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Masters Degrees (Robotic Surgery)

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Chelmsford, ICENI Centre, Broomfield Robotic Centre. Our course will provide you with the breadth and depth of experience to fully engage with all aspects of minimally invasive and robotic surgery including the latest technological advances. Read more

Campus

Chelmsford, ICENI Centre, Broomfield Robotic Centre

Overview

Our course will provide you with the breadth and depth of experience to fully engage with all aspects of minimally invasive and robotic surgery including the latest technological advances.
You’ll undertake laparoscopic simulation training, based at the ICENI Centre in Colchester, and you’ll also have access to the Robotic Centre at Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford. The ICENI Centre is internationally recognised as a leading centre of excellence in the field of minimally invasive surgery. It combines the advanced multidisciplinary laparoscopic techniques practised at Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, with the highest-quality research infrastructure established here at Anglia Ruskin University.
We’re home to the Postgraduate Medical Institute (PMI), which has its own £10 million building on our Chelmsford campus. It features state-of-the-art laboratory and training facilities and lecture theatres linked with partner hospital sites. In conjunction with Colchester Hospital University Foundation Trust, we’ve funded a £2 million building specifically for minimally-invasive surgery research and a training centre.
Designed by clinical experts, the course will prepare you to advance your career development and opportunities in this area of surgical specialism. On successful completion of this programme, you will be awarded a Master of Surgery which entitles you to use
MCh after your name. MCh is an abbreviation of Magister Chirurgiae, the Latin for Master of Surgery. Master of Surgery, rather than MCh, will appear on your certificate.

Core Modules

Core Principles of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery
Research Studies
Major Project

Specialist modules

Principles of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery – Gynaecology
Principles of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery – Gastrointestinal
Principles of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery – Urological
Principles of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery – Vascular
In addition to the compulsory modules students select one speciality module from the above list to complete the course.

Optional modules

Global Leadership
Advancing Professional Decision Making

Modules are subject to change and availability.

Start dates

September 2017

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The MSc in Surgical Science and Practice is a part-time, modular course completed in two to three years by surgical trainees. Read more
The MSc in Surgical Science and Practice is a part-time, modular course completed in two to three years by surgical trainees.

Delivered in collaboration with the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (http://www.nds.ox.ac.uk/) it is designed to prepare senior surgical trainees for life as independent specialists by providing key skills and knowledge essential for modern practice, which are not fully represented or are omitted from most postgraduate training curricula. The course is unique as its part-time nature is designed to allow students to fit their study around work.

The MSc in Surgical Science and Practice provides a foundation in some of the most important additional life long skills which the future leaders of the profession need to acquire. Surgeons in the future will work as part of multi-disciplinary teams in complex organisations, and will need to adapt and develop new skills and roles throughout their professional lives. Thus the syllabus covers management skills, quality improvement, leadership, teamwork and patient safety, as well as an introduction to the principles of medical education and clinical research methods. The knowledge gained during this course will stand students in good stead throughout their careers.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-surgical-science-and-practice

Programme details

The MSc in Surgical Science and Practice is organised around six compulsory modules, plus a work-based research project and dissertation. The programme is normally completed in two to three years. Students are full members of the University of Oxford and are matriculated as members of an Oxford college.

The course features a significant component of online and distance learning, as well as one week of intensive teaching in Oxford per module.

Modules:

- Becoming a Medical Educator
- Human Factors, Teamwork and Communication
- Introduction to Surgical Management and Leadership
- Quality Improvement Science and Systems Analysis
- Surgical Technology and Robotics
- The Practice of Evidence-Based Health Care (Surgery)

Each module takes place once a year, giving students the opportunity to individualise their patterns of study.

During the course there is an exceptional opportunity for an introduction, with hands-on experience, to leading edge modern surgical technology such as the Da Vinci robot. The programme also features lectures by staff from the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine based in the world-renowned Department of Primary Care Health Sciences.

Taught by global experts, the modules in this programme can also be taken as individual stand-alone courses.

Course aims

The overarching aim of the MSc in Surgical Science and Practice is to provide the next generation of surgeons with the tools to build and lead successful surgical units delivering safe, high quality, high reliability care.

By the end of the course candidates will be able to understand the following important principles:

- How to evaluate clinical research evidence critically and understand how it should be interpreted and applied to one’s own context and practice;

- How to design, conduct and evaluate teaching and training for postgraduate clinicians, and how to assess curricula and teaching programmes;

- Financial and quality management ideas, and methods for analysing and restructuring the systems in which surgeons work;

- A theoretical understanding of the use of modern surgical technology linked to baseline practical training in minimally invasive and robotic surgical techniques;

- The teamwork, leadership and communication skills required for effective and safe working in a modern surgical environment.

What will you gain from attending the programme?

At the end of the programme you will be able to:

- Critically appraise relevant clinical research and estimate its validity and relevance to your practice;

- Understand in principle how to design your own clinical research studies, and what expert support you need to be successful;

- Understand basic business and financial planning in the health care industry;

- Develop your own business plans and cases for your practice;

- Understand the principles of leading a team and how to foster an appropriate culture to promote good teamwork and communication;

- Analyse and improve systems of work within surgery using standard industrial quality improvement and human factors principles;

- Understand how to act as a mentor and trainer for postgraduate trainees, how to set up and run courses and curricula, and how to evaluate and improve trainee progress;

- Understand and have some experience of using up to the minute surgical technology which is likely to become important during your career.

Teaching methods

The class-based modules include a period of preparatory study, a week of intensive face-to-face lectures and tutorials, followed by a period for assignment work. Attendance at modules is a requirement for study. Some non-classroom activities are provided at facilities elsewhere in the University, including surgical simulators and operating theatres on the University's hospital sites. The course includes taught material on research skills.

The taught modules include group work, discussions, guest lectures, and interaction and feedback with tutors and lecturers. Practical work develops the student's knowledge and understanding of the subject. This includes supervised access to surgical simulators and robots as part of the Surgical Technology and Robotics module.

A virtual learning environment (VLE) provides extensive support between modules.

Resources available:

University of Oxford libraries, including:

- The Cairns Library at the John Radcliffe Hospital
- Radcliffe Science Library
- Rewley House Continuing Education Library
- Bodleian Libraries e-Resources

Plus facilities from the Department of Continuing Education, including:

- The Graduate School
- WebLearn virtual learning environment

Assessment methods

To complete the MSc, students will need to:

- Attend the six compulsory modules in Oxford, and undertake assessed written assignments for each module;
- Complete a dissertation on a topic selected by the candidate in consultation with the supervisor and approved by the Standing Committee.

Dissertation

The dissertation will be founded on a work-based research project that will build on the material studied in the taught modules. The dissertation should normally not exceed 15,000 words.

The project will normally be supervised by an academic supervisor from the University of Oxford, and an employer-based mentor.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts. Read more
As well as giving a solid scientific understanding, the course also addresses commercial, ethical, legal and regulatory requirements, aided by extensive industrial contacts.

Programme Structure

The MSc programmes in Biomedical Engineering are full-time, one academic year (12 consecutive months). The programmes consist of 4 core taught modules and two optional streams. Biomedical, Genetics and Tissue Engineering stream has 3 modules, all compulsory (individual course pages). The second option, Biomedical, Biomechanics and Bioelectronics Engineering stream consists of 5 modules. Students choosing this option will be required to choose 60 credit worth of modules.

The taught modules are delivered to students over two terms of each academic year. The taught modules are examined at the end of each term, and the students begin working on their dissertations on a part-time basis in term 2, then full-time during the months of May to September.

Core Modules
Biomechanics and Biomaterials (15 credit)
Design and Manufacture (15 credit)
Biomedical Engineering Principles (15 credit)
Innovation, Management and Research Methods (15 credit)
Plus: Dissertation (60 credit)

Optional Modules

60 credit to be selected from the following optional modules:
Design of Mechatronic Systems (15 credit)
Biomedical Imaging (15 credit)
Biofluid Mechanics (15 credit)
Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications (15 credit)
Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control (30 credit)

Module Descriptions

Applied Sensors Instrumentation and Control

Main topics:

Sensors and instrumentation – Sensor characteristics and the principles of sensing; electronic interfacing with sensors; sensor technologies – physical, chemical and biosensors; sensor examples – position, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, strain, pressure, temperature; distributed sensor networks; instrumentation for imaging, spectroscopy and ionising radiation detection; 'lab-on-a-chip'.

Control – Control theory and matrix/vector operations; state-space systems, multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems, nonlinear systems and linearization. Recurrence relations, discrete time state-space representation, controllability and observability, pole-placement for both continuous and discrete time systems, Luenberger observer. Optimal control systems, Stochastic systems: random variable theory; recursive estimation; introduction to Kalman filtering (KF); brief look at KF for non-linear systems and new results in KF theory.

Artificial Organs and Biomedical Applications

Main topics include: audiology and cochlear implants; prostheses; artificial limbs and rehabilitation engineering; life support systems; robotic surgical assistance; telemedicine; nanotechnology.

Biofluid Mechanics

Main topics include: review of the cardiovascular system; the cardiac cycle and cardiac performance, models of the cardiac system, respiratory system and respiratory performance, lung models, physiological effects of exercise, trauma and disease; blood structure and composition, blood gases. oxygenation, effect of implants and prostheses, blood damage and repair, viscometry of blood, measurement of blood pressure and flow; urinary system: anatomy and physiology, fluid and waste transfer mechanisms, urinary performance and control, effects of trauma, ageing and disease; modelling of biofluid systems, review of mass, momentum and energy transfers related to biological flow systems, fluid mechanics in selected topics relating to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; measurements in biomedical flows.

Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Main topics include: review of biomechanical principles; introduction to biomedical materials; stability of biomedical materials; biocompatibility; materials for adhesion and joining; applications of biomedical materials; implant design.

Biomedical Engineering Principles

Main topics include: bone structure and composition; the mechanical properties of bone, cartilage and tendon; the cardiovascular function and the cardiac cycle; body fluids and organs; organisation of the nervous system; sensory systems; biomechanical principles; biomedical materials; biofluid mechanics principles, the cardiovascular system, blood structure and composition, modelling of biofluid systems.

Biomedical Imaging

Principle and applications of medical image processing – Basic image processing operations, Advanced edge-detection techniques and image segmentation, Flexible shape extraction, Image restoration, 3D image reconstruction, image guided surgery

Introduction of modern medical imaging techniques – Computerized tomography imaging (principle, image reconstruction with nondiffracting sources, artifacts, clinical applications)

Magnetic resonance imaging (principle, image contrast and measurement of MR related phenomena, examples of contrast changes with changes of instrumental parameters and medical applications)

Ultrasound imaging (description of ultrasound radiation, transducers, basic imaging techniques: A-scan, B-scan and Doppler technique; clinical application)

Positron emission tomography (PET imaging) (principle, radioactive substance, major clinical applications)

Design and Manufacture

Main topics include: design and materials optimisation; management and manufacturing strategies; improving clinical medical and industrial interaction; meeting product liability, ethical, legal and commercial needs.

Design of Mechatronic Systems

Microcontroller technologies. Data acquisition. Interfacing to power devices. Sensors (Infrared, Ultrasonic, etc.). Optoelectronic devices and signal conditioning circuits. Pulse and timing-control circuits. Drive circuits. Electrical motor types: Stepper, Servo. Electronic Circuits. Power devices. Power conversion and power electronics. Line filters and protective devices. Industrial applications of digital devices.

Innovation and Management and Research Methods

Main topics include: company structure and organisation will be considered (with particular reference to the United Kingdom), together with the interfacing between hospital, clinical and healthcare sectors; review of existing practice: examination of existing equipment and devices; consideration of current procedures for integrating engineering expertise into the biomedical environment. Discussion of management techniques; design of biomedical equipment: statistical Procedures and Data Handling; matching of equipment to biomedical systems; quality assurance requirements in clinical technology; patient safety requirements and protection; sterilisation procedures and infection control; failure criteria and fail-safe design; maintainability and whole life provision; public and environmental considerations: environmental and hygenic topics in the provision of hospital services; legal and ethical requirements; product development: innovation in the company environment, innovation in the clinical environment; cash flow and capital provision; testing and validation; product development criteria and strategies.

Dissertation

The choice of Dissertation topic will be made by the student in consultation with academic staff and (where applicable) with the sponsoring company. The topic agreed is also subject to approval by the Module Co-ordinator. The primary requirement for the topic is that it must have sufficient scope to allow the student to demonstrate his or her ability to conduct a well-founded programme of investigation and research. It is not only the outcome that is important since the topic chosen must be such that the whole process of investigation can be clearly demonstrated throughout the project. In industrially sponsored projects the potential differences between industrial and academic expectations must be clearly understood.

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