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A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks. There are three options. the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). Read more
A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks:
There are three options: the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). All three options have thesis and nonthesis tracks. The French and Spanish options also allow for an applied linguistics track (thesis or nonthesis). Regardless of the option or track, all new graduate teaching assistants must enroll for the Practicum in Applied Linguistics (either FR 512 or SP 502).

Nonthesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan II). The nonthesis track for the French, Spanish, and Romance languages options incorporates 30 hours of coursework (or 36 hours of coursework for the applied linguistics version). Included in all nonthesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages is a core of five courses in the five areas listed below (approximately 50 percent of the major). Twenty-one hours of the coursework must be language specific.

1. Teaching Practicum/Topics in Linguistics
2. Proseminar: Research Methodology/Critical Theory
3. Topics in Culture and Civilization
4. Graduate Seminar
5. Special Topics/Directed Readings

All nonthesis tracks require success on comprehensive exams before granting of the degree.
Thesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan I). A description of the typical configuration for the various thesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages follows.

* Spanish Option, standard version with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum centers on Peninsular and Spanish-American literature. Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. The written examination is based on the coursework. The oral examination is based on the coursework and on a pre-established reading list.

* Spanish Option, applied linguistics track with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 30 hours of coursework and a thesis. In addition to the thesis, the applied linguistics track involves three components: language, linguistics, and applied linguistics. The language component consists of 15 hours of course credit in Spanish language, literature, and culture (a minimum of 6 hours must be in Peninsular literature and 6 hours in Spanish-American literature). The linguistics component is comprised of a 3-hour descriptive linguistics course (SP 556). The applied linguistics component consists of 12 hours of coursework in second language acquisition and pedagogy (SP 502, EN 613, and two of the following: SP 581, EN 610, EN 612, CIE 577, or other approved courses; for descriptions of courses bearing the EN prefix, see the Department of English section of this catalog; for a description of CIE 577, see "Curriculum and Instruction Course Descriptions" in the College of Education section). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All examinations are based on the coursework.

* Romance Languages Option, with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24-30 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum requires study of French and Spanish, one as the major and one as the minor. The major includes a minimum of 18 hours. The minor includes a minimum of 12 hours. More than the minimum is recommended for both the major and the minor. Graduate courses in Italian studies are also available (see the RL prefix in course listings below). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All exams are based on the coursework.

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Our M.A. programs offer training in the areas of French and Francophone Literature and Culture, Applied and Descriptive Linguistics, and Second-language Pedagogy. Read more
Our M.A. programs offer training in the areas of French and Francophone Literature and Culture, Applied and Descriptive Linguistics, and Second-language Pedagogy. Our programs are designed to promote professional development and preparation for the job market. To that end, qualified students awarded Graduate Teaching Assistantships learn to teach at the undergraduate level at the same time that they complete requirements toward the advanced degree. Many of them also present research at local and national conferences and publish their findings.

Students choose either the Standard (Literature) Track or the Applied Linguistics Track, each with or without thesis.

Standard (Literature) Track Degree requirements

33 credit hours of coursework without thesis; or 27 credit hours of coursework and 6 credit hours of thesis research (FR 599) resulting in a completed and approved thesis. Find out more information on thesis procedures.
At least one course in five of six fields:
- Medieval and Renaissance
- Early Modern (17th and 18th centuries)
- 19th century
- 20th and 21st centuries
- Francophone and French studies
- French linguistics
A comprehensive exam with written and oral components based on coursework completed in the five fields.*

*On the written portion of the comprehensive exam for the Standard Track, candidates may be exempted from examination in a maximum of two fields: by writing a thesis in a field; by presenting a research paper in a field at a professional conference; or by earning a grade of “A” or “B” in two courses in a field. For the oral portion of the exam, students present a topic assigned in advance.

Applied Linguistics Track Degree requirements

36 credit hours of coursework without thesis; or 30 credit hours of coursework and 6 credit hours of thesis research (FR 599) resulting in a completed and approved thesis. Find out more information on thesis procedures and consult the special instructions for French Linguistics students.

Coursework in three areas (French Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, French electives) as follows:
- French descriptive linguistics course for 3 credit hours (FR 561)
- 12 credit hours in SLA, pedagogy, and research (FR 512 and other approved courses)
- 21 credit hours of French electives (language, literature, film, culture, linguistics, etc.) for the non-thesis track; 15 credit hours of French electives for the thesis track.

A comprehensive written exam, based on the coursework.

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The Master of Arts in French, Italian and Spanish follow a 9 course requirement in two plans. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to seek academic advise early in their planning to ensure sequences that best reflect expectations and future career choices and interests. Read more

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in French, Italian and Spanish follow a 9 course requirement in two plans. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to seek academic advise early in their planning to ensure sequences that best reflect expectations and future career choices and interests.
The Romance Languages and Literatures Department provides instruction in the French, Italian and Spanish languages and their literatures with the programs leading to the master of arts degree. A candidate for the MA is expected to acquire oral and written proficiency in one Romance language, sound knowledge of the principal aspects of the literature in that language; and familiarity with various methods of scholarship and criticism. An elementary knowledge of a second Romance language and of Latin is desirable.
The master of arts degree in each of the three languages follows a similar structure: nine (9) graduate courses (36 credits). Two of the nine are considered electives, selected with the student's adviser or department graduate director and tailored to the student's needs and future objectives, in closely related subject matter within the general framework of the Master's program. Of the remaining seven courses, the student is immersed in the literature and canon of the language being studied. A parallel program is available whereby one course substitution of a Thesis may be selected. All students are required to take Comprehensive Examinations. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) aptitude test scores are required for admission. The requirements for the MA in French, Italian or Spanish may be satisfied according to Plan A or Plan B described below.

The Romance Languages and Literatures Department provides instruction in French language and literature leading to the master of arts degree. Students have the option of pursuing a track of study culminating in a master's thesis or may pursue a track of study whereby one course may be selected in substitution of the thesis.

The program at Binghamton University allows students to work closely with the accomplished members of our faculty throughout their academic careers, and also affords students the opportunity to participate in a joint MA/PhD program offered in collaboration with the Comparative Literature Department. The flexible programs and options for work done outside the department make Binghamton University a unique educational institution.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Two letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The MA by Research (French) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (French) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your own choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focused, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/mafrenchbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

You will have the opportunity to:
- Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support

- Follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture

- Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium

- Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies

- Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

Core course units:

Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This course is the core taught course for all students and is taught across two terms. It provides you with knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines your theoretical understanding and provides you with the methodological tools needed to proceed to PhD research if you so wish.

Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-to-one support from your supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
• Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline.

• Learned to undertake focused research, developed written and oral presentation skills, and honed skills in critical analysis.

• Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

• Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

Theories of Literature and Visual Culture is assessed by an essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a Visiting Examiner and includes a viva voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism, translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MA by Research (Italian) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (Italian) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your own choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focused, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/maitalianbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

• Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support
• Follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture
• Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium
• Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies
• Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

You will take one core taught course and complete a dissertation

Core course units:
- Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This course is the core taught course for all students and is taught across two terms. It provides you with knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines students’ theoretical understanding and provides the methodological tools to proceed to PhD research if they so wish.

- Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-one-one support from a dedicated supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline.

- Learnt to undertake focused research, developed written and presentation skills, and honed your skills in critical analysis.

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a visiting examiner and includes a viva voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism, translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Research profile. The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study. Read more

Research profile

The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study.

This programme allows you to pursue individual projects in Scottish and/or English literature within a wider interdisciplinary understanding of the period as a whole. Whether your interests lie in major figures such as Chaucer, Langland, The Gawain Poet, Malory, Skelton, Henryson, Dunbar, Douglas or Lyndsay, in less well-known or anonymous writers, the romance tradition, lyric poetry or drama, or in the relationships between literature, society and politics, you will have the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research, supported by a flexible choice of taught options in related areas.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of medieval literature, and have particular strengths in verse and prose romance, religious and secular drama, and lyric poetry.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Programme Structure

The course includes a 15,000-word dissertation, completed under the supervision of one or more of the course tutors. Students will undertake a seminar based programme of research methods training in core research skills and subject specific methodologies. They will also take two option courses covering areas of medieval literature and culture related to their chosen fields, each consisting of a weekly two-hour seminar, and will write two extended essays in relation to these courses

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.



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The MA by Research (Comparative Literature and Culture) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (Comparative Literature and Culture) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focussed, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/macomparativeliteratureandculturebyresearch.aspx

You will be able to:

• Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support
• Follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture
• Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium
• Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies
• Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

You will take one taught course and complete a dissertation.

- Core course units:
Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This core course is taught across two terms. It provides you with knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines your theoretical understanding and provides you with the methodological tools to proceed to PhD research if you so wish.

Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-to-one support from your supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline

- Learnt to undertake focused research, developed writtten and presentation skills, and honed your skills in critical analysis

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a Visiting Examiner and includes a Viva Voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism and translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online.

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The research-focused Master's programme in History imparts theory and research methods, enabling you to apply scientific principles to historical topics. Read more

About the programme

The research-focused Master's programme in History imparts theory and research methods, enabling you to apply scientific principles to historical topics.
You will learn to tackle complex issues and reconstruct historical developments and events by cross-referencing source material.
Most history programmes tend to focus on the major historical periods; the M.A. History at the University of Passau additionally includes subjects from closely related disciplines.
The programme is designed to allow you to actively shape your study path by selecting two focus modules to suit your personal interests and career plans.

Features

– A combination of conventional history course content and a choice of major epochs, subjects and regional disciplines, with the possibility to include topics from closely related disciplines
– Core subjects: the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, Modernity and Contemporary History, Eastern European History, Ecclesiastical History and Auxiliary Sciences of History
– You may specialise further by choosing a second focus subject
– Supplementary qualification: Certificate of Digital Humanities

Syllabus

The degree programme comprises eight module groups:

A) Intensive modules
B) Extension modules
C) Research module
D) Auxiliary sciences
E) Theory and methods
F) Subject-specific interdisciplinary modules

A) You will choose two focus areas from the offered historical areas as intensive modules: Ancient History, the Middle Ages, Modernity and Contemporary History, Eastern European History, Ecclesiastical History and Auxiliary Sciences of History.

B) You may choose any of the history courses offered in module group A to extend your knowledge of history.

C) You will present your own scientific aims for debate in a colloquium and critically appraise other research contributions.

D) This module teaches auxiliary sciences and predominantly source-oriented courses.

E) In this module group you consolidate your knowledge of history theory, methods and economic history. The module group also includes courses in history education, including theory and methods.

F) As the degree programme was designed to be interdisciplinary, you may attend courses for related scientific disciplines, such as Catholic Theology; Philosophy; Art History; German, English or Romance Philology; Slavic Literature and Cultural Studies; Political Science; Sociology or Geography.

As part of the degree programme you will write a thesis on a topic selected from module group A. Students who complete the programme will receive a total of 120 ECTS credits.

German language requirements

You will need good German language skills to study this degree programme, as that is the main language of instruction for this programme. Therefore, you will have to provide a recognised German language certificate when enrolling for the programme, unless you can demonstrate that German was the language of instruction for your secondary school education (e.g. Abitur at a German international school) or your first undergraduate degree (i.e. a German-taught bachelor's degree programme).

The University of Passau has set up a German language teaching unit, German Courses Passau, which offers a selection of preparatory language programmes tailored to the needs of international students. These range from summer courses to a full academic year and cater to learners of all levels.

Additional language requirements

You should provide a certificate in both Latin and English at level UNIcert® I/B1 CEFR or equivalent.

If you do not intend to select the Ancient World or Middle Ages focus modules, you may provide a certificate in a Romance language (French, Spanish, Italian) instead of Latin.

If you intend to select the Eastern-European History focus module, you are required to provide a certificate in an Eastern-European language at level UNIcert® I/B1 CEFR but not in Latin.

If you intend to select the Eastern-European History in conjunction with either Ancient or Medieval History focus modules, you are required to provide a certificate in an Eastern-European language at level UNIcert® I/B1 CEFR or equivalent, but not in English.

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The MA by Research (Hispanic Studies) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (Hispanic Studies) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your own choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focused, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/mahispanicstudiesbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

You will get the opportunity to:
- Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support

- You will follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture

- Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium

- Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies

- Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

You will take one core taught course and complete a dissertation.

- Core course units:

Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This course is the core taught course for all students and is taught across two terms. It provides y knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines students' theoretical understanding and provides the methodological tools to proceed to PhD research if they so wish.

Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-to-one support from your supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline.

- Learnt to undertake focussed research, developed written and oral presentation skills, and honed their skills in critical analysis.

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a visiting examiner and includes a viva voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism, translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Read more
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programmes offer up-to-date training in research methods and skills and a wide selection of literature modules from which you choose three; you will also write a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to follow up particular interests by studying a named pathway, or to designate your own area of study within the broad MA in English Literary Studies, tailoring an individual programme based on period, theme or genre. An MA in English is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take one of the named pathways, you will be expected to select two modules from those available within a pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to your named pathway. You need not confine your choices to a named pathway, as on the broad MA in English Literary Studies you may choose any three from the full list of modules on offer if you prefer. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules:
Research Methods and Resources
Dissertation

Typical optional Modules might include:
Old Norse
Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
Old English Language and Literature
Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Renaissance Tragedy
Renaissance Humanism
Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
Romantic Forms of Grief
Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
The Literatures of Slavery
Literature of the Supernatural
Modernism and Touch
Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
Life Narratives
Post-War British Drama
Modern Poetry
The Contemporary US Novel
Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative
The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than twenty of the above will run in any one year.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature is the first of its kind in the world. It draws on world-level expertise to explore the various types of narrative produced in ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt.

Key Features

This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. It is taught by a team of scholars associated with the KYKNOS research centre, whose research in this field is internationally recognised.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature offers excellent preparation for students who intend to undertake further research in this exciting and rapidly developing area of Classical literature. Students will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Greek and/or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient Narrative Literature can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin language
• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Greek and Roman Magic :Exploring the Sources
• Reading Academic German
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Word, Metaphor, Allegory: effective models of reality

Student Quote

"I studied at Swansea University for my Undergraduate degree and fell in love with the city, the university campus and the lecturers and supporting staff at the university. Deciding to do my MA in Ancient Narrative Literature here was therefore partly influenced by this. However, Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University was an attractive choice mostly because of the quality of the lecturers here. Both Professor John Morgan who is already a highly esteemed scholar within the area of the Ancient Greek novels and Dr Ian Repath who is a rising star in the same subject area make Swansea University the ideal place to study Ancient Narrative Literature at MA level."

Ida Meland

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Classics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Classics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Greek and Latin languages are the key to our knowledge of the ancient world, and the origin of many modern European languages. This MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in the ancient languages, and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world. In addition to developing their ability to read fluently in the ancient languages and to translate them accurately and sensitively, students are introduced to the critical and analytical methodologies that shape the study of Classical literature in the twenty-first century. Students in the MA in Classics should normally already have studied either Latin or Greek, and will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of the other.

Key Features of MA in Classics

The MA Classics studies Greek and Latin language, literature and civilisation.

The MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in ancient languages and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Classics MA is split across the year offering three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of your choosing.

Part-time Classics MA students take three modules in the first year, three in the second year and write the dissertation in the third year.

MA in Classics Aims

To acquire advanced reading skills in ancient Greek and Latin.
To develop the ability to translate from ancient Greek and Latin accurately and sensitively.
To develop the theoretical and analytical skills relevant to the study of ancient texts in the original languages.
To prepare for further text-based research on any aspect of Greek or Roman history and culture.
Through the precision and awareness to detail entailed in the study of ancient languages, to acquire a range of transferable skills relevant to a range of employment opportunities, including those which involve language acquisition and translation.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Classics course typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin Language
• Ancient Greek or Latin Texts
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, history and archaeology.
Particular strengths include:

• Ancient Narrative Literature
• The Ancient Novel
• Plato and Platonism
• Greek Tragedy
• Ancient Technology
• The Archaeology of Roman Egypt
• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation
• Greek Social History
• The History and Archaeology of Asia Minor
• Late Antiquity
• Roman Military History

All staff in History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. In addition, regular research seminars and lectures are run through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are
encouraged to attend.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Classics graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.

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Our taught MA pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. Read more
Our taught MA pathway in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the fields of Medieval and Renaissance studies. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from Old Norse to Renaissance Tragedy, from medieval manuscripts to critical theory. The Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies pathway is especially strong in offering interdisciplinary modules taught in collaboration with specialists from other departments including History and Archaeology. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programme offers up-to-date training in research methods and skills. You will choose three modules, at least two of which are from within the pathway, and you will write a dissertation on a subject related to Medieval and/or Renaissance studies.

An MA in Medieval and Renaissance Literary Studies is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take this named pathway, you will be expected to select at least two modules from those available within the pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to it. Your third optional module may, if you wish, be chosen from the full list of MA modules on offer in the Department. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Typical modules might include:
-Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
-Old Norse
-Old English Language and Literature
-The Anglo-Norman World
-Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
-Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
-Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
-Renaissance Tragedy
-Renaissance Humanism
-John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
-Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more then six of the above will run in any one year.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Read more
This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Choosing specialisms within European thought, society, history and politics you will develop discipline-specific skills and regional expertise, while the interdisciplinary programme structure encourages you to think across boundaries, gaining an expansive overview of the continent.

Degree information

The European Society pathway aims to provide a solid theoretical grounding and encourage students to look at different types of historical and social-scientific inquiry. It offers the opportunity to experiment with new ways of integrating the interpretation of literary texts, art and film in their study of history and society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. Two pathways are offered: Taught and Research. The Taught pathway consists of three core modules (90 credits), two optional inter-faculty modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). The Research pathway consists of six optional inter-faculty modules (90 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), two optional inter-faculty modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

Core modules - students on the Taught pathway take the following core modules:
-Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
-Social Theory
-The Making of Modern Europe

Optional modules - for the latest information on this course's optional modules, see the website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/european-studies-society-ma

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words, or 18,000 words for the Research pathway.

Teaching and learning
Key aspects of European theory and culture are taught through participation in lectures and seminars. Through feedback sessions on presentations and essays, students are encouraged to reflect on, and improve, their own work. Assessment is through a combination of coursework essays, unseen written examinations, and the dissertation.

Careers

MPhil and PhD degrees often follow on from a Master's programme: both the Taught and Research pathways of the MAs offered by the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) are intended to allow this type of progression, as well as standing as degrees in their own right. Outside academia, potential careers may include politics, business, commerce, teaching, public relations, or journalism.

Employability
Graduates of this MA have used their extensive knowledge and understanding of European institutions, policies and society to obtain positions within the European Union. The high level of interdisciplinary training and research skills offered by the programme have equipped others for positions as researchers in UK and European universities, museums and non-governmental agencies. The emphasis on written and verbal communication, collation and presentation of research and analysis have provided transferable skills for the fields of accountancy, law and PR.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) at UCL is unique in offering graduate students the opportunity to investigate Europe in its entirety, from European integration and public policy to European cinema and poetry.

The central London location offers easy access to the British Library, British Museum, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, German Historical Institute, Goethe Institut, Institut Français, and other similar research and cultural centres.

Less than three hours away from Brussels and Paris, nowhere enjoys such a range of resources and such a favourable location for the study of Europe.

Read less
This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Read more
This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Choosing specialisms within European thought, society, history and politics you will develop discipline-specific skills and regional expertise, while the interdisciplinary programme structure encourages you to think across boundaries, gaining an expansive overview of the continent.

Degree information

From Marx to Foucault, Bakhtin to Durkheim, European thinkers have helped to influence the ways in which we understand texts and communication, individuals and societies. This pathway encourages graduates to investigate a panoply of ideas and theories, and their applications.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. Two pathways are offered: Taught and Research.

The Taught pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), four optional inter-faculty modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). The Research pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), two inter-faculty optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four inter-faculty optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

Core modules
-Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
-Social Theory

Optional modules - students on the Taught pathway select four, and students on the Research pathway select two of the following inter-faculty optional modules:
-Relevant modules - UCL Arts & Humanities Faculty
-Relevant modules - UCL Social & Historical Sciences Faculty
-Relevant modules - UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES)

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000-words, or 18,000-words for the Research pathway.

Teaching and learning
Key aspects of European theory and culture are taught through participation in lectures and seminars. Through feedback sessions on presentations and essays, students are encouraged to reflect on, and improve, their own work. Assessment is through a combination of coursework essays, unseen written examinations, and the dissertation.

Careers

MPhil and PhD degrees often follow on from a Master's programme: both the Taught and Research pathways of the MAs offered by the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) are intended to allow this type of progression, as well as standing as degrees in their own right. Outside academia, potential careers may include politics, business, commerce, teaching, public relations, or journalism.

Employability
Graduates of this MA have used their extensive knowledge and understanding of European institutions, policies and society to obtain positions within the European Union. The high level of interdisciplinary training and research skills offered by the programme have equipped others for positions as researchers in UK and European universities, museums and non-governmental agencies. The emphasis on written and verbal communication, collation and presentation of research and analysis have provided transferable skills for the fields of accountancy, law and PR.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) at UCL is unique in offering graduate students the opportunity to investigate Europe in its entirety, from European integration and public policy to European cinema and poetry.

The central London location offers easy access to the British Library, British Museum, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, German Historical Institute, Goethe Institut, Institut Français, and other similar research and cultural centres.

Less than three hours away from Brussels and Paris, nowhere enjoys such a range of resources and such a favourable location for the study of Europe.

Read less

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