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Ritual in Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies. Rituals are indispensable for human beings, in past and present. Read more
Ritual in Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies.

Rituals are indispensable for human beings, in past and present. The important moments in human life are always highlighted by rituals. In addition to ritual’s traditional function of marking key moments in human life, people assign great value to rituals as instruments to achieve social cohesion, as means of coping with grief and bereavement, and as powerful tools to remember the past. Apart from such a predominantly positive use of rituals, it should be noted that ritual is also a contested phenomenon. Ritual is all about inclusion and exclusion and about power and display in the public domain. Moreover, ritual is dynamic and fluid; it is an excellent gauge of cultural diversity and societal developments. Therefore, the study of ritual is of vital importance for understanding society.

Your lecturers are nationally and internationally renowned scholars who will introduce you to the field of ritual studies on the basis of their own research. They will present to you both the state of the art in ritual studies as well as the most recent developments in their various disciplines. The MA in Ritual in Society offers you a unique, multidisciplinary program with a focus on ritual dynamics in contemporary Europe with regular forays into the global context.

Career Perspective Ritual in Society

The program offers a Master’s career to prepare students for jobs in areas ranging from research to the world of travel and tourism (travel agencies) and from education to consultancy and management. The program will have an explicit international orientation so students are expected to find jobs in the labor market in a variety of countries in Europe and beyond. More specifically, Ritual in Society prepares you for jobs in fields like:
•Research (PhD; contract research)
•Education
•Ritual facilitator
•Ritual consultancy
•Consultancy (culture; memory culture; museum)
•Journalism
•Editorial and publishing work
•Policy work (minorities policy; diversity)
•Project work
•Human Resource Management
•Scholarly Travel Agency

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Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama. Read more

Summary

Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama.

The MA Dramatherapy programme at Roehampton offers unique training within the Ritual Theatre process of dramatherapy. Drawing heavily on the theatrical observations of Peter Brook and the experiments of Jerzy Grotowski, as well as anthropological notions of “rites of passage” and the importance of “myth”, the programmes offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy at various levels.

On this course, you will learn to facilitate an in-depth therapeutic process for a range of client groups, and devise therapeutic performances and workshops. You will also undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice. The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally-recognised professional qualification.

The programme consists of three stages, which offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy. In Stage One, you will be introduced to basic theatre skills and use these creatively to work with established stories and characters. This progresses into an exploration of the personal identifications that we have with stories and myths, and an understanding of the deep foundations within many cultural traditions of using ritual, drama and performance for the enhancement of health. In Stage Two, the focus moves on to employing drama and theatre processes as vehicles for exploring our own inter-personal and internal ‘dramas’.

Stage Three is where you will conduct your own piece of practical investigation or research into the literature and theory-base of dramatherapy practice. The Dramatherapy programme will provide you with a broad range of skills enabling you to pursue your own research interests across a wide spectrum of dramatherapy practice and theory.

Content

You will study a range of topics including how to crafting therapeutic drama stories, understanding the individual and group process, Ritual Theatre, working with myths, paratheatrical explorations and the art of structure when working in dramatherapy.

Our research areas include individual dramatherapy in schizophrenia; perception and evaluation of therapeutic outcomes from therapist and client perspectives; the role of race, culture and gender; dramatherapy and “mentalisation” with borderline personality disorder and complex trauma; therapeutic scenarios and resistance; creativity and destructiveness; the dramatherapist; and the multidisciplinary team.

Alongside the experiential focus of the training, the programme also aims to develop the necessary understanding and reflective capacity required to practice as a professional dramatherapist. This is achieved through workshops, lecture series and clinical application seminars, as well as through assessed clinical placements.

We also offer introductory courses which provide a useful background to those working in related professions or anyone simply wishing to find out more about the work. For information on our Introduction Courses, Summer Schools and Foundation Course in Dramatherapy, see the Psychology Short Courses.

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This MA programme offers an interdisciplinary and multicultural perspective in both contemporary performance practice and research. Read more
This MA programme offers an interdisciplinary and multicultural perspective in both contemporary performance practice and research. The programme is unique, guiding students to conceive research, devise and deliver their creative ideas alongside cutting-edge theories and practice. It will be of particular interest to practitioners, curators and researchers interested in performance in its widest cultural sense and brings together the arts with science and ritual studies.

This MA will help you to develop a mature and critical understanding of a variety of creative forms and their relevant historical and cultural contexts. You will get the opportunity to create new forms and contexts for performance, theatre and dance that respond to emerging social, political and ecological settings. You will learn to write project and funding proposals and document and archive your practice; developing a portfolio of projects to use for professional interactions with art organisations and institutions at national and international level.

The MA is taught by specialist scholars and international practitioners. Supporting students at all levels is of utmost importance at Liverpool Hope and you will be mentored and receive personal development and supervision during throughout your study from distinguished subjects.

Through a praxis ethos where research informs practice and vice versa, students are encouraged to develop their skills, creativity, analytical skills and independence. Overall, the curriculum engages with a wide range of performance strategies including performance art, dance, ritual, site-specific performance, multicultural and/or hybrid forms of theatre.

The emphasis of the programme is on practice-based enquiry and interdisciplinary research. Students are exposed to innovative, integrative and intercultural perspectives on anthropology, politics, cultural theory, religious and ritual studies, but also on the social and human sciences, post-human theories and ecology. ‌

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The course has been specifically designed to develop and enhance your skills as a public theologian. You will explore the important role and contribution of theological ideas to public debates and issues. Read more
The course has been specifically designed to develop and enhance your skills as a public theologian. You will explore the important role and contribution of theological ideas to public debates and issues. The course is ecumenical and would be appropriate for those with a background in theology seeking to improve significantly their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of important areas.

The course will develop a set of practical and public theological skills. At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with public issues. You may then undertake advanced study in important topics such as ethics, pluralism and diversity, liturgy and ritual, spirituality, biblical studies, and missiology.

You can find out more about the MA by contacting Dr Graeme Smith and arranging an informal meeting or telephone call. Email: or Tel: 01243 816191

Course content
You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
May Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)
January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.

Block Teaching dates are:

Tuesday, August 23rd – Thursday, August 25th 2016
Tuesday, January 10th – Thursday, January 12th 2017
Tuesday, May 9th – Thursday, May 11th 2017

Tuesday, August 22nd – Thursday, August 24th 2017
Tuesday, January 9th – Thursday, January 11th 2018
Tuesday, May 8th – Thursday, May 10th 2018

Tuesday, August 21st – Thursday, August 23rd 2018
Tuesday, January 8th – Thursday, January 10th 2019
Tuesday, May 7th – Thursday, May 9th 2019

Course fees
The full rate for the MA is £640 per module which equates to £1920 per year. This is payable for each of the 3 years of study.

Reduced fees are available for those recommended for study by their local church authorities, the department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department of the University of Chichester, or by SCALA.

The reduced fee is £480 per module equating to £1440 per year for each of the three years of study.

Accommodation costs are in addition to the academic fee.

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The MA in Christian Ministry has been specially developed to meet the needs of Christian ministers, predominantly those working in local churches. Read more
The MA in Christian Ministry has been specially developed to meet the needs of Christian ministers, predominantly those working in local churches. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Your study will consistently ask what is the local and practical importance of key questions and issues. At the end of the course, in the dissertation, you will reflect theologically in depth on your own specific ministerial context.

The course is suitable for clergy and laity. There is an increasing diversity in Christian ministry and that provision is only likely to become more varied in the future. Teaching is ecumenical and would be appropriate for those ministers seeking to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of relevant theological areas.

Course content
You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
May Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)
January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Find out more

You can find out more about the MA by contacting Dr Graeme Smith or Canon Rebecca Swyer and arranging an informal meeting or telephone call.

The Revd Canon Rebecca Swyer

Director for Apostolic Life,

Diocesan Church House,

211 New Church Road,

Hove

BN3 4ED



Tel: 01273 425015

Dr Graeme Smith

Dept. of Theology, Philosophy & Religious Studies,

University of Chichester,

College Lane,

Chichester,

PO19 6PE.



Tel: 01243 816191



Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.

Block Teaching dates are:

Tuesday, August 23rd – Thursday, August 25th 2016
Tuesday, January 10th – Thursday, January 12th 2017
Tuesday, May 9th – Thursday, May 11th 2017

Tuesday, August 22nd – Thursday, August 24th 2017
Tuesday, January 9th – Thursday, January 11th 2018
Tuesday, May 8th – Thursday, May 10th 2018

Tuesday, August 21st – Thursday, August 23rd 2018
Tuesday, January 8th – Thursday, January 10th 2019
Tuesday, May 7th – Thursday, May 9th 2019

Course fees
The full rate for the MA is £640 per module which equates to £1920 per year. This is payable for each of the 3 years of study.

Reduced fees are available for those recommended for study by their local church authorities, the department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department of the University of Chichester, or by SCALA.

The reduced fee is £480 per module equating to £1440 per year for each of the three years of study.

Accommodation costs are in addition to the academic fee.

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The course has been specially developed to meet the needs of school chaplains working in schools and academies. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Read more
The course has been specially developed to meet the needs of school chaplains working in schools and academies. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Your study will consistently ask what is the practical school importance of key questions and issues. At the end of the course, in the dissertation, you will reflect theologically in depth on your own specific ministerial context.

The course is suitable for ordained and lay individuals. There is an increasing diversity in Christian ministry and that provision is only likely to become more varied in the future. Teaching is ecumenical and would be appropriate for those ministers seeking to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of relevant theological areas.


Course content
You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
May Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)
January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

You can find out more about the MA by contacting Dr Graeme Smith or SCALA and arranging an informal meeting or telephone call.

Dr Graeme Smith

Dept. of Theology, Philosophy & Religious Studies,

University of Chichester,

College Lane,

Chichester,

PO19 6PE.



Tel: 01243 816191

Paul Hansford

Administrator

SCALA (School Chaplains and Leaders Association)

01243 812134

http://www.scala.uk.net

Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.

Residential dates are:

Block Teaching dates are:

Tuesday, August 23rd – Thursday, August 25th 2016
Tuesday, January 10th – Thursday, January 12th 2017
Tuesday, May 9th – Thursday, May 11th 2017

Tuesday, August 22nd – Thursday, August 24th 2017
Tuesday, January 9th – Thursday, January 11th 2018
Tuesday, May 8th – Thursday, May 10th 2018

Tuesday, August 21st – Thursday, August 23rd 2018
Tuesday, January 8th – Thursday, January 10th 2019
Tuesday, May 7th – Thursday, May 9th 2019

Course fees
The full rate for the MA is £640 per module which equates to £19200 per year. This is payable for each of the 3 years of study.

Reduced fees are available for those recommended for study by their local church authorities, the department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department of the University of Chichester, or by SCALA.

The reduced fee is £480 per module equating to £1440 per year for each of the three years of study.

Accommodation costs are in addition to the academic fee.

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The MA in Dramatherapy is a two-year full-time course offered within the School of English, Media and Theatre Studies at NUI Maynooth, Co Kildare, Ireland. Read more

Overview

The MA in Dramatherapy is a two-year full-time course offered within the School of English, Media and Theatre Studies at NUI Maynooth, Co Kildare, Ireland. The programme offers a training to become a fully qualified Dramatherapist. At the core of Dramatherapy lies the experience of personal transformation through group and/or individual work. The Dramatherapy process uses drama activities with the intention of facilitating change. On this course students will study, explore, experience and develop the necessary theoretical and clinical framework for planning, facilitating and evaluating this therapeutic process. Students who complete all aspects of the MA training programme will be qualified to work as Dramatherapists with a variety of client groups within for example clinical, social and educational settings. Students are required to undergo personal therapy (group and individual) outside of the teaching hours throughout the training.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/english/our-courses/ma-dramatherapy

All applicants are required to have some experience in each of the following areas:
- 6 months minimum experience of working with people in clinical, social or educational settings
- Drama and theatre training or extensive experience of drama
- Training in or an interest in and experience of personal development through personal therapy or counselling.

Applicants must have a recognised primary degree which is considered equivalent to Irish university primary degree level.

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

Maynooth University’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

The Dramatherapy MA programme is delivered every Friday and one Saturday a month starting early September, continuing throughout the academic year and extending into a Summer School in June. The modules include a variety of subjects such as working with stories therapeutically, working with groups, developing theatre skills, introduction to Playback and Forum Theatre, working with ritual in therapy, introduction to psychological and psychoanalytical concepts, an introduction to research methodologies for the Arts Therapies and an Arts Therapies summer school.

Career Options

A wide range of career opportunities are available to graduates with the necessary skills and willingness to go out and find their own work in organisations such as the HSE, Social Services, Prison Services, Education, Community Services and the wider Business Community.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/english/our-courses/ma-dramatherapy#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Our Historical Research & Public History MA offers a rich and intensive study of historical research and public history. The programme is designed to produce talented and sought-after historians who are able to apply their skills not only to academia but also to the practice of history in the public sphere. Read more
Our Historical Research & Public History MA offers a rich and intensive study of historical research and public history. The programme is designed to produce talented and sought-after historians who are able to apply their skills not only to academia but also to the practice of history in the public sphere.

The Historical Research & Public History MA is a one-year programme taught primarily through seminars of no more than 10 students, over the course of 86 full contact hours.

In addition, you will receive 11 hours of intensive one-to-one tutorials, in which our academics will engage and work with you to clarify, challenge, defend and develop the arguments and ideas that you express in your essays. The tutorial method is the gold standard of a humanities education. It draws out your potential by providing the deepest insights and sharpens your intellectual skills. Graduate students are also welcome to attend lectures in all the other degree programmes being offered in history or other disciplines at NCH.

MA students are also strongly encouraged to attend 40 hours of lectures on ‘History, Heritage & Memory’, which are delivered by the History Faculty as part of the College’s History BA degree. You may also attend the regular professorial lectures that are delivered to our undergraduates and friends of the College in order to further enrich their studies, led by the College’s world-leading Visiting Professors including Bettany Hughes, Sir Christopher Ricks, Richard Dawkins, Steven Pinker, and others.

NCH understands the importance of thinking about your future while you are studying for your degree, so that you are ready to succeed in whatever you choose to do as soon as you graduate. All postgraduate students at NCH have the opportunity to benefit from the College’s professional development advisory service where you will work with our careers department on an individual basis throughout your time at NCH.

Whether you decide to pursue a career or start their own business, NCH will help identify a professional or academic future that best matches your ambitions and aptitudes, and to prepare you for success after graduation.

Research and archives

You will be introduced to major research libraries and archives including the National Archives, Senate House Library, the British Library and the British Museum, which is located mere steps from NCH.

You will be taught how to search these archives for primary sources – dating from the medieval, early modern and modern past and including manuscript sources, printed texts and quantified data – and how to research, evaluate and critique a wide range of different source materials.

You will learn to distinguish between and assess different historical perspectives, and to evaluate the usefulness of inter-disciplinary approaches to history, including anthropology, the history of art, and literary studies.

Public history

The public history strand of the programme teaches you how to critically appraise the ways in which historical knowledge can contribute to a wider public engagement with the past, and the challenges and complexities of reconstructing the past for a public audience.

During your studies, you will meet with professionals who practise History in the public realm, including historical novelists, media producers, museum curators and keeper of historic archives. The faculty will also organise a study trip a major historic house, or another site of historic interest.

Programme outline

Our Historical Research & Public History MA is a one-year programme of study, or can be studied part-time across three years.

Each of the programme’s seven courses have been developed and will be delivered by the History Faculty at NCH, led by award-winning academic, historian and broadcaster Dr Suzannah Lipscomb.

o Course 1: The Historian’s Craft
o Course 2: Depth Study I*
o Course 3: Public History
o Course 4: Depth Study II*
o Course 5: Dissertation I
o Course 6: Applied Public History
o Course 7: Dissertation II

* Depth Studies are chosen from:

o The Royal Court: Ritual, Culture & Power in Medieval England, 1150-1300
o Reality & Utopia: Renaissance Political Thought
o Cross-Cultural encounters in the Early Modern World
o The Later Victorian Age: Society & Culture, 1870-1900
o African Americans & Economic Inequality from Civil War to Civil Rights

Where we teach

New College of the Humanities has the great fortune of being based in one of the best locations for a higher education institution in the UK. Situated in the heart of Bloomsbury, the main building is mere steps from the Senate House Library and the British Museum, and just a few minutes’ walk to Oxford Street, Covent Garden, Theatreland and an array of galleries and museums.

The majority of your seminars and weekly one-to-one tutorials will take place in The Registry on Bedford Square, which is home to the College’s teaching and administrative facilities.

The Registry is a stunning and recently refurbished Grade I listed, five-storey townhouse, situated in the centre of one of the most beautiful examples of a Georgian terrace. It stands opposite the tranquil and beautiful Bedford Square Gardens, the first garden square with an imposed architectural uniformity, which set the style for garden squares across London.

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This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts. Read more
This interdisciplinary Masters course draws on studies in mythology, psychology, anthropology, theology, esoteric philosophy, a range of wisdom traditions and the arts.

It offers a discerning investigation into seemingly non­rational modes of knowing, exploring the cosmological sense of the sacred, the widespread practices of symbol interpretation and the cultural role of the creative imagination.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/myth-cosmology-and-the-sacred.aspx

Course detail

The overall aim of the course is to encourage critical, imaginative and creative ways of engaging reflexively with some of the most important questions of our time, such as the debate between science and religion, the nature of sacred reality, and the foundations of spiritual, religious and ritual experience. To do this we explore theories of knowledge and consciousness, oracular and divinatory practices (ancient and contemporary), and the cultural expression of myth in landscape, poetry, art and music.

The course has been highly praised as an outstanding example of transformative learning, as it brings personal reflection and creativity to bear on the study of spirituality in the broadest sense. It brings to the fore issues of connectivity, sustainability, ecological awareness, and the engagement of the imagination in the aid of individual, community and global understanding, wellbeing and harmony.

Canterbury is a perfect venue to study this course, with its ecclesiastical heritage, rich literary history, beauty of landscape and architecture, and easy access to both London and the continent.

Suitability

The course will appeal to all those seeking to develop and enrich their lives through the study of the history, philosophy and practices of Western sacred and esoteric traditions, and will be of particular interest to teachers, practitioners and therapists in the fields of contemporary spirituality and wellbeing who would like to engage more deeply with both the foundations of their work and their own self-knowledge.

There are many areas for potential further study, and we now have a thriving graduate environment with MPhil/PhD researchers pursing topics as diverse as the music of the spheres, Freemasonry, conflict resolution, alchemical symbolism, transformative learning and intuitive reading methods.

Content

The four taught modules, comprising seminars, learning journal groups and workshops take place at alternate weekends, in term time, from October to March, with optional workshops in the summer term.

The Creative Project assignment and dissertation module take place from April to September (for full-time students) and April to the following September (for part-time students). Each teaching weekend includes an open lecture by a visiting speaker. There are also optional sessions on Friday afternoons (compulsory for Tier 4 students).

The four taught modules will address the following topics:

• Theories and Methods
• Symbol and Imagination
• Oracular and Divinatory Traditions
• Spirit and Psyche
• Creative Project
• Learning Journal
• Dissertation

Format

Teaching methods include seminars, lectures and workshops. Students can expect eight hours of teaching each study weekend, plus two hours of learning journal groups. They also receive individual supervision for each taught and research assignment, and eight hours of research preparation seminars.

They will attend two days a year for creative project presentations and a variety of optional workshops will be offered. There will also be an open public lecture at each study weekend, on the Saturday evening, which they are encouraged to attend, and optional Friday afternoon seminars on a variety of themes.

Assessment

Four essays of 4,000 words (20 credits each), one creative project review of 4,000 words, one learning journal write-up of 4,000 words (20 credits each) and one dissertation of 12-15,000 words (60 credits).

What can I do next?

Most of the students on this course are mature adults with established careers. However, possible career opportunities might include teaching, counselling and mentoring, spiritual and wellbeing guidance, alternative healing and therapies, writing and media, the arts, and further research.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Tailor-made to the needs of health care practitioners, this research-intensive programme is driven by contemporary policy debates. Read more

Summary

Tailor-made to the needs of health care practitioners, this research-intensive programme is driven by contemporary policy debates. It will give you the opportunity to develop, undertake and publish your own original research.

On this course you will look at how different societies and people understand and react to health and illness. The course will cover the range of societies in our world, looking at responses to health from using ritual to cutting edge technologies and organ transplantation. You will also focus on how our evolving healthcare methods impact on how people see themselves, their families and communities.

As well as providing a wide knowledge base, this course will encourage you to develop your expertise in a number of areas in the anthropology of health, honing your critical, interpretative and evaluative skills, and undertaking continuous personal and professional development.

You will be supported by experienced staff whose research has made a significant impact on global society, and receive training in qualitative and quantitative anthropological research methods relevant to undertaking an extended research project. Based on the wide variety of staff expertise, some of the topics you can currently research may include HIV/AIDS care and intervention, pharmaceuticals, wellbeing and arts health, religion and traditional health care systems, human variation and adaptation. The research that you undertake will be of journal quality and published.

Studying the anthropology of health at Roehampton will give you a global perspective on the discipline, and a wide view of possible career paths. In an increasingly globalised world, you will be equipped with the necessary skills to understand and interpret the cultural patterns in diverse health fields and organisations, enabling you to progress to PhD-level study or a career in the complex and cultural field of healthcare.

Content

In this programme you will have a comprehensive introduction to the anthropology of health. Initial modules will allow you to study the diverse ideas and practice in healthcare, and how these impact on individual and community formation. For example, how do new reproductive technologies impact on notions of kinship within a family and community? How do different medical systems within a community relate to each other? How do organ transplants influence concepts of personhood and the self?

You will also study, through a selection of case studies, the idea of health, wellbeing and illness as states within a continuous process, using the idea of a life-cycle as a model. This module will investigate the ways in which people strive to lead healthy and fulfilling lives and respond to episodes of ill-health and unease. It places medical issues in a context of people’s quest for continuity and their struggles to cope with uncertainty.

Other modules on the course will cover topics such as sociocultural/biological/evolutionary concepts of health; mental and environmental health; food/nutrition; leisure and wellbeing; arts health; and disability. You will also explore lifecycles to understand health issues such as: birth to death, reproduction, ageing and the body, in/fertility, new reproductive technologies, life history narrative, childhood, puberty, rites of passage.

You will undertake an extended piece of original research showing a sustained engagement with an issue in the anthropology of health. It is supported by supervision and is the culmination of the MRes Anthropology of Health programme. This dissertation is supported by the preparation of a policy document or paper for publication.

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Study the field that brings past people to life. Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Read more
Study the field that brings past people to life

Why choose this course?

Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Funerary archaeology combines analysis of human remains with their archaeological context to take a truly interdisciplinary approach to studying both life and death in the past. The course at York offers the chance to develop skills in a range of different methods and techniques, but all centred on learning how to investigate death and burial in the past. The flexible nature of the course enables you to pursue your own particular period or methodological interests.
-Explore the varied archaeological and methodological approaches to funerary archaeology
-Work alongside internationally renowned specialists in a range of different periods and methodologies, by choosing either the MA or MSc route
-Gain ‘hands on’ experience of the analysis of human remains
-Learn through fieldtrips to local museums and relevant sites, e.g. the prehistoric monuments in the Yorkshire Wolds
-Choose modules to support your own research interests
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive advice on developing your career and research interests from knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The course focuses a range of topics from identity, landscape, social structure, commemoration and memory, ritual and belief, and the body. It covers attitudes and repsonses to death from the first evidence for the special treatment of human remains by homids up to the place of funeray rites in modern day societies, but with a particular focus on the interpretively challenging evidence from Prehistory. The analysis of human remains and their archaeological context are both taught in a flexible modular system, that allows you to tailor the course to your particular methodological or period interests.

The MA and MSc pathways offer a chance to specialise in different areas of Funerary Archaeology research. There is also an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying Funerary Archaeology from a range of perspectives, which are at the frontiers of both archaeological method and theoretical approach. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, biology or related fields, but students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds are encouraged.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Postgraduate students at York have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage.

Careers

By the end of the MA or MSc Funerary Archaeology course you will be able to:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches to Funerary Archaeology
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of studying death and burial in the past
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Explore selected methods and periods in detail, through the option modules
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many of York's Masters postgraduates go on to further research, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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The postgraduate diploma in Parish Church Studies offers a unique opportunity to gain detailed and practical knowledge of the history, use, care and conservation of parish churches. Read more
The postgraduate diploma in Parish Church Studies offers a unique opportunity to gain detailed and practical knowledge of the history, use, care and conservation of parish churches. The online format offers you the opportunity to study in your own home and somewhat at your own pace, extensively supported by an expert in the field, and learning as part of an active online community.

The only course of this type in Britain, the diploma enables those wishing to enhance their understanding of local sites of importance in order to develop new areas of expertise or those involved in the design and implementation of conservation techniques. It is equally valuable for lay staff, volunteers and those simply with a general interest in the parish landscape.

The programme starts in late September/early October, concurrent with each new academic year – places are limited to ensure a constructive atmosphere for discussions.

This is a two-year, part-time, postgraduate-level programme delivered wholly online in a fully-supported learning environment. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate after successful completion of the first year if their circumstances change.

This Diploma is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation for Continuing Professional Development purposes.

Overview

-To provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of the sources on which to draw for the study of parishes and parish churches
-To provide students with knowledge of the issues within parish history and current academic debate
-To provide the students with an understanding of the development of the parish system and its role in everyday life from the early medieval period to the present day
-To provide students with knowledge of how churches and their churchyards developed and changed over time and the current debates around ecology, maintenance and continued use
-To provide students with an understanding of the changing nature of the relationship between a parish church and the community it serves through time
-To demonstrate the complexity and diversity of events in the past, and the range of problems involved in the interpretation of complex, ambiguous, conflicting and often incomplete material
-To equip students with the analytical tools necessary to interrogate effectively the worth of primary and secondary source material pertaining to the history of parish churches
-To encourage students to develop their own views on different historical debates in the academic literature and to think creatively about the topics they are studying
-To provide a supportive and stimulating postgraduate environment enabling students to work independently within a clearly defined structure of regular discussion and supervision
-To underline for students the importance of objectivity in research and to be aware when their own views or feelings are unbalancing and objective argument
-To explore the changing practice of public worship and private devotion and their interaction with art and architecture
-To stimulate students to explore the use, care and changing of church buildings and to understand the complex issues and emotions which surround debates in this field.

Structure

This part-time two-year programme will comprise six 20-credit modules:
1. Sources and Issues
2. Objet D’art, Objects of Faith
3. Worship & Ritual
4. Parish & Community
5. Church & Churchyard
6. Use, Conservation & Change in Church Buildings

Students will be required to complete all these modules in the first instance, though additional modules may be added in the future to accommodate future programme growth and offer a broader learning experience.

Assessments will comprise a balance of short and long critical essays, book reviews, short research projects and other similar tasks.

Online Study

Our approach to e-learning is distinctive and may be different from your general perceptions about online study:
-Flexible, fully supported, modular delivery
-Taught exclusively online
-Two stages: Certificate and Diploma. Each stage typically takes 12 months
-Comprises six distinct modules
-Part-time study (approximately 15 hours per week) allows participants to structure their learning around the other life circumstances

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Experience a rigorous interdisciplinary graduate program in Social and Political Thought, in a supportive and personalized environment – the only one of its kind in Atlantic Canada. Read more
Experience a rigorous interdisciplinary graduate program in Social and Political Thought, in a supportive and personalized environment – the only one of its kind in Atlantic Canada.

In Acadia's graduate program in Social and Political Thought you will dive into the study of political and social life through theoretical questions and engagements. The program is interdisciplinary in nature since social and political thought is a nexus connecting political thought, social theory, philosophy, postcolonial thought, literary criticism, media studies, cultural studies, environment studies, and gender studies. Working in close collaboration with its nationally and internationally celebrated faculty, you will take courses spanning several disciplines, increase your exposure to other areas of inquiry and approaches to theory through the core colloquium, and undertake a final interdisciplinary thesis (in year two).

Be Inspired

As a graduate student of Social and Political Thought at Acadia, you will benefit from the small school environment with small class sizes and high faculty-to-student interaction. Only MA programs without PHD programs above them can promise this kind of support, attention and engagement. While having access to professors with a diverse set of research interests, you can also expect a personalized research agenda. To ensure attention to the interdisciplinary nature of the program, you will be guided in your research by your supervisor and a second reader (selected from another discipline).

This program is designed around student engagement. The Social and Political Thought program hosts: a bi-weekly colloquium attended by students, faculty and guest lectures; a newly-founded graduate journal in social and political thought titled: To Be Decided; a community speakers forum; a film series; and a robust graduate student culture. The program also hosts a bi-annual graduate conference on social and political thought in the spring, attracting students and scholars nationally and internationally.

Research Interests

-Paul Abela: Kant; Moral theory
-Andrew Biro: Critical theory; Environmental political theory; Political ecology/economy
-Rachel Brickner: Comparative political theory; Latin American politics
-James Brittain: Critical Development Studies; Latin American Society and Politics; Political Economy; Social Change and Revolution
-Michael Dennis: The political economy of the New Deal era; social movements and political reform in the United States; globalization and the American South; American economic history of the postwar period; and the civil rights movement.
-Marc Ramsay: Ethics and philosophy of law
-Jon Saklofske: Literary studies; Media forms and functions; Narrative ideologies; Digital cultures; Virtual environments; Video game studies
-Donna Seamone: Ritual studies; Ethnographic study of religion
-Tony Thomson: Marxism; Organized labour in Canada; Critical criminology; Social theory
-Brenda Trofanenko: Public history and pedagogy; Museum anthropology; Postcolonial theory; Memory studies
-Geoffrey Whitehall: International political theory; Contemporary Political Thought; Discourses of Culture and Technology; Philosophy of Space and Time
-Ian Wilks: Medieval philosophy; Philosophy of religion; Ethics and bioethics

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This pioneering MA offers interdisciplinary perspectives on international performance, and aims to understand performance in relation to the culture to which it contributes- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-culture/. Read more
This pioneering MA offers interdisciplinary perspectives on international performance, and aims to understand performance in relation to the culture to which it contributes- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-culture/

The Masters takes in diverse forms of theatre, including multicultural and street theatre, and such practices as:

performance art
dance
ritual
site-specific performance
a wide range of hybrid forms
It leads you to explore performance as sociocultural process by using analytical principles from sociology, the sociology of culture, cultural theory, anthropology, history, philosophy, politics and theatre and performance.

We have numerous links, locally and internationally, with a wide variety of theatres, companies and performers, all of which enhance your research possibilities.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Secretary.

There are three compulsory core modules which focus on a range of issues concerning performance as a sociocultural practice. They involve:

conceptual and theoretical material, their interweave and their relationship to performance
historiographical methodologies and textual issues
analysis of live performances
cultural difference, ethnicity and cross-culturalism
questions to do with corporeality, alternative spaces and performance in terms of social inclusivity
A choice of options or independent study constitutes the fourth component, and a dissertation on your individual research completes your programme of study.

Core modules

The three core modules consist of:

Cultural Theory, Performance, Interdisciplinary Perspectives:
This module is an introduction to the whole programme and focuses on the interdisciplinary use of a range of theories from sociology, anthropology, theatre and other areas to understand live performance. As part of this module you are expected to see as many performances as possible.

Historicising Theatre:
This module is concerned with exploring the problems and possibilities of theatre history, and the relationship between theatre, text and cultural context.

Corporeality, Embodiment, Alternative Spaces:
This module includes work on rituals, shamanism, dance, hybrid forms, site-specific, multi-ethnic performance and theatres of exclusion.

Assessment

Each compulsory module and the option module carry equal weight, each representing 15% of the overall mark. The dissertation is worth 40%.

Skills

You will develop writing and oral skills at a high academic level, demonstrating the ability to think and work in an interdisciplinary manner using a range of methodologies. your ability to work collaboratively and to facilitate and participate in group discussions will be enhanced.

You will also develop skills in identifying the socio-cultural, historical and political issues and pressures specific to varied types of performance.

Careers

This programme provides a strong grounding in the principles of research and of learning through independent research. It is particularly suitable if you wish to pursue further academic work in creative, performative fields.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CLASSICAL STRAND

The Classical strand follows the development of the theatrical art from its earliest ritual roots to the birth of naturalism:
> Greek Tragedy, Chorus and the Neutral Mask
> Clowning and Commedia dell’arte
> Shakespeare and the English Renaissance
> Stanislavski, the Method and ‘Realist’ Theatre.

The Classical strand draws on the hugely influential theories and techniques of the great French acting teacher Michel Saint-Denis, training the expressive body, voice and imagination. Working with some of the greatest dramatic texts ever written, students are asked to consider what they mean now, and how their 21st century reinterpretation and re-imagining still holds a ‘mirror up to nature’. Students are encouraged to understand the demands of both art and craft, as participants in, and practitioners of, the western theatrical tradition, through a course structure that examines, in chronological order, four key periods of innovation and transition.

CONTEMPORARY STRAND

The Contemporary strand addresses the actor’s relationship with the writer, from Early Modern times to the present day through the exploration of:
> Shakespeare and his legacy
> Chekhov, Stanislavski and the birth of naturalism
> the actor and 20th century playwriting
> new writing and the development of new work.

The Contemporary strand combines teaching in practical voice, movement and acting techniques with an exploration of some of the key playwrights that have helped forge the canon of Western theatre, from the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists to Chekhov and from Beckett to Kane. Uniquely, it explores the relationship between the two artists at the core of much Western theatre: the actor and the writer.
From Shakespeare and the King’s Men to the work of modern day producing houses, plays are frequently developed in collaboration between actors and writers, sometimes directly and sometimes mediated by a director. Students are encouraged to explore their role as creative artists in relation to writers and the written word. Throughout the course you will have the chance to work with, and alongside, writers on plays in development, both the next generation of playwrights on the MA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media, and established playwrights with a track record of produced plays.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage
of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa
Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools
Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.

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