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This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine. Read more
This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine.

You learn from experts working in these diverse fields, being taught how different societies, cultures, and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and encouraged to approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/83/history-of-science-medicine-environment-and-technology

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- place the study of texts, images and documentaries in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis

- ensure that students of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis

- enable you to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology in different academic contexts and develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines

- develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences

- encourage you to relate the academic study of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology to questions of public debate and concern

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Every day we are hearing of ground breaking advances in the field of tissue engineering which offer tremendous potential for the future of regenerative medicine and health care. Staff at Swansea University are active in many aspects of tissue engineering.

Key Features of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

We are actively researching many aspects of tissue engineering including the following areas:

- Characterisation and control of the stem cell niche
- Mechanical characterisation of stem cells and tissues
- Production of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering
- Electrospinning of scaffold materials
- Cartilage repair and replacement
- Bone repair and replacement
- The application of nanotechnology to regenerative medicine
- Wound healing engineering
- Reproductive Immunobiology
- Bioreactor design

As an MSc By Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine student, you will join one of the teams at Swansea University working in tissue engineering and use state of the art research equipment within the Centre for NanoHealth, a collaborative initiative between the College of Engineering and Swansea University Medical School.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Aim of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine programme

The aim of this MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine is to provide you with a solid grounding within the field of tissue engineering and its application within regenerative medicine.

This will be achieved through a year of research in a relevant area of tissue engineering identified after discussion with Swansea academic staff. Working with two academic supervisors you will undertake a comprehensive literature survey which will enable the formulation of an experimental research programme.

As a student on the MSc by Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine course, you will be given the relevant laboratory training to undertake the research program. The research will be written up as a thesis that is examined. You will also be encouraged to present your work in the form of scientific communications such as journals and conference poster presentation.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine will equip you with a wealth of research experience and knowledge that will benefit your future career in academia or the health care industries.

Recent MSc by Research theses supervised in the area of Tissue Engineering at Swansea University include:

- Quality assurance of human stem cell/primary cell bank
- The development of electrospinning techniques for the production of novel tissue engineering scaffolds.
- The incorporation of pulsed electromagnetic fields into wound dressings.
- The application of pulsed electromagnetic fields for improved wound healing.
- The use of nanoparticles in the control of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds.
- The control of bacterial adhesion at surfaces relevant to regenerative medicine.
- The production of micro-porous particles for bone repair

Facilities

The £22 million Centre for Nanohealth is a unique facility linking engineering and medicine, and will house a unique micro-nanofabrication clean room embedded within a biological research laboratory and with immediate access to clinical research facilities run by local NHS clinicians.

Links with industry

The academic staff of the Medical Engineering discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London also offers the opportunity for collaborative research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK
Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK
Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK

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The overall aims of the programme are to. - provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;. Read more
The overall aims of the programme are to:

- provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;
- develop and create a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine able to pursue and develop their roles in a rapidly-changing and challenging environment of genomic medicine;
- prepare healthcare professionals for the adoption of genomic technologies and the increasing use of genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care, and with the required knowledge, skills and capability to have a positive personal impact on the work of others;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with an understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities relevant to genomic medicine;
- encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based clinical practice informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge of genomic medicine;
- develop students' intellectual, practical and transferable skills related to genomic medicine;
encourage critical thinking related to genomic medicine;
- conduct systematic research relevant to their professional practice.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvmgmpgnm

Learning Outcomes

The over-arching learning outcomes are:

- Knowledge and understanding -

- To enhance the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine relevant to their present and future roles.
- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of genomic medicine informed by research in a rapidly-changing integrated clinical and research environment.
- To enable deployment of new knowledge in their clinical practice, and to have a positive personal impact on the work of others in their clinical team and wider service.
- To develop an understanding of genomic technologies and to be able to use genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway.
- To develop students’ knowledge so that they have the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care.
- To update and extend students’ understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities.
- To demonstrate knowledge, abilities and skills to engage in focused, professionally-relevant, independent learning, and through the production of a dissertation.

- Skills and other attributes -

- The skills necessary to locate, read, interpret and analyse primary and secondary sources of material enabling the development of a conceptual and theoretical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine.
- Skills to evaluate current scholarship and research critically and to place this knowledge within the context of their own situation and practice as clinical leaders.
- The ability to formulate a research topic relevant to their clinical context, to collect and analyse primary and/or secondary sources of data, and to undertake professionally relevant research.
- The facility to communicate the results of their ideas, research and its conclusions in a written form acceptable as a work of scholarship potentially publishable in a professional or academic journal.

Format

The MPhil comprises either:

- eight modules, plus a research project and associated dissertation of 10-12,000 words, or
- ten modules, plus a literature-based research project and associated dissertation of 5-6,000 words.

Students must complete seven Core Modules and one/three further modules chosen from a range of Option Modules, with additional between-module reflection, study and assignment work.

The modules are structured as follows:

- Core Module 1: An introduction to human genetics and genomics
- Core Module 2: Omics techniques and the application to genomic medicine
- Core Module 3: Genomics of common and rare disease
- Core Module 4: Molecular pathology of cancer and application in cancer diagnosis, screening, and treatment
- Core Module 5: Application of genomics to infectious disease
- Core Module 6: Pharmacogenetics and stratified healthcare
- Core Module 7: Bioinformatics, interpretation, and data quality assurance in genome analysis

Option modules will be selected from the following list. Not all options may be offered every year.

- Option Module 1: Ethical, Legal and Social Implications in applied genomics (ELSI) **
- Option Module 2: Counselling skills for genomics
- Option Module 3: Professional and research skills
- Option Module 4: Advanced Bioinformatics – from genomes to systems
- Option Module 5: Epigenetics and epigenomics
- Option Module 6: Expanding the content of the MPhil in genomic medicine with a workplace-based module

Each core module will involve around 30 hours of contact time, including lectures, group work and online teaching.

Placements

The research project element of the course may be undertaken in a number of scientific institutions, within and without the University. This may include the University's School of Clinical Medicine, the School of Biological Sciences, the European Bioinformatics Institute, Welcome Trust Sanger Institute and, subject to approval, other suitable research institutions.

Assessment

Students must submit a dissertation of 5-6,000 words or 10-12,000 words, depending on the options selected. This will be worth 1/6th or 1/3rd of the overall mark for the course, respectively.

For each of the taught modules, students must complete summative assignments of 2500-3500 words or equivalent (except where other methods of module assessment are indicated in individual module descriptions)

Each student is allocated a named supervisor, who will meet regularly with the student to discuss progress and provide feedback and support as required. Written supervision reports are accessed via the online supervision system. Students are given feedback on the assessments conducted at the end of each module.

All students will meet with the programme director on a termly basis to discuss progress and to provide their feedback on the course.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding is available from Health Education England to pay course fees for NHS employees wishing to apply for this course. Prospective students wishing to apply for HEE funding should refer to the application process published by HEE at http://www.genomicseducation.hee.nhs.uk/msc-funding-info/and ensure that access to this funding is approved before applying for the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) programme is internationally renowned for providing high quality distance learning exclusively to doctors. Read more
Our Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) programme is internationally renowned for providing high quality distance learning exclusively to doctors. The programme is designed to provide relevant knowledge for doctors involved, or wishing to be involved, in the full or part-time management of recreational and elite athletes. By studying this programme you will develop practical skills that can be applied to both primary and specialist care.

The highly interactive, flexible, online learning and hands-on clinical teaching provide you with expert knowledge and skills, while also enabling you to remain in practice.

Programme features:
- Flexible and online, allowing you to study alongside your clinical practice.
- Recognised by the Faculty of Sport & Exercise Medicine (FSEM) (http://www.fsem.co.uk/).
- You will become part of an international online community of SEM specialists.
- A problem-solving and reflective approach to sport and exercise medicine.
- Benefit from a reduced membership rate to the British Association of Sport and Exercise Medicine (BASEM) (http://www.basem.co.uk/) for the first year.

View a video about this programme (http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/postgraduate/)

Programme structure

This is a flexible programme. The Diploma can be completed in two years, but students have the option of taking up to four years. The MSc can be completed in 3.5 years: again, students have the option of taking up to 5 years.

The following events take place on the University of Bath campus:
- Induction Event (two days) – Year One (September)
- Sports Science Residential Week - Year One (January)
- Clinical Residential Week - Year Two (June)
- OSCE (Examination Event) (1 day) – Year Two (June or October)

Years one and two (Diploma):
- Sport & Exercise Medicine in Practice 1 - 6 Credits (ongoing throughout Diploma)
- Sport & Exercise Medicine in Practice 2 - 6 Credits (ongoing throughout Diploma)
- Sports Doctor - 6 Credits (3 month unit)
- Exercise Physiology - 6 Credits (3 month unit)
- Functional Anatomy and Sporting Movement Analysis - 12 credits (6 month unit)
- Sports Injuries & Rehabilitation - 12 credits (6 month unit)
- Psychology of Sport and Exercise - 6 Credits (3 month unit)
- Exercise for Health - 6 Credits (3 month unit)

Year three (MSc):
- Research Project Design
- Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Project

View summary table (http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/images/sem-programme-structure.jpg) or Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/hl/hl-proglist-pg.html#F) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

The majority of the content of the programme is delivered online to allow you to engage in flexible study alongside your clinical practice. To complement the online teaching there is a face-to-face induction event at the University and residential teaching weeks in the first and second years of the programme. Reflective, practice-based elements are provided through professional experiential learning and online virtual workshops.

Methods of assessment

You will be assessed through written assignments and case studies, a portfolio of clinical experience, the OSCE Examination and a Dissertation. Each unit is assessed individually.

Assignments are delivered online and must also be submitted online. The formative assessment includes moderated online discussions, self-assessment questions and online multiple choice tests.

Summative assessment will vary between units but will typically include some of the following:

Compilation of portfolio of evidence [SEM in Practice]
OSCE examination [SEM in Practice]
Maintaining a reflective practitioner portfolio [SEM in Practice]
Essays
Case studies
Short answer questions
Recorded consultations

- Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL):
If you have a previous qualification, or undertaken postgraduate units from another institution, you may be eligible to transfer credit for this prior learning.

Depending on the programme of study, you can gain APL for up to 50% of the total credits required (this credit must have been obtained within the previous five years).

- Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL)
You may also apply for APEL by submitting a portfolio of evidence, demonstrating that you have successfully achieved the learning outcomes for the specific unit(s) you seek exemption from.

We recommend you discuss this with the Director of Studies first to ensure this is suitable, as creating your portfolio can be very time consuming.

We will not permit exemptions of fractional units, and so the minimum threshold for the applications of APEL procedures will be a single, free standing unit (including three credit units). The maximum threshold for exemption will normally be 50% of the total credits required for a programme of study, for example, a 45-credit exemption towards a 90-credit Masters degree.

About the department

The School for Health was established within the University of Bath in 2003, to centralise the high profile research and teaching in the health-related disciplines already taking place throughout the university, so creating a single entity through which links with the health sector at national and international level can be channelled, co-ordinated and developed.

In 2010 the School joined the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences and became the Department for Health, providing excellent opportunities for academic teaching and research collaborations with other departments, such as Psychology and Social & Policy Sciences. The Department's postgraduate teaching and research programmes now form part of the Faculty's new Graduate School, also launched in 2010, providing postgraduate students with dedicated support and a strong community in which to base their studies - whether on campus or by distance learning.

In keeping with government initiatives surrounding population health and more general public concerns, the Department divides its activities between two main pillars: Healthcare and Population Health – one focuses on the NHS, healthcare and health services research and the other focuses on population health, healthy living, sport & physical activity and tobacco control; each of these groups, in turn, contain both teaching programmes and research activities. Furthermore, there is a bridging spine between both pillars and which houses the Professional Doctorate in Health, Research in Health Practice and the administrative, finance, learning & teaching development, marketing and support activities of the Department.

The Department’s aims are:

- To develop a research portfolio that is both of the highest academic standard and has applications in the real world
- To build on external links with the public services and other bodies concerned with health and society
- To innovate design and delivery of healthcare services
- To change corporate approaches to healthy organisations
- To support government reform of health and social care provision
- To identify and facilitate opportunities for academic collaboration and new developments.

The Department's postgraduate taught programmes combine academic excellence with flexible and innovative design and delivery; our postgraduate portfolio is distinguished by the provision of a number of Professional Masters and a Professional Doctorate programme designed to be studied part-time by learners working in a wide range of healthcare roles from all around the world. All our postgraduate courses are taught online and this has proved to be one of our unique selling points, with students able to continue within their practice area or working environment whilst gaining a further qualification.

The Department is renowned for its exemplary attention to educational design, integrating knowledge with research evidence and resulting in programmes which are highly relevant to contemporary practice; in addition, the Department boasts some of the most innovative and successful approaches to online and part-time education, recognised through a number of awards.

At all levels, learning and teaching in the Department provides a strong focus on high quality education for real world situations and produces graduates with skills and knowledge relevant to professional roles and in high demand from employers.

Teaching programmes on offer within the Department include:

- Sport & Exercise Medicine, the world renowned flexible masters programme exclusively for doctors
- Sports Physiotherapy, a specialist programme designed by physiotherapists for physiotherapists
- Research in Health Practice, a programme launched in 2008 aimed at health and social care professionals interested in conducting their own research
- The innovative Professional Doctorate in Health which focuses on both Population Health and Healthcare within the Department, providing a doctoral level programme to develop expert practitioners and researchers in practice.

Facilities, equipment, other resources
Sport and exercise science and medical science laboratories. Close links with the English Institute of Sport and the Department of Sports Development and Recreation.

International and industrial links
There are current links with primary care trusts, strategic health authorities, the two hospitals in Bath and colleagues in industry. The Department works closely with esteemed international academic institutions, and individual health practitioners, in order to meet the regional, national and global challenges facing health and social care.

Careers information
Postgraduate research students gain a wealth of experience to assist them with their next step and are offered personal career advice at the University. The Department has an established research training skills programme for all research students. The taught programmes enable students to extend their health and social care career pathways and to build important networks for further professional opportunities.

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

Overview

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course Content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

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The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of key developments in the fields of health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. Read more
The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of key developments in the fields of health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. It examines the political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions of contemporary trends in medicine, the biosciences and health, in changing social and regulatory contexts, and at national and international levels.

Key benefits

- Taught within a world-leading Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, by internationally recognised experts who have trained across a range of disciplines – from sociology, anthropology, geography, gerontology, socio-legal studies and political science to psychology, bioethics, philosophy, biology and medicine.

- Covers a broad range of substantive topics and offers a wide selection of specialist options addressing key social and ethical concerns related to, for example, psychiatry and mental health; ageing; war and trauma; pharmaceuticals, genomics, and biotechnology and clinical research; pandemics and biosecurity; and the political economy of health.

- Offers advanced training in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods, as well as critical policy research methods, allowing students to acquire the skills needed to undertake cutting-edge, social scientific analyses of diverse health-related issues.

- Provides opportunities to join a thriving research community, to participate with active researchers in a range of extra-curricular events such as reading groups and roundtable discussions, and to attend a rich programme of seminars and lectures by world renowned visiting speakers.

- Equips students with a set of skills and understandings necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.

- Provides internship opportunities and career support to enhance students’ employability

- Taught in the heart of London, at the Strand Campus on the banks of the Thames, with access to policy-makers, private sector organizations, government agencies and other research and academic institutions relevant to health, and to London’s key cultural activities.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medicine-health-and-public-policy-msc-pg-dip-pg-cert.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy addresses the nature and policy implications of developments in health and medicine from social scientific and ethical perspectives. It is designed for graduates who wish to develop specialist understanding of the complex interconnections between (1) changing social, economic and political contexts, (2) advances in the biosciences and technological innovation, and (3) the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities. Drawing on concepts, theories and methods from the social sciences and from philosophy and ethics, students are encouraged to combine rigorous theoretical analysis with concrete, problem-based and policy-relevant research addressing key issues and controversies relevant to recent developments in health and medicine.

Students will have the opportunity to study a wide range of topics, which may include: inequalities in health and access to healthcare; the dynamics and policy implications of ageing societies; the securitization of public health; the impact of war and conflict on health and well-being; transnational trends in medical research, pharmaceutical regulation and health technology assessment; ethical issues in clinical research; the implications of recent scientific advances in genomics, molecular biology and neuroscience for ideas of personhood and identity, and for the organisation and funding of healthcare; patient advocacy, health movements and citizen participation in health policy making; the commodification of the body; the role of psychiatry in the cultural construction of normality and abnormality; and the marketization and privatization of medical care.

- Course purpose -

The MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy is ideal for health professionals, graduates in relevant disciplines, policy makers, those who work in governmental and non-governmental organisations, and anyone wishing to develop advanced, interdisciplinary understanding of the complex relationships between medicine, science and society. Teaching focuses on cutting-edge research within socio-ethical studies of health, medicine and public policy, and provides a firm grounding in the knowledge, analytical techniques and research methods used within advanced social research. In doing so, it equips students with a set of skills and understandings that are necessary for future careers in the fields of policymaking and regulation, in health-related governmental and non-governmental agencies, and in university teaching and research.

- Course format and assessment -

Teaching involves a combination of lectures, seminars and workshopsthat place an emphasis on group dialogue, presentations and debate. Assessment includes a mix of examinations, written work and oral presentations.

Career prospects

Students may go on to pursue careers in academia, in the fields of policymaking, research, and regulation in the public and private sectors, in government agencies, think-tanks and in national and international NGOs. We collaborate closely with the Careers & Employability Office at King's College London to enhance the employability of our students, and we organise targeted careers sessions with guest-speakers from relevant fields.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Sunderland is the only university in the north of England to offer an Overseas Pharmacist Assessment Programme (OSPAP) that is accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council. Read more
Sunderland is the only university in the north of England to offer an Overseas Pharmacist Assessment Programme (OSPAP) that is accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council.

Course overview

Pharmaceutical Sciences for the Overseas Pharmacist Assessment Programme (OSPAP) is designed for those who are qualified pharmacists outside the European Economic Area and who are now looking to become registered pharmacists in the UK.

Our course is one of a small number of courses that are accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council. Their accreditation is based on quality reviews that ensure Sunderland is meeting the required standards.

Completing the OSPAP postgraduate diploma allows for entry to the next stages of registering as a pharmacist in the UK: firstly, 52 weeks of supervised training in employment; secondly, a registration assessment.

Once all these stages are successfully completed, and assuming you have the necessary visa and work permit, you would be in a position to apply for roles as a practising pharmacist in the UK. There is virtually no unemployment of registered pharmacists in the UK.

You can also apply to undertake a Masters research project in addition to your postgraduate diploma. Pharmacy is a particular area of strength at the University of Sunderland and our Department has been teaching the subject since 1921.

Course content

The content of this course reflects the accreditation requirements of the General Pharmaceutical Council.

Modules on the course include:
-Pharmacy, Law, Ethics and Practice (60 Credits)
-Clinical Therapeutics (60 Credits)
-Research Methods for Pharmaceutical Practice and Masters Research Project (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, debate sessions, online learning packages, tutorials and seminars.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include end-of-year examinations, practical assessments as well as assignments throughout the year.

Facilities & location

This course is based in the Sciences Complex at our City Campus, which boasts multi-disciplinary laboratories and cutting-edge equipment thanks to multi-million pound investments.

Facilities for Pharmaceutics
We have pharmaceutical-related equipment for wet granulation, spray drying, capsule filling, tablet making, mixing inhalation, film coating and freeze drying.

As well as standard pharmacopoeial test methods, such as dissolution testing, friability and disintegration, we also offer highly sophisticated test methods. These include rheometry, thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy), tests for powder flow, laser diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, image analysis and laser confocal microscopy.

Facilities for Medicinal Chemistry
Our state-of-the-art spectroscopic facility allows us to confirm the structures of new molecules that could be potential pharmaceutical products and to investigate the structures of potential medicinal substances that have been isolated from plants.

We are equipped with Liquid Chromatography-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Mass Spectroscopy (LCNMR/MS) platforms; this is an exceptional facility for a university. We also have low and high resolution mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and elemental analysis equipment.

Our facilities allow you to gain hands-on experience of a wide range of analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy, which are of great importance in determining both ionic/metal content of pharmaceuticals and simple chemical structures.

You will also gain experience of revolutionary protein and DNA separation techniques, as well as Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography for separating unknown chemical mixtures.

Facilities for Pharmacology
Our highly technical apparatus will give you first-hand experience of the principles of drug action and the effects of drugs on pharmacological and cellular models. As a result, you gain a better understanding of the effects of drugs on specific receptors located throughout the human body and related physiological effects.

Simulation technology
You’ll have the opportunity to apply your training in a realistic setting with our two advanced simulation technology ‘SimMan’ models.
Each of our £57,000 SimMan mannequins has blood pressure, a pulse and other realistic physiological behaviour. The models can be pre-programmed with various medical scenarios, so you can demonstrate your pharmacological expertise in a realistic yet safe setting. Our academic team is also actively working with the SimMan manufacturers to develop new pharmacy simulations.

Pharmacy Practice
One of the most important skills of pharmacists is to communicate their expertise in a manner that the public can understand and accept.

The University has invested in a purpose-built model pharmacy complete with consultation suite. This allows you to develop skills in helping patients take the correct medicine in the right way, with optional video recording of your interaction with patients for the purposes of analysis and improvement.

In addition, we can accurately simulate hospital-based scenarios in a fully equipped ward environment where medical, nursing and pharmacy students can share learning.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on pharmaceutical and biomedical science, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your studies include:
-Embase, which is a complex database covering drug research, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, toxicology, clinical and experimental human medicine, health policy and management, public health, occupational health, environmental health, drug dependence and abuse, psychiatry, forensic medicine and biomedical engineering/instrumentation
-PubMed, which contains life science journals, online books and abstracts that cover fields such as medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine and health care
-Science Direct, which offers more than 18,000 full-text journals published by Elsevier
-Web of Science, which covers a broad range of science areas

Learning Environment
Sunderland Pharmacy School has a rich heritage in scientific studies and our degree courses are extremely well respected in the industry. We are fully plugged into relevant medical and pharmaceutical industry bodies, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people. Our vibrant learning environment helps ensure a steady stream of well-trained pharmacists whose most important concern is patient-centred pharmaceutical care.

Employment & careers

On completing this course you can register and practise in the UK as a qualified pharmacist. An entry-level pharmacist usually starts within Band 5 of the NHS pay rates (up to around £28,000). Advanced pharmacists, consultants, team managers and managers of pharmaceutical services are rated as Bands 8-9 and can earn up to £99,000. Currently there is virtually no unemployment of qualified pharmacists. Typical starting salaries for community pharmacists range from £21,000 to £35,000 depending on location, conditions of employment and experience.

Most pharmacists work in the following areas:
Community pharmacy: this involves working in pharmacies on high streets or in large stores. You will dispense prescriptions, deal with minor ailments, advise on the use of medicines and liaise with other health professionals.

Hospital pharmacy: this involves the purchasing, dispensing, quality testing and supply of medicines used in hospitals.

Primary care: this involves working in General Practice surgeries, either as an employee of the Practice or the Primary Care Trust. Roles include Medicines Management Pharmacists, who are responsible for prescribing budgets and the development of prescribing directives.

Secondary care: this involves working in hospitals to supply medicines, manage clinics, provide drug information and prescribe medicines.

Industrial pharmacists are involved in areas such as Research & Development, Quality Assurance and product registration.
Research degrees can be undertaken in many aspects of pharmacy. Sunderland Pharmacy School offers excellent facilities and a wide range of research expertise.

You can also work in areas of the pharmaceutical industry, medical writing and in education. By completing a Masters project in addition to your OSPAP postgraduate diploma it will enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is a one year full time programme, which provides an ideal opportunity and environment in which to gain practical training in Research Methods and to join a thriving research team within Swansea University College of Medicine. The Medicine and Life Sciences course has been developed with an emphasis on providing students with a research-oriented approach to their learning. Students are able to tailor their studies towards a career in one of the College’s internationally recognised research themes:

– Biomarkers and Genes,
– Devices,
– Microbes and Immunity,
– Patient & Population Health and Informatics.

Key Features of MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is committed to supporting the development of evidence within the areas of Health, Medicine and Life Science through the training of researchers whose findings will directly inform their own understanding and that of others. The ethos of this programme is to produce graduates with the research skill and knowledge to become effective researchers, who will contribute to the body of knowledge within their chosen area of interest that will have an impact upon the health and well-being of all.

- The advantage of a MRes over other formats is that it provides a structured yet in-depth approach, taking the taught component of FHEQ Level 7 teaching as a framework for conducting research on the candidates own practice.
- Innovative and integrated curriculum that reflects the various aspects of the research process.
- Multidisciplinary teaching team with vast experience and expertise in conducting high quality research.
- Research informed teaching.
- Teaching is supported by online learning and support.
-Flexibility for you to gain specialist knowledge.
- A one year full-time taught masters programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required for a successful research career.
- This course is also available for two years part-time study.
- The opportunity to conduct an individual research project with an interdisciplinary team within a supportive environment.
- Students will be assigned a research-active supervisory team

The aim of the MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is to provide students with a broad research training to prepare them for a research career in Medical and Life Science research with emphasis on: Biomarkers & Genes, Devices, Microbes & Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. The course has been developed to enable graduates to pursue a variety of research careers in Medical and Life Sciences. The programme comprises both taught and research elements.

By the end of the Medicine and Life Sciences programme students will have:

Developed necessary skills to critically interpret and evaluate research evidence; Gained experience the in analysis and interpretation of research data; Advanced knowledge at the forefront of Medical and Life Science research, with the ability to integrate the theoretical and practical elements of research training; Developed the ability to conceptualise, design and implement a research project for the generation of new evidence that informs Health, Medicine and Life Science; Developed practical research skills by working with an interdisciplinary research team; The ability to confidently communicate research ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences; Acquired transferable skills which enhance your employability and future research career.

Modules

Modules on the Medicine and Life Sciences course may include:

PMRM01 Critical Appraisal and Evaluation

PMRM02 Data Analysis for Health and Medical Sciences

PMRM03 Research Leadership and Project Management OR any topic specific FHEQ Level 7 module from the College of Medicine ’s portfolio

Mode of delivery:

The 60 credits of the taught element will be delivered face-to-face, combining formal lecturing, seminars, and group work in addition to tutor-led practical classes. The remaining 120 credits for the research element will be available as distance learning either off or on-site. Irrespective of the location for conducting the research project, students will supported through monthly online (Skype)/or face-to-face supervisory meetings.

Course Structure

Students must complete 3 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 120 credits thesis on a research project aligned to one the College’s research theme. Each taught module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is designed in two phases:

Phase 1 – Training and Application (October – January; 60 credits)

Taught modules in Research Methods and their application to Medicine and Life Science. Personalised education and training relevant to student’s research interests. Identification of research questions and how they might be addressed.Focused on students existing knowledge and research skills.

Phase 2 – Research Project (February – September; 120 credits)

The project is selected by the student in combination with an academic supervisory team. Focussed on one of the College’s four main research themes: Biomarkers and Genes, Devices, Microbes and Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. At the end of Part 2 students submit a 40,000 word thesis worth 120 credits leading to the award of Master of Research in Medicine and Life Science.

Attendance Pattern

Students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Phase One. Attendance during Phase Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

You are also encouraged to attend the Postgraduate Taught Induction Event during the induction week and any programme associated seminars, together with Postgraduate research events.

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The Masters in Bioscience Enterprise (MBE) programme is an intensive, taught science and business course intended for those who have an interest in enterprise and the ambition to found technology companies or take up leadership, executive or consultancy roles in the life sciences sector. Read more
The Masters in Bioscience Enterprise (MBE) programme is an intensive, taught science and business course intended for those who have an interest in enterprise and the ambition to found technology companies or take up leadership, executive or consultancy roles in the life sciences sector. Practical experience is gained through individual and group professional practice assignments, a consulting project and an internship placement, both of which are conducted with host companies.

Applicants must have a good first degree in biological, medical or physical sciences or a financial or legal background and demonstrate a strong interest in pursuing a business career in the life science sector. MBE students are based at the Institute of Biotechnology and have a close affiliation to Judge Business School, a combination that provides an unparalleled educational experience and an opportunity to learn from leading scientists, entrepreneurs and academics at the University of Cambridge.

Learning is based on real business examples and lectures and case studies are frequently delivered by senior company executives. There are optional opportunities to gain a global perspective of the industry sector during a study tour to a international biotechnology business cluster, an event which may be planned and led by members of the class. Additional costs are incurred by students who elect to participate in these activities or incur other discretionary expenses associated with participation in the programme.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egcempbse

Course detail

The educational aims of the M.Phil. programme in Bioscience Enterprise are to:

- Enhance understanding of life sciences and related technological developments;
- Foster research and analytical skills and methodologies;
- Develop written and verbal communication skills;
- Provide knowledge of the ethical, legal and regulatory issues associated with bringing scientific advances to market;
- Develop applied business skills, including those that enable students to:
*identify potential business opportunities arising from research in life sciences and related areas;
*exploit entrepreneurial opportunities;
*undertake senior executive roles within biotechnology companies and other commercial entities.

Other aims of the programme are to:

- Provide a coherent and supportive learning environment, with students working closely with teachers drawn from both academic and biotechnology business executive backgrounds and whose teaching is informed by their own knowledge and business expertise;
- Develop new areas of teaching in response to advances of scholarship and the community;
- Continue to attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, nationality, background, gender or physical disability.

Learning Outcomes

Students gain an understanding of:

- Life sciences, including fundamental concepts of basic science and demonstration of how contemporary biological and medical research leads to exploitable science and commercial products;
- Business, including commercial and analytical skills required in biotechnology and healthcare related businesses;
- Management, including strategy, organisation, leadership, marketing and financing of technology companies;
- Technology transfer, from academia to industry and from industry to industry, including the concepts of licensing, partnering, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions;
- Law and intellectual property frameworks, relating to companies, individuals and shareholders in different jurisdictions;
- Social and ethical issues, including fundamental constraints when applying scientific research to the development of new bioscience products;
- Global biotechnology, including comparisons of the current industry status in the UK, Europe, USA and elsewhere.

Format

Science and technology, business and transitionary modules are taught in each term, integrating commercial know-how with advances in research and demonstrating the many complex issues associated with bringing discovery and innovation from the laboratory to the market. The programme is highly participatory and includes practical elements in the form of interdisciplinary projects, workshops, case studies and business planning activities. Students have opportunities to undertake a consulting project and a technology company internship placement, and to gain an international perspective during a (self-funded, optional, student planned and led) study tour to a biotechnology business cluster in the EU or USA.

The MBE class is taught as a single entity. There are no elective components and all students follow the same syllabus. The class offers a professional practice experience and a high level of participation is expected. All lectures and course components are mandatory.

The department is renowned for its practical and successful approach to biotechnology entrepreneurship and the exploitation of bioscience inventions. Students benefit from a unique combination of teaching and mentoring from experienced business and academic contributors. The faculty pursue a variety of research interests and the application of the resulting technologies has led to the founding of many spin-out companies. Our innovative achievements and strong Master's teaching were recognised by the Queen's Anniversary Award (2007).

Placements

In April and May of each year, MBE students spend the majority of their time working in a company placement, carrying out research with a commercial or business dimension. Students are encouraged at this time to put into practice the lessons learnt from the academic aspects of the programme as well as to demonstrate originality of research and analysis. The MBE staff provides considerable support to students in regard to both identifying suitable projects and during the placement itself.

It is important that the project undertaken relates to the field of ‘bioscience enterprise’, addresses a defined research question and affords students the opportunity to collect quantitative and qualitative data. The subsequent analysis forms the basis of a substantial dissertation and the findings are also presented at a Symposium held at the end of the year, as well as in the form of conclusions and recommendations for the host company.

Assessment

A 10,000 word dissertation is an important aspect of course assessment. Passing this element of the course is crucial to attainment of the degree. The work is based on data collected during a research placement in a company, the analysis of which forms the basis of the work. The dissertation should show evidence of innovative thinking and must not be simply a review and subsequent extrapolation of previously published work.

Written submissions include in-depth science and technology in business papers, up to 10 essays of no more than 4000 words, a number of short reports and critical appraisals, a consulting project report and a dissertation of no more than 10,000 words based on research and analysis conducted during the internship placement. At the conclusion of the dissertation students make an assessed presentation. The Examiners may ask candidates to take an oral exam at the conclusion of the course.

Attainment is continuously assessed, with particular emphasis on practical activities, participation and learning through team-work in the research, preparation, and delivery of presentations. Where possible group work reflects the activities of a professional business environment.

Students are also encouraged to participate in extracurricular enterprise activities, including entrepreneurial competitions within the University and further afield, and submit a business development plan as one of the course assignments.

Continuing

Students completing this course usually continue their career in the life sciences commercial sector but a number also at the conclusion of the course apply for PhD research programmes in either science or management disciplines.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Students normally fund their studies through savings, loans, by a grant from their employer or by securing a scholarship from either a Cambridge Trust or other awarding body. The competition for scholarship awards is intense and candidates are advised that only a small percentage of the highest-achieving applicants are successful.

A limited number of bursaries are available to MBE students through the generosity of the Chris R. Lowe Carpe Diem Bursary programme and at times from other sources associated with the course. Candidates who meet the eligibility criteria set by the donors and are offered a place to study on the course will be automatically considered for these awards as part of their application process. Usually these awards are made to students on the basis of economic need, or those who live in or have studied in and intend to pursue their future careers in the UK.

Please note that the programme bursaries, whilst at times substantial, are not intended to cover all the costs associated with living and studying at Cambridge and therefore applicants must ensure they have access to sufficient funds to cover the balance of their tuition and College fees and maintenance needs.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MA in Imperial History will be administered by the School of History and convened by Dr. Giacomo Macola, Senior Lecturer in African History. Read more
The MA in Imperial History will be administered by the School of History and convened by Dr. Giacomo Macola, Senior Lecturer in African History.

This programme allows you to examine key themes and regions in the making of world history, from the 18th century to the present day.

Imperial history is a rapidly growing and innovative field of historical research, which offers you the opportunity to explore the origins, workings and legacies of empires. By critically engaging with a range of theoretical and empirical literatures, as well as conducting original research, you use historical data to tackle momentous questions relating to violence, development and global inequality.

Led by five specialists in the School of History, the programme takes a broad interdisciplinary approach which also encompasses renowned academics from other departments. The team offers particular expertise in African political history, the history of military technology and conflict, global histories of religion and the newly-emerging field of children and childhoods. You also have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the Centre for the History of Colonialisms (http://www.kent.ac.uk/history/centres/colonialisms/index.html).

This programme offers an ideal launching pad for students who envisage careers with an international dimension or plan to embark on doctoral work.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/360/imperial-history

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in imperial and African history, medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Course structure

The MA in Imperial History is available for one year full-time, or two years part-time study

Students take four modules: two compulsory and two additional specialist modules (to be chosen from a menu of at least five variable yearly options). 60 further credits are earned through a final 15,000-word-long dissertation.

Modules

Compulsory modules

- Methods and Interpretations in Historical Research
- Themes and Controversies Modern Imperial History
- Dissertation of 15,000 words

Optional modules

- Liberation Struggles in Southern Africa
- War in the Hispanic World since 1808
- Colonial Childhoods
- An Intimate History of the British Empire
- Europe in Crisis, 1900-1925
- No End of a Lesson: Britain and the Boer War
- Writing of Empire and Settlement
- Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses

Assessment

This is by coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation, which counts for one-third of the final grade.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme has been designed to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing global market by providing the skills and abilities to contribute to the availability of well-designed products, process and systems. Read more
This programme has been designed to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing global market by providing the skills and abilities to contribute to the availability of well-designed products, process and systems.

As a broad-based Mechanical Engineering degree this programme provides a wide variety of career options in the engineering sector.

Core study areas include experimental mechanics, simulation of advanced materials and processes structural analysis, computer aided engineering, engineering design methods, sustainable development: the engineering context, the innovation process and project management, thermofluids and a project.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mechanical-manufacturing/mechanical-engineering/

Programme modules

- Experimental Mechanics
This module introduces the following elements: experimental techniques for analysis and characterisation of various engineering materials and full-field, non-contact optical methods for deformation and strain measurements. Students will learn to identify the most appropriate experimental techniques for evaluating material response in a specific setting and for different types of materials.

- Simulation of Advanced Materials and Processes
The objective of this module is to introduce students to the concepts in numerical simulation of advanced materials and processes. To enable students to gain theoretical and practical experience in simulating mechanical behaviour of advanced materials and modelling processes related to these materials using finite element modelling techniques.

- Structural Analysis
Students will gain an understanding of modern concepts of structural analysis. They will gain practical experience in analyses of structures using finite-element modelling and understand the need for structural analysis in design.

- Computer Aided Engineering
Students will learn how to evaluate, choose and implement CAE systems. Students will learn to select and apply appropriate computer based methods and systems for modelling engineering products; analysing engineering problems; and assisting in the product design process.

- Engineering Design Methods
The aims of this module are to provide students with a working understanding of some of the main methods which may be employed in the design of products and systems. Students will learn to identify appropriate methods and techniques for use at different times and situations within a project.

- Sustainable Development: The Engineering Context
The objective of this module are to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of sustainable development and to provide them with an understanding of how engineers can help manufacturing businesses develop into more sustainable enterprises.

- The Innovation Process and Project Management
This module allows students to gain a clear overview of the innovation process and an understanding of the essential elements within it. Students will learn strategies for planning and carrying out innovative projects in any field.

- Thermofluids
In this module students study the fundamentals of combustion processes and understand key aspects relating to performance and emissions. Students develop knowledge and skills required by engineers entering industries involved in the design and use of combustion equipment.

- Project
In addition to the taught modules, all students undertake an individual major project. Part-time students normally undertake a major project that is based on the needs of their employing company.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling and independent research.

The programme consists of eight, week-long, taught lecture modules plus project work. Each taught module is self-contained and covers a complete target. This programme is available in both full-time and part-time forms. Full-time students commence their studies on the first Monday in October for a period of 12 months. Part-time students may commence their registration at any time between October and the following March, and take 3 years (typical) to complete the programme.

On completion of this programme, students should be able to:
- Plan and monitor multi-disciplinary projects;
- appreciate the central role of design within engineering;
- demonstrate competence in using computer based engineering techniques;
- analyse and understand complex engineering problems; and
- use team working skills and communicate effectively at an advanced technical level.

Facilities

As a student within the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering you will have access to a range of state-of-the-art equipment. Our computer labs are open 24/7 and use some of the latest industry standard software including STAR-CCM and CAD.

We have high-tech laboratories devoted to:
- Dynamics and control
- Electronics
- Fluid mechanics
- Materials
- Mechatronics
- Metrology
- Optical engineering
- Structural integrity
- Thermodynamics

Careers and further study

The programme will allow students to acquire the technical and transferable skills required to succeed in a career in industry or academic research. Graduates may also study for an MPhil or PhD with the School.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a country outside the European Union. These scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why Choose Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at Loughborough?

The School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering is a leader in technological research and innovation, with extensive national and international industrial links, and a long standing tradition of excellent teaching.

Our Industrial Advisory Committee, comprising of engineers at senior levels in the profession, ensures that our programmes contain the optimal balance of subjects and industrial relevance, with our programmes accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Institution of Engineering and Technology and Institution of Engineering Designers.

- Facilities
The School has laboratories devoted to disciplines such as; dynamics and control, automation, fluid mechanics, healthcare engineering, internal combustion engines, materials, mechatronics, metrology, optical engineering, additive manufacturing, sports engineering, structural integrity and thermodynamics.

- Research
The School has a busy, multi-national community of well over 150 postgraduate research students who form an important part of our internationally recognised research activities.
We have seven key research centres (Electronics Manufacture, Intelligent Automation, Regenerative Medicine Embedded Intelligence, High Efficiency SCR for Low Emission Vehicles and High Value Manufacturing Catapult Centre) and we are a lead governing partner in the newly formed UK Manufacturing Technology Centre.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment or further study within six months of graduating. Our graduates go on to work with companies such as Airbus, BAE Systems, Caterpillar, EDF Energy, Ford, IBM, Jaguar Land Rover, Millbrook Proving Ground, Rolls Royce and Tata Steel.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mechanical-manufacturing/mechanical-engineering/

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There is an increasing demand for highly trained public health specialists in Ireland and abroad to tackle major public health issues including health inequalities, communicable diseases, international health development, obesity and smoking. Read more
There is an increasing demand for highly trained public health specialists in Ireland and abroad to tackle major public health issues including health inequalities, communicable diseases, international health development, obesity and smoking. University College Cork (UCC) is meeting this need by offering an online Master of Public Health designed to offer multi-disciplinary academic and experiential development, whatever your professional background.

Our online Master of Public Health will arm you with the knowledge and skills necessary to make a real difference in public health. The programme emphasises the use of evidence-based healthcare and practice, enabling participants to put public health principles into effect in both research and professional contexts.

After completing the programme you will be able to:
• Critically analyse theories and issues related to public health
• Construct arguments around the social, political and economic factors determining the health of populations
• Demonstrate competence in the key underpinning disciplines and theories of public health, including epidemiology and communicable diseases
• Demonstrate enhanced knowledge in specific public health areas, including health promotion, health protection, epidemiology and biostatistics in public health
• Employ a range of appropriate research and analysis methods with confidence and expertise

Why pursue your Master of Public Health at UCC?

● UCC is a leading centre of research into multiple areas of public health
● A significant portion of MPH graduates successfully submit work for international publication
● Direct contact with multi-discipline public health and epidemiology researchers
● Exposure to integrative research, both qualitative and quantitative
● Coursework has a strong international public health focus

About Us

University College Cork (UCC) is dedicated to ensuring its students are the very best they can be; a promise underpinned by its award-winning teaching techniques, cutting-edge research credentials and long history of independent thinking from mathematical genius George Boole and beyond. Everyone at UCC, from the lecturers to the administrative staff, is committed to supporting the students, giving them the fuel to fulfil their potential and shape the world we live in. After completing a programme at UCC, students are not just work ready, but world ready.

Accreditation

Rankings and Awards
• Ranked in top 2% of universities worldwide, based on the quality of its research and peer esteem
• Ireland’s first five-star university (QS Stars 2011)
• Consistently strong performance in a number of global rankings:
- CWTS Leiden Ranking 2015: now holds the 16th position in Europe and 52nd position worldwide.
- U-Multirank rankings (March 2015): UCC was the top performing university internationally, based on obtaining the highest number of ‘A’ scores.
- QS World University Rankings by Subject (April 2015): 13 subject areas featuring in the top tier globally and Pharmacy & Pharmacology listed within the top 50 worldwide.
• The only Irish university to be awarded University of the Year by The Sunday Times four times, including one in 2016.

Online Graduate Programmes

UCC’s online programmes have been developed to provide both research-led and practical-based learning to give students the skills and confidence they need to succeed in a real-world environment. UCC recently launched an online version of its successful Master of Public Health that turns a passion for the health and well-being of populations into a dynamic, transferable skillset, which can be applied to a growing number of public health careers.

Career Outlook

Through its Master of Public Health programme, UCC prepares students for a diverse range of public, non-profit and academic-based positions, giving them the experience they need to fulfil their potential and excel in a career in public health on a national or international level.

Unique Opportunities

University College Cork is ranked in the top 2% of universities worldwide, based on the quality of its research, with UCC researchers collaborating with 700 of the world’s top universities, across 110 countries.

Why We Love UCC

University College Cork is dedicated to delivering innovative online programmes with the same level of engagement, research-focus and teaching commitment as campus-based programmes, giving time-pressed professionals an opportunity to ignite their future careers.

Student Reviews

“I have been exposed to a diverse range of public health issues, many of which I would never have previously considered, but now fascinate me. One of the main strengths of this course is its multidisciplinary approach which is taught at such a high level by experts in research and practice.”
Mr. Declan Whelan Curtin

“This masters uncovered my interest in research and formed the foundations for a future career in public health”
Mr. Martin Davoren

Entry Requirements

Prospective students must satisfy the following:

•Students accepted in the course would normally be expected to hold an Honours primary degree in a relevant subject (minimum Second Class Honours) or an Honours primary degree in any discipline (minimum Second Class Honours) and either possess a postgraduate qualification in a relevant field or show evidence of at least two years’ work experience in a relevant field.
•The Department of Epidemiology and Public Health course is open to registered health care professionals in Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Allied Health care disciplines or applicants who hold a relevant primary degree. Applicants must provide evidence of current registration with the relevant professional regulatory body (e.g. the Irish Medical Council, the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland (active registration) and the Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland). Applicants not registered with one of the above professional bodies must provide evidence of level 8 qualification in a relevant health care discipline.
•Candidates whose first language is not English must have a minimum of IELTS 6.5 with scores in no individual sections less than 6.0.
•All applicants are required to complete an application form and provide evidence of either current professional registration or primary degree. In all cases, decisions will be based on qualifications and quality of application.

Exemptions at point of entry:

Holders of the Postgraduate Certificates in Health Protection (CKU02/CKU13), the Postgraduate Certificate in Public Health, or the Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health (CKW19/CKW20), will be exempt from certain modules on the programme if passed as part of the Postgraduate Certificate/Diploma examination and if he/she undertakes the MPH within 60 months from the date of successful completion of the aforementioned qualifications.

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The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population. Read more
The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population.

The programme provides training in the modern practical, academic and research skills that are used in academia and industry. Through a combination of lectures, small-group seminars and practical classes, students will apply this training towards the development of new therapies.

The programme culminates with a research project that investigates the molecular and cellular basis of cancer biology or the development of new therapies under the supervision of active cancer research scientists.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/226/cancer-biology

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science and biophysics. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

Each one-hour lecture is supplemented by two hours of small-group seminars and workshops in which individual themes are explored in-depth. There are practical classes and mini-projects in which you design, produce and characterise a therapeutic protein with applications in therapy.

In additional to traditional scientific laboratory reports, experience will be gained in a range of scientific writing styles relevant to future employment, such as literature reviews, patent applications, regulatory documents, and patient information suitable for a non-scientific readership.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

BI830 - Science at Work (30 credits)
BI836 - Practical and Applied Research Skills for Advanced Biologists (30 credits)
BI837 - The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Cancer (15 credits)
BI838 - Genomic Stability and Cancer (15 credits)
BI840 - Cancer Therapeutics: From the Laboratory to the Clinic (15 credits)
BI857 - Cancer Research in Focus (15 credits)
BI845 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme features a combination of examinations and practically focused continuous assessment, which gives you experience within a range of professional activities, eg, report writing, patent applications and public health information. The assessments have been designed to promote employability in a range of professional settings.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide an excellent quality of postgraduate-level education in the field of cancer, its biology and its treatment

- provide a research-led, inspiring learning environment

- provide a regional postgraduate progression route for the advanced study of a disease that affects a high proportion of the population

- promote engagement with biological research into cancer and inspire you to pursue a scientific career inside or outside of the laboratory

- develop subject specific and transferable skills to maximise employment prospects

- promote an understanding of the impact of scientific research on society and the role for scientists in a range of professions.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/226

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