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Masters Degrees (Scenic Art)

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This is an intensive, vocational course with strong professional links to the industry, offering a maximum of four students, with high levels of painting and drawing skills, the opportunity to develop their careers as scenic artists. Read more
This is an intensive, vocational course with strong professional links to the industry, offering a maximum of four students, with high levels of painting and drawing skills, the opportunity to develop their careers as scenic artists. The skills and techniques acquired on this course are to the level necessary for theatre, television, film and animation industries..

During the year students acquire an understanding of professional practice and standards, and gain in-depth skills and experience in scenic art techniques and their application, combined with the practice of managing a scenic art department.

The Course has 3 very intensive terms during which students paint the sets for the School’s six main house public productions, offering them the opportunity to see their finished work used on stage in a wide range of public performances and venues. Teaching is led by the School’s Head of Scenic Art in collaboration with visiting industry professionals who provide master-classes in a range of skills and techniques that include; life drawing, portraiture, perspective, marbling, wood-graining, polystyrene carving and painting for animation. The scenic art students work collaboratively with the School’s other production departments, and most especially with design students. Furthering their introduction to the industry, work placements with principal companies are arranged during the course; particular attention is placed on students developing their own professional portfolio. Upon graduation students will showcase their work in a public exhibition and be interviewed by some of the UK’s leading industry practitioners. In a freelance industry most of our graduates begin working as assistants for scenic artists, scenic workshops and large theatre companies, eventually becoming supervising scenic artists themselves.

Recent graduate employment; The Royal Opera House, The Royal Shakespeare Company, Cardiff Theatrical Services, The Royal National Theatre, Northern Ballet, TR2 Plymouth, Richard Nutbourne - Cool Flight Ltd, Cameron Macintosh's National Tour of ‘Mary Poppins’, Disney's ‘Aladdin’, ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ for Warner Brothers. Film work includes; Wes Anderson's ‘Fantastic Mr Fox’ and ‘Isle of Dogs’ (still in production) Tim Burton's ‘Frankenweenie’, Aardman Animations' ‘Shaun the Sheep’, ‘Pirates’ and ‘Early Man’ (still in production). TV work includes 'Will' for TNT and ‘Crazy Face’ for Netflix.

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- Performance (Set & Costume Design). - Set Design. - Costume Design. - Costume Construction. - Puppetry. - Lighting Design. - Sound Design. Read more

Specialist Pathways

- Performance (Set & Costume Design)
- Set Design
- Costume Design
- Costume Construction
- Puppetry
- Lighting Design
- Sound Design
- Scenic Art and Construction for Stage and Screen

Key Features

- Taught element starting in September and running for one year, full time
- Alternative flexible pathway for students already in relevant employment
- Specialist tuition from established team of professional theatre design practitioners
- Input from visiting professionals from around the world
- Design positions in College productions ranging from drama to musical theatre and opera
- Professional work placement opportunities
- Exhibition of your work in Cardiff and London for an invited audience of potential employers
- Final component involving the completion of a reflective journal based on your professional engagement, with support and mentoring from College tutors

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Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance. Read more
Created to challenge and inspire the next generation of theatre designers, the Theatre Design MA course at Bristol Old Vic Theatre School delivers intensive vocational training, enabling talented designers to develop their creative and technical ability in set and costume design for performance.

The Theatre Design MA course has just four places on offer in each intake, students receive focused individual mentoring and support from the BOVTS team and high-profile visiting professionals, all set in the environment of an integrated company staging fourteen productions a year.

The course duration is four terms; starting in April the course runs until July the following year.

The full time course is aimed at multi-skilled postgraduate level students. We encourage applicants with a range of experience and previous training in Theatre, Art and Design, (Architecture, Costume, Graphics, Interiors, Film Design, Painting, Sculpture, Drama and Theatre). We do not limit entry to students with previous training, although the majority of applicants come from degree courses. A comprehensive portfolio of artwork is required at interview.

Collaborative working with students from a range of disciplines at BOVTS, design students are offered at least three leading design positions on public productions at a variety of respected venues – from The Bristol Old Vic Theatre to the Brewery Theatre.

Master-classes and workshops with visiting professional practitioners help build a thorough understanding of the subject, these include script analysis, life and figure drawing, model making, technical drawing, CAD, Photoshop and model photography. Specialist lectures cover theatre design and costume history. Research and practical work are supported by site and production visits including trips to theatre design events and exhibitions.

An extensive portfolio of industry-standard work can be achieved over the course of four terms, including staged productions and theoretical projects. Students leave BOVTS with the skills, knowledge and confidence to build careers as professional designers. There are end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art in Bristol and in London.

Inspiring leadership by Head of Design Angela Davies, who is an award-winning theatre designer with high-level industry links. The course equips its graduates for entry into prestigious Theatre Design competitions such as the Linbury Prize for Stage Design and the RSC’s trainee scheme. BOVTS graduates held 5 out of the 12 final places in the Linbury Prize 2013.

Applications are accepted at least one year in advance of the course start date. The four-term course starts at the beginning of the summer term and completes at the end of the summer term of the following academic year.

Recent graduates have held design positions at the RSC, Pilmlico Opera, Bristol Old Vic, The Brewery Theatre and the Tobacco Factory, The Finsborough Theatre The Vault Festival and with Kneehigh Theatre Company.

To receive more information on course structure and highlights, please contact

Course Outline

Term 1
- Intensive skills-based classes from professional practitioners, including model-making and technical drawing
- Theatre script analysis and period research workshops
- Exploration of the collaborative creative process with a professional director and the MA Directors at BOVTS on the Theatre and Short Play Project
- Master-classes in advanced model-making techniques, technical drawing, an introduction to Photoshop and model photography
- Production and site visits.

Term 2
- Continued exploration of the design process through to presentation with meetings with a visiting professional on the Opera Project
- Regular design tutorials with additional workshops and classes to extend understanding.
- Theory is put into practice by designing the set or costumes for a BOVTS Spring production
- Collaborative working with a staff or visiting director and the BOVTS production teams for professional theatre venues

Term 3
- Design presentations and exploration of the production process through to full stage realisation.
- Close collaboration with actors, stage managers, technicians and scenic artists
- Work with the BOVTS MA Directors to complete production designs for the Brewery Theatre
- Skills classes and support in CAD and Photoshop and an introduction to portfolio design.

Term 4
- Series of small-scale productions for the Brewery Theatre
- Work begins on summer productions, exploring the role of set or costume designer in-depth
- More independent working with mentoring and support through the process
- Development of CV and professional portfolio
- Preparations for the end of year exhibitions at the Royal West Academy of Art, Bristol and London
- Exhibitions and Industry interviews with professional practitioners from a range of theatre disciplines, providing networking opportunities and pathways to work

PLEASE NOTE THAT APPLICATIONS ARE FOR APRIL 2016 ENTRY AND WILL CLOSE ON 27TH FEBRUARY 2015 AT 4PM.

Offline Applications
Please contact:The Admissions Office, 1-2 Downside Road, Bristol BS8 2XF.

Tel: 0117 973 3535.
Email: .

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Develop as a producer/director of factual programmes and extend your creative skills and technical knowledge. With talks by industry professionals, and access to a broad range of equipment, you’ll create a portfolio of work that will help you stand out from the crowd. Read more
Develop as a producer/director of factual programmes and extend your creative skills and technical knowledge. With talks by industry professionals, and access to a broad range of equipment, you’ll create a portfolio of work that will help you stand out from the crowd.

Overview

No matter what experience you have of filmmaking, our course will develop your knowledge of factual UK TV and digital media content production, and your creative skills, to an advanced level. Along the way, you’ll make seven films of different lengths and write a dissertation on a media subject that excites and interests you.

Focusing on two key roles, the director and the producer (which in current factual programming are merged into one), you’ll explore the dynamics of this ever-changing industry, and what it takes to succeed. You’ll learn to become a visual storyteller, a communicator, a collaborator, a motivator and a problem solver. You’ll also develop skills in scheduling, production managing, budgeting and marketing programmes. Although the emphasis is on factual programming, there is scope and flexibility to develop more creative films.

With specialist technical workshops on camera operation, sound, lighting and editing, you’ll develop professional skills in screen-based production. This will be supported by tutorials, diary work, and independent research, giving you a strong critical and contextual grounding for your practical work.

You’ll be encouraged to collaborate with other students on this course and others, becoming a flexible media professional who can produce and deliver high-quality video content for many different clients.

All our teaching staff have backgrounds in the film and television industries, and they're supported by industry specialists and visiting lecturers.

Teaching times:
Trimester 1: Wednesdays & Thursdays, 10am - 1pm (full time); Wednesdays, 10am - 1pm (part time).
Trimester 2: Wednesdays 10am – 4pm, Thursdays 10am – 1pm (full time); Wednesdays 10am – 4pm (part time).
Trimester 3: Tuesdays 10am – 12pm for 4 weeks & then tutorials by arrangement (full time).
Trimester 4: Thursdays 10am – 1pm (part time)
Trimester 5 & 6: Tuesdays 10am – 12pm for 4 weeks & then tutorials by arrangement (part time)

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career in TV or in the broader media, and help you to decide which areas of the industry attract you the most. Although the emphasis is on directing and producing, you might choose to move into cinematography, production management or even television programme sales once you graduate. You might also develop a particular interest in observational documentary, natural history films or science programming, and decide to follow a career in these fields.

Here at Cambridge School of Art, you’ll gain specialist skills that will be useful for traditional, experimental and creative documentary making, or films for education, training, public relations, current affairs, marketing and campaigning. Our course will prepare you to forge a portfolio or freelance career, and give you the ability to make high-quality content for broadcast, web, film festivals or cinema.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Visual Storytelling
Understanding the Audience
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning, and ensure you’re developing the knowledge and skills to complete the course, through:
• Producing and directing films of different lengths and styles
• Working in a team on a TV Studio production
• Written production analyses and reflective commentaries
• Essays
• Filming schedules & budgets
• Film pitches
• Final Masters Project: this film is your “calling card” for the industry

Your assignments are usually submitted at the end of each term. You’ll also be assessed informally and given feedback during the term to help you achieve to the highest level. Feedback could be on a film, a presentation or group participation; it will be given by your tutor and your fellow students.

Events

Our Wired events are specialist lectures and workshops run by industry professionals, where you’ll learn about up-to-date practices and get invaluable advice. Our past speakers have included Sean Bobbitt (cinematographer: 12 Years a Slave, The Place Beyond the Pines, Hunger), Peter Strickland and Nic Knowland (director and cinematographer: Berberian Sound Studio), Cilla Ware (freelance drama director of Silk, Spooks, Primeval), Kathy Lee (film editor: Abuelas, A Letter to Dad), and Larry Sider (sound designer, The Piano Tuner of Earthquakes, Mirrormask).

Our Creative Front Futures events, run by Creative Front Cambridgeshire, will give you a broader taste of the creative industries, and let you find out more about the world of film and television production as well as explore other career options.

You’ll also get first-hand experience of the industry at informal work placements throughout the course and benefit from our close links with Cambridge Arts Picturehouse, where we hold regular student and industry events.

Specialist facilities

When shooting your projects you’ll benefit from our fully-equipped TV studio with full lighting rig; professional-standard gallery; mixer; autocue; multi-purpose scenic backdrops suitable for current affairs, magazine programmes and dramas; a large four-waller film stage with overhead lighting, tracks, dollies and green screens and sets for flats; a full range of HD and SD location cameras (including Steadicam); location lighting; and sound-recording equipment.

For your post-production work you’ll get access to over 30 Final Cut editing suites, Pro Tools and the Adobe Creative Suite master collection. You’ll be trained on all our equipment by a team of experienced technical staff, who also maintain and manage the facilities.

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The Department of Theatre and Performance's research embraces a range of global theory and practice in theatre and performance including play-texts, physical practices and critical/cultural theory on which students can draw in their research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-drama/. Read more
The Department of Theatre and Performance's research embraces a range of global theory and practice in theatre and performance including play-texts, physical practices and critical/cultural theory on which students can draw in their research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-drama/

The Department of Theatre and Performance's research culture is both interdisciplinary and intercultural. It's an ethos reflected across our staff, our programmes and our students.

As a research student, you may register either for research based on practice with a written element, or for research by written thesis.

If your topic is practice-led you should be concerned to contextualise your practice in relation to other cultural production and critical theory in your contribution to new knowledge.

Empirical research is essential to innovative practice and you will be required to propose how you intend to conduct this during the course of your studies, as well as present and document this as part of your final submission.

At research level, the Department’s aim is to encourage and support innovative thinking and approaches to praxis, both historical and contemporary and within a broad cultural frame of reference, and for this to be conducted within the context of live as well as academic sources.

Goldsmiths celebrates interdisciplinarity and supervision may be conducted within the department as well as through inter-departmental co-supervision.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department Secretary.

Structure

All students initially enrol on the MPhil programme and may subsequently upgrade to PhD status if their work is considered to be at the appropriate level. You can study full-time or part-time and can optionally apply to upgrade to PhD registration usually after 18 months (full-time) or 24 months (part-time).

All students are supervised by a full-time member of staff, generally agreed during the preliminary discussion regarding your research with the Department’s Director of Postgraduate Studies.

Research methodology seminar

All students enrolled on the MPhil programme are required to attend a weekly seminar in research methodology. This seminar is designed to bring together research students with diverse interests in a co-operative and stimulating environment.

Its objectives include training students for the Spring Review Week, written and oral presentations, preparation for upgrading procedures, and publication of articles.

Assessment

Through thesis and viva voce. If you are studying for a practice-based degree, you present a thesis in the form of a practical presentation and written dissertation, and have a viva voce.

The Department of Theatre and Performance offers a vibrant interdisciplinary learning environment, supported by distinguished staff and outstanding facilities

Study in a department that fuses theory and practice, where you can study diverse subjects, and benefit from our industry links.

Theory and practice

We balance academic study with creative and technical practice, so you’ll explore hands-on theatre making while developing your knowledge of theatre history and culture.

Diverse subjects

We cover diverse subjects from classical texts and new writing to contemporary writing and performance, and from physical and applied theatres to multimedia/live art.

Distinguished staff

Teaching staff include distinguished researchers and professional theatre-makers.

Industry links

We have international networks in the industry, with regular visits from professionals, and links with associate organisations in London including:

LIFT
Battersea Arts Centre
The Albany, Deptford

Facilities

Our excellent facilities include a 160-seat theatre, four performance studios, new scenic workshops, sound studio, and open-access media lab. All supported by an outstanding team of technicians and scenic designers.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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MA Theatre Design at Wimbledon College of Arts is designed to support and further theatre design practice-based research. Students will develop advanced level scenographic speculative methods, either collaboratively or as auteur. Read more

Introduction

MA Theatre Design at Wimbledon College of Arts is designed to support and further theatre design practice-based research. Students will develop advanced level scenographic speculative methods, either collaboratively or as auteur.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- To research practitioners past and present and form a distinctive view of their position in the discipline

- To collaborate with other postgraduate student directors, choreographers or other theatre makers to practice and test their abilities to negotiate and communicate at an advanced level

- To maintain an online research folio to develop a professional ‘shop window’ for their ideas

- To interrogate contemporary scenography through the established modes of industrial practice in set and costume design, though students may also investigate various specialisms in their studies, such as lighting, projection or sound

- Work closely with a mentor who will challenge and advise students throughout the development of their final self-motivated Action Research Project

- Specialist tutorial and technical support from across Wimbledon’s renowned Theatre Programme, focusing on the production and research in both industrial and academic contexts

- Established contacts with complementary London-based Director and Choreographic MA courses support the delivery of collaborative study components

- Direct access to the Jocelyn Herbert Archive and engagement with the college’s theatre design-related special exhibitions and conferences

- Direct access to scenographic curatorial practice at a national and international level

Structure

Unit One:

In Unit One students engage with the field of Theatre Design through researching practitioners past and present, to form a distinctive view of their position in the discipline. To support their work they'll have access to a wide range of expertise within the areas of scenic and costume design at Wimbledon College of Art.

Students will share opinions about bodies of generally held views and attitudes to Theatre Design in an attempt to reach a collective consensus or understood divergence. Synergies and differences between addressing bodies and spaces in digital and analogue contexts will be a focus for debate and provide a platform for discourse between both MA Theatre courses and the wider Postgraduate communities at Wimbledon and across the Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Graduate School.

Unit Two:

In Unit Two the course will structure a partnership between students and a Postgraduate director, choreographer or other theatre maker to practice and test their abilities to negotiate, collaborate and communicate at an advanced level.

All students will be expected to engage with each other’s ideas and proposals through periodic supportive group critiques and formative peer assessment targeted specifically at Units One and Two. Students will maintain a Research Folio on line that began in Unit One and develop a professional shop window for their ideas, including reviews of study visits to events and performance environments.

Unit Three:

In Unit Three, students and their tutors will be asked to identify a professional mentor, who will both advise and challenge them when appropriate during your final self-motivated Research Project. Along with student tutors, mentors can monitor the work’s conception at an intermediate stage of development and provide an industry-based reaction to its sophistication and effectiveness within negotiated parameters.

Students will be expected to make a research-motivated experiment in either real or virtual space to underpin their work. Innovative impact-driven methods of documenting and presenting ideas will be encouraged for a final proposal, usually combining both web presence and an exhibition context.

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This innovative programme explores how arts and creative enterprises work in theory and practice, as well as the impact they can have on individuals and communities. Read more

Overview

This innovative programme explores how arts and creative enterprises work in theory and practice, as well as the impact they can have on individuals and communities.

You’ll gain an understanding of the policy contexts of creative work, analyse and apply theories of art and culture and examine the cultural industries that comprise the arts, including theatre, performance, dance, opera, crafts, and museums.

Then you’ll choose from optional modules to focus on topics that suit your interests and career plans, such as arts management or culture and place, and investigate topics like audience engagement and cultural policy. You may even have the chance to undertake a placement or a consultancy project for an external cultural organisation.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers in a city with a diverse cultural landscape. Whether you’ve already started your career or see yourself moving into the sector, this programme will give you the knowledge and skills to support your ambitions.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

On and off-campus, you’ll benefit from opportunities to get involved in various cultural activities. The School of Performance and Cultural Industries organises the annual Little Leeds Fringe Festival, a series of cultural events on campus giving you the chance to volunteer in the management and programming team. What’s more, you can join any of the student societies that run events, campaigns and productions throughout the year.

You’ll study in a city with a rich cultural life that’s also a hub for business and entrepreneurship – home to the Leeds International Film Festival and Leeds International Piano Competition, as well as a variety of galleries, museums, theatres and other cultural facilities.

Our purpose-built landmark building [email protected] houses two professional-standard and publicly licensed theatres that regularly host work by both students and visiting theatre companies – one of which is a technically advanced research facility.

Our School includes rehearsal rooms, two black-box studios, costume construction and wardrobe stores, a design studio and scenic workshop, video editing and sound recording suits as well as computer aided design.

Our links with external organisations are among our biggest strengths, giving you the chance to take performance to different environments outside of the university context. We’re always developing new relationships with partners in different contexts to offer you more opportunities to participate.

Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse, the National Media Museum, Leeds City Council, Red Ladder Theatre Company, Limehouse Productions, Phoenix Dance Theatre, the National Coal Mining Museum for England, HMP New Hall, Blah Blah Blah Theatre Company, the BBC and HMP Wetherby are all among our partners.

Course Content

Core modules in Semester One will lay the foundations of the programme. You’ll explore different theoretical approaches to understand the relationships between culture, creativity, and entrepreneurship, learning about cultural industries and how public policy impacts on cultural development.

To help you focus your studies in the areas that suit your interests and career plans, you’ll choose one of two optional modules which allow you to specialise in either the relationship between culture and place or management and leadership in the arts and cultural industries.

You’ll then choose another optional module to complement or broaden your studies. You could focus on topics such as audience engagement or cultural policy, or you may be able to gain experience of consultancy working in teams to complete a brief for an external organisation. If you select the Creative Work module, you could spend two weeks on a placement in a cultural organisation as the basis of a small-scale research project.

Another core module that runs throughout the year will develop your understanding of research methods in the arts and cultural industries. By the end of the programme you’ll demonstrate your skills and knowledge by completing an independent research project on a topic of your choice.

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Explore the potential of performance design with this wide-ranging programme. Read more

Overview

Explore the potential of performance design with this wide-ranging programme.

You’ll develop an awareness of the performance events and experiences that can be created with the aid of lighting, projection, settings and objects, puppetry, props, costume, sound as well as newer technologies such as digital and pervasive media. You’ll have space to experiment and come up with innovative and creative ideas for performance, while learning more about the theories and concepts that are shaping emergent forms of theatre, art and performance practice.

As you build up your MA portfolio you’ll engage with contemporary performance and arts practices – including immersive and participatory forms of performance, as well as those outside of the theatre – while considering the role they play in their wider social, cultural and economic landscape. This is the only research-orientated programme in the UK tailored towards academic and practical engagement with performance design.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

On and off-campus, you’ll benefit from opportunities to get involved in various cultural activities. The School of Performance and Cultural Industries organises the annual Little Leeds Fringe Festival, a series of cultural events on campus giving you the chance to volunteer in the management and programming team. What’s more, you can join any of the student societies that run events, campaigns and productions throughout the year.

You’ll study in a city with a rich cultural life that’s also a hub for business and entrepreneurship – home to the Leeds International Film Festival and Leeds International Piano Competition, as well as a variety of galleries, museums, theatres and other cultural facilities.

Our purpose-built landmark building [email protected] houses two professional-standard and publicly licensed theatres that regularly host work by both students and visiting theatre companies – one of which is a technically advanced research facility.

Our School includes rehearsal rooms, two black-box studios, costume construction and wardrobe stores, a design studio and scenic workshop, video editing and sound recording suits as well as computer aided design.

Our links with external organisations are among our biggest strengths, giving you the chance to take performance to different environments outside of the university context. We’re always developing new relationships with partners in different contexts to offer you more opportunities to participate.

Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse, the National Media Museum, Leeds City Council, Red Ladder Theatre Company, Limehouse Productions, Phoenix Dance Theatre, the National Coal Mining Museum for England, HMP New Hall, Blah Blah Blah Theatre Company, the BBC and HMP Wetherby are all among our partners.

Course Content

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop an awareness of research methods and approaches in performance and the cultural industries. In Semester One, you’ll also take a core module which introduces you to key concepts, theories and ideas in performance design, exploring ideas such as visuality and the theatre, spectacle, audience experience and multi-sensorial performance.

This foundation will inform the rest of your studies, including your practice. In Semester One you’ll also work with a range of scenographic materials to develop your own creative practice, spending time in practical workshops alongside lectures where you’ll consider current issues and debates in performance design and the role of practice-led research.

In Semester Two you’ll apply all the knowledge and skills you’ve gained to an independent research project, which could be practice-led or a written dissertation on a topic of your choice. You’ll also be able to spend more time on your practice – you’ll have the chance to complete an individual project, or to collaborate with fellow students from across the School, or work on another small-scale research project based on a two-week placement in an external organisation. Alternatively you could choose from optional modules on topics such as audience engagement or debates on culture and place.

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