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Masters Degrees (Sacred Music)

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established Music PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance. Read more

School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established Music PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance.

About this programme

The Music PGCE introduces students to the broad scope of Music as a curriculum subject across the 11-16 age range. The course is designed to support musicians in coming to an understanding of what it means to be an effective and succesful music educator. Our priority is to develop your expertise in a variety of teaching situations, by exploring a range of different teaching styles. We will offer a range of perspectives on the principles of syllabus design, evaluation and assessment. We aim to deepen students' theoretical understanding of educational issues through engaging practical music workshops, lectures, seminars and tutorials.

Students undertake two Master’s-level (level 7) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level (level 7) modules, which are assessed through written assignments and practical musicianship tasks, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE).

Core modules

  • Subject Studies - Music (30 Master's-level credits)
  • Wider Educational Studies - Music (30 Master's-level credits)
  • Professional Practice

Optional modules

  • There are no optional modules for this programme

Placement

You will spend most of your time (120 days) in schools, working with music mentors who support you through your school placements. The Professional Practice module is assessed through these placements, associated tasks and a portfolio.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placement at the host school or alliance. Assessment is by the observation of practical teaching, assignments and a portfolio (which links into continuing professional development in the induction year).

Further information on modules and programme structure is available on the department website: School Direct (Tuition Fee): Music

Funding

Bursaries of £4,000-£9,000 are available to students who meet the eligibility criteria for the Music programme. To find out what funding may be available to you, please visit the Department for Education website.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the UCL Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas, including: classroom music and instrumental teachers, music educators, workshop leaders and consultants in National Music Hubs and local authorities, learning and participation programme leaders for professional orchestras, and resident composers in schools.

Recent career destinations for this programme

  • Secondary School Teacher (Music), St Mary's and St Johns CE School
  • Secondary School Teacher (Music), Sacred Heart High School Hammersmith
  • Secondary School Teacher (Music), Cecil Jones College
  • Secondary School Teacher (Music), Chestnut Grove Academy

Employability

Graduates of the Secondary PGCE programme are highly employable and sought after by schools and colleges in London and beyond. Almost all graduates secure their first teaching post by the time they finish the PGCE programme. Graduates of the programme also have great career prospects, with many becoming Head of Department or a Head of Year within 2-5 years, often acting, in their schools, as mentors to new PGCE student teachers. Many of our graduates become senior teachers (such as Assistant Headteachers or Head of a Faculty) in 5-8 years of graduating, and some are now Headteachers. Others have developed their careers as subject specialist teachers and educators, both becoming lead teachers in the classroom and researching, writing and advising other teachers themselves. The Secondary PGCE Programme is a springboard into a rewarding career, not just as a skilled teacher, but as an educational leader.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this programme at UCL?

UCL Institute of Education (IOE) offers one of the larger music PGCE programmes in the country, allowing students to benefit from a team of lecturers with a wide range of expertise and interests. 

"I can't rate my training highly enough. Not only am I a more confident musician, but I am now equipped to apply all the ideas I've learnt from workshops, lectures and from my research to my teaching. I feel excited and prepared for my future career" (PGCE Music Student Teacher Evaluation, 2016)

Our central London location means that we are able to draw on the world-leading expertise of professional musicians and music educators. For example, a number of subject sessions are arranged in collaboration with expert musicians from The London Sinfonietta, LSO St Luke's (Gamelan) and the Kingdom Choir (Gospel).

While undertaking placements in our network of partner schools, students also benefit from the wealth of expertise on offer in London and the opportunity to teach music in a vibrant and dynamic setting.

Accreditation:

This route leads to the award of QTS (Qualified Teacher Status).



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The MA Music course is designed to enhance your core research and contextual skills, whilst allowing you the freedom to specialise in a chosen area through specialist pathway modules. Read more
The MA Music course is designed to enhance your core research and contextual skills, whilst allowing you the freedom to specialise in a chosen area through specialist pathway modules. Specialist pathways are available in: Musicology, Performance, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition, and Sacred Music. All students study core modules in Research Skills and Ideas in Music and complete an Extended Research Project (either a dissertation, critical edition with commentary or a practice-based research project). Outside of this, you have the choice of two specialist pathway modules. These can both be taken from the same area of study, or you can take one module from two different specialist pathways including Musicology, Performance, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition and Sacred Music. Through support from dedicated specialists in your field, you will develop an in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of core theoretical and methodological approaches and contemporary debates at the forefront of scholarly practice.

The MA Music will be fully delivered at the Music Department, situated in the new purpose-built Capstone Building (opened in 2010), also home to a new publically-accessible performance venue, the Capstone Theatre. The electroacoustic music facilities at Hope are new and up-to-date in terms of the hardware and software on offer. The department has two high-specification iMac computer labs installed with industry standard software (Pro Tools, Logic, Max/MSP, GRM Tools, Metasynth, Waves), a multi-channel surround studio (8-channel setup), two individual-use project rooms for loudspeaker monitoring, and a further space for interactive laptop music. The Music Department also benefits from being one of only a handful of All-Steinway Schools in the UK. The Department owns two Steinway grand pianos (a Model D and Model B), two Boston grand pianos (permanently situated in the two main teaching rooms), and suite of practice rooms all equipped with upright Steinway pianos. The Department additionally owns two harpsichords and has recently acquired a fully restored eighteenth-century Dutch chamber organ.

For further information download the Music MA Leaflet‌ - http://www.hope.ac.uk/media/liverpoolhope/contentassets/images/artsandhumanities/media,48090,en.pdf

Teaching & Research

The MA Music will be delivered via a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and individual supervision. Each of the specialist pathway modules is led by an expert within the field. The musicology pathway is led by Dr Laura Hamer; the Performance pathway is led by Dr Alberto Sanna; the Composition pathway is led by Dr Ian Percy; the Electroacoustic Composition pathway is led by Dr Manuella Blackburn; and the Sacred Music pathway is led by Prof Tassilo Erhardt.

In addition to this, students taking the performance pathway will benefit from 25 hours of individual lessons on their chosen instrument or voice. Students on the Composition pathway also benefit from dedicated Composition workshops with members of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra.

Each of the specialist pathways also includes contributions from one of our partner organisations including the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Milapfest, the European Opera Centre and Liverpool’s two Cathedrals (Liverpool Anglican Cathedral and Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral). Input to the course is also enhanced by specialist sessions from our Visiting Professors including Prof John Milsom, Prof Michael Talbot and Liverpool Hope Professor of Performance, Joanna MacGregor.

Each year the Music Department hosts its long-running Research Seminar Series. The Research Seminar Series includes contributions from distinguished visiting speakers, Department staff, and postgraduate taught and research students. Attendance at the Research Seminar Series is compulsory for students enrolled on the MA Music, and the seminar series is embedded into the teaching provision of the 2 core modules. For postgraduate students, the Research Seminar Series provides a nurturing and supportive environment to gain experience in presenting their work to a specialist audience and to receive feedback on their research from their peers.

Employability

The MA Music is designed to enhance and develop a variety of transferable skills, as well as subject-specific skills. You will learn how to critically engage with written documents of different genres, as well as having the opportunity to develop your written and presentation skills.

As well as preparing students for a range of employment opportunities, the enhancement of academic skills will prepare students for research degrees, such as MPhil and PhD.

The Post Graduate Certificate block has been designed to be accessible by those already in full-time employment who would like to further their knowledge and enhance their academic and professional skills.

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The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

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The M.A. program, offered in the fields of historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, is designed to acquaint the student with methods of scholarly research. Read more

Master of Arts

The M.A. program, offered in the fields of historical musicology, music theory and ethnomusicology, is designed to acquaint the student with methods of scholarly research. It provides broad general training in addition to opportunities for specialized research in particular areas of inquiry. Prescribed curricula are flexible, providing latitude to meet diverse individual needs. A thesis is required and the program is normally of two-year’s duration.

Areas of scholarly research emphasis pursued by faculty include Renaissance sacred polyphony; source studies in the music of Bach and other major composers; Reformation and Counter-Reformation; nineteenth-century topics (program music, form, harmony); twentieth-century American music, Second Viennese School; issues in rhythmic analysis; theory construction and analytical method; computer-based analysis; aspects of modern and contemporary music and musical life; and music of East Asia (especially China and Bali). The faculty in performance and composition includes many figures well-known throughout Canada and beyond for their work in concert, on radio, and on CDs.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Music
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Music

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This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts. Read more

This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts.

It offers a discerning investigation into seemingly non­rational modes of knowing, exploring the cosmological sense of the sacred, the widespread practices of symbol interpretation and the cultural role of the creative imagination.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/myth-cosmology-and-the-sacred.aspx

Course detail

The overall aim of the course is to encourage critical, imaginative and creative ways of engaging reflexively with some of the most important questions of our time, such as the debate between science and religion, the nature of sacred reality, and the foundations of spiritual, religious and ritual experience. To do this we explore theories of knowledge and consciousness, oracular and divinatory practices (ancient and contemporary), and the cultural expression of myth in landscape, poetry, art and music.

The course has been highly praised as an outstanding example of transformative learning, as it brings personal reflection and creativity to bear on the study of spirituality in the broadest sense. It brings to the fore issues of connectivity, sustainability, ecological awareness, and the engagement of the imagination in the aid of individual, community and global understanding, wellbeing and harmony.

Canterbury is a perfect venue to study this course, with its ecclesiastical heritage, rich literary history, beauty of landscape and architecture, and easy access to both London and the continent.

Suitability

The course will appeal to all those seeking to develop and enrich their lives through the study of the history, philosophy and practices of Western sacred and esoteric traditions, and will be of particular interest to teachers, practitioners and therapists in the fields of contemporary spirituality and wellbeing who would like to engage more deeply with both the foundations of their work and their own self-knowledge.

There are many areas for potential further study, and we now have a thriving graduate environment with MPhil/PhD researchers pursing topics as diverse as the music of the spheres, Freemasonry, conflict resolution, alchemical symbolism, transformative learning and intuitive reading methods.

Content

The four taught modules, comprising seminars, learning journal groups and workshops take place at alternate weekends, in term time, from October to March, with optional workshops in the summer term.

The Creative Project assignment and dissertation module take place from April to September (for full-time students) and April to the following September (for part-time students). Each teaching weekend includes an open lecture by a visiting speaker. There are also optional sessions on Friday afternoons (compulsory for Tier 4 students).

The four taught modules will address the following topics:

• Theories and Methods

• Symbol and Imagination

• Oracular and Divinatory Traditions

• Spirit and Psyche

• Creative Project

• Learning Journal

• Dissertation

Format

Teaching methods include seminars, lectures and workshops. Students can expect eight hours of teaching each study weekend, plus two hours of learning journal groups. They also receive individual supervision for each taught and research assignment, and eight hours of research preparation seminars.

They will attend two days a year for creative project presentations and a variety of optional workshops will be offered. There will also be an open public lecture at each study weekend, on the Saturday evening, which they are encouraged to attend, and optional Friday afternoon seminars on a variety of themes.

Assessment

Four essays of 4,000 words (20 credits each), one creative project review of 4,000 words, one learning journal write-up of 4,000 words (20 credits each) and one dissertation of 12-15,000 words (60 credits).

What can I do next?

Most of the students on this course are mature adults with established careers. However, possible career opportunities might include teaching, counselling and mentoring, spiritual and wellbeing guidance, alternative healing and therapies, writing and media, the arts, and further research.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Fees and Funding

See our postgraduate fees and funding page to discover the loans, scholarships and bursaries available.

View https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/fees-and-funding/postgraduate-fees-funding/postgraduate-funding.aspx



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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)

English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits): This module explores the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to exploring its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture (manuscript and printed editions, artefacts). Focusing on a number of texts in different genres and languages (read in English translation when necessary), the module will offer postgraduates an insight into the origins and development of Arthurian themes in medieval literature (Convener: Dr Raluca Radulescu.)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)
English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits) (English: HPW-4000; Welsh: HPC-4000)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Major (40 credits) and Minor (20 credits) Submissions are different in scope.

The choice of Early Music a s Principal Subject entails that students make their Part II submission in the area of Early Music as well.

WMM4044: Principal Subject: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4046: Major Open Submission: Early Music (40 credits)
WMM4047 and WMM4048: Minor Open Submission: Early Music (20 credits)
WMM4050: Preparing for the Part II project (20 credits)
Students may also select relevant modules also on offer by the Graduate School of the College of Arts and Humanities which include:

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
QXE4033: Postgraduate Portfolio
Further information about the above modules is available directly from the Directors of Graduate Studies in each contributing schools. Module availability depends on yearly internal arrangements in each contributing school. For further details, contact the School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, the School of Music, and School of Welsh.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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Why study at Roehampton. Partnerships with over 150 schools in south London and the surrounding areas. Learning supported by experienced academics at one of the highest rated initial teacher education providers in the UK. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Partnerships with over 150 schools in south London and the surrounding areas.
  • Learning supported by experienced academics at one of the highest rated initial teacher education providers in the UK.
  • The qualification gained is a PGCE which is recognised internationally and you will also get a recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status. Successful completion will give you 60 Masters level credits, which can be carried forward to further study.

What is School Direct?

School Direct is a government-led initiative that seeks to place schools at the centre of Initial Teacher Education (ITE). Working with University of Roehampton, our partner schools take a leading role in recruiting trainee teachers and in designing and delivering the training programme. 

There are two possible routes if you are thinking of training via School Direct:

School Direct Training Programme (salaried)

This is open to high quality graduates with three or more years' professional experience.Applications are made on UCAS to individual schools or alliances of schools. The schools pay a salary based on that of an unqualified teacher but there is no government bursary. Trainees carry out training at Roehampton and within their school alliance.

School Direct Training Programme (tuition fee)

This route is open to all high quality graduates. The trainee can receive a bursary from the government at a level determined by the subject/phase of training and the trainee's degree class. Trainees carry out training at Roehampton and within their school alliance.

Structure

Both routes lead to a PGCE with 60 Masters credits on successful completion. There will be three assignments across the year, each leading to 20 Masters level credits. You will spend at least 120 days in school over the year long programme, and will also attend classes at Roehampton. Your main placement will be in the school that you have applied to and there will also be a shorter placement in another school which will add breadth to the experience.

You will be visited in school by a university tutor, and you will have a mentor in school. The training at Roehampton will enable you to reflect upon your practice within the broad context of educational theory so that you will feel equipped to teach in any school.

Subjects offered

Primary Subjects offered

  • Primary General
  • Primary with Maths

Secondary Subjects offered

  • Art and Design
  • Computing
  • Design and Technology
  • Drama
  • English
  • Geography
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Modern Foreign Languages
  • Music
  • Religious Education
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Physical Education

Primary schools

Secondary schools

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