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Masters Degrees (Rural Land)

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Our highly regarded postgraduate course provides students with a fast track to a fascinating, challenging career in rural land management, an area where employers acknowledge an enduring demand for qualified graduate trainees. Read more
Our highly regarded postgraduate course provides students with a fast track to a fascinating, challenging career in rural land management, an area where employers acknowledge an enduring demand for qualified graduate trainees.

COURSE OVERVIEW

We aim to equip you with a detailed knowledge of business management, law, finance, tax and valuation, as well as the strategic decision-making ability you will need to build a successful career as a rural land or estate manager. Our course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

We will help you to develop an analytical, strategic approach to managing and advising on rural land and estates. We underpin this by developing your understanding of the legal, social, ecological and economic aspects that affect and govern the rural environment and also offer a selection of optional modules to enable you to personalise your degree.

Management case studies on local farms and rural estates allow you to apply knowledge and skills to real life problems. The programme culminates with either a project or dissertation, which is designed to consolidate your learning.

HOW WE TEACH YOU

Our programmes are designed and delivered by internationally-renowned experts, with a wealth of academic and professional experience. All of our programmes are regularly updated to maintain their relevance in a rapidly changing industry.

Our teaching received an excellent score in the most recent independent Teaching Quality Assessment (TQA), highlighting our commitment to maintaining a world-class learning environment. You will enjoy access to our cutting-edge research, ensuring that you remain at the forefront of the field.

We believe that our students should have access to good quality resources and, in addition to the facilities offered by the University, we fund a professionally staffed Resource Centre.

We aim to create a stimulating academic environment; you will be encouraged to develop individual interests and general skills as a basis for a career in the property industry, a related field or for further study.

EMPLOYABILITY

Students taking this degree programme usually find employment as trainee chartered surveyors with firms having a rural specialism or undertaking substantive rural work. Real Estate and Planning has long-standing links with a number of larger firms that regularly recruit from the University.

Our graduates tell us the content of the course is highly relevant to the profession, training them to be analytical thinkers and leaders. They have frequently progressed to become directors of landed estates or surveying firms. Some have secured posts in environmental organisations, government agencies, planning consultancies, or in academia. Some find this higher degree pathway an ideal entry qualification into wider management careers.

Most graduates complete the two years’ professional training required to become members of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and many also become members of the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers.

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The REALM (Rural Environment and Land Management) courses provide a first step on the route to qualification as a chartered surveyor. Read more
The REALM (Rural Environment and Land Management) courses provide a first step on the route to qualification as a chartered surveyor. All prospective chartered surveyors must complete the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC) offered by RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors), and the programmes provide the academic foundation for candidates wishing to pursue the rural APC.

The postgraduate diploma (PgD) and MSc programmes are both validated by RICS under the RICS-Harper Adams University Partnership agreement, recognising the high regard in which the courses are held.

The course

The REALM (Rural Estate and Land Management) courses provide a first step on the route to qualification as a chartered surveyor. All prospective chartered surveyors must complete the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC) offered by RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors), and the programmes provide the academic foundation for candidates wishing to pursue the rural APC.

The postgraduate diploma (PgD) and MSc programmes are both validated by RICS under the RICS-Harper Adams University Partnership agreement, recognising the high regard in which the courses are held. The PgD in particular, is one of a very small number of courses in the country to have this distinction with regard to the rural APC, which is why you are required to study 12 modules (180 credits) rather than eight (120 credits). The postgraduate certificate provides a route for students who may fall short of our exacting entry requirements to get up to speed before transferring to either the PgD or MSc programmes.

Modules cover the main areas required for professional practice, in particular providing the necessary legal foundations for practice, and covering the all-important areas of the UK planning system, land tenure, rural valuation, primary production in agriculture and forestry, countryside and environmental management. A wide choice of modules means that you can tailor the programme to your own requirements.

The PgD programme is particularly popular with part-time students, often graduates who are able to combine suitable employment with study and progression through the APC.

Employment prospects in rural practice are good, and successful graduates have gone on to a wide range of jobs in recent years on rural estates and with local and national firms of rural surveyors and agricultural valuers. Feedback from students shows that the intensive modular structure is well-received, along with the practical slant of many of the assignments. This is underpinned by the professional standing of many of the tutors, who are active with the profession at the highest levels nationally and act as Assessors for the APC.

How will it benefit me?

The MSc/PgD will enable you to analyse a range of stakeholder interests and their influence, generally and site specifically, in rural land management. You will become competent in a range of techniques for rural land management and appraisal, be able to appraise the value and worth of rural land, and review the role of property in organisations.

Students also become skilled at evaluating and exploiting the latest developments in technology, and developing performance indicators in rural estate management and strategy. You will learn to formulate land management strategies which meet objectives for sustainable management while taking into account legislature, regulations, ethics and morals, the environment, amenities and commercial needs.

You will also learn to evaluate how previously implemented land management strategies have achieved their objectives, and adapt them to new requirements within an evolving economic, social, legal and political framework, with due regard to developments in sustainable development and biodiversity. You will become competent in professional methodologies used by chartered surveyors to manage and appraise rural land and property.

MSc students carry out an independent research or development project to advance their understanding of a particular issue in rural land management, or to resolve a specific and novel technical problem facing rural land managers in practice.

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MPhil - full time. minimum 12 months, part time. minimum 24 months. PhD - full time. minimum 36 months, part time. minimum 72 months. Read more

Course Description

MPhil - full time: minimum 12 months, part time: minimum 24 months
PhD - full time: minimum 36 months, part time: minimum 72 months

MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of research topics supported by research active academic staff. Our broad range of research areas relate to land use, natural resources and environmental change; rural planning, community governance and resilience; rural change, culture and wellbeing; and rural economy, enterprise and innovation.
Areas of research include:
•impact and implications of ‘local-global’ processes and relationships for rural areas
•characteristics and performance of rural businesses and households
•rural governance
•demographic ageing and social change
•living with environmental change

Opportunities are available for postgraduate research in the following areas:

Land use, natural resources and environmental change
•multifunctional land use and the evolving role of small farms
•land use and food security
•the management and governance of natural resources
•agri-environment policy
•environmental valuation and choice modelling
•access to land for outdoor recreation and leisure
•protected areas management

Rural planning, community governance and resilience
•relationship between rural development policy and communities in a changing political landscape
•rural policies and the role of communities in policy development
•neo-endogenous or networked rural development
•rural housing and trends in counter-urbanisation
•community asset management
•rural partnerships and stakeholder relationships
•community resilience

Rural change, culture and wellbeing
•perceptions of rurality
•rural social change
•the role of rural women
•the needs of a changing rural community
•wellbeing and quality of life
•rural social capital
•social exclusion and rural poverty
•changing perceptions of farming

Rural economy, enterprise and innovation
•rural enterprise and its economic contribution
•innovation and entrepreneurialism
•networks and knowledge exchange
•the nature and needs of rural enterprise
•technological adoption and innovation in agriculture
•linkages between urban and rural economies
•business collaboration and networking
•expertise and knowledge exchange
•social and community enterprise
•the green economy

Find out more about the work of the Rural Studies and Resource Economics research group.

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This is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. Read more
This is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. It is a fast-track route to qualification as a Chartered Surveyor. The course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

The Royal Agricultural University is in partnership with the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), which fully accredits this one-year Masters degree.

This course is a highly-regarded course which equips graduates for a rewarding and challenging career in the management of land, property, and business in the countryside. It is a fast-track route to qualification as a Chartered Surveyor.

This course is for graduates looking to acquire the specialist knowledge and skills necessary to work as a rural property manager. It also prepares graduates for qualification as a Chartered Surveyor and Fellow of the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers.

Structure

The course will be studied full-time over 12 months.

You will study eight modules in the autumn and spring terms, with final examinations taking place in May. The dissertation is typically undertaken between May and September.

You will attend lectures and group tutorials.There is also a range of practical sessions, and visits to local farms, commercial properties, and rural estates where owners, occupiers and their professional advisors provide additional insights into the management of rural property. Assessed coursework features strongly throughout the course.

Before starting the MSc, students receive reading lists and study material so that they can develop a basic grounding in study areas with which they are not familiar.

Modules

• 4002 Agriculture
• 4007 Dissertation
• 4015 Farm Business and Enterprise Management
• 4016 Rural Planning and Buildings
• 4019 Rural Property Law
• 4029 Environmental and Woodland Management
• 4031 Rural Policy and Implementation
• 4033 Rural Valuation
• 4043 Rural Asset Management

Career prospects

Our Rural Estate Management graduates are directly involved with managing all types of property. The professional work of the Rural Property Manager may include:

• Valuation, and the sale and purchase of land and rural property
• Management and letting of land and property
• Farm business planning and diversification
• Development of land and buildings and rural planning
• Management of woodlands and the environment
• Compulsory purchase (roads, pipelines cables etc) and compensation claims
• Tax and financial strategy

Types of employer include:

• National, international, regional, and small firms of chartered surveyors
• Private estates
• Large landowners such as the National Trust, county councils and utility companies
• Planning and environmental consultancy
• Research and education
• Leisure management
• Rrural conservation
• Investment management.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.rau.ac.uk/STUDY/POSTGRADUATE/HOW-APPLY

Funding

For information on funding, please view the following page: https://www.rau.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding

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The two-year Master International Land and Water Management programme focuses on the scientific analysis of land and water management issues at various scales. Read more

MSc International Land and Water Management

The two-year Master International Land and Water Management programme focuses on the scientific analysis of land and water management issues at various scales. An integration of physical, technical, socio-economic and political dimensions in various approaches is sought in order to critically analyse, understand and tackle land and water management problems.

Programme summary

The MSc International Land and Water Management focuses on the scientific analysis of the physical, environmental, technical and socio-economic aspects of land and water management and their mutual interactions. Students develop comparative insights into the development of land and water management, take a scientific approach to various research paradigms and acquire a problemoriented, interdisciplinary attitude towards land and water management and rural development issues. Graduates will not only be able to study these issues, but also design and propose sustainable solutions to land and water management problems.

Specialisations

Sustainable Land Management
This specialisation deals with the processes, drivers and consequences of land degradation; as well as with interventions and conservation practices for sustainable land management. By providing in-depth knowledge and developing skills in physical and socio-economic aspects, this specialisation prepares students for both research and development jobs. Topics covered range from erosion processes and modelling to impact assessment and strategies, from field scale to watershed and beyond.

Irrigation and Water Management
Students in this specialisation obtain extensive knowledge on water usage in agriculture. Irrigation -from the farm level to the watershed level- is the main focus. Topics include irrigation of agricultural land, design of irrigation systems, water justice, distribution issues, equity and gender discussion, improving the social and technical performance of existing farm irrigation systems and practices, and irrigation in its wider water management context.

Adaptive Water Management
Increasing human induced pressures on water cycles together with growing demands on water resources ask for careful management of water systems. Students in this specialisation acquire the knowledge, skills and capacity to analyse future- oriented issues in water management and to propose and critically assess management strategies and innovations.

Your future career

Graduates find jobs in a wide range of fields including design and implementation, policy making, project management and research and education. Many find a PhD position at universities worldwide. They are employed by international organisations such as the Food and Agricultural Organisation of the UN (FAO), the International Water Management Institute (IWMI), or NGOs involved in international or national development. Some graduates also work for ministries, water boards and other governmental organisations in the field of international cooperation, such as the Dutch DGIS and the German GIZ, while others find jobs in private or public institutes in their home countries. For graduates interested in design and implementation, there are also job opportunities at international consultancies. In the Netherlands this includes firms such as Arcadis, Grontmij, Antea Group, Euroconsult Mott MacDonald and Royal Haskoning DHV.

Alumna Cecilia Borgia.
"After completing my degree, I worked in Mauretania for the Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible (CSIC-IAS) promoting both crop diversification and evaluating the performance of irrigation systems in the Senegal Valley. This has also been the subject of my PhD at the University of Cordoba in Spain. Recently, I returned to Wageningen and joined the consultancy firm MetaMeta where I look at water-food-energy linkages and water governance in Yemen. Water access and management, as well as the interactions between local water governance and new forms of organisation, have been central aspects of my work."

Related programmes:
MSc Earth and Environment
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
MSc Geo-information Science
MSc Landscape Architecture and Planning
MSc Forest and Nature Conservation.

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The programme gives you a knowledge of skills and land management, public policy, law, planning, economics and valuation to meet challenges of future land management. Read more
The programme gives you a knowledge of skills and land management, public policy, law, planning, economics and valuation to meet challenges of future land management

COURSES
Semester 1
Forestry and Game Management
Agricultural Principles and Practices
Planning, Land and Environmental Law

Semester 2
Valuation for Rural Surveyors
Rural Business Management
Rural Policy in Practice
Research Methods

Semester 3
Dissertation

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If you want to progress into a managerial role in rural development, this postgraduate course in Sustainable Rural Development is for you. Read more
If you want to progress into a managerial role in rural development, this postgraduate course in Sustainable Rural Development is for you.

You will study social, environmental, economic and professional development, and community engagement issues in the context of managing rural development.

The MSc Sustainable Rural Development can be studied online from anywhere in the world.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Develop key research and policy skills
• Study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip or full Masters degree
• Study online, full time or part time to suit your lifestyle

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Local economic development; Developing communities; People and nature

PgDip

Option modules, from which you must choose three, include: Biodiversity management; Developing potential through placement; Environmental and Social issues in mountain areas; Field studies; Policy analysis; Research methods and techniques (strongly recommended if you intend to continue to MSc); Sustainable tourism; Sustainable land use and renewable energy in rural Scotland; Sustainable development; An elective may also be taken from any UHI Masters Programme

Msc

To achieve the award of MSc Sustainable Rural Development you must complete a research dissertation.

Locations

This course is available online with support from Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR

Access routes

BSc (Hons) Environmental Sciences
BSc (Hons) Archaeology and Environmental Studies
BSc Sustainable Forest Management
BA (Hons) Health Studies (Rural Health)
BA (Hons) Business and Management
BA (Hons) Social Sciences

Study Options

You will study through supported online learning using the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
A fully online induction web resource is available to all new students and you are encouraged to refer to this during your first term in particular. An optional two-day induction is also available each September in Inverness, Scotland.

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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The MSc Development and Rural Innovation is the international social sciences programme for students with a technical, life Wageningen Universityscience or relevant management background with an interest in international development and beta/ gamma integration. Read more

MSc Development and Rural Innovation

The MSc Development and Rural Innovation is the international social sciences programme for students with a technical, life Wageningen Universityscience or relevant management background with an interest in international development and beta/ gamma integration. In Development and Rural Innovation, we develop professionals who are able to deal with knowledge processes in dynamic contexts.

Programme summary

This programme aims to develop professionals who understand the role of knowledge in societal change processes and are able to link human and technological dimensions of innovation in dynamic contexts across the globe. It is a social science programme tailored for students with a technical, life science or relevant management background with an interest in international development problems. Innovations in the field of agriculture, food and natural resource management have a dual nature. They consist of new technological practices as well as new socio-organisational arrangements between different societal actors. Dealing with the links between technological developments and societies in which these are introduced and used, requires a fundamental understanding of socio-technical innovation and change processes. In other words, you will be challenged to combine your previously acquired competencies with new social science competencies in order to make innovations work.

Offering a variety of disciplinary and problem-oriented courses, the programme is taught in an interactive style where learning from each other is emphasised. Working in small international groups contributes significantly to this mutual learning process. The programme is highly thesis-oriented. The subject matter and methodology courses serve primarily as preparation for an empirical research project. This entails writing a research proposal, conducting the research and completing a thesis, thereby offering you the opportunity to apply your newly acquired insights in a field situation. International students often apply this knowledge in their home country on a topic relevant to their professional interests and preferences. Others choose a relevant topic in their field of interest in various countries around the world, including the Netherlands.

Thesis tracks

Communication and Innovation
In this track, you study communication among stakeholders and disciplines in the context of societal problem solving and change. Special attention is given to the role of communication, knowledge, interpretation and innovation support strategies in bringing about organisational, policy or technological change in societal domains such as sustainable agriculture, health, environment, multifunctional land use and international development.

Technology and Development
The goal of this track is to understand how science and technology interact with international development problems, such as food security, adaptation to climate change and social justice. The approach involves analysis of how technology both mediates and is constituted through social relations and institutional arrangements between various actors including farmers, scientists and policymakers. Most social problems that we face today involves science and technology, either as a cause or as a cure.

Sociology of Development and Change
This track focuses on the understanding of rural development problems worldwide from sociological and anthropological perspectives. Particular attention is paid to how local people themselves solve problems. Field-based studies are the basis for critical reflection on theories of development and social change. Themes addressed include food security, livelihoods in the context of globalisation, poverty and environmental degradation, property rights, conflict, and policy

Your future career

The programme lays the foundations for a variety of career opportunities, usually oriented towards societal problem solving and innovation. You can become a researcher or a knowledge broker who ensures a good fit between client demands and research formulation. You might take on the role of process facilitator or communication specialist in a non-governmental organisation, the public sector or the private industry. A career as a policymaker or consultant in various (inter)national organisations is another option. Organisations where graduates work are for example: UNDP, Tropenbos International, Women for Water, UTZ Certified, George Washington University, UNICEF, Fairfood International.

Alumnus Ben Corrigan.
After studying physical geography, Ben joined the social science Master Development and Rural Innovation. In his job as Programme Manager for the German Red Cross in Haiti, he works on food security and providing basic services such as water and sanitation to remote communities. “One of my responsibilities is to ensure that technical staff integrate social dimensions into their work and build real partnerships with stakeholders in the field. As a Development and Rural Innovation graduate, I am well prepared for this kind of job and feel confident in it. This programme is a gateway to a great career if you like to work in the development sector or continue in academia.”

Related programmes:
MSc International Development Studies
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Environmental Sciences.

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If you want to make a real difference towards the sustainability of mountain regions, this postgraduate course in Sustainable Mountain Development is for you. Read more
If you want to make a real difference towards the sustainability of mountain regions, this postgraduate course in Sustainable Mountain Development is for you.

You will access the latest thinking on complex mountain issues by studying modules with a focus on advanced theory and practice relating to environmental, social, economic and professional development. By the end of your studies, you will be equipped with the practical skills and knowledge to help you understand and manage the real challenges faced by people living in mountainous areas today.

The course is part time; you will study all modules online with support from experts at the

Centre for Mountain Studies

, based at Perth College UHI, and around the UHI network. This allows you to fit your studies around your personal and professional commitments. If you are not able to complete the full MSc, you can exit with a PgCert by completing the 3 core modules or a PgDip by also completing 3 optional modules.

There are also two stand-alone CPD modules, water management and deer management which are available too.

The MSc Sustainable Mountain Development can be studied online from anywhere in the world.

Special Features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Develop key scientific and policy skills
• Learn from experts in the field of sustainable mountain development at the Centre for Mountain Studies, including Professor Martin Price, holder of the UNESCO Chair in Sustainable Mountain Development
• Study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip or full Masters degree
• Study online, part-time to suit your lifestyle

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Environmental and social issues in mountain areas; Sustainable development; Policy analysis

PgDip

Optional modules, from which you must choose three, include: Biodiversity management; Developing communities; Developing potential through placement; Field studies; Local economic development; People and nature; Research methods and techniques; Sustainable deer management; Sustainable rural land use and energy; Sustainable tourism; Water management; An elective from any UHI Masters Programme

Msc

To achieve the award of MSc Sustainable Mountain Development you must complete a 15,000 word research dissertation on a topic of your own choice.

Locations

This course is available online with support from Perth College UHI, Crieff Road, Perth, PH1 2NX

Study Options

You will study through supported online learning using the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
If possible, you are strongly encouraged to attend a two-day induction in Scotland at the start of your course. However, if this is not possible, online/phone induction can be arranged.

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. Read more

Food security: a global concern

There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. The Royal Society report Reaping the Benefits: science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture published in October 2009, provided the clearest evidence of the challenge of ensuring global food security during the next 50 years. Crop yields need to rise significantly, but in a manner that requires much lower dependency on chemical intervention and fertilisers.

Meeting the challenge of sustainable agriculture

This programme was developed in collaboration with the agricultural industry, government agencies including Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), and farmers and food manufacturers, to provide a multi-disciplinary training in sustainable agriculture and global food security. Research-led teaching in molecular plant pathology, plant sciences and microbiology is strongly supplemented by Rothamsted Research, North Wyke expertise in grassland management, soil science and sustainable farming systems. Leading social scientists also provide valuable input in rural land use and the rural economy. The combination of expertise in both arable and pastureland systems ensures a truly rounded learning experience.

The curriculum takes account of the key skills shortages in the UK to train highly skilled individuals who can enter government agencies, agriculture and food industries and fulfil very valuable roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security. The programme provides opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences including field trips.

Expert teaching

Teaching is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry. Scientific staff from Fera provide specialist lectures as part of the Crop Security module, members of the Plant Health Inspectorate cover field aspects of plant pathology, and a LEAF1 farmer addresses agricultural systems and the realities of food production using integrated farm management. In addition, teaching staff from the University and BBSRC Rothamsted-North Wyke will draw on material and experiences from their academic research and scientific links with industry.

Industrial and practical experience

All students will have opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences. Teaching visits will be made to the Plant Health Inspectorate in Cornwall to see quarantine management of Phytophthora, and to a local LEAF farm to review the challenges and approaches to food production in integrated farm management systems. You will gain specialised experience in practical science or policy making through a dissertation or project placement with external agencies. Defra and Fera, for example, are offering five dissertation and/or project placements annually.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of modules. The list of modules may include the following; Professional Skills; Research Project; Sustainable Land Use in Grassland Agriculture; Crop Security; Sustainable Livestock and Fisheries; Political Economy of Food and Agriculture and Research and Knowledge Transfer for Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see the website for an up to date list (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/foodsecurity/#Programme-structure)

Addressing a skills shortage to tackle global food security

The MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture curriculum has been designed in collaboration with the agricultural industry to tackle the skills shortage that exists in this vital interdisciplinary area. This programme will provide the highly skilled individuals required in government agencies, agriculture and food industries for critical roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security.

Global horizons

With food security and sustainable agriculture a global concern, opportunities for specialists in the areas of agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant improvement will be worldwide. By combining expertise across the natural, social and political sciences, this programme provides valuable interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in both arable and pastureland systems. Graduates will be prepared to take on the global challenges of food security and sustainable agriculture, being able to adapt to farming systems across the world and identify cross-disciplinary solutions to local agricultural problems.

Learning enhanced by industry

The programme is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry, with specialist lectures, teaching visits to observe the practical application of techniques, and industrial placement opportunities for project work or dissertations in practical science or policy making.

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As the renewable energy sector continues to grow there is a need for trained individuals to plan, implement and manage new renewable energy projects. Read more
As the renewable energy sector continues to grow there is a need for trained individuals to plan, implement and manage new renewable energy projects. This course will provide you with the theoretical and practical tools to place you at the centre of such ventures.

If you are already working in or are interested in a career in the renewable energy or low-carbon technology sectors, this dynamic course will provide you with the knowledge and skills required to critically analyse the theories, principles and concepts of low-carbon energy production and sustainability.

Additionally the course will give you a firm understanding of the technical and economic case for renewables along with confidence to tackle the calculations required to assess their viability.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• You will be taught by recognised experts in the field of renewable energy
• You can study full time or part time
• The course is delivered through online distance learning with support from expert staff at UHI, which means that you can fit your studies around your personal and professional commitments
• You can choose to study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip or full Masters degree

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Energy, climate and carbon; Transition to a low-carbon society; Renewable energy technologies

PgDip

Option modules, from which you will choose three, include: Sustainable rural land use and energy in rural Scotland; Energy modelling for building; Tidal, wave and future energy; Developing a community energy project; Sustainable development; Local economic development; Research methods (strongly recommended to continue to MSc.)

Msc

To achieve the award of MSc Sustainable Energy Solutions you must complete the PgDip plus a research dissertation

Access Routes

BSc (Hons) Environmental Sciences
BSc (Hons) Sustainable Development
BSc (Hons) Archaeology and Environmental Studies
BEng (Hons) Energy Engineering

Locations

This course is available online with support from North Highland College UHI, Ormlie Road, Thurso, KW14 7EE

Study Options

You will study through supported online learning using the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
This method of flexible study enables you to fit your course and your professional development around your personal and professional life.
You will have support from your tutors and studies advisor.

Part-time students can start at variable times

For more information on other start dates please contact North Highland College UHI.

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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The factors affecting the wider environment are constantly increasing and range from agriculture and forestry to recreation, urban development and population growth. Read more
The factors affecting the wider environment are constantly increasing and range from agriculture and forestry to recreation, urban development and population growth. These in turn have knock-on effects such as climate change, water and food shortages, habitat and species loss and the impact of non-native species.

One of the areas where these factors come together is in the field of countryside management where the public use of the countryside interacts with professional land managers and can result in conflict.

In the context of this programme and the degree programme from which it has developed the term countryside management encompasses a broad range of topics and land uses ranging from conservation management to rural land use planning and interpretation to land use history.

Students are expected to have a broad knowledge of how the countryside that we see around us has developed in a historical context and how this relates to factors such as climate, ecology and soils. This in turn helps to determine current land use practice whether it be for agriculture or forestry, conservation management or recreation.

Inevitably these land uses are interlinked in complex ways and the countryside manager is expected to be able to identify the potential conflicts and to arrive at appropriate management options.

Of course there is rarely a simple answer in such situations and the resulting decisions have to be based on an understanding of the competing claims and an awareness of how to work with individuals, interest groups and communities to ensure that stakeholders' views have been taken into account.

Course Content

There are eight taught modules providing for the development of a range of technical, practical and professional skills. Residential study weekends are also used as a vital tool in delivering some of the practical aspects of the course.
In the modules an element of student choice is often built in through the use of essay and other course work topics that cover areas of potential interest. The modules will be of value individually to those in employment who are looking for Continuing Professional Development.

Taught modules are:

Planning and the Legal Framework

This module will provide a background to the legislation and policy framework within which the countryside is managed. This will include planning, biodiversity and landscape and will focus on the role of EIA and SEA. The planning system is prone to conflicts between interest groups and students will look at case studies that highlight some of the main issues that arise.

Habitat and Species Management

Habitats and species have been the subject of management for centuries but only comparatively recently has there been a focus on their management for conservation reasons. In practice species management relies on appropriate habitat management although there are times when more specific prescriptions are appropriate. This module will look at management through a number of case studies which will be examined in detail. The case studies will include both desk studies and field visits and students will be encouraged to research appropriate examples in their own areas.

Visitor Management

Visitor management is a crucial part of countryside management and should be integrated into area and site management plans. An understanding of visitor management and the opportunities for education, interpretation and marketing, is a requirement for senior countryside managers. Students will look at the full range of visitor management issues from visitor profiles and motivations to site design and the impacts on wildlife and the wider environment.

Species Identification and Familiarity

The ability to accurately identify a range of species is crucial to aid in species conservation and to properly evaluate an area for its biodiversity. Central to species identification is the use of field keys and identification guides. This course will be based around a week long, intensive series of practical and laboratory based sessions to provide participants with the necessary skills to implement habitat and species survey techniques. Training in computer recording packages will also be provided to ensure best practice in species recording is maintained

Project Management for Countryside Professionals

Countryside Managers need to be able to effectively manage their own as well as the work of others. The skills of project planning/reporting/acquisition of funding and the proper upkeep of work related files and paperwork is fundamental to effective management. A strong component of this module will also involve the development of team management skills as well as health and safety awareness.

Integrated Planning Management

Multifunctional land use is a well recognised term. It is part of the planning system at differing scales and with multi-partnership and stakeholder involvement. The module will define both the industry organisations commonly involved in multifunctional land use planning and the other likely stakeholders. The land use changes proposed will take account of the historical and cultural aspects of the landscape.

Integrated planning management is undertaken at different scales ranging from individual project management plans and environmental statements to strategic planning at regional, national or European level. The module will look at how the production of these plans and strategies might be expected to integrate with other planning policy and legislation. Integrated management systems are collective.

Methods and Delivery

This course is studied part time through on-line distance learning. This allows those in continuing employment or with family commitments to participate. With the exception of several weekend schools and a short study tour, the learning is carried out in the student's home or work place.

The PgDip is a high level learning course taught at university post-graduate level. Students are required to complete all taught modules detailed above. Typically a student will study 4 modules per year and complete the PgDip in two years. This would normally take an average of 12 to 15 hours study time a week.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

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You will gain the higher level skills needed to understand the workings of the farm-based business, its success as well as aspects of lower performance and weakness.You will have an understanding of the supply chains in which the business operates and could operate and how to maximise the opportunity and in so doing develop the business further. Read more
You will gain the higher level skills needed to understand the workings of the farm-based business, its success as well as aspects of lower performance and weakness.You will have an understanding of the supply chains in which the business operates and could operate and how to maximise the opportunity and in so doing develop the business further. You will undertake practical application of a range of techniques to enable you to develop business management strategies within the evolving economic, social, legal and political framework that farm businesses operate in. Additionally, you will develop enhanced leadership and communication skills.

The course

Agriculture is the dominant user of rural land, accounting for about 70% of the UK land area. There is increasing demand to find diverse means of using rural resources to ensure the continued viability of the rural economy. There is therefore need to further develop the skills in farm management and develop new business opportunities, be that farm diversification, value added enterprises, on-farm but non-farm activities or other rural developments to ensure that the future of the rural economy will be secured. This programme therefore aims to enhance the capacity of farm managers and those working in closely associated industries to perform within shifting economic and policy environments.

The course will focus on effective use of agricultural resources and the opportunities this presents to the rural economy. The course will seek to enable individuals to develop leadership skills while becoming more creative, flexible and innovative entrepreneurs with a high level of transferable skills. It will support students to identify opportunities offered by the changing economy. Teaching will be contexualised presentations of theory with direct practical consideration, utilising a practical knowledge base of the rural environment. By combining this with a sound understanding of business development and policy it will enable participants to maximise on opportunities identified.

The course is designed for existing owner-managers, directors and managers of farm-based businesses, and those who aspire to this level of career development. We expect participants, whilst not necessarily formally educated to undergraduate level, will be well informed and committed to the subject area. This course will provide the necessary focus for growth-orientated businesses to develop.

How will it benefit me?

Your qualification, be it the MSc or the PgD/PgC will provide you with the skill, confidence and competence to enable you to manage growth-orientated businesses.

You will gain the higher level skills needed to really understand the workings of the farm-based business, its success as well as aspects of lower performance and weakness. You will have a clear understanding of the supply chains in which the business operates and could operate and how to maximise the opportunity and in so doing develop the business further. You will undertake practical application of a range of techniques to enable you to develop business management strategies within the evolving economic, social, legal and political framework that farm businesses operate in. Additionally, you will develop enhanced leadership and communication skills required for the management of successful rural business.

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The Master of International Forestry (MIF) is a full-time, 10 month course-based master’s degree that provides a foundation in forest and natural resource management, conservation and policy. Read more
The Master of International Forestry (MIF) is a full-time, 10 month course-based master’s degree that provides a foundation in forest and natural resource management, conservation and policy. The MIF is designed for early/mid-career professionals who wish to expedite their careers and advance to leadership positions.

Advance your career

- Complete a professional master’s degree in 10 months
- Benefit from a curriculum targeted at major international employers
- Apply your knowledge and skills to international forest issues
- Obtain a world-recognized degree from The University of British Columbia
- Grow your professional network and your career
- Connect with our Faculty’s other outstanding graduate students from 40 countries
- Explore Vancouver – consistently ranked as one of the world’s best cities

Why choose the MIF program?

You’ll gain valuable skills relevant to a career in rural development, forest conservation planning, sustainable resource management, and conservation policy development, diplomacy and negotiation. The MIF is for individuals who want to engage productively – and to become leaders – in an international forestry context with international agencies and secretariats (e.g., UN FAO, UNEP), finance institutions (e.g., The World Bank, Asian Development Bank), transnational forest products enterprises, government ministries,consulting firms, environmental NGOs, and advocacy groups. The MIF program provides training on those skills identified in over 200 forestry and environmental job postings, and our curriculum is targeted at major international employers.

What will I learn?

The UBC Faculty of Forestry aims to educate global citizens who promote the values of a civil and sustainable society and with ambitions to become ‘agents of change and innovation’. Students will be prepared for work in forestry in both tropical and non-tropical regions, in conservation and production forestry, and with subsistence and industrial forestry. MIF students will focus on the identification of major opportunities common in forestry and the management of other natural resources in many countries, and their political, economic, social and environmental settings. Students will also gain intercultural understanding through working with international colleagues and professors.

Program components include:
- Natural resources economics
- International forest governance and policy
- Forest business enterprise
- Forests and society
- Natural resources planning
- International forestry institutions, diplomacy and negotiations
- Social, community and indigenous forestry

Grow your career with UBC Faculty of Forestry

Upon completion, MIF graduates will have a solid foundation in forestry and rural land use, in combination with knowledge of international institutional arrangements and policies concerning environmental protection, human rights, natural resources management, and leadership. Graduates will be able to:
- examine the interdependent relationships among societies and forested environments;
- assess current trends in the production, valuation and marketing of forest-based goods and services, including ecological services;
- understand the need for and principles of sound forest governance;
- negotiate and evaluate multilateral environmental agreements;
- demonstrate the elements of forest management and conservation decision-making, including economic analysis and financing and how to apply these in the formulation of policies and plans; and
- design and plan work programs and provide effective leadership.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of International Forestry
- Specialization: Forestry
- Subject: Agriculture and Forestry
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework only
- Registration options: Full-time
- Faculty: Faculty of Forestry

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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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