access to the Edinburgh University Careers Service during the programme and for two years after graduation.



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This MSc aims to educate a new generation of public policymakers and policy analysts, familiarising them with the necessary concepts, theories, methods and principles involved in the formulation and analysis of public policy. Read more

This MSc aims to educate a new generation of public policymakers and policy analysts, familiarising them with the necessary concepts, theories, methods and principles involved in the formulation and analysis of public policy. The programme draws on many disciplines, including political science, economics, law, public management and public health.

About this degree

Students develop a working knowledge of many aspects of political science theory relevant to understanding how public policies are formulated, implemented and evaluated. They gain a basic understanding of economic approaches to public policy analysis and of the concepts of economic efficiency and equity as societal objectives. Students also learn extensively about research methods which gives them the tools necessary to understand political processes and to analyse important policy issues.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Theories and Actors of the Policy Process (30)
  • Public Policy Economics and Analysis (PPEA) (15)
  • Introduction to Qualitative Methods or Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Introduction to Quantitative Methods or Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

Optional modules

  • Choose one of the following 15 credit modules (the other two remain available as options):
  • Law and Regulation (15)
  • Public Management: Theories and Innovations (15)
  • Agenda Setting and Public Policy (15)
  • Choose further modules up to a value of 30 credits in total from a list available on the departmental website
  • The following are suggestions:
  • Health, Policy and Reform (15)
  • Non-Profit and Voluntary Sector Policy and Management (15)
  • Energy and Climate Policy (15)
  • Making Policy Work (15)
  • Policy-Making & Regulation in Europe (15)
  • The European Union in the World (15)
  • Public Ethics (15)
  • British Government and Politics (15)
  • International Political Economy (15)
  • The Political Economy of Development (15)
  • Democratic Political Institutions (15)
  • Foreign Policy Analysis (15)
  • Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
  • Democracy and Accountability: Holding Power to Account (15)

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an individual research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and case studies, and is taught by scholars who have carried out theoretical and empirical research in the field. Students will be assessed by a variety of methods: unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Public Policy MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates go on to a range of destinations both nationally and internationally including:

  • civil servants in central or local government in the UK and overseas, think tanks, NGOs and consultancies
  • policy officers and researchers for UK members of parliament and members of the European Parliament
  • the European Commission
  • other public and private sector organisations in a range of sectors, for example, Universities UK, Transport for London, the Legal Services Commission, Accenture, Japan International Cooperation Agency, Overseas Development Institute, United Nations Development Programme, Deloitte and Touche, Serco, KPMG, Confederation of British Industry, Civil Service Faststream, the Institute of Government, the Legatum Institute
  • further research study at UCL or elsewhere.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Economist, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC)
  • Economics Officer, Ministry of Finance
  • Implementation Manager, NSPCC
  • Research Analyst, World Bank Group
  • Strategy and Communication Officer, Labour

Employability

The training that students receive in policy analysis, research methods, political science, economics and other disciplines equips them to work in a range of different organisations engaged in policy-making and policy analysis. Additionally, the emphasis on independent research, through the dissertation, enables students to think critically about policy problems and devise innovative solutions to such problems.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of public policy.

The interdisciplinary aspect of this programme provides participants with the opportunity to address some of the key issues of contemporary governance and public sector reform.

UCL is uniquely well placed to draw together theory and practice in the field of public policy in health, where perhaps the most far-reaching of all public sector reforms has taken place.



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