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Masters Degrees (Russian Literature)

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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

Russian

The MRes in Russian is a flexible course which allows students to develop a chosen interest in the field of Russian cultural studies via specialist modules and a 20-25,000-word dissertation. The teaching staff have expertise in the areas of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian culture, are very prominent in their field: the recent RAE report spoke of 'world-leading and internationally excellent research activity'. A wide range of Masters topics can be undertaken. Recent examples include themes such as 'Women in Russian Literature' and 'Modernity and the City in Russian Literature' as well as author based topics (eg. Dostoevsky and Zamyatin).

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Russian can offer you a friendly, stimulating and supportive community of postgraduate students. Our research has been internationally acknowledged for its quality. Read more

Russian can offer you a friendly, stimulating and supportive community of postgraduate students.

Our research has been internationally acknowledged for its quality. Research staff in Russian are actively involved in many UK and international research partnerships and projects, including the ARHC-sponsored project on the Russian 20th-century poetry canon in the post-Soviet period.

Supervision is offered in the broad field of Russian Studies including research areas related to the study of social, political and cultural perspectives on Russian language; the study of Russian literature; media; culture; film studies; theatre studies and comparative literature.

Your research can be linked with various taught MSc programmes (Comparative Literature, Theatre and Performance Studies, and Film Studies), allowing you to extend your research range. Research can also benefit from links with the Translation Studies research group.

Training and support

The flagship of our research is the unique Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, an internationally recognised hub with a focus on the Russian language in its social and cultural contexts. The Centre hosts an array of research activity including conferences, workshops, lectures and postgraduate seminars.

Facilities

The University has an excellent library and computing facilities in both English and Russian. Postgraduate students can also use the National Library of Scotland.

You will also have access to Russian TV channels, a rich collection of Russian books, journals and electronic resources, and of course the Princess Dashkova Russian Centre.



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The MLitt in Russian Studies is a one-year taught programme run by the Department of Russian in the School of Modern Languages. The programme combines guided and independent study of some of the most notable Russian writers and ideas from the nineteenth century to the present day. Read more

The MLitt in Russian Studies is a one-year taught programme run by the Department of Russian in the School of Modern Languages. The programme combines guided and independent study of some of the most notable Russian writers and ideas from the nineteenth century to the present day.

Highlights

  • Students receive training in theoretical and methodological issues relevant to their area of studies.
  • Small group tuition in subjects that correspond to particular teaching and research strengths at St Andrews.
  • Students have the opportunity to study in depth a topic of their choice and to build on this in the form of a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching format

The taught portion of the course consists of five compulsory modules involving literary theory, research skills, and Russian literature and culture. Classes are delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and fortnightly tutorials, with class sizes ranging from individual one-to-one teaching up to 20 students. Modules are assessed through coursework; there are no final exams for this programme.

You will spend the summer months focusing on researching and writing a final dissertation of no more than 15,000 words.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies. Read more

This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies.

About this degree

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of aspects of Russian and/or east European literature and culture, including art, film, philosophy, and linguistics. They gain key research skills, enabling them to solve problems of conflicting sources or interpretations, locate primary and secondary materials, and use research aids and resources effectively.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core module

  • Literary and Cultural Theory

Optional modules

Students take up to 90 credits of optional modules. Subject to approval, elective modules up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from other SSEES MA Programmes or from other UCL MA Programmes.

  • All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
  • Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
  • Freedom Death and Love: Polish Fiction 1918-2005 (language prerequisite)
  • How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
  • Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
  • The 19th-Century Russian Novel
  • The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
  • Language Modules
  • Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
  • Comparative Literary Studies
  • Translation Studies

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations, film viewings and private study. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

AHRC Scholarships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academe. Some of our graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Account Executive, Testify
  • Headhunter, Proco Global
  • DPhil in Modern Languages, University of Oxford
  • Public Relations (PR) Assistant, Indie Ray
  • Language Producer, Unspecified Language Production Company

Employability

Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.



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The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film. Read more

The Russian Studies MA draws on the unique area studies expertise at the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of modules unparalleled in depth and breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval history to its contemporary politics, from 19th-century literature to 21st-century film.

About this degree

Russian culture is explored from a variety of perspectives. Students specialise in literature and culture, social sciences or history, or combine modules into an interdisciplinary programme. They are encouraged to develop their research skills, and many choose to learn Russian, or improve their command of Russian, through a language course.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one of a choice of three core modules (30 credits), a choice of a Russian language module (30 credits) and/or optional modules (to a total of 90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

This is a multidisciplinary programme. Nevertheless, students are required to gain a thorough methodological and theoretical grounding in disciplinary study and hence must choose between one of the following three modules:

  • Literary and Cultural Theory
  • Historical Methods and Approaches
  • Political Analysis AND Political Sociology

Optional modules

90 credits from a range of options, which may include:

  • Advanced Qualitative Methods
  • Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
  • The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
  • The Nineteenth-Century Russian Novel
  • Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
  • Causes, Consequences and Control: Corruption and Governance
  • Linguistic Methods
  • How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
  • Informal Practices in Post-Communist Societies
  • Russian Foreign Policy
  • Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
  • Russian Language Module
  • Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, film viewings, tutorials and specialist language courses. Assessment is carried out through unseen examinations, long essays, coursework and the research dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Funding

AHRC Scholarships may be available.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academia.

Some graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Diplomat/Third Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of The Kingdom of Thailand
  • Editorial Intern, openDemocracy
  • Marketing Planner, Waterstones
  • Support Officer, Refugee Council
  • Principal Examiner for GCE and GCSE, Pearson-Edexcel

Employability

Russia is one of the most exciting and important countries in the world, and SSEES is the ideal place in which to study it. Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

SSEES is a world-leading specialist institution, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located in Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.



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The MA in Comparative Literature offers students the opportunity to study, in comparative perspective, in the original language or in translation, as appropriate, a range of national and regional literatures from around the world written in European languages taught in the School. Read more
The MA in Comparative Literature offers students the opportunity to study, in comparative perspective, in the original language or in translation, as appropriate, a range of national and regional literatures from around the world written in European languages taught in the School. In offering literatures in French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian and Serbian/Croatian from Europe, the Americas and Africa, this programme provides one of the most comprehensive comparative literature coverages in the UK and allows students to put together an individual programme of comparative literature study, drawing on the expertise available in the School, to reflect their own current research interests and future research trajectories. The course is designed both as an independent scheme of study and as preparation for students who may wish to proceed to research for PhD. The taught MA programme offers an introduction to advanced study in key areas of comparative literature, combining close study of texts with wider theoretical and cultural contexts, advancing knowledge and research skills.

This programme is built around two core modules, one offering grounding in research methodologies, the other in the theory and practice of Comparative Literature. In semester one and semester two, students will also take uniquely designed directed reading modules, in collaboration with an academic supervisor, to reflect their particular combination of language competences and their interests. All projects are comparative in themselves. English-language literature can be part of individual projects. Classes will centre on a selection of literary or theoretical texts for close study with the aim of placing these in much wider comparative contexts. Bibliographies of secondary literature and pointers to other sources of information will be provided to enable candidates to follow up various topics and different texts for essay or dissertation projects. The essays and dissertation should show knowledge of the field of study and the ability to think independently and critically.

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The MA in Comparative Literature offers students the opportunity to study, in comparative perspective, in the original language or in translation, as appropriate, a range of national and regional literatures from around the world written in European languages taught in the school. Read more
The MA in Comparative Literature offers students the opportunity to study, in comparative perspective, in the original language or in translation, as appropriate, a range of national and regional literatures from around the world written in European languages taught in the school. In offering literatures in French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian and Serbian/Croatian from Europe, the Americas and Africa, this programme provides one of the most comprehensive comparative literature coverages in the UK and allows students to put together an individual programme of comparative literature study, drawing on the expertise available in the School, to reflect their own current research interests and future research trajectories. The course is designed both as an independent scheme of study and as preparation for students who may wish to proceed to research for PhD. The taught MA programme offers an introduction to advanced study in key areas of comparative literature, combining close study of texts with wider theoretical and cultural contexts, advancing knowledge and research skills.

This programme is built around two core modules, one offering grounding in research methodologies, the other in the theory and practice of comparative literature. In semester one and semester two, students will also take uniquely designed directed reading modules, in collaboration with an academic supervisor, to reflect their particular combination of language competences and their interests. All projects are comparative in themselves. English-language literature can be part of individual projects. Classes will centre on a selection of literary or theoretical texts for close study with the aim of placing these in much wider comparative contexts. Bibliographies of secondary literature and pointers to other sources of information will be provided to enable candidates to follow up various topics and different texts for essay or dissertation projects. The essays and dissertation should show knowledge of the field of study and the ability to think independently and critically.

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As well as inviting the comparative study of literary works of different linguistic and cultural origins, this absorbing programme encourages you to explore the interrelation between literature and the other arts, such as music, visual arts and film. Read more

As well as inviting the comparative study of literary works of different linguistic and cultural origins, this absorbing programme encourages you to explore the interrelation between literature and the other arts, such as music, visual arts and film.

You’ll embrace a range of languages and cultures within Europe, North America, South America and Asia, and draw on the teaching and research expertise of our internationally renowned departments, including several of the highest-rated literature departments in the UK.

The programme introduces you to subjects related to your studies, such as comparative literature, world literature and post-colonialism, translation studies, intermediality, psychoanalytical criticism, formalism, feminist literary theory, structuralism and post-structuralism, and deconstruction.

The programme also allows you to follow your own research interests through other tutorial work and your independently researched dissertation.

Programme structure

The programme combines seminar and tutorial work. You will take two compulsory and two option courses, plus compulsory research skills and methods courses. The two semesters of taught courses are followed by your independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

  • Theories and Methods of Literary Study (I and II)
  • Research Methods and Problems
  • Research Skills and Methods

Option courses may include:

  • Film and Gender
  • Poet-Critics: the Style of Modern Poetry
  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
  • Fairy Tales
  • The Great Russian Novel
  • Poetry, Music and Translation
  • Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature

Learning outcomes

On completion of the programme you will have gained:

  • a thorough understanding of Comparative Literature, as a subject and as a practice
  • knowledge of a number of literary theories and different approaches to literary study, and the ability to use them for literary analysis
  • the ability to focus on detail on literary themes, genres and historical periods from a comparative perspective
  • transferable skills such as critical thinking, analytical and interpretative ability, communication and writing skills

Career opportunities

This interdisciplinary programme will help take your research interests further into a broad range of fields. You may decide to concentrate on an academic career, or apply your learning to a diversity of roles, from teaching to publishing or cultural heritage. You will also graduate with skills that can be applied to any career.



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The MLitt in Comparative Literature is a one-year taught programme run by the School of Modern Languages. The programme explores the transnational understanding of literature and culture. Read more

The MLitt in Comparative Literature is a one-year taught programme run by the School of Modern Languages. The programme explores the transnational understanding of literature and culture. It aims to provide training in traditional and new research techniques.

Highlights

  • Students receive training in traditional and new research techniques and have the opportunity to broaden their language portfolios.
  • Small class sizes of no more than 20 students provide a close-knit postgraduate community and friendly environment. 
  • A wide range of optional modules provides the opportunity to take modules from other disciplines or to learn a third language.

Teaching format

The taught portion of the course consists of four compulsory modules and a range of optional modules held over two semesters, plus a 15,000-word dissertation. Classes are delivered through a mixture of lectures (with around 20 students) and seminars (which vary from individual one-to-one teaching up to ten students). Modules are assessed through coursework; there are no final exams for this programme.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

Each module typically comprises:

  • two hours per week of lectures, seminars or practical classes
  • coursework assessment 100%

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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Literature is produced in a market, in an economic as well as in a figurative sense - a marketplace in which points of view and values are negotiated and reflected upon. Read more
Literature is produced in a market, in an economic as well as in a figurative sense - a marketplace in which points of view and values are negotiated and reflected upon.

The Master's profile European Literatures and Cultures examines this cultural process of production and reflection, and how literature functions in society.

As a continuation of your bachelor degree you specialise in English, French, Frisian, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish or Swedish literature and choose one of the three following pathways:
- Literature as Market
- The Uses of Literature
- Material Culture.

Why in Groningen?

- English, German, French, Frisian, Italian, Russian, Spanish or Swedish literature
- New, modern and unique programme with focus on Media, Markets and Communication
- Attractive specializations in: Literature as Market, the Uses of Literature, Material Culture

Job perspectives

The programme aims to provide you with academic skills and approaches that will prepare you to operate as a cultural expert in wherever texts are involved: in the private sphere, in the media, in institutions and networks. You learn to analyse these processes and functions, to solve problems and to communicate about them clearly and with flair.

Job examples

- Book editing and publishing
- Cultural functions
- Journalism
- Translation

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The master's programme in Russian and Eurasian Studies draws on Leiden University's status as an international centre of expertise in the study of Russia and Eurasia. Read more

The master's programme in Russian and Eurasian Studies draws on Leiden University's status as an international centre of expertise in the study of Russia and Eurasia.

Learn from leading researchers in the field

This one-year master’s programme explores Russia and the Eurasian world from the perspectives of language, literature and culture, or politics, history and economics. Leiden University's Faculty of Humanities has been studying Russia and the Slavic world since 1913. Scholars from around the world come to Leiden University to study and teach this fascinating field. During your studies, you will learn from our faculty members as well as visiting international scholars.

Flexibility to construct your own programme

A flexible degree format means that you can focus your studies on the region's language, literature and culture, or on its politics, history, international relations and economics. You can also combine elements from the two focus areas. At Leiden we offer courses taught nowhere else in the Netherlands.

International classrooms and internships

An international classroom makes this a particularly rich learning environment for students. A competitive scholarship and internship programme also gives you the opportunity to study or do an internship in Russia, Georgia, or other countries.



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The master's programme trains students to be cultural mediators (translators, administrators, editors, etc.) by providing knowledge and skills in a modern or classical language and culture. Read more
The master's programme trains students to be cultural mediators (translators, administrators, editors, etc.) by providing knowledge and skills in a modern or classical language and culture. Students choose one of the following specialities: 1) Classical philology 2) English language and literature 3) French language and literature 4) German language and literature 5) Russian and Slavic philology 6) Scandinavian languages and literature 7) Spanish language and literature

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Who is it for?. The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture postgraduate course is for you, if you. are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels. Read more

Who is it for?

The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture postgraduate course is for you, if you:

  • are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
  • love languages, other cultures and their differences
  • are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
  • know about translation and want to specialise
  • have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
  • have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
  • are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
  • want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The Masters course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:

  • provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques
  • uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over
  • specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games
  • introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres
  • focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions
  • provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture degree:

  • aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation
  • develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics
  • works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity
  • has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

John Dryden Translation Competition

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work.

The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).



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The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Read more

Overview

The MRes in Humanities offers students the opportunity to produce a substantial piece of independent research and writing, and to undertake wide-ranging, systematic training in research skills and project management. Students will write a dissertation in a specific field or prepare a portfolio of compositions, recital or a media project with a named supervisor.

Supervision is available in all disciplines where the School has expertise:
- American Studies
- English
- History
- Media, Communications and Culture
- Music and Music Technology
- Philosophy
- Russian

You will be able to develop your research topic within the context of current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines and within the humanities generally. The course will develop practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. The programme is tailored to your research and career plans, and we recommend that you contact us before making a formal application.

The MRes degree is intended for applicants who already have a clear dissertation project (or equivalent, e.g. composition portfolio, performance or software development plan). In liaison with the supervisor and discipline lead, a plan of work in semester 1 and 2 is agreed and serves as preparation for the project as well as assessed work in its own right. When you submit your online application, please use your personal statement to describe the dissertation (or equivalent) project you intend to carry out (500-700 words). Include specific research questions and aims. What does the project intend to elucidate? Is any hypothesis proposed? How will the research be carried out (i.e. methodology)?

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanitiesmres/

American Studies

American Studies is a multidisciplinary department devoted to the analysis of the United States from the foundations of the republic to the present day. As a long-established centre of excellence in research and teaching, we aim to offer a supportive and lively environment for pursuing top-quality postgraduate courses.

American Studies at Keele enjoys an outstanding national and international reputation. At every level of the postgraduate programme our aim is to give both clear expectations and supportive guidance to enable you to achieve your goal.

Our tutors are all active in research, and our teaching reflects our specialist strengths. There is considerable cross-fertilization of ideas within the department, and consequently an interest in multidisciplinary work. In US History and Politics, tutors (Chris Bailey, Jon Herbert, Jon Parker, Laura Sandy and Axel Schafer) specialize in the history of the Civil War era and the American South, Cold War society, religion and politics, intellectual history, the politics of the environment, the US Congress, the American presidency, the politics of education, state and local government, and electoral politics.

In American Literature and Culture, tutors, (Ian Bell, Oliver Harris, James Peacock and Tim Lustig) have research interests in nineteenth- and twentieth-century, in contemporary fiction, relations between literature and science, African American literature, film noir, cultural theory and cultural memory, Anglo-American modernism, trauma theory, and the Beat generation.

Course Aims

To enable students to research and write an extended dissertation, whilst developing practical, critical and analytical research skills that can be deployed in a variety of professional and intellectual contexts. Students will develop an understanding of the place of a specific research topic within current debates and methodologies in relevant disciplines, and within the humanities generally. The course will promote the ‘project management skills’ of defining and planning a project, meeting deadlines, and recording and reflecting on outcomes.

Course Content

Students follow a tailor-made programme, comprising three components totalling at least 180 credits.
- A 20,000 word dissertation (or equivalent composition or artistic production) is at the heart of the programme (90 credits).

- Research Training covering research skills and reflective practice in the humanities (2 x 15 = 30 credits).

- Research methods in the field relevant to the thesis topic (30 credits)

- Individual Research Orientation: a module tailored to the needs of the student (30 credits).

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, culminating in the 20,000 word dissertation (or the equivalent composition or artistic production). Research Training is assessed by a portfolio consisting of an annotated bibliography, a project outline and a reflective diary. Each of the other modules will be examined through a 4,000-5,000 word essay or approved equivalent.

The pass mark is 50%. A merit will be awarded where students obtain 60% or over for the dissertation (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 60% on their other coursework. A distinction will be awarded where students obtain 70% or over for the dissertation, (or equivalent project or performance) and an average of 70% in their other coursework.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Discretionary Award:
A sum of £6,250 has been made available to students enrolling on taught postgraduate course in History by a former member of Keele staff. The money will be distributed at the discretion of the relevant programme director(s) and is available to students entering the programme in 2015 and/or 2016. No application is required.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Read more
The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Its starting point is the student’s individual approach and choice of emphases; together with interdisciplinary projects it enables multidisciplinary exchanges with students and teaching staff from other disciplines.

The course aims to foster an independent artistic outlook within a framework of collective and interdisciplinary working interrelationships. The course of study sharpens students’ individual artistic practices through direct engagement with other artistic strategies. A knowledge of current discourse in other art forms causes their view of their own work to change.

Degree Structure

The Master’s degree comprises 120 ECTS credit points and is usually completed in four semesters. The degree is structured into three degree modules.

The degree places independent study and teaching, disciplinary foundations and transdisciplinary expansion in a balanced relationship. At the heart of the Master’s degree is artistic production, which includes an MA project in one of the specialisations. The didactic combination of one-to-one lessons with a high proportion of independent study, the targeted consolidation of technical and theoretical knowledge of the subject and context in elective courses, and the exchange between peers and professionals in various networks and in the joint Master’s fora support artistic production. Since in today’s artworld there is almost no generally binding canon of knowledge and skills, perfecting one’s art rests on individual decisions based on a wide-ranging knowledge of the dynamic state of the art.

Module Groups

Artistic Production/Master's Thesis (70 ECTS)
At the core of the programme, is the students' independent work on their own projects. This individual work is supervised by a personal mentor in one-to-one tuition. Students develop a deep understanding of their own authorship. They learn to present their work and to confront their own creativity with the strategies and approaches of other artists. In this endeavour, they are supported by numerous artistic personalities from the different departments of the BUA, as well as from the Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz in Basel and from further partner institutions in an international network.

Transdisciplinarity: Individuality in Context (30 ECTS)
The transdisciplinary aspect of the studies is largely based on the study of other genres' strategies of artistic authorship and by the search for common parameters for content and structure.
In lectures and seminars on contemporary art theory and media studies, common terminology is developed to facilitate communication about artistic strategies and production procedures beyond the limits of each discipline's specific vocabulary. The exchange among the different specialisations of the CAP occurs within the framework of tuition as well as in the interdisciplinary projects, but primarily in the common theory blocks, in the encounters with mentors from other disciplines and in the thematic project weeks that take place once per semester. Here, there are talks and practical workshops, transdisciplinary meetings, discussions, project and work presentations as well as courses on research strategies and scientific work. These block events not only heighten the understanding of one's own and unfamiliar working processes, they also prepare students for their professional future, when large projects will be realised in specialised artistic collectives and networks, which must be able to communicate across their fields' boundaries.

There is also tuition beyond the subject's artistic boundaries - on professional skills in economic terms. Students gain a basic understanding of how to set up a company and how to conduct self-promotion. This includes tuition about management, administration, law and copyright, marketing, project management etc.

Subject-related Theory and Practice (20 ECTS)
The third module group addresses the theory and practice of the respective specialisations. This includes courses on technical specialisation and perfection (for instance: composition, musical strategies, specific software knowledge, lighting, curating, exhibiting) and on the subject-related theory (for instance: lectures and guest seminars on contemporary art/music; graduate societies) as well as excursions and encounters with artists, institutions, clients, teachers etc. The various courses are open to all students of the MA CAP and the partner institutions, if they meet the individual course's requirements.

The degree programme culminates in the Master thesis. This consists of the public presentation of an independent artistic creation and the written reflection on the student's own practice. The written part can be conducted as a research project. Content and form of the artistic presentation, reflectiveness and relevance are evaluated by external experts.

Specialisations

Fine Arts
In the Fine Arts specialisation current developments in art and the historical foundations of art are the reference for students’ work. Static and moving pictures in analogue or digital form, sculpture and installation techniques are options as much as conceptual and performative approaches or the treatment of social processes and documentary strategies. The course is notable for its strong engagement with the professional demands of sound, words and performative production. The Fine Arts specialisation collaborates closely with the Master of Fine Arts at the Academy of Art and Design Basel (HGK Basel). Students have a broad range of options from which to assemble the content of their studies according to their own needs. These are extended by the BUA’s membership in the Swiss Master of Fine Arts Network. The discipline-related foundations for the Fine Arts specialisation are generally laid by a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts.

Music and Media Art
In this programme the main focus is on sound art, experimental and electronic music. Students develop compositions, sound installations or other sound-based art forms. In seminars and lectures exemplary works of sound art from the past and present are discussed and analyzed. We teach compositional strategies and approach the subject matter from a contemporary and historical-theoretical point of view. Reference to one's own work is a key focus. The aim is not to solely work on the development of one's own artistic practices, but also to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of contemporary compositions and art forms. In addition to the MA CAP program students can attend other courses, which teach practical skills in programming with Max MSP,hardware hacking, audio technology or interface handling. The integration of sound and musical aspects into areas like performance art, literature and fine arts has increasingly gained importance over the last decades. Hence, this study program intensively deals with the musical-sound aspects of different art forms. In the MA CAP the interaction between the visual, performative, literary and sound aspects, brings students from different artistic areas together, encourages exchange and enables collaborative working.

Literary Writing/Translation
Literature reacts to other arts, just as much as it influences them. Students hoping to practice their literary art in the field of tension of contemporary art production and its advanced reflection, find in the CAP a wide range of teachers and students with diverse backgrounds. Alongside this vibrant exchange and proximity, they work on their own texts of all genres, under the supervision of mentors. This constitutes the core of the students` individual study profiles. Something unique about the CAP is, that the work of the literary translators (with the source languages German, French, Spanish, Italian, English and Russian and the target languages German or French) is regarded as artistic production. The offers for translators are expanded thanks to a cooperation with the "Centre de la Traduction Littéraire" at the University of Lausanne.

Performance
In the sense of physical presence, real or conceptual action, performance occurs in various artistic fields. It addresses certain issues relating to body, space and time. Considering the transdisciplinary history of performance, we understand it as a varied and open field of general performativity.
Performance is regarded as part of all the different artistic disciplines united under the umbrella of the CAP.
As an active form and physical action, it resides within music, fine arts and also literary writing and occurs in close connection with these separate forms. In addition, the focus on performativity opens up new forms of representation, viewing and listening, participating, which the studies are supposed to explore in the practical work as well as in the theoretical reflection.

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