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Masters Degrees (Scandinavian)

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UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. Read more

UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. No prior knowledge of a Nordic language is required, though students can opt to consolidate their language or translation skills, or to start Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish from scratch.

About this degree

Optional modules include advanced translation skills, Nordic cinema, Nordic literature in global perspective, the transnational politics of the region, and material cultures as well as modules on Viking and medieval Scandinavia. Assessed modules are supplemented with workshops and a summer school providing opportunities for networking and career development in publishing, translation, film-making, and the heritage and creative sectors.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core cross-language module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core cross-language module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module

  • Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; recent modules available have included Trauma, Visual Culture, Comedy, Que(e)rying Sexuality

Optional modules

Students choose from a range of optional modules on topics such as the following:

  • Advanced Scandinavian Translation
  • Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme 95
  • Introduction to Old Norse
  • Crime and Small Communities in Nordic Literature
  • Advanced Old Icelandic Literature
  • Sources for the Viking Age

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and reading and language classes. Student performance is assessed through written examination, coursework, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Language, Culture and History: Scandinavian Studies MA

Careers

An MA in Scandinavian Studies offers prospects for employment in the private as well as in the public sector, whether in Scandinavia or in the English-speaking world. Former graduate students in the department are to be found in a range of challenging careers, which include work in IT and management, museums and university teaching.

Employability

In the UK and abroad, the Nordic countries are increasingly recognised for the success of their political and social model, and for their film, literature, food and design. Our MA graduates bring their deep understanding of Scandinavian culture to careers in which knowledge of the region is key: publishing, the arts, commerce and information management. Expertise in Nordic languages is rare in the UK, and employer demand is accordingly high. Our MA allows students to hone their Nordic language skills or to try a new language. Many of our graduates launch careers with translation companies and as freelancers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Scandinavian Studies is the largest independent Scandinavian department in the UK. Our research and teaching encompasses the languages, literatures, cultures, histories and politics of the entire Nordic region, ranging from the Viking Middle Ages to the present day.

Facilities are excellent: UCL boasts possibly the best Scandinavian Studies library outside Scandinavia, and students also have the outstanding collections of the British Library close at hand. Excellent links with universities in mainland Scandinavia, Iceland and Finland provide further benefits.

The department is home to the Viking Society for Northern Research, a leading publisher of Old Norse texts and monographs on medieval Scandinavia.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: School of European Languages, Culture & Society

74% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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As one of the few centres for the study of modern Scandinavian languages in the UK, we offer a programme that can cater to a wide range of research interests, covering all Scandinavian countries. Read more

As one of the few centres for the study of modern Scandinavian languages in the UK, we offer a programme that can cater to a wide range of research interests, covering all Scandinavian countries.

Our academic staff are able to offer supervision on a broad variety of subjects, including:

  • 19th and 20th century literature
  • cultural relations and transfer
  • language history and dialectology
  • literary translation
  • onomastics
  • place and identity
  • Scottish–Scandinavian historical relations

In addition, you have the opportunity to undertake interdisciplinary research in areas such as comparative literature, film studies, translation studies, cultural studies and Scottish studies.

Thanks to our place in the diverse School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures, we are also able to cater for interdisciplinary research programmes.

Training and support

In order to encourage immersion in your research, we celebrate the major Scandinavian festivals, screen regular films and generally make the atmosphere as Scandinavian as possible. We are fortunate in being able to attract many Scandinavian visitors and speakers, including prominent authors and academics.

We encourage you to participate in our very active social and cultural life. We collaborate closely with the many Scandinavian bodies active in Edinburgh, such as the Danish Cultural Institute, the Norwegian Consulate General, the Scottish-Swedish Society and the Scottish-Finnish Society.

In addition, we have a partnership with the Georg Brandes International PhD School for Scandinavian Literature, Art and Linguistics, which is affiliated to the Department of Scandinavian Studies and Linguistics at the University of Copenhagen. This collaboration provides funding for our staff and students to attend and contribute to international workshops and seminars at the University of Copenhagen.



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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

If you are interested in understanding the Old Norse language this programme will provide an answer to questions like what did the early Scandinavians read and write, what was society like, what language did they speak, and how did they live?  You will rapidly become somewhat of an expert in this niche area which probably affected the lives of people across the UK and Europe at one time or another. You will become fluent in all things Scandinavian to provide that knowledge either to future generations in terms of teaching at all levels, in heritage attractions and you can use the essential skills you pick up within many other areas of work. You are taught by internationally renowned experts within Scandinavian Studies at one of the largest research institutes in the UK.

Apart from the strong ties of Aberdeen and the rest of the UK and influences from the Vikings both past and present you are also a ferry ride away from Orkney and Shetland.  Orkney is famed for its Viking archaeology and myths and both Orkney and Shetland was part of Scandinavia for many years until 1468 when Denmark mortgaged the islands to Scotland. Many Norse events still take place throughout the year in Aberdeenshire and the islands.

The MLitt will appeal to students interested in the history, language and culture of the Scandinavian-speaking peoples, and particularly to those who wish to gain an interdisciplinary insight to this field of research. The programme offers training and thematic courses as well as specialist supervision for a 15,000 word dissertation of the students' own choice. It is suited for students seeking to continue with postgraduate study as well as those simply interested to learn more.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Old Norse 1: Language, Literature and Culture

Optional

  • Palaeography
  • Special Subject

Semester 2

  • Old Norse 2 Language, Runes and Place Names
  • Research Preparation in Historical Studies

Semester 3

  • Dissertation in Historical Studies

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • The Centre for Scandinavian Studies is the largest Scandinavian research institution in the UK
  • You have a wide choice of careers either within the area of Scandinavian expertise or other areas of work.
  • You study in beautiful old Aberdeen which is situated next to the sea and a ferry ride from Orkney and Shetland

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about international fees:

  • International
  • EU and Scotland
  • Other UK

Find out more about fees on the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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This flexible MA allows you to enhance your knowledge of the language of your choice (Dutch, French, German, Italian, a Scandinavian option, Spanish and Portuguese) while offering you the opportunity to take courses in history, literature and culture across the range of areas offered in the School of European Languages, Culture and Society (SELCS). Read more
This flexible MA allows you to enhance your knowledge of the language of your choice (Dutch, French, German, Italian, a Scandinavian option, Spanish and Portuguese) while offering you the opportunity to take courses in history, literature and culture across the range of areas offered in the School of European Languages, Culture and Society (SELCS).

Degree information

Students will research cultural issues of major contemporary importance in the language of their choice.The degree will also help you develop your knowledge of one or more of the languages taught in SELCS (Dutch, French, German, Italian, a Scandinavian option, Spanish and Portuguese).

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core module (30 credits), three optional modules from a range of graduate modules (90 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core modules - The core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; for example, topics explored during the current year include the following: Trauma; Memory; Visual Culture; Queer(y)ing Sexuality

Optional modules - optional modules may include:
-Advanced Translation (Dutch, French, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Spanish)
-Advanced Language Modules (Dutch, French, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Spanish)
-Early Modern Exchanges Modules
-Medieval and Renaissance Studies Modules
-Organised Crime: Gangsters in Life and Art
-Material Encounters with Medieval Texts
-Comparative Syntax
-Witches in History, Fiction and Scholarship

Dissertation/report
All students are required to write a dissertation of 12,000 words on an approved research topic for the taught pathway and 18,000 words for the research pathway.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Teaching is concentrated in the first two terms, with the third term devoted to revision sessions, examinations and a dissertation project. Student performance is assessed by various methods, including coursework essays, a dissertation, and unseen written examinations.

Careers

The degree offers a graduate qualification in its own right, as well as serving as a pathway towards doctoral research in European literature, language, history, film and other areas. Many students progress from one of our MA programmes to an MPhil or PhD research degree.

Why study this degree at UCL?

SELCS at UCL is recognised as a world-class department for the study of European languages, culture and history.

Our central location offers students easy access to excellent resources for a range of European cultures, such as the British Library, the Institute for Modern Languages Research, the Warburg Institute, the Institute of Historical Research, along with access to numerous cultural and social events relating to the degree.

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What is the role of sport in a world facing pressing social challenges? How do we understand the opportunities and challenges of sport and sport sciences as a means for social change? How can we look critically at the development of sport in relation to social processes such as globalisation, migration and urbanisation? . Read more

What is the role of sport in a world facing pressing social challenges? How do we understand the opportunities and challenges of sport and sport sciences as a means for social change? How can we look critically at the development of sport in relation to social processes such as globalisation, migration and urbanisation? 

Sport Science: Sport in Society is a one-year master’s programme that tackles these questions and prepares students to work with sport and sustainable development. Throughout the programme, students develop applied skills and perspectives to work with sport, leisure and health industries as platforms for social change.

The programme is tailored for those who have undergraduate experience in sports science, physical education, health science and management. During the programme, you will be schooled in the latest theories and be given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects through individual assignments and group projects. 

What makes this programme unique?

Located in the dynamic Öresund Region, the programme is linked to Malmö's urban environment and its position as a multicultural, innovative and sustainable city. Throughout the programme, both Scandinavian and international contexts are used as case studies, and the programme is carried out in close collaboration with industry partners and external organisations.

The programme strives to offer an international classroom environment and bring together students from different backgrounds and experiences. This allows students to deepen their knowledge and gain an overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experience of other students, which will allow them to be able to work transcultural in their future professions. 

What career will I be prepared for?

After completing the programme, you will have significantly deepened your knowledge and understanding of sport in relation to society's change processes, and have the competence, knowledge and understanding required to work with sport in relation to sustainable development and social change.

The education is relevant for a wide range of jobs and roles where sport is used in the context of change, ranging from working with elite athletes to sporting federations or public health sectors. 

Content

The programme aims for the student to develop applied skills and a critical knowledge base in order to work with sport, leisure and health industries as sites for social change. Emphasis is placed on an in-depth ability to use different theories and methods for understanding, analysing, changing and using sport towards a sustainable and equal society. 

The concept of sustainable society includes social, economic and environmental perspectives. Furthermore, the programme aims at providing local, regional, national and international perspectives on sports, sports science and a sustainable society. Urban and innovative local environments, with associated challenges and initiatives, are used as living case studies. The students also actively contribute with experiences from different countries and sports cultures. Based on these, the students problematize the Swedish and Scandinavian sports context. 

The student is given the opportunity to develop skills and in-depth knowledge suitable for a wide range of jobs, entrepreneurship, and research in fields where sports and health are used, for example, to meet or create changes and contribute to social development. The student works for this in close dialogue with stakeholders external to the university. 

In addition, the education prepares for research studies. The education is closely linked to the sports science research environment at Malmö University and its research areas, which are focused upon the social sciences. Emphasis is placed on highlighting and working with the multidisciplinary nature of sport science and the position and opportunities of those with a sport science education in society. 

Structure 

The programme consists of 60 higher education credits and contains compulsory courses. Teaching is based on scheduled tasks such as lectures and seminars as well as self-study. Some elements require on-campus attendance while others can be carried out remotely. In the programme, we work with a wide variety of educational forms and materials, using digital communication channels.

Courses

For programme with start Autumn 2018: 

Autumn 2018 - Semester 1

Spring 2019 - Semester 2



For the one-year Master's degree: 

Knowledge and understanding 

• knowledge and understanding within the main field of education, sport sciences, both generally and specifically in relation to sport in society and a specialised insight into current research and development work in the field. 

• specialised knowledge of the scientific methods used in sport. 

Skills and Abilities 

• the ability to integrate knowledge, analyse, assess and deal with complex phenomena, questions and situations even with limited information 

• the ability to independently identify and formulate research questions and to plan and, using appropiate methods, perform advanced tasks within a specified period of time 

• demonstrate the ability in speech and writing to clearly report and discuss their conclusions and the knowledge and arguments on which they are based in dialogue with different audiences 

• demonstrate the skills required to participate in research and development work or to work in other qualified activities 

Evaluation ability and approach 

• demonstrate the ability to make assessments in the main field of study informed by relevant disciplinary, social and ethical issues and also to demonstrate awareness of ethical aspects of research and development work 

• demonstrate insight into the possibilities and limitations of research, its role in society and the responsibility of the individual for how it is used 

• demonstrate the ability to identify the personal need for further knowledge and take responsibility for their ongoing learning 



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The Translation and Culture pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to focus on your practical language, translation and technology skills, with the option of studying an additional language, while developing a comprehensive understanding of the nature of translation. Read more

The Translation and Culture pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to focus on your practical language, translation and technology skills, with the option of studying an additional language, while developing a comprehensive understanding of the nature of translation. In this multilingual environment, you will build international networks and the language skills to enhance your employability in today's multicultural workplace.

About this degree

In addition to a range of translation options covering theoretical and technological topics, you can focus on one or more languages and choose to study interdisciplinary modules, gaining practical experience of translation and the critical and analytical skills required for research and employment. The final dissertation project provides an opportunity to showcase your translation interests and abilities in an extended annotated translation. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The Translation and Culture pathway has two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is also available).

Core modules

  • Language and Translation
  • Translation Technologies 1

Part-time students take both core modules and 30-60 credits of optional modules in year one.

Optional modules

Students select optional modules wih a total value of 90 credits from the following:

  • Translation Theory
  • Translation Technologies 2
  • Language modules including Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Scandinavian languages, Spanish (up to 60 credits)
  • Translation in History
  • Corpora for Translation
  • The Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
  • The Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
  • Translation and the Web
  • Translating Literary Culture
  • Specialised Translation MSc modules (up to 30 credits)
  • CMII modules (up to 30 credits)

The Centre for Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) offers modules in African and European area studies, comparative literature, European thought and culture, film studies, gender & sexuality studies and health humanities. Optional modules are subject to availability and language prerequisites where applicable.

Dissertation/report

All students complete a 12,000-word dissertation consisting either of an annotated translation or a critical discussion of theoretical, practical or historical aspects of translation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical translation exercises, case studies and web-based classes, depending on the options chosen. The core modules are assessed by essays and coursework. Optional modules are assessed through unseen and written examination, coursework, translation projects and essays.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Translation: Translation and Culture MA

Careers

There is an ever-growing demand for highly-trained commercial, literary and other types of translators in the private as well as in the public sector and in international organisations, in Britain and abroad. Other career paths include the media, publishing and education. 

Employability

The programme provides graduates with a range of vocational skills that enable them to pursue successful careers in the fields of translation and interpreting. Former students have gone on to work as translators for companies such as KPMG, SDL International and Alpha CRC; some have set up their own translation business. Graduates also acquire transferable skills that lead them into successful careers in publishing, media, finance, fashion, PR and education; examples include our graduates who are now working for Newsweek, the British Library, Morgan Stanley, Sainsbury's and Deloitte.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of multicultural London, UCL provides a uniquely rich environment for studying and researching translation in all its facets. Students are taught by specialist translation staff with a diverse range of research interests including translation and the web, theatre translation, and Chinese translation.

The MA is truly interdisciplinary, with access to experts in an unrivalled variety of languages and disciplines from across Europe and further afield. This allows students to customise their own programmes in relation to their language competencies and other academic and professional interests.

UCL translation students are highly valued by the translation industry, with workshops and networking events organised during the year.



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The Research pathway of the Translation MA in the Centre for Translation Studies enables you to focus on a specific interest in translation and intercultural studies under specialist supervision, developing superior research and writing abilities. Read more

The Research pathway of the Translation MA in the Centre for Translation Studies enables you to focus on a specific interest in translation and intercultural studies under specialist supervision, developing superior research and writing abilities. You can also choose from a range of modules to enhance your language, translation and technology skills.

About this degree

The dissertation project provides an opportunity to develop independent critical and analytical thought in researching and presenting a sustained piece of writing on a topic of your choice. You will also choose from a range of translation options covering theoretical and technological topics, language and interdisciplinary modules.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The Research pathway has two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Language and Translation
  • Translation Theory

Part-time students take both core modules and 30-60 credits of optional modules in year one.

Optional modules

Students choose modules with a total value of 60 credits from the following:

  • Translation Technologies 1
  • Translation Technologies 2
  • Language modules including Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Scandinavian languages, Spanish (up to 30 credits)
  • Translation in History
  • Corpora for Translation
  • The Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
  • The Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
  • Translation and the Web
  • Translating Literary Culture
  • Specialised Translation MSc module (up to 15 credits)
  • CMII modules (up to 30 credits)

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) offers modules in African and European area studies, comparative literature, European thought and culture, film studies, gender & sexuality studies and health humanities. Optional modules are subject to availability and language prerequisites where applicable.

Dissertation/report

All students on the Research pathway undertake a supervised independent research project culminating in a dissertation of 18,000 words, consisting of a critical discussion of theoretical, practical or historical aspects of translation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical translation exercises, case studies and web-based classes, depending on the options chosen. The core modules are assessed by essays and coursework. Optional modules are assessed through unseen and written examination, coursework, translation projects and essays.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Translation: Research MA

Careers

There is an ever-growing demand for highly-trained commercial, literary and other types of translators in the private as well as in the public sector and in international organisations, in Britain and abroad. Other career paths include the media, publishing and education. 

Employability

The programme provides graduates with a range of vocational skills that enable them to pursue successful careers in the fields of translation and interpreting. Former students have gone on to work as translators for companies such as KPMG, SDL International and Alpha CRC; some have set up their own translation business. Graduates also acquire transferable skills that lead them into successful careers in publishing, media, finance, fashion, PR and education; examples include our graduates who are now working for Newsweek, the British Library, Morgan Stanley, Sainsbury's and Deloitte.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of multicultural London, UCL provides a uniquely rich environment for studying and researching translation in all its facets, taught by specialist translation staff with a diverse range of research interests including translation and the web, theatre translation, and Chinese translation.

The MA is truly interdisciplinary, with access to experts in an unrivalled variety of languages and disciplines from across Europe and further afield. This allows students to customise their own programmes in relation to their language competencies and other academic and professional interests.



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The Translation Studies pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to advance your practical language, translation and technology skills while developing a comprehensive understanding of translation in social, cultural and historical contexts. Read more

The Translation Studies pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to advance your practical language, translation and technology skills while developing a comprehensive understanding of translation in social, cultural and historical contexts. The programme is taught in the Centre for Translation Studies, generating international networks and the language skills to enhance your employability in today's multicultural workplace.

About this degree

In addition to a range of translation options covering theoretical and technological topics, you can focus on a specific language and choose to study interdisciplinary modules, gaining practical experience of translation and the critical and analytical skills required for research and employment. The final dissertation project provides an opportunity to showcase your translation interests and abilities in an extended annotated translation. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The Translation Studies pathway has two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is also available.

Core modules

  • Language and Translation
  • Translation Theory

Part-time students take both core modules and 30-60 credits of optional modules in year one.

Optional modules

Students select optional modules with a total value of 90 credits from the following:

  • Translation Technologies 1
  • Translation Technologies 2
  • Language modules including Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Scandinavian languages, Spanish (up to 30 credits)
  • Translation in History
  • Corpora for Translation
  • The Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
  • The Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
  • Translation and the Web
  • Translating Literary Culture
  • Specialised Translation MSc modules (up to 15 credits)
  • CMII modules (up to 30 credits)

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) offers modules in African and European area studies, comparative literature, European thought and culture, film studies, gender & sexuality studies and health humanities. Optional modules are subject to availability and language prerequisites where applicable.

Dissertation/report

All students complete a 12,000-word dissertation consisting either of an annotated translation or a critical discussion of theoretical, practical or historical aspects of translation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical translation exercises, case studies and web-based classes, depending on the options chosen. The core modules are assessed by essays and coursework. Optional modules are assessed through unseen and written examination, coursework, translation projects and essays.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Translation: Translation Studies MA

Careers

There is an ever-growing demand for highly-trained commercial, literary and other types of translators in the private as well as in the public sector and in international organisations, in Britain and abroad. Other career paths include the media, publishing and education. 

Employability

The programme provides graduates with a range of vocational skills that enable them to pursue successful careers in the fields of translation and interpreting. Former students have gone on to work as translators for companies such as KPMG, SDL International and Alpha CRC; some have set up their own translation business. Graduates also acquire transferable skills that lead them into successful careers in publishing, media, finance, fashion, PR and education; examples include our graduates who are now working for Newsweek, the British Library, Morgan Stanley, Sainsbury's and Deloitte.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of multicultural London, UCL provides a uniquely rich environment for studying and researching translation in all its facets. Students are taught by specialist translation staff with a diverse range of research interests including translation and the web, theatre translation, and Chinese translation.

The MA is truly interdisciplinary, with access to experts in an unrivalled variety of languages and disciplines from across Europe and further afield. This allows students to customise their own programmes in relation to their language competencies and other academic and professional interests.

UCL translation students are highly valued by the translation industry, with workshops and networking events organised during the year.



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This programme offers a series of closely integrated core modules addressing key issues in medieval archaeology, enabling you to develop your experience and understanding of method and theory whilst developing your intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving and independent judgement. Read more

About the course

This programme offers a series of closely integrated core modules addressing key issues in medieval archaeology, enabling you to develop your experience and understanding of method and theory whilst developing your intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving and independent judgement. You will be encouraged to explore your own particular interests with a range of modules allowing you to focus on Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian and later medieval, and Tudor archaeology in Europe.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Heritage, Museum and Field: Archaeology in Practice; Ethnicity and Identity in the Early Middle Ages; Society and Culture in the Later Middle Ages; Reinventing Archaeology; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Viking-Age Britain; Wars of the Roses to Elizabeth: The Archaeology of England 1455-1603; Introduction to Human Osteology; Archaeozoology; Two modules from the Department of History.

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The European Euromaster in Urban Studies (4Cities) is a unique two-year interdisciplinary and international programme. 4Cities takes students to Brussels, Copenhagen, Vienna, Madrid and a number of surrounding cities. Read more
The European Euromaster in Urban Studies (4Cities) is a unique two-year interdisciplinary and international programme. 4Cities takes students to Brussels, Copenhagen, Vienna, Madrid and a number of surrounding cities. The European Euromaster adds a European perspective to the field of Urban Studies: it wants to break up and to open the national perspective on urban problems. The growing importance of globalisation and the shift towards a world of flows calls for a new approach in important fields of urban policy like culture, economy, planning.

Programme focus

 Globalisation - the processes of globalisation and localisation - as a general context leading to a renewed importance of the city and urbanity in the 21st century. The city is considered a nodal point in post-national developments.
Europe as the unit of analysis: Europe and the European unification process is seen as part of and a reaction to this globalisation processes. Our scope is Europe seen through its cities and urban networks.
 Interdisciplinarity and internationality as a surplus value. The Unica master is a thematic masters programme focused on transdisciplinary approaches and transdisciplinary practices (not the least bridging urban planning and urban sociology, geography, etc) with a focus on the socio-spatial analysis of cities.
An education build on strong cases: Brussels (capital of EU, small global city) – Copenhagen (the Scandinavian mode of regulation), Vienna (metropolis at the centre of Europe: gateway to the East), Madrid (the Mediterranean cities) and a number of surrounding cities.
The importance of fieldwork: research experience in each city and comparative or transnational research as the basis for a final masters thesis.
 A number of excursions and visits: a central attractor will be that we incorporate well prepared excursions in each block. Each excursion will incorporate a socio-spatial introduction to the city (a city walk) and an institutional visit with a focus on certain aspects of policy or management. Moreover a number of projects and institutions will be visited.

Program structure

During a period of two years, students take part in an interdisciplinary programme and study in four cities: Brussels, Copenhagen, Madrid and Vienna. Students live in each of the cities for one semester, except for the first block (Brussels) which takes a few weeks longer and the last block which consists of a short intensive stay in Madrid. Students spend most of the last semester in a location of their choice, where they are able to work on their master thesis.

In each city the programme consists of:
 academic courses
 fieldwork
 excursions & visits
 exams

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CBS Global Executive MBA. 20 months, 11 modules, 4 continents. The triple-accredited CBS Global Executive MBA is a truly global programme taking place in four continents over 20 months. Read more
CBS Global Executive MBA: 20 months, 11 modules, 4 continents

The triple-accredited CBS Global Executive MBA is a truly global programme taking place in four continents over 20 months. The learning experience is deeply rooted in Scandinavian excellence and you will be part of a small class to facilitate learning and networking. Your fellow participants have been carefully screened and vetted before admission and the programme is designed to offer immediate ROI for yourself and your organisation in the form of practical strategy projects designed to propel your organisation forward.

Rankings and Recognitions

In addition to its triple-accreditation, awarded to less than 1% of global business schools, CBS GEMBA is ranked among the top 100 global programmes by Financial Times (#62) and The Economist (#60).


The programme is structured around five themes which interact in a disciplined progression:

- Business Leadership and Organisation
- New Financial Strategies
- Business Innovation

The themes are developed over three terms that give you a solid theoretical foundation that is progressively enhanced by practical challenges based on today’s business environment:

- First Term & Second Term: General Management & Business Analysis and Leadership
- Third Term: Business Development and Innovation

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The Graduate Program in Germanic Studies at UBC integrates a large scope of thematic and theoretical research areas. Students are guided by faculty whose teaching and research cover the full range of German literature and culture from medieval to the present. Read more

The Graduate Program in Germanic Studies at UBC integrates a large scope of thematic and theoretical research areas. Students are guided by faculty whose teaching and research cover the full range of German literature and culture from medieval to the present. Course offerings comprise approaches from historical, cultural, media, performance and gender studies. The program's structure encourages students to develop their individual focus of study and research. Students have the opportunity to develop a comprehensive knowledge of German literary texts in their aesthetic, social, political, (inter-)cultural, and historical dimensions. They will learn how to apply a variety of critical methods and theories to the study of literary texts, refine literary sensibilities, analytical skills and conceptual abilities. We offer professional development opportunities such as Teaching and Research Assistantships.

What makes the program unique?

We are one of North America's top departments for Northern and Central European languages, with a thriving cohort of German and Swedish-language students and outstanding Polish, Danish and Russian language programs.

We encourage our MA students to pursue German cultural and literary studies with an interdisciplinary approach.

Our faculty, whose expertise lies in all areas of German, Baltic, Scandinavian, and Slavic studies, including gender, film and media studies, as well as second language acquisition, prepare students for their future endeavours and engage them in a diversity of professional development opportunities.

Our faculty are dedicated teachers who are regularly honoured with prestigious teaching awards.

Career options

The Master’s program is intended as preparation for a career in teaching and provides a possible foundation for advancement to a PhD in Germanic Studies. Our Teaching Assistants receive supervision and guidance to become effective and engaging instructors. Recent graduates have become sessional instructors of German, and have received recognition for excellent teaching evaluations. Other recent graduates have gone on to pursue studies at UBC, Cornell University, law studies at the University of Calgary, and art studies at McGill.



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An intensive studio introducing students to the Scandinavian-Nordic context and region, focusing on the public realm with attention to the urban form analysis, social life, landscape design and processes of collaborative work in strategic planning and implementation of public space. Read more
An intensive studio introducing students to the Scandinavian-Nordic context and region, focusing on the public realm with attention to the urban form analysis, social life, landscape design and processes of collaborative work in strategic planning and implementation of public space. Students work collaboratively to produce a project that is theoretically rooted in the form of a strategic urban design public space project on the city level. This course is about rethinking the public realm and designing new public spaces - an urban square or an urban park in the urban landacape. The space should have an actuality in the local political discussion as well as the global discussions about climate and ecological issues but also the issues of human scale, enjoyment, aestethics, history and culture. Public space should be complex and contain a variety of functions and programs for all. The question that will be raised is how can we work according to long-term goals when the public’s mood, expectations and desires change so easily? The question of what should be public spaces, and what our public should be like, is highly political, since we all have different opinions of what constitutes a good life. Can we design and maintain public places for good life based on timeless principles of civic design? Can Urban Design, Landscape Architecture and Urban -Town Planning have a common language and understanding when it comes to design of urban, nature and landscape sensitive places - public realms that should be attractive, enjoyable, engaging, inclusive but also lifelong transformative. [STUDIO WILL FEATURE AND INTERNATIONAL NORDIC STUDY TRIP WITHIN THE PROJECT]

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The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Read more
The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Our MPhil programme provides a 9-month course (October to June) in the scholarly methods and disciplines relevant to the study of the history, languages, literatures, and material culture of the peoples of Britain and Ireland, Brittany and Scandinavia in the earlier Middle Ages.

The course enables candidates to achieve an understanding of early Insular culture as a whole, as well as specialising in aspects of particular interest, whether historical, palaeographical, literary, or linguistic. Training is given in scholarly methods and practices, complemented by instruction in the particular fields of the candidate's interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc

Course detail

During the MPhil, students should have:

(1) developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen area within Anglo- Saxon, Norse & Celtic and of the critical debates within it;
(2) developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field;
(3) shown independent judgement based on their own research.
(4) acquired and/or consolidated linguistic, palaeographical or other scholarly skills;
(5) participated effectively in seminar discussions and made an oral presentation of their research;
(6) learnt how to schedule independent research to produce written work of a high standard to a strict deadline.

Format

After two weeks of orientation and study-skills training, MPhil students meet for a weekly hour-long text-seminar throughout the first two terms of the course. The text-seminar focuses on a sequence of literary texts (studied in translation), including key Latin and vernacular texts from all the fields within ASNC, preceded by a group of earlier works that provided the intellectual background to the medieval world.

Alongside this core seminar, students are expected to attend the two courses they have chosen to pursue from among the selection of linguistic/literary and historical subjects offered in the Department, which are taught through a varying combination of lectures, classes and seminars. In this way, a significant proportion of the taught element of this MPhil is tailored to the individual needs of each student, hence the possible variation in weekly hours of seminars, classes and lectures.

Assessment

The MPhil dissertation (between 10,000 and 15,000 words) makes up 50% of the total mark for the course, and is submitted in the last week of the third term (mid-June). Students are required to submit a dissertation title, with abstract, by the mid-point of the second term (February).

At the end of the first term of the course (December), students are required to submit a 5000-word Review of Scholarship essay, intended as a survey and assessment of scholarship on the topic of the projected MPhil dissertation. The mark for the Review of Scholarship essay constitutes 10% of the overall MPhil grade.

Over the course of four days in the first week of the third term (April), students write a 3000-word take-home essay, on a broad topic chosen from a selection, and drawing on at least three of the works of literature discussed during the course of the MPhil text-seminar, which runs throughout the first two terms of the course. The mark for the take-home essay makes up 10% of the overall mark.

Students are required to take two 3-hour written examinations which assess knowledge and skills acquired during the first two terms of the academic year, in two courses chosen from among those taught in the Department. Courses on offer include Anglo-Saxon history, Scandinavian history, Brittonic and Gaelic history, Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Welsh, Medieval Irish, Insular Latin, and palaeography, most of which can be pursued at beginner, intermediate or advanced level; Germanic philology, Celtic philology, and textual criticism are further options for students with the appropriate prior knowledge. Each written examination is worth 15% of the total MPhil mark, and is assessed independently by two examiners.

Continuing

MPhil students may apply to continue to a PhD in ASNC; the academic condition for continuation is an overall mark of 70 or more in the MPhil course, and 70 or more for the dissertation. A viva on the dissertation is compulsory for all students who have been made an offer for continuation to PhD.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc/apply

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The master's programme trains students to be cultural mediators (translators, administrators, editors, etc.) by providing knowledge and skills in a modern or classical language and culture. Read more
The master's programme trains students to be cultural mediators (translators, administrators, editors, etc.) by providing knowledge and skills in a modern or classical language and culture. Students choose one of the following specialities: 1) Classical philology 2) English language and literature 3) French language and literature 4) German language and literature 5) Russian and Slavic philology 6) Scandinavian languages and literature 7) Spanish language and literature

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