• University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
"romanticism"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Romanticism)

  • "romanticism" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 40
Order by 
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism offers you a dynamic engagement with Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism in their cultural contexts. Read more
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism offers you a dynamic engagement with Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism in their cultural contexts. The course provides you with a firm grounding in the latest developments in literary criticism and analysis. It also provides you with the key skills to undertake your own detailed research project successfully. Thus a special feature of the Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism pathway is the combination of the study of the literature of this period with the development of key transferable skills. As a student on this MA scheme, you will have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivaled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-eighteenth-century-writing-and-romanticism-masters/

- Assessment:
Assessment takes the form of: a research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. Each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals specifically with an area of Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism in the third semester.

Overview

You will study two core modules, together with two option modules. Specialist MA modules in Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism provide a rigorous and detailed engagement with specific aspects of the literature of the period. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a Dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also ask you to interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in an aspect of Eighteenth-Century Writing and Romanticism that is of particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

- Application Details
In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Qualification: MA in Literary Studies, pathway Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism

This degree will suit you:
- If you have a specific interest in Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism
- If you want a rigorous training for future work as a researcher
- If you want to develop your literary research skills
- If you are interested in the theoretical and historical debates behind literary studies

- Employability:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism provides you with both an in-depth knowledge of the literature, history and culture of this period and key transferable skills. Thus it provides a natural entry for further academic study for a PhD and to a range of occupations. Specialist modules on research techniques, presentation, analysis, professional standards of writing and oral presentations provide you with core skills that are highly valued by a diverse range of employers.

- Key Skills and Competencies:
Study Skills
You will learn how to gain access to the relevant literature and materials in this field and how to use them in critical discussion of the issues covered by this subject and in relation to your own specific needs. Practical advice is given in research methods and sources.

The ability to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a broad range of information is a skill which is keenly sought by a broad range of employers from the civil service to journalism, to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level is a very disciplined process. You will be guided and aided by University staff, but you will be expected to conduct your own scholarly research and work independently. The final Dissertation in particular teaches you how to employ your own skills and knowledge to produce high standards of work. The practice of self-motivation and discipline will prepare you for what will be expected in the working world.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA in Literary Studies, pathway in Eighteenth Century Writing and Romanticism provides you with key skills which are transferable to all areas of employment. Students will be able to structure and communicate ideas efficiently, write for and speak to a range of audiences, evaluate and organize information, work effectively with others, work within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-eighteenth-century-writing-and-romanticism-masters/#how-to-apply

Read less
The writing and thought of the Romantic period has long been central to the study of modern literatures in English, and recent developments in literary theory have underlined the continuing importance of changing conceptions and practices of literature and philosophy in this period. Read more

Research profile

The writing and thought of the Romantic period has long been central to the study of modern literatures in English, and recent developments in literary theory have underlined the continuing importance of changing conceptions and practices of literature and philosophy in this period.

Whether your interests lie in major figures such as Wordsworth, Scott or Mary Shelley, or more neglected writers such as Joanna Baillie; or in the relationship between literature and philosophy, or literature and society, this programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of romanticism, and have particular strengths in philosophical approaches to romantic literature, in Irish and Scottish romanticism, and in the 18th century background to romantic literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics.

In your first semester you might explore the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interest in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London.

In the second semester, you can examine Romantic poetics and manifestos, the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment, Orientalism, travel, and the French Revolution and its aftershocks.

This pathway aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials, and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the pathway will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical, and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography, and IT.

You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a module in research skills.

Read less
This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. Read more
This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. It also makes use of the holdings of the Special Collections of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works.

Course Overview

Underpinned by instruction in advanced research methods and skills and the comparative study of theoretically informed critical approaches, this MA, based on the Lampeter Campus of the University, enables students to undertake an advanced level study of literature in English and associated aspects of culture in the period from 1790 to the present day.

Romanticism, post-Romanticism, the Victorian, Decadence, Modernism, Post-modernism – are explored in two core modules, ‘Visions of Society’ and ‘The Shock of the New’. Informed by established and emerging theoretical positions, these will critically examine the connections and tensions between the ideas and kinds of literary production traditionally associated with those movements: for example, the emergence of the individual, shifts in religious belief, the importance of the city and urbanisation, attitudes to class, race and gender, the dominance of the novel and the impact of new media forms, commodification and the emergence of competing views of the real.

These modules are supported by topic-specific modules reflecting staff expertise, for example the consideration of the figure of the child as a shifting ideological construct within and across these movements; writing by American Black Women writers; and the utopian urge in the literature of the period.

Modules

-Research Methods
-Comparative and Critical Approaches
-Visions of Society
-The Shock of the New

And optional modules in topics such as:
-Utopian and Dystopian Fiction
-The Child in Time
-Black American Women Writers

Key Features

The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize winning authors.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-Online and distance learing option

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

Read less
The MRes programme in Contemporary literature is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes programme in Contemporary literature is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. It covers a wide range of literary topics from the Romantics to contemporary literary theory and is tailored to allow students to pursue their own particular interests.

Course Overview

This programme draws on specialist staff with expertise in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Literature, Romanticism, Children’s Literature, and Contemporary Literature and theory. It also makes use of the holdings of the Special Collections of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works.

Underpinned by instruction in advanced research methods and skills and the comparative study of theoretically informed critical approaches, this MRes, based on the Lampeter Campus of the University, enables students to undertake an advanced level study of literature in English and associated aspects of culture in the period from 1790 to the present day.

Romanticism, post-Romanticism, the Victorian, Decadence, Modernism, Post-modernism – are explored in a range of modules. For example two modules, ‘Visions of Society’ and ‘The Shock of the New’, critically examine the connections and tensions between the ideas and kinds of literary production traditionally associated with those movements: for example, the emergence of the individual, shifts in religious belief, the importance of the city and urbanisation, attitudes to class, race and gender, the dominance of the novel and the impact of new media forms, commodification and the emergence of competing views of the real. Other areas of focus include the consideration of the figure of the child as a shifting ideological construct within and across various C19th cultural movements; writing by American Black Women writers; and the utopian urge in the literature of the period.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methods (compulsory)
-Comparative and Critical Approaches
-Visions of Society
-The Shock of the New
-Utopian and Dystopian Fiction
-The Child in Time
-Black American Women Writers

Key Features

The programme is delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize winning authors.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-Available as an online and distance learning option

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

Read less
This programme offers students an introduction to the study of the ways in which writing in English has shaped or mediated political identities in England, Scotland and Ireland. Read more

Programme description

This programme offers students an introduction to the study of the ways in which writing in English has shaped or mediated political identities in England, Scotland and Ireland.

This programme introduces you to the relationship between literary writing and political and social discourse in Britain and Ireland between the ‘Glorious Revolution’ of 1688 and the end of the 19th century. This is the period of the creation of the Britain in which we live today, and also the time in which ancient British, Scottish and Irish national cultures were conceptualised as a response to radical literary, social and political innovations.

In examining the role of literary writing in this period, you will evaluate the ways in which it changed in response to social and political developments. You will also explore how Romantic conceptions of history, society and the aesthetic are developed and questioned during the course of the 19th century.

Programme structure

The programme will be taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials over two semesters, after which you will complete an independently researched dissertation. You will complete two compulsory and two option courses, along with courses in research methods.

Compulsory courses:

Enlightenment and Romanticism 1688–1815
Romanticism and Victorian Society 1815–1900
Research Skills and Methods

Option courses may include:

Poet-Critics: the Style of Modern Poetry
Fairy Tales
Digital Humanities for Literary Studies
Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
The Long Summer: Edwardian Texts and Contexts 1900–1910
Shakespeare Adapted
Fairy Tales

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully follow this programme will gain:

knowledge and understanding of the role of literary writing in the formation of British, Scottish, Irish and English national identities in the 18th and 19th centuries
practical knowledge of the range of theoretical and philosophical ideas informing contemporary literary criticism
a grounding in the research methods of literary studies

Career opportunities

This programme will help you to identify possible topics for advanced research in English literature, potentially leading to an academic career. The transferable skills you gain, such as communication, project management and analysis, will give you an edge in a competitive employment market.

Read less
This programme offers students the opportunity to develop their interests in aspects of American literature, from first colonisation to the present, post-9/11 moment. Read more

Research profile

This programme offers students the opportunity to develop their interests in aspects of American literature, from first colonisation to the present, post-9/11 moment.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of American literature, in topics as diverse as the Black Atlantic, postmodernist fiction, and the poetics of republicanism.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
Critical Theory is an exciting and dynamic field encompassing diverse intellectual approaches to literature, culture, society, and politics. Read more

Research profile

Critical Theory is an exciting and dynamic field encompassing diverse intellectual approaches to literature, culture, society, and politics. It entails reflection on the premises, concepts and categories used in different disciplines.

This programme provides expert-led teaching on the wide range of theoretical approaches that constitute the contemporary critical vocabulary within the humanities.

Seminar-based teaching will allow you to critically engage with theoretical approaches as diverse as poststructuralism, postcolonialism, and the Frankfurt School, and with the work of thinkers such as Heidegger, Derrida and Deleuze.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of English literature, historical and/or theoretical.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study. Read more

Research profile

The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study.

This programme allows you to pursue individual projects in Scottish and/or English literature within a wider interdisciplinary understanding of the period as a whole. Whether your interests lie in major figures such as Chaucer, Langland, The Gawain Poet, Malory, Skelton, Henryson, Dunbar, Douglas or Lyndsay, in less well-known or anonymous writers, the romance tradition, lyric poetry or drama, or in the relationships between literature, society and politics, you will have the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research, supported by a flexible choice of taught options in related areas.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of medieval literature, and have particular strengths in verse and prose romance, religious and secular drama, and lyric poetry.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. Read more

Research profile

This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. You will explore a range of issues contingent upon colonisation, independence, and the formation of postcolonial diasporic communities.

You will be encouraged to develop a knowledge and understanding of the roles played by various forms of writing in the shaping and representation of postcolonial subjectivity and context, and to contextualise postcolonial writing in terms of its chronological and geographical specificities, deepening your knowledge and understanding of selected themes and topics in a way that will enable you to select and execute an independent piece of research.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of postcolonial literature, and have particular strengths in African American and Chicana writing, black British writing, Canadian literature, Indian subcontinental and diasporic writing, New Zealand literature, and Pacific literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
Modern English Literature begins in the extraordinary developments of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Read more

Research profile

Modern English Literature begins in the extraordinary developments of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Under the influence of social, religious and political transformations, and through engagement with classical and continental European culture, new theories and practices of literature appeared that have influenced generations of writers since.

Studying the literature of this period allows us both to enter a world that is not our own, and to see the origins of modern western perspectives and predicaments. This programme offer you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in this field.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Renaissance literature, and have particular strengths in Renaissance drama and performance, Renaissance poetry, the politics of literature in the Renaissance, religious writing in the Renaissance, Renaissance biographical and autobiographical writing, and the relevance to the study of Renaissance literature of modern and contemporary theory.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Extensive collections of Renaissance manuscripts and printed books are held in Edinburgh by the University’s own library, the National Library of Scotland, and the National Archives of Scotland. These collections offer excellent research resources and opportunities for graduate study, and are particularly rich in materials relating to Shakespeare and Renaissance drama.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
The literature of the Victorian era offers an extraordinary range of styles, themes and intellectual ideas. This diverse and dynamic literary field reflects a period which witnessed rapid change in almost every area of existence. Read more

Research profile

The literature of the Victorian era offers an extraordinary range of styles, themes and intellectual ideas. This diverse and dynamic literary field reflects a period which witnessed rapid change in almost every area of existence.

Writers such as Dickens, Eliot, the Brontë sisters, Stevenson, Tennyson, Browning, and Christina Rossetti used their work to explore new developments in topics that ranged from religion to sexuality, evolution to imperialism, and mass culture to aestheticism. This programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Victorian literature, and have particular strengths in social, historical and philosophical approaches to literature, in gender studies, and in the literary culture of the fin de siecle.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
From the poetry of Dunbar and Henryson to the fiction of James Kelman and A.L. Kennedy, Scottish literature presents an extraordinarily rich and varied subject of study, whether considered as a tradition in its own right or in terms of its interaction with English, European or world literatures. Read more

Research profile

From the poetry of Dunbar and Henryson to the fiction of James Kelman and A.L. Kennedy, Scottish literature presents an extraordinarily rich and varied subject of study, whether considered as a tradition in its own right or in terms of its interaction with English, European or world literatures.

Whether you’re interested in poetry, fiction or drama, the literary dimensions of the Scottish Enlightenment, the relationship between modernism and nationalism, Walter Scott or Irvine Welsh, Muriel Spark or Robert Louis Stevenson, this programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Scottish literature, and have particular strengths in medieval Scottish writing, in comparative approaches to Scottish literature, in Scotland’s transatlantic connections, in the relationship between literature and philosophy in Scotland, in 18th and 19th century writing and culture, and in modern and contemporary Scottish literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.

Read less
Explore Romanticism and Victorian-period literature through the study of literary culture from the 1760s to 1900. Examine the various conceptions and dimensions of British Romantic-period and Victorian literature and culture, and Romantic and Victorian criticism and theory, up to the present. Read more

MLitt in Romantic / Victorian Studies

• Explore Romanticism and Victorian-period literature through the study of literary culture from the 1760s to 1900.
• Examine the various conceptions and dimensions of British Romantic-period and Victorian literature and culture, and Romantic and Victorian criticism and theory, up to the present.
• Study various ideologies, such as the idea of childhood and discourses of emancipation in the Romantic period in relation to literary culture, and debates about gender, colonialism, Gothic and aestheticism in the Victorian period.

This MLitt is currently being redesigned for the 2016-2017 session. For up-to-date information on course content, please contact:

Teaching methods: Seminar: group discussion and individual presentations.
Assessment: Coursework essays, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Fortnightly or weekly seminars for core modules, each lasting 90 minutes; for Special Topics, six hour-long meetings over the course of one semester

Features

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

Read less
There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. Read more
There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. If you are a recent graduate looking to stand out in the job market, already working but want to develop further, or simply looking to take your passion for English to the next level then we have the strength and depth of specialisms to fit your interests.

We are one of the strongest English departments in the UK with an excellent reputation for high quality research. Our Postgraduate students are an important part of our research community, and if you choose to join us at Exeter then you will be too.

Our Library and Special Collections offer modern study facilities and a vast amount of original source material, and if you’re interested in film or visual culture then the on-site Bill Douglas Cinema Museum is an invaluable resource.

You can choose to study one of the specialist pathways we have chosen to match the Department’s strengths or you can take an open pathway and tailor your own programme from our wide range of modules.

Programme Structure

Students may opt to follow one of our seven named pathways, each of which has its own pathway leader and associated modules. American and Atlantic Studies, Criticism and Theory, Enlightenment to Romanticism, Film Studies, Renaissance Studies, Modern and Contemporary, Victorian Studies, or opt for the ‘open’ English Literary Studies pathway.

Modules

Each Pathway has compulsory and optional modules some of these are listed here;
The Cultures of American Modernism; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Criticism and Theory: Critical and Literary Theory in a Global Context; Revival and Return: Using the Past from Pope to Keats; Body and Identity; Sense, Sensation, and Cinema; Hearing Film: Film Sound and Music; Country City and Court Renaissance Literature 1558-1618; Bodies Politic: Cultural and Sexual Politics in England, 1603-85; From Orientalism to Globalization: Debates in Postcolonial Studies; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Making Progress? Literature in a Changing Environment 1830-1870 and Empire, Decadence and Modernity: Literature 1870-1910.

Constituent modules and pathways may be updated, deleted or replaced in future years as a consequence of programme development. Details at any time may be obtained from the Department website at http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/ .

Careers

In recent years the positions some of our graduates have gone on to include: Copywriter; Marketing Assistant; Assistant Editor; Publishing Assistant; Editorial Assistant; Freelance Journalist and Writer

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X