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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communications Engineering at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Communications Engineering at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

As a student on the MSc in Communications Engineering, you will be provided with an in-depth understanding of the technology and architecture of computer communications, photonics and telecommunication networks, wireless telecommunications and related wireless information technologies.

Key Features of MSc in Communications Engineering

The practical knowledge and skills you will gain as a student on the MSc Communications Engineering course include being presented with the essential element of modern optical communication systems based on single mode optical fibres from the core to the access, evaluating bandwidth-rich contemporary approaches.

The MSc Communications Engineering course also covers advanced networking topics including network performance and network security. This is supported with some practical knowledge and skills for project and business management principles.

As a student on the MSc Communications Engineering course, you will also be introduced to technologies underlying the compressions and transmission of digital video over networking platforms, gain knowledge on the channel models and associated impairments that typically limit the performance of wireless systems, and learn to design optimum digital communication receivers for some basic communications channel models.

The MSc in Communications Engineering is modular in structure. Communications Engineering students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students on the Communications Engineering course must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time MSc in Communications Engineering Delivery mode:

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Communications Engineering scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Timetables for the Communications Engineering programme are typically available one week prior to each semester.

Modules

Modules on the MSc Communications Engineering course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

RF and Microwave

Signals and Systems

Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Nanophotonics

Micro and Nano Electro-Mechnical Systems

Lasers and applications

Wireless Communications

Digital Communications

Optical Communications

Optical Networks

Communication Skills for Research Engineers

Research Dissertation

MSc Dissertation - Communications Engineering

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Engineering at Swansea University has extensive IT facilities and provides extensive software licenses and packages to support teaching which benefit students on the MSc in Communications Engineering course. In addition the University provides open access IT resources.

Links with Industry

At Swansea University, Electronic and Electrical Engineering has an active interface with industry and many of our activities are sponsored by companies such as Agilent, Auto Glass, BT and Siemens.

This discipline has a good track record of working with industry both at research level and in linking industry-related work to our postgraduate courses. We also have an industrial advisory board that ensures our taught courses maintain relevance.

Our research groups work with many major UK, Japanese, European and American multinational companies and numerous small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to pioneer research. This activity filters down and influences the project work that is undertaken by all our postgraduate students.

Careers

The MSc Communications Engineering is suitable for those who have a career interest in the field of communication systems, which has been fundamentally changing the whole world in virtually every aspect, and would like to gain lasting career skills and in-depth knowledge to carry out development projects and advanced research in the area of communication systems.

Communications Engineering graduates can seek employment in wireless communication systems and network administration, and mobile applications development.

Student Quotes

“I was fascinated by the natural beauty of Swansea before I came here. Swansea University is near the beach so you can walk around the beach at any time. This Master’s is very useful to enhance your ability and enrich your principle of the academic knowledge.”

Zhang Daping, MSc Communication Systems (now Communications Engineering)

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

World-Leading Research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

With recent academic appointments strengthening electronics research at the College, the Electronic Systems Design Centre (ESDC) has been re-launched to support these activities.

The Centre aims to represent all major electronics research within the College and to promote the Electrical and Electronics Engineering degree.

Best known for its research in ground-breaking Power IC technology, the key technology for more energy efficient electronics, the Centre is also a world leader in semiconductor device modelling, FEM and compact modelling.



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Computer science has a brilliant future! You could help to create new network solutions, build the future digital society, develop secure digital services, or be involved in a ground-breaking international software project. Read more
Computer science has a brilliant future! You could help to create new network solutions, build the future digital society, develop secure digital services, or be involved in a ground-breaking international software project. Perhaps you will develop algorithms for utilising genome data in medicine or optimise bus routes using positioning data. Do you wonder about all the things that can be automated? Or would you like to dig deeper and become a researcher?

In the Master’s programme in computer science you can become an expert in a wide range of fields. You will have access to the focus areas of research in computer science at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, distributed or networked systems, and software engineering. You will gain lasting professional skills for specialist, design, or managerial posts in the corporate world, or for research and doctoral education, since the Master’s programme in computer science gives you the aptitude for both independent working and multidisciplinary teamwork.

This education will give you:
-The ability to advance your knowledge in the different areas of computer science.
-The skill to seek, assess, and analyse scientific information in your own area of expertise, and apply the methods of the field in an ethical and sustainable way.
-The ability to act as expert in the field, and to develop the practices and methods of your field in cooperation with specialists from other fields.
-Oral and written communication skills in an international work environment.

The quality teaching within the computer science programme at the University of Helsinki has been highlighted repeatedly in national and international teaching assessments. The student-centred, in-depth learning gives you a solid basis for life-long learning. Studying at the leading research unit for computer science in Finland offers you constant interaction with current research and insight into the development patterns in the field.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

In future, we will increasingly be using intelligent tools, consisting of networked hardware, software, services, and data. They will work based on intelligent, learning algorithms, data streams carried by communication protocols, and global infrastructures.

Within the Algorithms sub-programme, you will study effective algorithms and their application within other disciplines and in corporate life. Future IT systems will contain more and more intelligent components, the function of which will be based on complex mathematical models created automatically with the aid of machine-learning methods. The problems to be solved are computationally challenging, and the ever increasing amounts of data will create their own challenges when it comes to the efficiency of the algorithms needed.

The Networking and services sub-programme educates you to become an expert and strategic leader in the design and management of new global infrastructures. The infrastructures include Internet technologies in fixed networks and mobile environments, as well as the information and service networks built on top of them. Focus areas include the theory, data security, and trust within distributed systems, interactive systems, and the adaptability of services in a changing environment.

The Software systems sub-programme introduces you to the design and implementation of advanced software. The development of a shared software framework or platform for several software products is very demanding both technically and from the development project viewpoint. Developing such software requires technical skills, but also team- and project work, quality assurance, and communication. Within this sub-programme, you can specialise in software engineering, software technology, or information management, and study the current research questions in these areas in depth.

Selection of the Major

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for computer science are:
-Algorithms
-Networking and services
-Software systems

You can select any of these programmes according to your preferences at the beginning of your studies. The sub-programme determines which courses you should take.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme comprises 120 credits, which can be completed in two years, in accordance with an approved personal study plan. The degree includes:
-80 credits of advanced courses, including shared courses within the programme, courses within the programme which support the thesis topic, the Master’s thesis (Pro gradu), 30 credits.
-40 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes. The other courses can include a work-orientation period.

Career Prospects

The employment outlook within the field is excellent. Masters of computer science find varied positions within the ICT field, both as employees and entrepreneurs. The nature of the education is also geared towards giving you an aptitude for managerial posts. All the sub-programmes provide the qualifications to find employment in a wide variety of jobs.

Software-system graduates often start their careers as software developers and designers, while network graduates often start with software at the infrastructure level (such as data communications, computation, or data entry). The skills learned in the algorithms sub-programme enable you to work on challenging tasks in various fields.

As a graduate you can find employment within small or large corporations as well as organisations in the private, public, or third sector. Due to the global nature of the field, you can find employment anywhere in the world. Taking modules from other education programmes will help you apply your computer science skills in other areas. Many jobs are based on these combinations.

Thanks to its strong scientific basis, the degree is also an excellent springboard to a doctoral programme.

Internationalization

There is a very international atmosphere within the programme, as nearly a third of the students come from abroad, and the advanced courses are instructed by international researchers.

In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science offer you many opportunities for international activities:
-Instruction in English within other education programmes.
-International tasks within the students’ organisations or union.
-Language courses at the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki.

You can also get information and counselling about independent international experience, such as:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeships abroad.

Computer science at the University of Helsinki is a popular exchange location, especially from Germany. Some 5-10 students come annually; exchange students have come from 14 countries in recent years. The students in the department have taken exchange periods in 16 countries in the past few years.

Research Focus

There are several multidisciplinary research projects under way at the Faculty of Science, which are being carried out in cooperation with the research institutes on the science campus and with other faculties, universities, and corporations. The role of computer science within these projects is to develop the basic methods of the discipline in strategic areas and to collaborate in depth with other disciplines.

The sub-programmes within the Master’s programme cover a considerable part of the strategic focus areas of computer science research at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, data analysis and machine learning, networking and services, software systems, bioinformatics, and data science.

Computer science is part of three Finnish Academy centres of excellence: for computational inference, inversion problems, and cancer genetics. These units represent the collaboration between computer science and other disciplines.

Computer science has coordinated the long-lived Algodan centre of excellence, which has been the basis for many current research groups.

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Digital signal processing (DSP) is at the core of the communications revolution. Research is constantly being carried out to develop new DSP algorithms, allowing mobile broadband services, ‘Internet of Things’ applications and other technologies to be delivered to a growing number of users. Read more

Digital signal processing (DSP) is at the core of the communications revolution. Research is constantly being carried out to develop new DSP algorithms, allowing mobile broadband services, ‘Internet of Things’ applications and other technologies to be delivered to a growing number of users.

This programme will give you a thorough understanding of different aspects of DSP and as it relates to the communications landscape, as well as specialist knowledge from your choice of optional modules.

Our DSP lab will give you hands-on experience using the DSP technology that can be found in computers, cellular phones, GPS and other technologies, and you’ll learn from expert researchers at the forefront of their fields.

You’ll also benefit from specialist industrial lectures, allowing you to relate the theoretical and design aspects of communications and signal processing to practical problems and real-world constraints.

School Facilities

Our School is an exciting and stimulating environment where you’ll learn from leading researchers in specialist facilities. These include our Keysight Technologies wireless communications lab, as well as labs for embedded systems, power electronics and drives, ultrasound and bioelectronics.

There’s also a Terahertz photonics lab, class 100 semiconductor cleanroom, traffic generators and analysers, FPGA development tools, sensor network test beds. We have facilities for electron-beam lithography and ceramic circuit fabrication – and a III-V semiconductor molecular beam epitaxy facility. The Faculty is also home to the £4.3 million EPSRC National Facility for Innovative Robotic Systems, set to make us a world leader in robot design and construction.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll study a set of core modules that give you an in-depth understanding of DSP, wireless communications, different optical communications networks and the complex issues around network security. If you don’t have any experience of c-programming you’ll also take a module that develops these skills; alternatively, you can choose between this module and another on software development.

You’ll also select optional modules that are tailored to your own interests or career plans – you could focus on embedded microprocessor systems, high-speed internet architecture or other topics. To build your understanding of the global electronics industry, you’ll also complete a dissertation. This could take the form of a business, manufacturing or outsourcing plan, a proposal for research funding or an essay on a specific aspect of the industry.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Communications and Signal Processing module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Industry Dissertation 15 credits
  • Wireless Communications Systems Design 15 credits
  • Digital Signal Processing for Communications 15 credits
  • Digital Wireless Communications Principles 15 credits
  • Optical Communications Networks 15 credits
  • Data Communications and Network Security 15 credits
  • Main Project 45 credits

Optional modules

  • Cellular Mobile Communication Systems 15 credits
  • High Speed Internet Architecture 15 credits
  • FPGA Design for System-on-Chip 15 credits
  • Embedded Microprocessor System Design 15 credits
  • Programming 15 credits
  • Software Development 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Communications and Signal Processing MSc(Eng) in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings. Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Projects

The research project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects on the MSc in Communications and Signal Processing include:

  • Powerline communications for smart grid
  • Quantum key distribution over passive optical networks
  • Physical layer security using artificial noise
  • An energy-saving robot mobility diversity algorithm for wireless communications
  • Analysis and processing of physiological data from a smart watch to monitor health
  • Evaluation of wireless sensor networks for civil engineering applications
  • Cooperative wireless communications over fading channels
  • Carrier frequency offset compensation in OFDM for IEEE 802.11
  • Underlay spectrum access strategy in cognitive radio
  • Spectrum sensing for cognitive radio

Career opportunities

On completing this course, you will have obtained the skills that will lead to employment in any area of the communications/signal processing industry including optical networking, DSP design and implementation, cellular mobile, RF planning, broadband systems and general communications research and development.

Graduates from our School have gone on to work for organisations such as the National Grid, Ericsson Telecommunications, Cisco Systems, AECOM, Deep Sea Electronics, Huawei, Intel Corp., the Technology and Strategy Board and many more.

This course is also an excellent base from which to pursue a PhD and possibly an academic career.



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Mobile communications provide terrestrial coverage in densely populated areas, while satellite communications enable wireless communication in regions where mobile networking is not cost-effective. Read more

Mobile communications provide terrestrial coverage in densely populated areas, while satellite communications enable wireless communication in regions where mobile networking is not cost-effective. The programme gives you an in-depth understanding of the engineering aspects of these important current and future technologies.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Gideon Ewa.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to:

  • Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
  • Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
  • Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
  • Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
  • Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
  • Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:

  • Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin mobile and satellite communications
  • Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
  • Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
  • Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within mobile and satellite communications
  • Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
  • Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
  • Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
  • Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Technical characteristics of the pathway

This Programme in Mobile and Satellite Communications reflects the importance of mobile telephony, mobile data communications and satellite-based communications as complementary technologies.

Students will gain a detailed knowledge of the fundamentals and advanced concepts involved in communications and 3G/4G/5G mobile technology, and satellite-based communications and networking.

This material is complemented by study in areas such as mobile applications and web services, mobile app software development, RF design, the Internet of Things, and network management.

The teaching material and projects are closely related to the research being carried out in the EE Department's Institute for Communications Systems.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics. Read more
This is a unique opportunity for artists to collaborate in the world of science with opportunities in the fields of public health, astrophysics, sports science, technology, museum practice, computing, medicine and forensics.

•Enrol on a truly innovative course, collaboratively developed with academic experts across a number of disciplines that include: Art and Design, Science, Education, Health and Community, Technology and Environment
•Enjoy access to a number of different established research centres across Liverpool John Moores University
•Develop real world skills on a programme unique to the UK and decide which areas of art and science you wish to follow as the programme progresses
•Explore art and science project briefs in unexpected forms

This practical, collaborative and vocational discipline can be applied to a rich variety of creative contexts and purposes within collaborative areas in art and science.

The MA is a studio based programme with collaborative practice and discovery at its core. The programme will offer a number of options for study and collaboration including; science and archaeological visualisation, museums, advertising, education, public health, biomedical communications, sports science and forensics.

You will focus on the practical application of art in a science context and be guided in understanding how this translates through a sequence of set and self-initiated projects.

You will define your existing practice and extend its scope and ambition within an art and science context, while studying themes related to public engagement, ethics, data protection and working with humans in research, and developing an understanding of current research happening in collaborative areas in art and science.

The programme will encourage you to work across other disciplines and, where appropriate, collaborate with other MA programmes within the Liverpool School of Art and Design, as well as other postgraduate taught courses across LJMU and external partners. It aims to help you to understand research happening in collaborative areas in art and science, and to develop research skills and relevant approaches to your practice and the critical techniques to support your final project.

Learning takes place predominantly through the creative and critical exploration of research focused Art in Science projects.

The programme is delivered full time over one year and features a significant amount of independent study. You will exhibit your final work at the Masters degree show which involves all Liverpool School of Art and Design's taught postgraduate Masters students.

Facilities and Research Groups

The programme is based in the Liverpool School of Art and Design’s John Lennon Art and Design building, a purpose-built facility in Liverpool city centre which encourages interaction between different disciplines and sharing of ideas and expertise.

As a Masters student on this course you may become linked to our Exhibition Research Centre, Design Lab, Contemporary Art Lab and the Face Lab.

Throughout the programme you will have opportunities to visit and potentially collaborate with research centres across LJMU. This may include: The Centre for Advanced Policing Studies, Centre for Public Health, Astrophysics Research Institute, Centre in Evolutionary Anthropology and Palaeoecology and the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Level 7

-Studio practice (Art in Science)
-Research and Practice
-Collaborative practice
-Major project (Art in Science)

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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The MSc Media and Communications programmes offer an intensive, year-long exploration of a wide range of contemporary issues in media and communications. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Media and Communications programmes offer an intensive, year-long exploration of a wide range of contemporary issues in media and communications. They aim to provide a broad-based understanding of the development and forms of media and communications in relation to political economy, regulation and power, production and organisation, processes of mediation and influence, communication content and audience response. They offer an up-to-date engagement with diverse theoretical, conceptual and empirical developments in research on media and communications through a mix of compulsory and optional courses and an independent research project.

The Research track programme also provides advanced research and methodological training, enhancing students' methodological and statistical skills. This training is particularly suited to students wishing to undertake MPhil/PhD degrees or pursue research-related careers. See the MSc Media and Communications (Research) programme.

We attract students from a diverse range of backgrounds, often including professional experience working in media and communications related fields. Indeed, the opportunity for cross-cultural meetings and exchange of ideas among the student body is a valuable feature of studying within the Department.

Graduate destinations

On graduating, our students enter a variety of careers in the UK and abroad, including broadcasting, journalism, advertising, new media industries, political marketing, market research, regulation and policy, media management and research in both public and private sectors.

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The communications sector has changed dramatically in the past 5 years, as mobile internet, smartphones and associated apps such as social media, commerce and digital media have spurred an information revolution. Read more

The communications sector has changed dramatically in the past 5 years, as mobile internet, smartphones and associated apps such as social media, commerce and digital media have spurred an information revolution.

This programme responds to the growth of networks and mobile internet applications, allowing you to study traditional communications theory alongside modules dealing with network security and the protocols for high-speed switches and routers.

You’ll build your knowledge of new developments in data-centric networking and the growing trend in cloud computing and online services, such as web-search, video content hosting and distribution, social networking and large-scale computations. Optional modules will allow you to specialise in topics appropriate to your interests and career plans.

It’s a chance to gain specialist knowledge and skills that will be in demand over a wide range of disciplines, from the traditional communications industries to banking, finance and commerce.

Specialist facilities

Our School is an exciting and stimulating environment where you’ll learn from leading researchers in specialist facilities. Depending on your research project, these may include our Keysight Technologies wireless communications lab, as well as labs for embedded systems, power electronics and drives, ultrasound and bioelectronics.

There’s also a Terahertz photonics lab, class 100 semiconductor cleanroom, traffic generators and analysers, FPGA development tools, sensor network test beds. We have facilities for electron-beam lithography and ceramic circuit fabrication – and a III-V semiconductor molecular beam epitaxy facility.

The Faculty is also home to the £4.3 million EPSRC National Facility for Innovative Robotic Systems, set to make us a world leader in robot design and construction.

Course content

The programme is built around a set of core modules that develop your knowledge across both semesters. You’ll build your understanding of topics like communication network design, high-speed internet architecture, optical communications networks, data communications and the issues surrounding network security.

If you have no experience of C programming, you’ll also take a module that will equip you with these skills. However, if you do, you could choose to take a specialist module on software development instead. In addition, you’ll choose from optional modules on topics such as digital media engineering, cellular mobile communication systems and even applications of this technology in the medical sector.

To build your understanding of the global electronics industry, you’ll also complete a dissertation. This could take the form of a business, manufacturing or outsourcing plan, a proposal for research funding or an essay on a specific aspect of the industry.

Over the summer months you’ll also work on your research project. This gives you the chance to work as an integral part of one of our active research groups, focusing on a specialist topic in computer science and selecting the appropriate research methods.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Digital Communications Networks module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Industry Dissertation 15 credits
  • Communication Network Design 15 credits
  • Optical Communications Networks 15 credits
  • High Speed Internet Architecture 15 credits
  • Data Communications and Network Security 15 credits
  • Main Project 45 credits

Optional modules

  • Wireless Communications Systems Design 15 credits
  • Cellular Mobile Communication Systems 15 credits
  • Digital Wireless Communications Principles 15 credits
  • FPGA Design for System-on-Chip 15 credits
  • Digital Media Engineering 15 credits
  • Medical Electronics and E-Health 15 credits
  • Programming 15 credits
  • Software Development 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Digital Communications Networks MSc(Eng) in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of their disciplines. You’ll have regular contact with them through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings.

Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments and exams. Optional modules may also use alternative assessment methods.

Career opportunities

Career prospects are excellent. There is a wide range of career opportunities in all aspects of the communications industry, and the skills learned here will also be generic to allow employment in other sectors such as finance, banking, general manufacturing, etc.

Graduates from our School have pursued careers with organisations like Cisco Systems, General Electric, Huawei, Ericsson Telecommunications, Intel Corp., Technology and Strategy Board, Wabtec Rail UK, AECOM and Orascom Telecom.

Some graduates also choose the path of academic research and therefore subsequently undertake a PhD.

Careers support

You’ll have access to the wide range of engineering and computing careers resources held by our Employability team in our dedicated Employability Suite. You’ll have the chance to attend industry presentations book appointments with qualified careers consultants and take part in employability workshops. Our annual Engineering and Computing Careers Fairs provide further opportunities to explore your career options with some of the UK’s leading employers.

The University's Careers Centre also provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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This is a new strand of the PGCE Science where you will specialise in Physics. Students who successfully complete this route will be in a strong position to gain employment as teachers of Physics up to post-16 and general science at least to KS3 and possibly KS4. Read more
This is a new strand of the PGCE Science where you will specialise in Physics. Students who successfully complete this route will be in a strong position to gain employment as teachers of Physics up to post-16 and general science at least to KS3 and possibly KS4.

This course will attract bursaries from the Department for Education, for further information please visit the http://www.education.gov.uk.

The PGCE programme has been designed to train teachers to practice as a subject specialist teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). Trainees are assessed against the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) across the age range. Trainees will also often gain experience of the 16-18 age range, although they will not be formally assessed in this phase.

Course detail

The course is active and practical allowing trainees to develop professional competence through work undertaken in schools and in the University. Trainees work with young people, develop their expertise in their specialist subject area, share and discuss educational issues and study relevant educational research. The course is just the beginning of what we hope will be a process of continual professional development throughout a challenging and rewarding career.

Structure

The course is part of UWE's Department of Education's programme for Initial Teacher Training. Units studied are:

• Enabling Learning
• Meeting Curriculum Challenges
• Becoming a Teacher

These units are studied in both the school and the University-based parts of the course, the work on each site being complementary. The course centres on learning about the nature, content and teaching of all aspects of the science curriculum for 11-16 year olds and of specialist Physics for 14-19 year old eg. A level.

During your 12 weeks of study at the university, a range of aspects of teaching and learning of the Science curriculum will be addressed, e.g.
• Common misconceptions in Science
• Learning Science through out-of school trips and visits
• Supporting Numeracy and literacy through Science teaching
• Safety in Science lessons
• The nature of Science

Format

We will introduce you to a range of teaching styles, classroom management skills, lesson planning and assessment procedures both in the University and through classroom support from teachers in schools. You will consider strategies to support young people in their learning of science. You will also consider the use of a range of teaching styles and resources, including the appropriate use of information and communications technology (ICT)'

You will participate in sessions with other Physics graduates, and in mixed Science groups. You will also work with graduates from other disciplines where cross-curricular issues, such as learning theories and behaviour management are covered. If you have the knowledge and the passion to teach Science with Physics then this PGCE course is for you.

We recognise that embarking on a new course of study can sometimes be quite a challenging undertaking. You will have support from a number of staff in the university including; your group tutor, a personal tutor from you 14 - 19 specialism (Physics). Additionally any student can get support on a range of issues from a Department Student Adviser.

Placements

24 weeks are spent on placement: a total of eight weeks in one placement during the autumn term and 16 weeks in a second placement during the spring and summer.

As well as teaching, the programme includes contact time with a Senior Professional Tutor and a Subject Mentor, directed study time and personal study time.

There is an opportunity to spend time in a primary school and some students may also visit other institutions, such as special schools, science learning centres or colleges of further education.

Trainees in some placements also have the opportunity for a third placement during the final weeks of the course.

You will also be provided with opportunities to work in collaboratively with young people as a whole subject group or with other scientists.

Assessment

In order to pass the course, trainees are required to pass each unit. They are assessed on a number of written assignments and also on classroom practice against the standards specified by the Secretary of State for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) Before the end of the course it is recommended that trainees take the computer-based QTS skills tests in Numeracy, Literacy and ICT.

Careers / Further study

The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programmes now include 40 credits of assessment at Master's Level (Level M). For candidates who opt not to attempt the requisite credit at Level M, a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education will be available as an alternative award.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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This course is about analysing the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation. Read more

Overview

This course is about analysing the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation.
Philosophy and science don't mix. Or do they? What we nowadays call "science" used to be part of "philosophy." It is not a coincidence that Isaac Newton called his physical masterpiece "The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy." And today, the two are still closely connected. Our current worldview is strongly shaped by scientific thought. We look to science for both answers to our theoretical questions and solutions to our practical problems.

The Master's specialisation in Philosophy and Science analyses the relation of philosophy and science in terms of their historical development, as well as the current situation. How did the scientific worldview come about? What are its components? What models have been proposed for the relationship between philosophical and scientific thinking?

This Master's specialisation will give you a better understanding of the evolution, the current status and the implications of the scientific worldview. Professionally, it prepares you for several possible avenues, in fields including science administration, research, journalism, and policy-making.

Why study Philosophy and Science at Radboud University?

- The focus on the historical and systematic relationship between philosophy and science is unique in the Netherlands.
- The Philosophy Faculty has close ties with scientists and professors at the other faculties on campus - and philosophy as a subject is an integral part of all the faculties at Radboud University. This makes it easier for our students to combine Philosophy with any discipline when working on their thesis.
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups.
- The seminars specifically train skills such as critical reading, analytical thinking, policy writing and debating.
- This Master's specialisation is run by the Center for the History of Philosophy and Science (CHPS), the only centre in the world that studies philosophy and science as historically intertwined phenomena.
- This Master's specialisation is aimed at career prospects in, as well outside of, research.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophyandscience

Career prospects

During the specialisation Philosophy and Science you will learn to think about issues in debates with major thinkers. You will study texts by philosophers of the past and present. What you learn here is applicable to the social, scientific and political situations around us.

After you graduate, you’ll be well situated to analyse texts and extract concepts. You’ll have the ability to think out of the box and to think creatively about possible solutions. You can use those skills in society, in political or social debates and in your work.

Job positions

Graduates of the Master’s specialisation in Philosophy and Science have many options. You can work within journalism and become a journalist, editor or critic. You can also become a policy advisor for a governmental organisation, or for other cultural and social institutions. You can also work as a philosopher in business, communications advisor or ethical expert. And Dutch students who would like to become teachers within the Netherlands could continue to attain the academic teacher’s degree for the subject of Philosophy (leraar Filosofie).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophyandscience

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The Masters in Data Science provides you with a thorough grounding in the analysis and use of large data sets, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the Big Data and IT industries. Read more
The Masters in Data Science provides you with a thorough grounding in the analysis and use of large data sets, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the Big Data and IT industries. As well as studying a range of taught courses reflecting the state-of-the-art and the expertise of our internationally respected academic staff, you will undertake a significant programming team project, and develop your own skills in conducting a data science project.

Why this programme

◾The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
◾The School is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance: SICSA. This collaboration of Scottish universities aims to develop Scotland's place as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
◾We currently have 15 funded places to offer to home and EU students.
◾You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Data Science include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Big data
◾Data fundementals
◾Information retrieval
◾Machine learning
◾Research methods and techniques
◾Text as data
◾Web science
◾Masters team project.

Optional courses

◾Advanced networking and communications
◾Advanced operating systems
◾Algorithmics
◾Artificial intelligence
◾Big data: systems, programming and management
◾Computer architecture
◾Computer vision methods and applications
◾Cryptography and secure development
◾Cyber security forensics
◾Cyber security fundamentals
◾Distributed algorithms and systems
◾Enterprise cyber security
◾Functional programming
◾Human computer interaction
◾Human computer interaction: design and evaluation
◾Human-centred security
◾Information retrieval
◾Internet technology
◾IT architecture
◾Machine learning
◾Mobile human computer interaction
◾Modelling reactive systems
◾Safety critical systems.
◾Software project management
◾Theory of Computation

Depending on staff availability, the optional courses listed here may change.

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Industry links and employability

◾The advent of Big Data tools in recent years has facilitated the large-scale mining of voluminous data, to allow actionable knowledge and understanding, known as Data Science. For instance, search engines can gain insights into how ambiguous a query is according to the querying and clicking patterns of different users. Data Science combines a thorough background in Big Data processing techniques, combined with techniques from information retrieval and machine learning, to permit coherent and principled solutions allowing real insights and predictions to be obtained from data.
◾The programme includes a thorough grounding in professional software development, together with experience of conducting a development project. The programme will prepare you for a responsible position in the IT industry.
◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors include representatives from IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe, Red Hat and Bing.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the IT industry.

The Data Lab

We work closely with The Data Lab, an internationally leading research and innovation centre in data science. Established with an £11.3 million grant from the Scottish Funding Council, The Data Lab will enable industry, public sector and world-class university researchers to innovate and develop new data science capabilities in a collaborative environment. Its core mission is to generate significant economic, social and scientific value from data. Our students will benefit from a wide range of learning and networking events that connect leading organisations seeking business analytics skills with students looking for exciting opportunities in this field.

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This is a new strand of the PGCE Science where you will specialise in Chemistry. Students who successfully complete this route will be in a strong position to gain employment as teachers of Chemistry up to post-16 and general science at least to KS3 and possibly KS4. Read more
This is a new strand of the PGCE Science where you will specialise in Chemistry. Students who successfully complete this route will be in a strong position to gain employment as teachers of Chemistry up to post-16 and general science at least to KS3 and possibly KS4.

The PGCE programme has been designed to train teachers to practice as a subject specialist teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). Trainees are assessed against the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) across the age range. Trainees will also often gain experience of the 16-18 age range, although they will not be formally assessed in this phase.

Course detail

The course is active and practical allowing trainees to develop professional competence through work undertaken in schools and in the University. Trainees work with young people, develop their expertise in their specialist subject area, share and discuss educational issues and study relevant educational research. The course is just the beginning of what we hope will be a process of continual professional development throughout a challenging and rewarding career.

The course is part of UWE's Department of Education's programme for Initial Teacher Training. Units studied are:

• Enabling Learning
• Meeting Curriculum Challenges
• Becoming a Teacher

These units are studied in both the school and the University-based parts of the course, the work on each site being complementary. The course centres on learning about the nature, content and teaching of all aspects of the science curriculum for 11-16 year olds and of specialist Chemistry for 14-19 year old e.g. A -level.

Structure

During your 12 weeks of study at the university, a range of aspects of teaching and learning of the Science curriculum will be addressed, e.g.

• Common misconceptions in Science
• Learning Science through out-of school trips and visits
• Supporting Numeracy and literacy through Science teaching
• Safety in Science lessons
• The nature of Science

We will introduce you to a range of teaching styles, classroom management skills, lesson planning and assessment procedures both in the University and through classroom support from teachers in schools. You will consider strategies to support young people in their learning of science. You will also consider the use of a range of teaching styles and resources, including the appropriate use of information and communications technology (ICT).

Format

You will participate in sessions with other Chemistry graduates, and in mixed Science groups. You will also work with graduates from other disciplines where cross-curricular issues, such as learning theories and behaviour management are covered. If you have the knowledge and the passion to teach Science with Chemistry then this PGCE course is for you.

We recognise that embarking on a new course of study can sometimes be quite a challenging undertaking. You will have support from a number of staff in the university including; your group tutor and a personal tutor from your 14-19 specialism (Chemistry). Additionally any student can get support on a range of issues from a Department Student Adviser.

Assessment

In order to pass the course, trainees are required to pass each unit. They are assessed on a number of written assignments and also on classroom practice against the standards specified by the Secretary of State for the award of Qualified Teacher Status. Before the end of the course it is recommended that trainees take the computer-based QTS skills tests in Numeracy, Literacy and ICT.

Careers / Further study

The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programmes now include 40 credits of assessment at Master's Level (Level M). For candidates who opt not to attempt the requisite credit at Level M, a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education will be available as an alternative award.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

Read less
This is a new strand of the PGCE Science where you will specialise in Biology. Students who successfully complete this route will be in a strong position to gain employment as teachers of Biology up to post-18 and general science at least to KS3 and possibly KS4. Read more
This is a new strand of the PGCE Science where you will specialise in Biology. Students who successfully complete this route will be in a strong position to gain employment as teachers of Biology up to post-18 and general science at least to KS3 and possibly KS4.

The PGCE programme has been designed to train teachers to practice as a subject specialist teacher for the secondary age range (11-16). Trainees are assessed against the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) across the age range. Trainees will also often gain experience of the 16-18 age range, although they will not be formally assessed in this phase.

Course detail

The course is active and practical allowing trainees to develop professional competence through work undertaken in schools and in the university. Trainees work with young people, develop their expertise in their specialist subject area, share and discuss educational issues and study relevant educational research. The course is just the beginning of what we hope will be a process of continual professional development throughout a challenging and rewarding career.

The course is part of UWE's Department of Education's programme for Initial Teacher Training. Units studied are:

• Subject Knowledge for Teaching
• Professional Development
• Professional Practice
• Classroom Based Enquiry

These units are studied in both the school and the university-based parts of the course, the work on each site being complementary. The course centres on learning about the nature, content and teaching of all aspects of the science curriculum for 11-16 year olds and of specialist Biology for 14-19 year olds.

Structure

During your 12 weeks of study at the university, a range of aspects of teaching and learning of the Science curriculum will be addressed, for example:

• Common misconceptions in Science
• Behaviour for learning in the science classroom
• The science curriculum and qualifications
• Use of ICT in science
• Use of assessment to help all learners to make progress
• Safety in Science lessons
• The nature of Science

We will introduce you to a range of teaching styles, classroom management skills, lesson planning and assessment procedures both in the university and through classroom support from teachers in schools. You will consider strategies to support young people in their learning of science. You will also consider the use of a range of teaching styles and resources, including the appropriate use of information and communications technology (ICT).

You will participate in sessions with other biology graduates, and in mixed science groups. You will also work with graduates from other disciplines where cross-curricular issues, such as learning theories and behaviour management are covered.

Format

We recognise that embarking on a new course of study can sometimes be quite a challenging undertaking. You will have support from a number of staff in the university including your group tutor. Additionally any student can get support on a range of issues from a Department Student Adviser.

Placements

24 weeks are spent on placement: a total of nine weeks in one placement during the autumn term and 12 weeks in a second placement during the spring and summer, with shorter placements designed to complement your school experiences, including opportunities to spend time in primary or special schools.

As well as teaching, the course includes contact time with a Senior Professional Tutor and a Subject Mentor in school, directed study time and personal study time.

Trainees in some placements also have the opportunity for a third placement during the final weeks of the course.
You will also be provided with opportunities to work collaboratively with young people as a whole subject group or with other scientists.

Assessment

In order to pass the course, trainees are required to pass each unit. They are assessed on a number of written assignments and also on classroom practise against the standards specified by the Secretary of State for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Before you start the course it is recommended that trainees take the computer-based QTS skills tests in Numeracy, Literacy and ICT.

Careers / Further study

The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) courses now include 60 credits of assessment at Master's Level (Level M). For candidates who opt not to attempt the requisite credit at Level M, a Professional Graduate Certificate in Education will be available as an alternative award.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

Read less
The Masters in Computing Science provides you with a thorough grounding in advanced computing science, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry. Read more
The Masters in Computing Science provides you with a thorough grounding in advanced computing science, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry.

Why this programme

◾The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
◾The School is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance: SICSA. This collaboration of Scottish universities aims to develop Scotland's place as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
◾You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, computing at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Computing Science include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses
◾Research methods and techniques
◾Masters team project

Optional courses
◾Advanced networking and communications
◾Advanced operating systems
◾Algorithmics
◾Artificial intelligence
◾Big data: systems, programming and management
◾Computer architecture
◾Computer vision methods and applications
◾Cryptography and secure development
◾Cyber security forensics
◾Cyber security fundamentals
◾Distributed algorithms and systems
◾Enterprise cyber security
◾Functional programming
◾Human computer interaction
◾Human computer interaction: design and evaluation
◾Human-centred security
◾Information retrieval
◾Internet technology
◾IT architecture
◾Machine learning
◾Mobile human computer interaction
◾Modelling reactive systems
◾Safety critical systems.
◾Software project management
◾Theory of Computation
◾Web Science

Depending on staff availability, the optional courses listed here may change.

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Accreditation

MSc Computing Science is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS) and the Institution of Engineering & Technology (IET)

Our specialist MSc graduates in Computing Science, Software Engineering and Information Security are recognised by the British Computer Society (BCS), The Chartered Institute for IT, for the purposes of fully meeting the further learning academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional (CITP Further Learning) and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Scientist (CSci). These programmes have also been awarded the Euro-Info Master Label.

[[Industry links and employability ]]

◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors include representatives from IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe and Red Hat.
◾Employers are interested in graduates who have a combination of good technical skills and well-developed personal skills, and in this respect graduates of the MSc in Computing Science from the University of Glasgow are particularly well placed.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the IT industry.

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This MPA is designed to train professionals who want to be leaders in navigating decision-making at the intersection of science, engineering and public policy. Read more
This MPA is designed to train professionals who want to be leaders in navigating decision-making at the intersection of science, engineering and public policy. Students undertake a major live project associated with a real world science and engineering policy challenge and have opportunities to learn from policy practitioners, industry experts and UCL researchers.

Degree information

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to creatively develop policies relevant to science and engineering contexts. Students also study how policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a Major Group Project module (45 credits).

Core modules - students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module.
-Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
-Analytical Methods for Policy
-Negotiations, Meditation and Diplomacy
-Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules - students select one optional STEaPP module from the following:
-Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
-Risk Assessment and Governance
-Communicating Science for Policy

Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project
In the Group Project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP faculty, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning
The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles.

Careers

Graduates with Science, Engineering and Public Policy MPA degrees typically work in government agencies, corporate regulatory affairs departments or within advocacy groups doing legislative, regulatory or policy analysis. The career path for this type of profession begins as research or policy assistant, moves through policy or research analyst, then to technical consultant or project director or other senior professional roles. Ambitious candidates can work toward top-level positions such as assistant secretary or executive director.

Employability
Through the MPA programme, students will:
-Gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in innovation, development, science, technology and engineering.
-Develop a greater awareness of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policymaking processes.
-Learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policy makers and industry experts.
-Develop the skills to mobilise development, technology and innovation policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise to address societal challenges.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Science and engineering are at the center of an increasing number of policy issues that affect every aspect of society. This unique and practical programme offers experiential learning for the skills and knowledge that leaders need to navigate policymaking at the intersection with science and engineering.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policymaking process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project on a policy challenge for a real world client. Example policy areas include resources, energy, waste, transport, or communications

Students also network with their peers in sister MPA and doctoral programmes.

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The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation. Read more
The Master of Science is intended for those who have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field, or have sufficient preparation.

The purpose of the programs is to provide the intellectual and practical tools that professionals will need either to pursue or further careers as computer scientists in industry or to pursue a doctorate degree in computer science.

Curriculum

The Master's curriculum is designed with these goals in mind:

• The core modules provide a solid foundation in the fundamental principles of computer science.
• The 500-level electives give exposure to a variety of Computer Science subject areas.
• The 600-level advanced courses give exposure to research topics of current interest and provide in-depth knowledge.

Core: All four modules (12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC520 — Foundations of Computer Science
CSC530 — Data Structures
CSC540 — Programming Languages
CSC560 — Analysis of Algorithms

Electives: At least four 500-level electives (at least 12 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC525 — Operating Systems
CSC535 — Networks and Data Communications
CSC545 — Database System Concepts
CSC555 — Software Engineering
CSC565 — Compiler Design
CSC570 — Computer Architecture
CSC573 — Graphics and User Interfaces
CSC575 — Artificial Intelligence
CSC581 — Topics in Computer Science
CSC582 — Topics in Information Systems
CSC583 — Topics in Computer Security
CSC584 — Topics in Web Technology
CSC585 — User Interfaces in Java
CSC586 — System Administration and Security
CSC587 — Web Services
CSC588 — Wireless Programming and Security
CSC589 — UML and Pattern Design

Advanced: At least two 600-level (at least 6 credits – 3 credits each)

CSC600 — Advanced Seminar
CSC603 — Advanced Seminar in Computer Security
CSC604 — Advanced Seminar in Web Technology
CSC605 — Internship
CSC610 — Independent Research
CSC620 — Master's Thesis

To find out more information about the curriculum please visit the website:

http://www.cs.wcupa.edu/grad/masters.html

Internships

West Chester University students may register for a Computer Science Internship and work part time or full time in Summer II or during regular semesters. Students who are not Computer Science majors should use CSC300 (3 credits). Computer Science majors should use CSC400 (6 credits); of the 6 credits, 3 credits can be used to satisfy the major requirements, and the other 3 credits satisfy general electives. Computer Science graduate students should use the course number CSC605 (3 credits).

For more information please visit the website:

https://www.wcupa.edu/internships/

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