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Masters Degrees (Rural Development)

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Rural Economics and Management. Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. Read more
Rural Economics and Management : Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countriesIn the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds.

The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses.

The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS). The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen:

Rural Economics and Management

Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countries are studied in depth.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning Outcomes

-Understand different socio-economic concepts, theories and multi-disciplinary approaches with respect to rural economies and rural development.
-Have profound insights in different rural development realities, and compare rural development issues, approaches and policies within an international context..
-Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterise and analyse the economic and social problems of rural areas, food and agricultural chains, natural resource management, national and international agriculture.
-Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve problems related to agriculture, food chain and natural resource- management, and to rural development and countryside stewardship.
-Design, implement and monitor national and international agro-food policies, rural institutions and rural development programmes.
-Construct innovative tools and instruments for the (multifunctional) development of rural areas.
-Design and assess research in the domain of rural development, formulating a problem statement and operationalizing objectives and research questions within an adequate research plan.
-Select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect and analyse data from literature and empirical research in the domain of rural development.
-Critically reflect on topical rural development issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.
-Work in an integrated internationally composed team dealing with rural development and food production challenges, interacting respectfully with diverse others and developing a global perspective.
-Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders of the socio-professional world (food sector, NGOs, rural organisations, rural administration, universities and research institutes).
-Communicate convincingly (written, oral, using appropriate tools) about (own) research findings and project results and their underpinning rationale.
-Effectively and appropriately use good language, communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.
-Design and plan own learning processes based on continuous reflection (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, and attitudes and functioning.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.
-Independently perform scientific research in the domain of rural development. Give proof of a clear international orientation.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted).
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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IMRD, part of the Erasmus Mundus scholarship programme, is a joint degree which offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. Read more
IMRD, part of the Erasmus Mundus scholarship programme, is a joint degree which offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. The 2 year master programme (120 ECTS) is jointly organized by 12 institutes leading in agricultural economics and rural development from all over the world. IMRD offers a combination of basic and specialized theoretical and practical training in technical, economic and social sciences. This competitive master programme has a high extent of international student mobility, making it possible to learn from specialists worldwide.
-Study each semester at a different university and compare international views on rural development.
-Gain practical experience through a 1 month case study in Italy or Slovakia.
-Several scholarship opportunities: Erasmus Mundus, IMRD consortium, ICI-ECP.
-1/3 of our graduates start a PhD; others work at UN, FAO and in the agribusiness industry
-Obtain a joint MSc in Rural Development.
-European and US students can combine this degree with a MSc in Agricultural Economics (University of Arkansas, US) and obtain a double degree at the end of the programme. Choose the ATLANTIS learning path.
-European and South-Korean students can combine this degree with a Master of Arts in Economics (Korea University, Seoul National University). Choose the EKAFREE learning path.
-Study in Europe, the US, South-Korea, India, South Africa, Ecuador or China, depending on the learning path you choose.

IMRD offers you the opportunity to study rural development in its diversity of international approaches and applications. Depending on the focus and mobility track you choose, you can study at one or a combination of our 12 partners in Europe, India, South-Africa, Ecuador, China, the US or South-Korea.

Learning path IMRD >> International MSc in Rural Development: study 2 years at the IMRD - Erasmus Mundus programme, possibly supported by an Erasmus Mundus scholarship. At the end you obtain the Joint IMRD Diploma. Study at one or a combination of our partners in Europe, India, South-Africa, Ecuador or China.

Learning path ATLANTIS >> MSc in Rural Development and MSc in Agricultural Economics: European and US students can combine this degree with a MSc in Agricultural Economics (University of Arkansas, US) and obtain a double degree at the end of the programme.

Learning path EKAFREE >>MSc in Rural Development and MA in Economics: European and South-Korean students can combine this degree with a Master of Arts in Economics (Korea University, Seoul National University).

Structure

Structure of the programme:
-General Entrance Module - Semester I 30-35 ECTS - UGent.
-Advanced Module I - Semester II 15-40 ECTS - any partner university or thesis partner university.
-Case Study - Summer Course 10 ECTS - Nitra University or Pisa University.
-Advanced Module II - Semester III 15-40 ECTS - opposite choice of semester II.
-Thesis Module - Semester IV 30 ECTS - thesis partner university.

Learning outcomes

Our programme will prepare you to become:
-A trained expert in integrated rural development specialized in agricultural sociology, economics, policy and decision making, with a competitive advantage on the international job market.
-A master of science with a unique international theoretical knowledge in development and agricultural economics theories and policies, combined with a practical based comparative knowledge of different approaches to rural development
part of an international network of specialists in agronomics and rural development.

Other admission requirements

The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests:
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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Sustainable rural development is seen as critical to survival of rural areas at a global level. Central to the success of any rural development programme, is a skilled team of experts to think strategically about rural development and ensure its delivery. Read more
Sustainable rural development is seen as critical to survival of rural areas at a global level. Central to the success of any rural development programme, is a skilled team of experts to think strategically about rural development and ensure its delivery. This graduate programme will be of direct relevance to those interested in becoming leaders in rural development and promoting sustainability in the rural sector. It will also be of interest to those currently employed in rural development.

AIM
The Diploma course is strongly inter-disciplinary. It aims to develop an understanding of the underlying processes of economic, social and environmental practice with an emphasis on sustainability. Thus, as well as teaching the theories and concepts underlying rural development, the course places strong emphasis on the application of theory to development problems in rural areas, with an emphasis on the EU.


STRUCTURE AND CONTENT
Students on the full-time diploma course are required to take a total of four taught modules and a double module Work Experience Placement during the academic year from September to June.


Global Sustainability, Local Solutions and Rural Policy (single module)
This module explores the history of Rural
Development locally and provides an introduction to European Union, national and regional policies and strategies. Students will become familiar with key policies such as the Common Agricultural Policy, EU Rural Development Programmes, Rural Development Programme, and a range of EU legislation relating to rural policies.

Students will have had the opportunity to develop the following knowledge:

• CAP reform, Decoupling and Single Farm Payment
• Use of Community Initiatives such as LEADER
• Diversification of the rural economy
• Rural Champion, Rural White Paper and Rural Proofing
• Agri-Environment Programmes, Countryside Management, Forestry and Organic Farming schemes

Rural Development: Rhetoric and Reality (single module)
This module aims to provide students with the basic skills necessary to take responsibility for a project management process from start to finish. The following are the main areas covered.
• Fundraising and income generation
• Social inclusion: key concepts
• Rural poverty
• Physical Planning for Rural Areas
• Sustainable Rural Tourism
• Community Development

Foundations for Sustainable Development (i) (single module)
This is a broad ranging module exploring the major global issues in environmental sustainability, such as Climate Change, Biodiversity, Waste Management, Water Management, Renewable Energy. The module will introduce concepts and methodologies such as Environmental Economics, Ecological Footprinting and Environmental Impact Analysis as well as moral and ethical ways of considering sustainable development problems.

Methods for Rural and Sustainability Research (single module)
The purpose of this module is to provide students with a basic understanding of the various methods which are used in both rural and sustainable development practice and research.
The module is intended to complement other modules in the curriculum by providing students with a range of techniques which can be utilised in gathering knowledge, undertaking analyses, reporting findings and applying knowledge. Formal lectures are supplemented by case studies and visiting speakers.


Work Placement/Internship (double module)
Each student will work with a University tutor to identify and undertake a specific piece of work either in their own workplace or in a suitable co-operating organisation that has a rural or sustainability interest. The placement must normally be completed during years 1 & 2 of the degree and will be guided by an agreed set of learning objectives and work tasks. Assessment will be based on the student’s diary or log, a final report prepared by the student and an oral presentation to students, staff and the placement mentor. This internship will offer students the opportunity to combine theory with practical tasks and to develop professional work habits.

The aim is to ensure, by the end of the programme, adequate coverage of the range of disciplines relevant to sustainable rural development. All taught modules will be assessed by a combination of continuous assessment and written and oral examination.


PROGRESSION TO MSc
Students who attain the required standard in the six modules and submit a satisfactory research proposal may progress from the Graduate Diploma to the MSc by completion of a dissertation which is equivalent to three modules. This element of the programme involves original research including a literature review, data gathering and analysis. The research will be carried out under the supervision of a member of the academic staff from July to September (inclusive).

Up to date information on course fees can be found at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/finance/TuitionFees/

The University provides information on possible sources of awards which is available at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/PostgraduateCentre/PostgraduateFunding/

Additional information for International students

http://www.qub.ac.uk/home/StudyatQueens/InternationalStudents/

Applicants who are non-EEA nationals must satisfy the UK Border Agency (UKBA) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes, by providing evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.0, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

*Taken within the last 2 yrs.

Please see http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs for more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals.

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The MSc in Conservation and Rural Development explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development. Read more
The MSc in Conservation and Rural Development explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development.

The relationship between conservation and rural development can best be described as an uneasy alliance: on the one hand there is substantial common ground between them in terms of preventing environmental degradation, but on the other, they are often in direct conflict. This pathway explores the issues underlying the conservation/rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between the two.

The programme is relevant to the work of national management and scientific authorities, international and national NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, international agencies and donors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/271/conservation-and-rural-development

Why study with us?

- 1 year taught Master's programme

- Teaching which provides substantive natural and social sciences training in both conservation and rural development

- Formal lectures and seminars supported by residential courses and day trips including to the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, Slimbridge, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Jersey, previous fieldtrips have also taken place in Scotland and Malta (these change annually)

- Mix of formal academic training and practical field conservation experience

- Research-led pathway taught by academics rated as world-leading and internationally excellent (REF2014) who are members of DICE

- Benefit from DICE's extensive links with international conservation organisations

About The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE)

Conservation programmes offered by the School of Anthropology and Conservation are delivered by members of DICE.

DICE is Britain’s leading research centre dedicated to conserving biodiversity and the ecological processes that support ecosystems and people. It pursues innovative and cutting-edge research to develop the knowledge that underpins conservation, and sets itself apart from more traditionally-minded academic institutions with its clear aims to:

- Break down the barriers between the natural and social sciences in conservation

- Conduct research that informs and improves policy and practice in all relevant sectors

- Disseminate knowledge and provide expertise on conservation issues to stakeholders

- Build capacity in the conservation sector through research-led teaching and training

- Strive for sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation that benefits people

Our staff have outstanding international research profiles, yet integrate this with considerable on-the-ground experience working with conservation agencies around the world. This combination of expertise ensures that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of conservation implementation.

Course structure

The MSc consists of six months of coursework and five months of research. The optional modules allow you the flexibility to devise a pathway that suits your specific interests, with an appropriate balance between natural and social sciences.

Modules

Please note that not all modules necessarily run every year. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

DI880 - Conservation and Community Development (15 credits)
DI1001 - Interdisciplinary Foundations for Conservation (15 credits)
DI876 - Research Methods for Social Science (15 credits)
DI884 - Research Methods for Natural Sciences (15 credits)
DI877 - Population and Evolutionary Biology (15 credits)
SE857 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (20 credits)
DI836 - Integrated Species Conservation and Management (15 credits)
DI841 - Managing Protected Areas (15 credits)
DI849 - Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
DI871 - International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability (15 credits)
DI875 - Principles and Practice of Ecotourism (15 credits)
DI881 - Advanced Topics in Conservation Ecology and Management (15 credits)
DI883 - Special Topics in Conservation (15 credits)
DI885 - Ecotourism and Rural Development Field Course (15 credits)
DI888 - Economics of Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI889 - Leadership Skills for Conservation Managers (15 credits)
DI892 - Current Issues in Primate Conservation (15 credits)
DI893 - Business Principles for Biodiversity Conservation (15 credits)
DI998 - Dissertation - Conservation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is carried out primarily through coursework with written examinations for some modules. The research dissertation is written up in the format of a paper for publication.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- produce postgraduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of international conservation and biodiversity management

- develop new areas of teaching in response to the advance of scholarship and practice

- provide you with opportunities to gain a interdisciplinary perspective on conservation issues through collaborative exchange between DICE and the wider University

- develop your competence in applying theoretical and methodological skills to the implementation of conservation practice and biodiversity management

- develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to policy formulation and data analysis and interpretation

- provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change

- develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills necessary for professional development

- enhance the development of your interpersonal skills

- assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working.

Careers

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. DICE programmes combine academic theory with practical field experience to develop graduates who are highly employable within government, NGOs and the private sector.

Our alumni progress into a wide range of organisations across the world. Examples include: consultancy for a Darwin Initiative project in West Sumatra; Wildlife Management Officer in Kenya; Chief of the Biodiversity Unit – UN Environment Programme; Research and Analysis Programme Leader for TRAFFIC; Freshwater Programme Officer, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Head of the Ecosystem Assessment Programme, United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC); Community Based Natural Resource Manager, WWF; Managing Partner, Althelia Climate Fund; and Programme Officer, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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If you want to progress into a managerial role in rural development, this postgraduate course in Sustainable Rural Development is for you. Read more
If you want to progress into a managerial role in rural development, this postgraduate course in Sustainable Rural Development is for you.

You will study social, environmental, economic and professional development, and community engagement issues in the context of managing rural development.

The MSc Sustainable Rural Development can be studied online from anywhere in the world.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Gain practical experience in understanding current rural development issues and working with communities
• Develop key research and policy skills
• Study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip or full Masters degree
• Study online, full time or part time to suit your lifestyle

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Local economic development; Developing communities; Communities and nature

PgDip

Option modules, from which you must choose three, include: Biodiversity management; Developing potential through placement; Environmental and Social issues in mountain areas; Field studies; Policy analysis; Research methods and techniques (strongly recommended if you intend to continue to MSc); Sustainable tourism; Sustainable land use and renewable energy in rural Scotland; Sustainable development; An elective may also be taken from any of the university's Masters Programme, e.g. other research skills, modules such as Qualitive Inquiry or Quantative Research and Data Management

Msc

To achieve the award of MSc Sustainable Rural Development you must complete a research dissertation.

Locations

This course is available online with support from Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR

Access routes

BSc (Hons) Environmental Sciences
BSc (Hons) Archaeology and Environmental Studies
BSc Sustainable Forest Management
BA (Hons) Health Studies (Rural Health)
BA (Hons) Business and Management
BA (Hons) Social Sciences
BSc (Hons) Sustainable Development
BSc (Hons) Geography

Study Options

You will study through supported online learning using the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
A fully online induction web resource is available to all new students and you are encouraged to refer to this during your first term in particular. An optional two-day induction is also available each September in Inverness, Scotland.

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.
See https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/first-steps/how-much-will-it-cost/funding-your-studies/funded-postgraduate-places/

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development aims to equip you with the marketing, organisational and management skills you will need to make innovative contributions to the development of local economies, with particular emphasis on co-operatives, social enterprises and food businesses in Ireland and overseas. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development aims to equip you with the marketing, organisational and management skills you will need to make innovative contributions to the development of local economies, with particular emphasis on co-operatives, social enterprises and food businesses in Ireland and overseas.

It is aimed at graduates from a wide range of disciplines who are interested in careers in co-operative organisations, food marketing or rural development. The Postgraduate Diploma is a full-time course that extends over 9 months. It leads to a one year MSc (masters by research) in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development in a second year.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckp01/

Course Details

This course takes an interdisciplinary, problem-centred approach to teaching and learning. It also integrates an eight week work placement, giving you the opportunity to travel if you want to. You are qualified to take up a wide range of employment opportunities on graduation.

[[Format]

The Postgraduate Diploma uses a unique combination of teaching and learning methods and emphasises practical skills and learning as well as developing a solid grounding in theoretical and applied concepts. This includes lectures, ‘capstone’ seminars (involving interactive staff and student discussion and debate), field visits, case study analysis, project-based fieldwork (one week is spent conducting research in a designated location on a designated topic), analysis of new food products in class, guest lectures, group work and web-based resources.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development is delivered over 9 months.

Core Modules

Students take 50 credits as follows:

FE6109 Co-operative Organisation: Theory and Concepts (10 credits)
FE6111 Co-operative Organisation: Theoretical Application and Practice (5 credits)
FE6112 Rural Development: Theory and Practice (10 credits)
FE6113 Rural Development: Application and Practice (5 credits)
FE6115 Food Marketing and the Consumer (5 credits)
FE6116 Marketing Strategies for Local Development (5 credits)
FE6104*Practical Training Placement (10 credits) - Students will be placed for a minimum of eight weeks during the Summer in a relevant work environment.

*As part of FE6104 Practical Training Placement, a report must be submitted for the Autumn Examination on a date specified at the beginning of the academic year. Programme leadership will be provided by the Department/Associate School of Food Business and Development in association with the Centre for Co-operative Studies.

Elective Modules

Students take 10 credits from the following:

FE6114 Introduction to Food Marketing (5 credits) (for students who have not previously studied Marketing) OR
FE4205 Consumer Behaviour in Food Markets (5 credits) (for students who have previously studied marketing)
AND
FE4002 Global Food Policy (5 credits) OR
FE4008 Food Security and the Developing World (5 credits) OR
any other 5-credit module which may be made available by the School of Food Science, depending on the prior qualifications and interests of each student and subject to the approval of the Programme Leader.

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/PGDiplomas/food/page01.html

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of continuous assessment – e.g. essays, case studies, group work, project work, presentations, reflective journal – and end-of-year written examinations.

Careers

This course provides a good critical education for those entering into a wide range of administrative, business and personnel appointments in the private, public and third sectors. It also offers a thorough and stimulating grounding in organisational studies to anybody interested in pursuing an academic career in this field.

Examples of employment destinations of graduates include Bord Bia, Concern, local authorities, Food Safety Authority, LEADER companies, VEC, HSE, IRCSET, Farm Relief Services, teaching, financial services and many more.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The Food and Rural Development Research MSc is designed to provide high quality training for those interested in a research career focusing on food social science, rural development and rural sociology. Read more
The Food and Rural Development Research MSc is designed to provide high quality training for those interested in a research career focusing on food social science, rural development and rural sociology. The research focus makes the course ideal if you are interested in gaining a Master's qualification and then continuing on to a PhD.

We provide research training and skills development specifically related to conducting research into rural areas, the environment and food markets. We are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing a 1+3 programme, which is a four year award with a research training Master's in the first year followed by a PhD.

You will study alongside students and staff in our Centre for Rural Economy, which specialises in interdisciplinary social science, researching rural development and policy, food and society and the wellbeing of rural communities. You will also undertake a postgraduate research training programme in our purpose-built Doctoral Training Suite, with facilities for lectures, workshops, seminars and computer access to specialist software required for research in the social sciences and the humanities.

Through studying on our course you will:
-Identify your own research topic
-Specialise and develop skills specific to your research
-Learn research practice fundamentals
-Understand research principles, data handling and analysis

You take compulsory modules and optional modules, and complete a dissertation, which could be a desk-based analysis, or a study involving fieldwork or case studies.

You will be encouraged to participate fully in our research culture by organising and attending seminars and reading groups and contributing to research meetings.

Our staff

You will benefit from being taught by lecturers who are industry experienced and research active. You can find out about our staff in the following research groups:
-Food Quality and Health
-Food and Society
-Rural Development

The Degree Programme Director is Dr Menelaos Gkartzios. Menelaos’ research interests include:
-Rural mobilities, migration and counterurbanisation
-Spatial planning and governance
-Rural housing, planning and architectural studies
-International comparative research

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The MSc course allows honours graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development to specialise, through research, in their chosen area of interest. Read more
The MSc course allows honours graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development to specialise, through research, in their chosen area of interest. Every attempt is made to match your interests with an identified research need, enabling you to make a social contribution as well as meeting the academic requirements. While you will specialise for MSc research, you are nevertheless able to draw on the wider knowledge of business and development gained from completing the Postgraduate Diploma.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/cks33/

Course Details

Candidates can select a research topic from a wide range of areas within cooperative studies, rural and international development and food marketing. Scholarships are sometimes available depending on research interests.

Format

The MSc usually involves primary research and the completion of a written thesis. You will be assigned a supervisor to give advice at every stage of the research process. Departmental progress reviews are carried out at regular intervals.

Part I

Students take 60 credits as for the Postgraduate Diploma in Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development: http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/PGDiplomas/food/page01.html

Part II

Students take 60 credits as follows:

FE6100 Dissertation

FE6100 Dissertation must be submitted on an approved topic within the fields of Co-operative Organisation, Food Marketing and Rural Development. Students may be required to pass an examination on the subject matter of the dissertation (FE6100) if the examiners so decide.

Assessment

Assessment is by means of a written thesis.

Careers

This course provides a thorough and stimulating grounding in research for those entering into a wide range of administrative, business and personnel appointments in the private, public and third sectors or for those wishing to pursue academic careers in this field.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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This MA is unique for its focus on the dynamic interactions between local livelihoods in rural areas and agriculture understood as a globalised industry. Read more
This MA is unique for its focus on the dynamic interactions between local livelihoods in rural areas and agriculture understood as a globalised industry. It advances an interdisciplinary perspective on linkages between global national and local level processes shaping agriculture and rural development by integrating knowledge from the social sciences economics and natural resource studies.

The MA gives an overview of agriculture, rural livelihoods and rural policy and politics to strengthen students analytical skills and to transfer key professional skills of relevance to work on rural development and agriculture. Lectures, seminars, group work and individual assignment will cover the policies and practices of the major international institutions in rural development, including the World Bank, Food and Agriculture Organisation and United Nations Development Programme, just as much as of civil society organisations, such as La Via Campesina.

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While governments around the world have committed themselves to fighting poverty, poverty can only be eradicated once marginalised individuals and groups experience equality, regardless of their gender, race, ethnicity, disabilities or age. Read more

Linking sustainable development to social inclusion

While governments around the world have committed themselves to fighting poverty, poverty can only be eradicated once marginalised individuals and groups experience equality, regardless of their gender, race, ethnicity, disabilities or age. That is why discussions on sustainable development and reversing poverty often refer to social inclusion. Development organisations and government agencies can contribute to inclusive transformation processes that improve circumstances for marginalised people and allow them to take part in society and benefit from social services and various political, social, physical and market spaces.

Youth are particularly important drivers of innovation, entrepreneurship and prosperity in developing countries and engaging them in the agricultural sector and keeping them in the rural areas should be a priority. To ensure context-specific inclusive transformation processes, development professionals and organisations need to understand and define marginalised peoples’ needs, interests, constraints and possibilities, as well as understand their roles in decision-making processes at household, economic and societal levels.

The Rural Development, Social nclusion, Gender and Youth specialisation equips students with competences needed to understand and define these contextual factors, reduce inequities and improve social and economic conditions for everyone.

Competences

By the time you graduate, you will have developed the ability to:

• identify opportunities for systemic change and to enhance opportunities and interests of youth, men and women in rural environments
• promote social inclusion and mainstream gender and other socialequity issues in rural development
• recommend changes that will bring about gender equality in organisations
• develop a personal strategy for enhancing empowerment, social inclusion, youth involvement and gender equality in your own profession and organisation.

Career opportunities

Specialists in Rural Development, Social Inclusion, Gender and Youth contribute to inclusive transformation of social processes that improve circumstances for marginalised people to take part in society. Recognising that equal access to markets and social services, influence over decisions affecting one’s life and young people as key drivers of innovation, entrepreneurship and prosperity will increase security over livelihood and improve social economic conditions for everyone, specialists may design interdisciplinary projects to mainstream social inclusion and reduce inequities. As agents for community development, they may be managers, coordinators or consultants in a (non-)governmental organisation or in the private sector.

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Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. Read more

Local food security in a globalising world

Food security exists when everybody has access to sufficient, nutritious and safe food at all times. However, various predictable and unpredictable challenges around the globe, including changes in climate (i.e. rising/falling temperatures, droughts and floods, diseases and pests), market tendencies, insufficient access to food for households, unequal distribution of resources and opportunities and inadequate food distribution channels, prevent the realisation of this idealistic and often oversimplified term.

Despite a growing number of large-scale, high-external input farms and enough food production to feed the world, post-harvest losses result in less optimal yields and (locally) produced foods are often used for other purposes, such as animal feed or biofuel. Consequentially, 795 million1 undernourished people around the globe do not have access to this lost and wasted food.

Ensuring access to food for everyone is the key to ending hunger, which will require improved collaboration between various stakeholders - producer (organisations), the private sector, governments, traders and development organisations. Structures, policies and programmes must be continuously adapted to a variety of external factors, such as the economy, environment and current social structures. Rethinking of informal rules and habits is another essential step in attaining food security, considering even members of the same household are not guaranteed equal access to food. In light of these external factors and challenges, this specialisation presents various interventions needed to combat hunger and ensure food security for everyone.

Competences

At graduation, you will have the ability to:
• define the economic, commercial and marketing needs, constraints and opportunities of those in rural communities who produce for local and regional markets
• analyse food security at a local and global level
• apply tools for diagnosing food security
• analyse the livelihoods of farmers who produce for local and regional markets and understand farmers' coping strategies
• select, explain and design an appropriate development intervention leading to food security
• develop support programmes for farmers, producers and other groups
• mainstream food security within Agricultural and rural development programmes
• define the economic, commercoal and marketing needs, constraints and oppertunities for small-scale producers in rural communities
• formulate and recommend any organisational adjustments that are needed within service-delivery organisations.

Career opportunities

Rural Development and Food Security specialists explore effective responses to mal- and undernourishment, by defining needs, constraints, coping strategies and opportunities for small-scale producers in rural communities. In selecting appropriate context-specific interventions, which reflect understanding of the local context in its wider context, they consider stakeholder relationships and how collaboration could be organised to each stakeholder’s benefit while helping farmers to safeguard their ability to ensure local food security. In the face of globalisation, slow economic growth and political instability, specialists may design and implement responses for (non-)governmental organisations or partners in the private sector, in the form of projects, programmes, market structures or policies.

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In the first academic year of the MSc program, the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc program, the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject , major and optional courses chosen.

Human nutrition

Transfers specific and profound knowledge, insights and skills related to the food and public health nutrition security problems and possible solutions at population level. Therefore, this subject focuses on themes such as food chemistry, food and nutrition science, nutritional requirements, food and nutrition policy, nutrition surveillance, nutrition disorders, nutrition research, food and nutrition interventions, food safety, nutrition epidemiology, consumer behaviour, rural development and agriculture, development economics, project management, and project planning.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context.
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context.
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context.
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context.

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission details

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted):
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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Specialists in Rural Development, Communication and Innovation are greatly needed in organizations and projects around the world, especially those offering capacity building, training, information and e-learning while addressing rural poverty, social equity, sustainability, resource scarcity and food security. Read more

Responding to changes in rural environments

Specialists in Rural Development, Communication and Innovation are greatly needed in organizations and projects around the world, especially those offering capacity building, training, information and e-learning while addressing rural poverty, social equity, sustainability, resource scarcity and food security. Communication is the key in bringing about social change and innovation. However, adapting development projects and processes to social, political, economic and environmental changes poses challenges to many organisations, which has resulted in a pressing need to facilitate innovation and communication processes. Organizations and professionals providing such services require knowledge on facilitation, public participation and innovative praxis.

To ensure appropriate responses to contemporary conditions and local circumstances, such organisations need to adapt their approaches, as well as design new operational structures, to increase the relevance of their performance and the sustainability of their actions. This programme equips mid-career professionals and their organisations with competences that will strengthen their ability to work in a range of complex multi-actor settings in his increasingly digitized world.

Competences

At graduation, you will have developed the ability to:
• analyse stakeholders’ interests and needs and outline policies that lead to social change and participation
• design processes and strategies that facilitate communication and knowledge sharing
• transform traditional extension policy and practice and develop new approaches to communication and innovation
• design and facilitate effective, appropriate and exciting learning environments

Career opportunities

When an organisation reorganises its service provision and information management, there is often a considerable need for new management styles and thus for capacity building. Various sources and activities – such as policy reforms, customer surveys and the formulation of funding conditions – suggest this applies at all organisational levels. In some cases, complex organisational problems need to be addressed; in others, staff needs to improve their ability to design and implement new strategies and activities for information and communication.

Read less
In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen.

Tropical Agriculture

Delivers technical knowledge related to agriculture focussing on developing countries. The students can specialize in animal production or plant production by choosing the specific option. The major on Animal Production delivers in depth knowledge on production biology, animal nutrition, pasture management, animal genetics. The major on Plant Production focuses on themes like ethno-botany, crop protection, plant breeding, plant biotechnology. The courses are applicative and aim at presenting solutions for production problems in developing countries in an interdisciplinary way.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning and Outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted)
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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