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This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts. Read more
This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts.

It offers a discerning investigation into seemingly non­rational modes of knowing, exploring the cosmological sense of the sacred, the widespread practices of symbol interpretation and the cultural role of the creative imagination.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/myth-cosmology-and-the-sacred.aspx

Course detail

The overall aim of the course is to encourage critical, imaginative and creative ways of engaging reflexively with some of the most important questions of our time, such as the debate between science and religion, the nature of sacred reality, and the foundations of spiritual, religious and ritual experience. To do this we explore theories of knowledge and consciousness, oracular and divinatory practices (ancient and contemporary), and the cultural expression of myth in landscape, poetry, art and music.

The course has been highly praised as an outstanding example of transformative learning, as it brings personal reflection and creativity to bear on the study of spirituality in the broadest sense. It brings to the fore issues of connectivity, sustainability, ecological awareness, and the engagement of the imagination in the aid of individual, community and global understanding, wellbeing and harmony.

Canterbury is a perfect venue to study this course, with its ecclesiastical heritage, rich literary history, beauty of landscape and architecture, and easy access to both London and the continent.

Suitability

The course will appeal to all those seeking to develop and enrich their lives through the study of the history, philosophy and practices of Western sacred and esoteric traditions, and will be of particular interest to teachers, practitioners and therapists in the fields of contemporary spirituality and wellbeing who would like to engage more deeply with both the foundations of their work and their own self-knowledge.

There are many areas for potential further study, and we now have a thriving graduate environment with MPhil/PhD researchers pursing topics as diverse as the music of the spheres, Freemasonry, conflict resolution, alchemical symbolism, transformative learning and intuitive reading methods.

Content

The four taught modules, comprising seminars, learning journal groups and workshops take place at alternate weekends, in term time, from October to March, with optional workshops in the summer term.

The Creative Project assignment and dissertation module take place from April to September (for full-time students) and April to the following September (for part-time students). Each teaching weekend includes an open lecture by a visiting speaker. There are also optional sessions on Friday afternoons (compulsory for Tier 4 students).

The four taught modules will address the following topics:

• Theories and Methods
• Symbol and Imagination
• Oracular and Divinatory Traditions
• Spirit and Psyche
• Creative Project
• Learning Journal
• Dissertation

Format

Teaching methods include seminars, lectures and workshops. Students can expect eight hours of teaching each study weekend, plus two hours of learning journal groups. They also receive individual supervision for each taught and research assignment, and eight hours of research preparation seminars.

They will attend two days a year for creative project presentations and a variety of optional workshops will be offered. There will also be an open public lecture at each study weekend, on the Saturday evening, which they are encouraged to attend, and optional Friday afternoon seminars on a variety of themes.

Assessment

Four essays of 4,000 words (20 credits each), one creative project review of 4,000 words, one learning journal write-up of 4,000 words (20 credits each) and one dissertation of 12-15,000 words (60 credits).

What can I do next?

Most of the students on this course are mature adults with established careers. However, possible career opportunities might include teaching, counselling and mentoring, spiritual and wellbeing guidance, alternative healing and therapies, writing and media, the arts, and further research.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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The MA Music course is designed to enhance your core research and contextual skills, whilst allowing you the freedom to specialise in a chosen area through specialist pathway modules. Read more
The MA Music course is designed to enhance your core research and contextual skills, whilst allowing you the freedom to specialise in a chosen area through specialist pathway modules. Specialist pathways are available in: Musicology, Performance, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition, and Sacred Music. All students study core modules in Research Skills and Ideas in Music and complete an Extended Research Project (either a dissertation, critical edition with commentary or a practice-based research project). Outside of this, you have the choice of two specialist pathway modules. These can both be taken from the same area of study, or you can take one module from two different specialist pathways including Musicology, Performance, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition and Sacred Music. Through support from dedicated specialists in your field, you will develop an in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of core theoretical and methodological approaches and contemporary debates at the forefront of scholarly practice.

The MA Music will be fully delivered at the Music Department, situated in the new purpose-built Capstone Building (opened in 2010), also home to a new publically-accessible performance venue, the Capstone Theatre. The electroacoustic music facilities at Hope are new and up-to-date in terms of the hardware and software on offer. The department has two high-specification iMac computer labs installed with industry standard software (Pro Tools, Logic, Max/MSP, GRM Tools, Metasynth, Waves), a multi-channel surround studio (8-channel setup), two individual-use project rooms for loudspeaker monitoring, and a further space for interactive laptop music. The Music Department also benefits from being one of only a handful of All-Steinway Schools in the UK. The Department owns two Steinway grand pianos (a Model D and Model B), two Boston grand pianos (permanently situated in the two main teaching rooms), and suite of practice rooms all equipped with upright Steinway pianos. The Department additionally owns two harpsichords and has recently acquired a fully restored eighteenth-century Dutch chamber organ.

For further information download the Music MA Leaflet‌ - http://www.hope.ac.uk/media/liverpoolhope/contentassets/images/artsandhumanities/media,48090,en.pdf

Teaching & Research

The MA Music will be delivered via a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and individual supervision. Each of the specialist pathway modules is led by an expert within the field. The musicology pathway is led by Dr Laura Hamer; the Performance pathway is led by Dr Alberto Sanna; the Composition pathway is led by Dr Ian Percy; the Electroacoustic Composition pathway is led by Dr Manuella Blackburn; and the Sacred Music pathway is led by Prof Tassilo Erhardt.

In addition to this, students taking the performance pathway will benefit from 25 hours of individual lessons on their chosen instrument or voice. Students on the Composition pathway also benefit from dedicated Composition workshops with members of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra.

Each of the specialist pathways also includes contributions from one of our partner organisations including the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Milapfest, the European Opera Centre and Liverpool’s two Cathedrals (Liverpool Anglican Cathedral and Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral). Input to the course is also enhanced by specialist sessions from our Visiting Professors including Prof John Milsom, Prof Michael Talbot and Liverpool Hope Professor of Performance, Joanna MacGregor.

Each year the Music Department hosts its long-running Research Seminar Series. The Research Seminar Series includes contributions from distinguished visiting speakers, Department staff, and postgraduate taught and research students. Attendance at the Research Seminar Series is compulsory for students enrolled on the MA Music, and the seminar series is embedded into the teaching provision of the 2 core modules. For postgraduate students, the Research Seminar Series provides a nurturing and supportive environment to gain experience in presenting their work to a specialist audience and to receive feedback on their research from their peers.

Employability

The MA Music is designed to enhance and develop a variety of transferable skills, as well as subject-specific skills. You will learn how to critically engage with written documents of different genres, as well as having the opportunity to develop your written and presentation skills.

As well as preparing students for a range of employment opportunities, the enhancement of academic skills will prepare students for research degrees, such as MPhil and PhD.

The Post Graduate Certificate block has been designed to be accessible by those already in full-time employment who would like to further their knowledge and enhance their academic and professional skills.

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The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

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This Master of Business Administration program provides you with a top-notch education and real world experience. This program eases the entry of students without work experience into the professional life and facilitates young professionals to switch career. Read more
This Master of Business Administration program provides you with a top-notch education and real world experience.

This program eases the entry of students without work experience into the professional life and facilitates young professionals to switch career.

The program is designed in such a way that classes are conducted in the evening (from 6:30pm to 9:30pm and occasionally on Saturday mornings) and paid internships are held during the day.

Features:

•American MBA, AACSB Accredited program. All courses taught in English

•Faculty from the main campus in Fairfield, CT and Luxembourg-based practitioners with strong academic qualifications

•6-9 month paid internship supported by individual coaching

•Individual mentoring program for personal and professional guidance

•International student body from over 50 countries

•Access to SHU’s extensive online library and databases

•Option to add courses on Sacred Heart University’s main campus in Fairfield, Connecticut, U.S.A. (about one hour north from New York City)

•Non-EU/EEA students graduating with an MBA can obtain a work permit in Luxembourg under certain conditions

Paid internship:

SHU has a roster of many top companies which include firms like ArcelorMittal, ATOZ, Banque Internationale à Luxembourg, Brown Brothers Harriman, Cargolux Airlines International S.A., Lombard International Assurance S.A., PwC, SES and UBS. SHU and the student will work together to find the best match between the candidate’s objectives and the employer’s expectations. An individual coaching program will also support this process.

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The MA Ecology and Spirituality brings together the expertise in theology, philosophy and anthropology of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David with the pioneering spiritual and ecological thinking developed by Schumacher College (Devon) over the last 25 years. Read more
The MA Ecology and Spirituality brings together the expertise in theology, philosophy and anthropology of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David with the pioneering spiritual and ecological thinking developed by Schumacher College (Devon) over the last 25 years.

Course Overview

At this point in human history, many academics, activists, leaders and thinkers are calling for an urgent reconsideration of the cultural narratives and spiritual values that support our very existence on the planet. In an attempt to divert the current trajectory of ‘progress’ and ‘development’ towards a more sustainable and equitable future, this requires objective and critical thinking about our relationship and connection to the natural world, to the people and communities around us and to the very beliefs and values that drive our individual and collective actions.

This programme in Ecology and Spirituality brings together the theological legacy of academic work at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David with the spiritual and ecological thinking developed to postgraduate level by Schumacher College over 25 years. It explores the role of spirituality, religion, philosophy, science and narrative as the underlying causes, but also the potential solutions, to the systemic ecological crises in which we find ourselves. From different perspectives it will track the roots, thought-lines and stories that have caused our modern-day disconnection from the natural world and from each other – and look at ways in which we might make re-connection, in theory and in practice, for ourselves and for others.

More than simply postgraduate study, this programme is a personal and experiential journey – an opportunity for you to deeply explore your own inner landscape and how it relates to your actions in the outer world. Safely held within the transformational space that Schumacher College has become known for worldwide, you will combine critical thinking and academic rigour with an exploration of your own values, beliefs and personal narratives and how these fit, and find resonance and authenticity with your life and work. This is a chance to look at your own disconnection – its origins, influences and consequences – and in doing so find personal and collective solutions to living in a more sustainable, resilient, connected and beautiful world.

Modules

Programme Modules:
-Science and Spirit (Delivered at Schumacher College)
-The Ecological Self (Delivered at Schumacher College)
-Indigeny Today (Delivered at Schumacher College)
-Sacred Activism (Delivered at Schumacher College)
-Mythology (Delivered at Schumacher College)
-Religion and the Environment (Delivered via distance learning)
-Environmental Philosophy (Delivered via distance learning)
-Heavenly Discourse (Delivered via distance learning)
-Sacred Geography (Delivered via distance learning)

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This MA is designed for lay and ordained Christians with significant experience of working (paid or volunteer) in churches, mission agencies, or not-for-profit organisations (faith-based or secular), enabling you to engage theologically and strategically with the contemporary world. Read more

Summary

This MA is designed for lay and ordained Christians with significant experience of working (paid or volunteer) in churches, mission agencies, or not-for-profit organisations (faith-based or secular), enabling you to engage theologically and strategically with the contemporary world.

The course will provide you with the opportunity to integrate biblical, theological, and empirical studies in the context of Christian spirituality. The aim is to engage faithfully and practically with existing and emerging challenges to Christian ministry and mission in the twenty-first century.

Students on this course become highly learned and educated professionals capable of providing intellectual leadership in, and adapting to the needs of, contemporary churches. You will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the contribution that theological, and biblical studies can make to the effective provision of Christian ministry in the community, and be equipped with the knowledge and critical skills to bring advanced academic expertise to professional work in church and ministerial practice.

The course will provide you with an integrated framework for theology and biblical studies in the context of Christian ministry and mission, which you can use to transform your ministerial practice. You will also develop the critical faculties of analytic and research skills, to enable you to create and interpret new knowledge in theological and ministerial studies, and extend the reach of the discipline in society.

Our networks with other local universities and places of learning will give you regular access to a range of extra-curricular seminars and other educational events relevant to the study of Christian ministry. The University’s proximity to the centre of London with its rich religious history, its diverse religious communities, and its many museums, art galleries, libraries and places of worship, makes it an ideal venue for those who are interested in exploring the histories, interactions and influences of religious communities in contemporary culture as part of their studies.

Content

You will first of all reflect theologically and strategically on the character, nature, purpose, and practice of Christian ministry in church and society. You will be equipped to research the practices of ministry and mission, through study of key Missiological texts.

You will study ministry across a range of denominations and traditions including Pentecostal, Charismatic, Methodist, Anglican, Baptist and Catholic. You will explore and evaluate the language, secular/sacred ideas, rituals and cultural norms that nourish spiritualities, ministerial formation, and ministry practice within different historical and cultural contexts. In particular, you will examine how forms of Christian worship, such as prayer, scriptural readings and sacraments, influence conduct, moral behaviour and patterns of life, in order to develop your ministerial abilities within different political, social and economic environments.

You will also be able to take modules which look at the theological ideas from both classical and modern periods, which are of greatest relevance to church ministry and mission in the contemporary world. Using this theoretical grounding, you can pursue your interest in practical areas of ministry such as marriage and family life, or community work. In these complex and demanding areas, the Christian minister and theologian are faced with new challenges. These modules will give students the historical and academic understanding to be able to offer fresh Christian perspectives, and encourage you to develop your own responses.

There will also be the opportunity for you to reflect deeply on a particular aspect of ministerial practice through the dissertation module.

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The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. Read more
The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. The programme places a strong emphasis on language training, on theoretically informed approaches to Classical texts, and on practical engagement with your chosen specialism. The course is composed of a core research training module, a module in a relevant language (ancient or modern), a 15,000 word dissertation, and two elective modules, which are offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

For information on the structure of the course, please see our department web pages (https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9532&title=Classics&code=Q8K307&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent)
Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)

In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also substitute modules offered in other departments, such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Learning and Teaching

The MA in Classics is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern). All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

Other admission details

*Note that this need not be 'Classics' (so named). If your plan is to specialise in ancient history, literature, or philosophy, for example, it might be perfectly natural to apply with a first degree in History, or English, or Philosophy; or you might just have taken a substantial range of Classical options along the course of your previous studies.

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This Literacy Learning and Literacy Difficulties MA will provide students with a deeper understanding of the processes involved in learning to read, write and spell, the sources of difficulties, and approaches to intervention. Read more
This Literacy Learning and Literacy Difficulties MA will provide students with a deeper understanding of the processes involved in learning to read, write and spell, the sources of difficulties, and approaches to intervention.

Degree information

This programme provides students with the opportunity to draw on the strengths of a team with research expertise in literacy and experience in evaluating early literacy interventions. They will also investigate literacy acquisition and problems in depth, covering reading, writing and spelling.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules:
-Research Methods in Literacy and Literary Development
-Literacy Development
-Literacy Practice in Writing and Comprehension

Optional modules
-Reading and Spelling Difficulties
-Students choose one or two optional Master's level modules from across the UCL IOE offering.

Dissertation/report
All students submit a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

Teaching and learning
Sessions for all modules are offered face-to-face in the evenings, supplemented by online discussion and reading. Dissertation/report group sessions are also delivered in the evening and are supplemented by one-to-one supervision. All 30 credit modules are assessed via the equivalent of a 4,000-word assignment.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as literacy co-ordinators and special educational needs co-ordinators, while others have jobs as literacy advisers and specialists. Graduates can also be found working as teachers and as independent literacy intervention tutors.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Primary School Acting Deputy Head Teacher, Peterborough City Council
-Primary School Class Teacher (Year 5), Belmore Primary Academy
-Primary School Class Teacher, Sacred Heart Catholic Voluntary Academy
-Special Education Deputy Head Teacher, The Collett School

Employability
Students learn to diagnose a range of literacy difficulties and then to be able to consider appropriate interventions for those struggling with their reading and/or writing. Those graduating from the programme usually enhance their career prospects and can demonstrate a deeper understanding of literacy learning and supporting struggling readers and writers. Graduates usually move into coordinator/literacy management roles.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Learning and Leadership at UCL Institute of Education (IOE) has developed an internationally-recognised reputation for early childhood and pre-school and primary education studies.

The department has a vibrant teaching programme and offers a range of enriching events including research seminars and conferences in the field of early childhood and primary education.

In all its work, the department is strongly committed to working in partnership with government agencies, education authorities, schools, early years and community groups and other departments within the IOE.

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One of the great attractions of Jewish Studies at King's is its diversity as it covers Biblical Studies, Rabbinics, Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim relations and Modern Jewish Thought. Read more
One of the great attractions of Jewish Studies at King's is its diversity as it covers Biblical Studies, Rabbinics, Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim relations and Modern Jewish Thought. It offers students the opportunity to combine the academic study of Jewish sources from antiquity to the modern period with intense explorations of their significance for contemporary issues and debates in multi-religious societies. You will find a vibrant, supportive, and intellectually inspiring framework in this exciting MA.

Key benefits

- In unique collaborations with Leo Baeck College and with the London School of Jewish Studies, we offer a wide range of subjects.

- Cooperation with other subject areas (Biblical Studies, Abrahamic Religions, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies), and with other departments at King's (History), enables us to introduce students to a variety of methods and to encourage interdisciplinary approaches.

- Diverse choices: Whether students want to explore the topical and methodological richness of Jewish Studies or would like to expand their expertise in one of our core areas, such as Biblical Studies, Rabbinics, Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim relations or Modern Jewish Thought, they will find a vibrant, supportive, and intellectually inspiring framework in the three institutions participating in this MA programme.

- Research seminars and international workshops offer students the chance to discuss innovative research with leading scholars in the field. Please see our latest list of research seminars.

- Our collaboration with other departments in the Department of Theology & Religious Studies (Biblical Studies, Sacred Traditions & The Arts, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies), with other departments at King's (History, Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies) and with other colleges in London allow students to familiarise themselves with a wide range of themes, methods and interdisciplinary approaches

- Modern Hebrew is offered through the Modern Language Centre at King's.

- Superb location, with access to important social, cultural, material and textual resources, such as the Judaica collections of King's College London's own Maughan Library, the British Library, the British Museum, the London Museum of Jewish Life, and a range of synagogues.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/jewish-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

"Identities and Communities in Flux: Texts & Methods in Jewish Studies" is our core module: it invites students to explore how Jewish communities and individuals in ancient, medieval and modern times negotiated (and continue to negotiate) identities and boundaries in multi-religious societies. It also introduces students to a range of research fields – biblical and rabbinical literature; intellectual, social, and cultural history; philosophy – and to key methodological approaches and questions in Jewish Studies.

From Abraham to Zionism, from Maimonides to Medical Ethics, from Jewish-Christian interaction to contemporary Halakhah, you will be exposed to perspectives, cutting edge and traditional, on Jews, Jewishness, and Jewish thought and practice.
The programme has become a forum for students and scholars of a wide range of Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds who work together, initiate new projects and cooperate with other departments and institutions at King's, in London and beyond.

All students take modules which foster their Hebrew language skills (Biblical or Modern), whether they just start to learn the language or are already at an advanced level.

- Course purpose -
To provide teaching and research training in Jewish Studies, offered by King’s College London.

- Course format and assessment -
Taught core and optional modules assessed by coursework essays plus a dissertation, and, for language modules, examinations.

Career Prospectss:

Students pursue a variety of careers, including teaching, journalism and further research.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Creative Writing MA at Oxford Brookes will help your writing grow through work with established writers, industry professionals, teaching specialists and your peers, whilst you experience this most literary of cities. Read more
The Creative Writing MA at Oxford Brookes will help your writing grow through work with established writers, industry professionals, teaching specialists and your peers, whilst you experience this most literary of cities.

From the opening evening of your course – where previous speakers have included international bestseller Philip Pullman, Booker winner, Howard Jacobson and Pulitzer/Orange winner, Marilynne Robinson – through to the showcase for agents and publishers following your graduation, our aim is to make your time at Brookes a decisive stage in your development.

Your postgraduate study will centre on your own creative writing, combined with critical analysis, reflective commentary and scholarly research. The course can be studied full-time or part-time.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/creative-writing/

Why choose this course?

- The degree is led by our core staff of practicing and published creative writers/ academics and is also supported by a unique group of distinguished Creative Writing Fellows and guest speakers, including: Philip Pullman (author of internationally best selling trilogy, His Dark Materials) Sarah Dunant (bestselling author of Sacred Hearts) Kate Clanchy (winner of BBC National Short Story 2009 and first Oxford City Poet) James Meek (author of the Booker Prize long-listed, The People's Act of Love) Patience Agbabi (star performance poet and author of Bloodshot Monochrome and Telling Tales) Nick Cohen (star Observer journalist and bestselling author) John L Williams (literary talent spotter, novelist and freelance commissioning editor).

- Our Creative Writing Fellows do not merely visit occasionally. Between them, they lead a major workshop session every other week of each semester (on average) as well as other shorter sessions, resulting in a varied learning experience.

- Oxford has a vibrant literary community with many resident literary figures and publishing companies such as Oxford University Press, Blackwell Publishing, Taylor & Francis and Harcourt Education, based in the city.

- Cultural and literary events such as the Oxford Literary Festival take place throughout the year.

- Oxford has world-class libraries, such as the Bodleian, archives, collections and museums, including the Ashmolean, Pitt Rivers Museum and Modern Art Oxford.

Teaching and learning

A variety of teaching and learning methods are used across the course and all modules use more than one method. Methods include seminars, oral presentations and readings, workshops, visiting speakers, individual supervision, autonomous research and writing.

All modules are assessed by coursework (portfolios or pieces of work with a critical commentary) of about 6,000 words.

The Major Project of writing in any genre (with critical commentary) would normally be within the range of 15,000 to 20,000 words.

Specialist facilities

Our virtual learning portals provide core materials relating to learning and assessment online. These include lecture schedules, module guides, supporting materials, guidelines and criteria for coursework along with notes on essay writing and report presentation.

How this course helps you develop

During the course we help students foster links with publishers through a number of workshops run by publishing houses.

The Annual Creative Writing Showcase is a key event in the calendar where students are selected to present their work to publishers and agents. In 2012, Helen Eve was offered a two-book deal by Macmillan as a result of the event. See our other publishing successes

Careers

Many of our alumni have gone on to win literary prizes and have their own writing published.

A significant number of successful MA students continue into further research and careers in academia, either at Oxford Brookes or at other institutions.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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This is a specialist programme geared towards preparing students for higher research in ancient philosophy - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more
This is a specialist programme geared towards preparing students for higher research in ancient philosophy - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Durham has a longstanding tradition of international excellence in the field of ancient philosophy, with several recent doctoral students having gone on to take up academic positions in the UK and abroad. The programme lasts for one year (two years part-time), and centres around a core module on a topic in ancient philosophy.

Other key elements of the course include a core research training module, a 15,000 word dissertation, and one elective module, which is offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

For information on the structure of the course, please view our website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9536&title=Ancient+Philosophy&code=Q8K707&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent

Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
-Forms After Plato or Ancient Philosophers on Origins or Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will.

Optional Modules
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches.
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesara and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also be substitute modules offered in other departments such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MA in Ancient Philosophy is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern), and one dealing directly with research on ancient philosophy. All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

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This is a programme geared towards preparing students for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more
This is a programme geared towards preparing students for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars.

The relationship between the classical world and neighbouring civilisations is among the most important and most rapidly expanding areas of classical scholarship, and we have particular strength in this field: we offer tuition in Akkadian, and can draw on the resources of the Oriental Museum in Durham and the expertise pooled in the recently inaugurated Centre for the Study of the Ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. The programme lasts for one year (two years part-time), and centres around a core module on cultural contact in the Ancient World.

Other key elements of the course include a core research training module, a 15,000 word dissertation, and one elective module, which is offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

Information on the structure of the course.
Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
-Religious Life in the Roman Near East or Akkadian

Optional Modules:
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also substitute modules offered in other departments, such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Learning and Teaching

The MA in Greece, Rome and the Near East is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern), and one dealing directly with research on interaction between the ancient Mediterranean and the ancient Near East. All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

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Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Read more
Medieval Studies is a well-known and internationally recognised area of expertise at Bangor. Over the decades particular strengths in Arthurian literature, Welsh History and Archaeology and Cymraeg, as well as Music have attracted postgraduates to Bangor to work with experts in each of these areas. Additional strengths include gender and devotional literature (in the School of English), Anglo-Norman studies, and early sacred music, among others. Interdisciplinary approaches form the core of medieval studies, and the current expertise at Bangor guarantees this approach both through the core module and through the option modules. In addition to this, Bangor can boast a unique combination of modules students can choose from, such as do not normally feature together: Welsh, Arthurian studies and Music form the distinctive core of the provision, alongside our widely recognised expertise in teaching palaeography and codicology.

Course Structure
In Part 1 of the course, students develop skills and acquire subject knowledge by way of preparation for Part Two, a 20,000 word dissertation. The Diploma, which consists of Part One of the MA programme, aims to develop learner autonomy to the point where the student is capable of beginning a scholarly dissertation at MA level.

Part 1: At the beginning of this course, all students must register for the following modules:

Understanding the Middle Ages (semesters 1 and 2)
Manuscripts and Printed Books (1 semester)
In addition to these modules, students may choose from a wide range of modules in this part of the course which may include:

Cymraeg:

CXC4004: Britain’s Celtic Heritage (40 credits)
CXC4005: Medieval Welsh literature (40 credits)

English:

QXE4030: Medieval Arthur (30 credits): This module explores the Arthurian myth from the earliest archaeological evidence to the end of the fifteenth century, with a view to exploring its evolution in a variety of the socio-political contexts, as well as material culture (manuscript and printed editions, artefacts). Focusing on a number of texts in different genres and languages (read in English translation when necessary), the module will offer postgraduates an insight into the origins and development of Arthurian themes in medieval literature (Convener: Dr Raluca Radulescu.)

QXE4029: Women’s Devotional Writing (30 credits)

QXE4016: Pre-Modern Travel (30 credits)

QXE4032: Advanced Latin for Postgraduates (20 credits)

History, Welsh History and Archaeology:

HPH4000: The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (40 credits)

HPH4002: The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches (40 credits)

HPH4013: The Duke, Duchy and Institutions of Normandy, 942-1135 (40 credits)

HPH4017: Women and Power in the High Middle Ages (40 credits)

HPH4018: Medieval Latin (20 credits)

Music:

General explanation: Modules in Early Music place a thematic focus on music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. They are intended to broaden the student’s knowledge of different types of music composed during these periods as well as the various contexts within which they were placed. This will include consideration of analytical, repertorial, palaeographic, biographical, institutional, social and cultural aspects. A number of case studies, complemented by directed reading and assignments, will explore the depth of historical and musicological study and understanding and enable a student to address specific, focused periods, topics and/or issues in which they have an interest.

Part 2: Preparation of a 20,000 word dissertation on a subject related to medieval studies agreed by your chosen supervisor. This preparation will involve a series of one-to-one supervisory meetings during the summer, once Part 1 has been completed successfully.

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This programme provides a thorough and cutting-edge exploration of classic and contemporary debates in theology and religious studies, incorporating the latest scholarship in the field. Read more
This programme provides a thorough and cutting-edge exploration of classic and contemporary debates in theology and religious studies, incorporating the latest scholarship in the field.

Why this programme

◾You will have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive overview of the field and to develop an area of expertise.
◾You will be taught by academics who are currently engaging in and shaping the international debates around the specialisations offered.
◾This programme is open to those of all faiths and none, and to those who are new to the study of religion.

Programme structure

The 180 credit programme is comprised of two compulsory 30 credit core courses, two 20 credit optional courses, a compulsory 20 credit research skills course, and a compulsory 60 credit dissertation of 12,000 - 15,000 words.

The 12 month programme structure for full-time students is as follows:

Semester 1:
◾Core 1: Reason, Religion and Culture
◾Option 1
◾Research skills course

Semester 2:
◾Core 2: Reading, Religion, and Culture
◾Option 2
◾Dissertation (submitted in September)

Theology and Religious Studies has a selection of optional courses available, including:
◾Modern Islamic Thought
◾Muhammad
◾Reading Theology: Hermeneutics and Interpretation Theory
◾Writing Theology: Creative Writing as Theological Reflection
◾Central Issues in Christian Theology
◾Theology in the Catholic Tradition
◾Foundations of Contemporary Biblical Studies
◾Bible, Culture and Criticism
◾Sacred Texts and Critical Theories
◾Political Theologies
◾Religion and Violence
◾Directed Study

Please contact the Programme Convener for further details about planned taught courses. In order to promote interdisciplinary study, students can elect to take one optional course from any other University of Glasgow Masters programme. The directed study option allows for one-to-one supervision on a topic of personal interest.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this programme, you will be in possession of a variety of subject specific and transferable skills and graduate attributes which will equip you for a wide range of careers and for further academic study.

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