• University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University College London Featured Masters Courses
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of the West of England, Bristol Featured Masters Courses
"ritual"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Ritual)

We have 51 Masters Degrees (Ritual)

  • "ritual" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 51
Order by 
Ritual in Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies. Rituals are indispensable for human beings, in past and present. Read more
Ritual in Society is a renewed, fully English-taught Master's specialization within the Master's program Culture Studies.

Rituals are indispensable for human beings, in past and present. The important moments in human life are always highlighted by rituals. In addition to ritual’s traditional function of marking key moments in human life, people assign great value to rituals as instruments to achieve social cohesion, as means of coping with grief and bereavement, and as powerful tools to remember the past. Apart from such a predominantly positive use of rituals, it should be noted that ritual is also a contested phenomenon. Ritual is all about inclusion and exclusion and about power and display in the public domain. Moreover, ritual is dynamic and fluid; it is an excellent gauge of cultural diversity and societal developments. Therefore, the study of ritual is of vital importance for understanding society.

Your lecturers are nationally and internationally renowned scholars who will introduce you to the field of ritual studies on the basis of their own research. They will present to you both the state of the art in ritual studies as well as the most recent developments in their various disciplines. The MA in Ritual in Society offers you a unique, multidisciplinary program with a focus on ritual dynamics in contemporary Europe with regular forays into the global context.

Career Perspective Ritual in Society

The program offers a Master’s career to prepare students for jobs in areas ranging from research to the world of travel and tourism (travel agencies) and from education to consultancy and management. The program will have an explicit international orientation so students are expected to find jobs in the labor market in a variety of countries in Europe and beyond. More specifically, Ritual in Society prepares you for jobs in fields like:
•Research (PhD; contract research)
•Education
•Ritual facilitator
•Ritual consultancy
•Consultancy (culture; memory culture; museum)
•Journalism
•Editorial and publishing work
•Policy work (minorities policy; diversity)
•Project work
•Human Resource Management
•Scholarly Travel Agency

Read less
Why study at Roehampton. Approved by the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification as a dramatherapist. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Approved by the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification as a dramatherapist.
  • The programme is based upon the Ritual Theatre process of dramatherapy. It draws heavily on the theatrical observations of Peter Brook and the experiments of Jerzy Grotowski, as well as anthropological notions of ‘rites of passage’ and the importance of ‘myth’.
  • The opportunity to undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice.
  • Taught by experienced clinical practitioners and authors of dramatherapy publications, including the editor of The Dramatherapy Journal.
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact. 

Course summary

Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama.

The MA Dramatherapy programme at Roehampton offers unique training within the Ritual Theatre process of dramatherapy. Drawing heavily on the theatrical observations of Peter Brook and the experiments of Jerzy Grotowski, as well as anthropological notions of “rites of passage” and the importance of “myth”, the programmes offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy at various levels. 

On this course, you will learn to facilitate an in-depth therapeutic process for a range of client groups, and devise therapeutic performances and workshops. You will also undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice. The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally-recognised professional qualification.

The programme consists of three stages, which offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy. In Stage One, you will be introduced to basic theatre skills and use these creatively to work with established stories and characters. This progresses into an exploration of the personal identifications that we have with stories and myths, and an understanding of the deep foundations within many cultural traditions of using ritual, drama and performance for the enhancement of health. In Stage Two, the focus moves on to employing drama and theatre processes as vehicles for exploring our own inter-personal and internal ‘dramas’. 

Stage Three is where you will conduct your own piece of practical investigation or research into the literature and theory-base of dramatherapy practice. The Dramatherapy programme will provide you with a broad range of skills enabling you to pursue your own research interests across a wide spectrum of dramatherapy practice and theory.

Content

You will study a range of topics including how to crafting therapeutic drama stories, understanding the individual and group process, Ritual Theatre, working with myths, paratheatrical explorations and the art of structure when working in dramatherapy.

Our research areas include individual dramatherapy in schizophrenia; perception and evaluation of therapeutic outcomes from therapist and client perspectives; the role of race, culture and gender; dramatherapy and “mentalisation” with borderline personality disorder and complex trauma; therapeutic scenarios and resistance; creativity and destructiveness; the dramatherapist; and the multidisciplinary team.

Alongside the experiential focus of the training, the programme also aims to develop the necessary understanding and reflective capacity required to practice as a professional dramatherapist. This is achieved through workshops, lecture series and clinical application seminars, as well as through assessed clinical placements.

Modueles

Here are examples of the modules:

Year One:

  • Human Development and Growth
  • Process Group
  • Research Methods
  • Dramatherapy Practice & Supervision

Year Two:

  • Process Group
  • Research Portfolio
  • The Ritual of Creative Expression
  • The Ritual of Exploration
  • The Ritual of Transformation

Career options

Dramatherapists are employed across the spectrum of health and social care, education and forensic services. Dramatherapists may also operate in private therapy, training and consultancy practice.

Email Now



Read less
The Postgraduate Certificate in Vigiling with the Dying at Winchester allows students to reflect on their own professional practice in writing and performing ritual for the dying through a critical and self-reflective engagement with ritual and performance studies theories. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Vigiling with the Dying at Winchester allows students to reflect on their own professional practice in writing and performing ritual for the dying through a critical and self-reflective engagement with ritual and performance studies theories.

Programme Content

The programme is specifically designed for those who vigil with the dying who are looking to reflect critically on, and develop, their professional practice, especially in regard to creating rituals. It is also designed for those who wish to explore academically historical and current approaches to death, dying, and pastoral care in a variety of world religions.

See the website http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Studyhere/Pages/pgcert-vigiling-with-the-dying.aspx

Modules

- Contemporary Approaches to Death and Dying
- Death, Dying and Pastoral Care in World Religions
- Performing Rituals: Creative and Critical Methodologies in Vigiling with the Dying

Learning and Teaching

Students undertake structured discussion and debate through electronic forums and are provided with guided course readings and access to the e-resources held in the University library in order to complete assessments. A visit to a local crematorium, cemetery, mortuary and/or funeral home is an essential aspect of the programme. Reflection on current practice with peers also forms an essential part of the course.

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff who include internationally renowned scholars.

Assessment

Assessments include weekly study skills tasks, a field report, a dossier, self-reflections document, essays and constructing a vigiling ritual with a critical rationale.

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Careers

Graduates vigil with the dying.

Read less
This MA programme offers an interdisciplinary and multicultural perspective in both contemporary performance practice and research. Read more
This MA programme offers an interdisciplinary and multicultural perspective in both contemporary performance practice and research. The programme is unique, guiding students to conceive research, devise and deliver their creative ideas alongside cutting-edge theories and practice. It will be of particular interest to practitioners, curators and researchers interested in performance in its widest cultural sense and brings together the arts with science and ritual studies.

This MA will help you to develop a mature and critical understanding of a variety of creative forms and their relevant historical and cultural contexts. You will get the opportunity to create new forms and contexts for performance, theatre and dance that respond to emerging social, political and ecological settings. You will learn to write project and funding proposals and document and archive your practice; developing a portfolio of projects to use for professional interactions with art organisations and institutions at national and international level.

The MA is taught by specialist scholars and international practitioners. Supporting students at all levels is of utmost importance at Liverpool Hope and you will be mentored and receive personal development and supervision during throughout your study from distinguished subjects.

Through a praxis ethos where research informs practice and vice versa, students are encouraged to develop their skills, creativity, analytical skills and independence. Overall, the curriculum engages with a wide range of performance strategies including performance art, dance, ritual, site-specific performance, multicultural and/or hybrid forms of theatre.

The emphasis of the programme is on practice-based enquiry and interdisciplinary research. Students are exposed to innovative, integrative and intercultural perspectives on anthropology, politics, cultural theory, religious and ritual studies, but also on the social and human sciences, post-human theories and ecology. ‌

Read less
PgCert Funeral Celebrancy at Winchester enables students to reflect on their existing professional practice as a Funeral Celebrant/ Officiant. Read more
PgCert Funeral Celebrancy at Winchester enables students to reflect on their existing professional practice as a Funeral Celebrant/ Officiant. Students develop existing creative and critical professional practice through an engagement with theories and methodologies from the academic disciplines of death studies, religious studies, ritual and performance studies, and creative writing.

Programme Content

This Postgraduate Certificate relates a wide range of religious and cultural approaches to death and dying, disposal and bereavement rituals, and the work of a funeral celebrant.

Students explore sociological, anthropological, philosophical and theological methodologies; look at creative writing through an academic lens; and explore ritual and performance studies theories.

With a strong focus on self-reflection and professional development, this programme is only suitable for individuals already working as Funeral Celebrants/Officiants.

See the website http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Studyhere/Pages/pgcert-funeral-celebrancy.aspx

Modules

- Approaches to Studying Death
- Death, Dying and Pastoral Care in World Religions
- Performing Rituals: Creative and Critical Methodologies in Constructing and Performing a Eulogy

Learning and Teaching

Students undertake structured guided reading and engage in online discussion and debate. A visit to a local crematorium, cemetery or natural burial site is an essential aspect of the programme.

The programme is taught by a team of highly qualified and enthusiastic staff who include internationally renowned scholars.

Assessment

Types of assessment used include reflecting on writing and performing eulogies, exploring professional practice in light of a site visit and more traditional methods of assessment such as essays. There are no examinations. An introduction to academic study skills is embedded into the first module.

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Careers

This Postgraduate Certificate is designed for those already working as Funeral Celebrants/Officiants. It offers a valuable professional development opportunity and a firm foundation for postgraduate research.

Read less
Course content. You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns. Read more

Course content

You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)

January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology

May Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey

May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation 

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.



Read less
The course has been specially developed to meet the needs of school chaplains working in schools and academies. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Read more
The course has been specially developed to meet the needs of school chaplains working in schools and academies. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Your study will consistently ask what is the practical school importance of key questions and issues. At the end of the course, in the dissertation, you will reflect theologically in depth on your own specific ministerial context.

The course is suitable for ordained and lay individuals. There is an increasing diversity in Christian ministry and that provision is only likely to become more varied in the future. Teaching is ecumenical and would be appropriate for those ministers seeking to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of relevant theological areas.


Course content
You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
May Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)
January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

You can find out more about the MA by contacting Dr Graeme Smith or SCALA and arranging an informal meeting or telephone call.

Dr Graeme Smith

Dept. of Theology, Philosophy & Religious Studies,

University of Chichester,

College Lane,

Chichester,

PO19 6PE.



Tel: 01243 816191

Paul Hansford

Administrator

SCALA (School Chaplains and Leaders Association)

01243 812134

http://www.scala.uk.net

Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.

Residential dates are:

Block Teaching dates are:

Tuesday, August 23rd – Thursday, August 25th 2016
Tuesday, January 10th – Thursday, January 12th 2017
Tuesday, May 9th – Thursday, May 11th 2017

Tuesday, August 22nd – Thursday, August 24th 2017
Tuesday, January 9th – Thursday, January 11th 2018
Tuesday, May 8th – Thursday, May 10th 2018

Tuesday, August 21st – Thursday, August 23rd 2018
Tuesday, January 8th – Thursday, January 10th 2019
Tuesday, May 7th – Thursday, May 9th 2019

Course fees
The full rate for the MA is £640 per module which equates to £19200 per year. This is payable for each of the 3 years of study.

Reduced fees are available for those recommended for study by their local church authorities, the department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department of the University of Chichester, or by SCALA.

The reduced fee is £480 per module equating to £1440 per year for each of the three years of study.

Accommodation costs are in addition to the academic fee.

Read less
Course content. You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns. Read more

Course content

You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

  • August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
  • January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
  • May Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)

Year Two

  • August Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)
  • January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
  • May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation 

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.



Read less
This pioneering MA offers interdisciplinary perspectives on international performance, and aims to understand performance in relation to the culture to which it contributes. Read more

This pioneering MA offers interdisciplinary perspectives on international performance, and aims to understand performance in relation to the culture to which it contributes.

The Masters takes in diverse forms of theatre, including multicultural and street theatre, and such practices as:

  • performance art
  • dance
  • ritual
  • site-specific performance
  • a wide range of hybrid forms

It leads you to explore performance as sociocultural process by using analytical principles from sociology, the sociology of culture, cultural theory, anthropology, history, philosophy, politics and theatre and performance.

We have numerous links, locally and internationally, with a wide variety of theatres, companies and performers, all of which enhance your research possibilities.

Modules & structure

There are three compulsory core modules which focus on a range of issues concerning performance as a sociocultural practice. They involve:

  • conceptual and theoretical material, their interweave and their relationship to performance
  • historiographical methodologies and textual issues
  • analysis of live performances
  • cultural difference, ethnicity and cross-culturalism
  • questions to do with corporeality, alternative spaces and performance in terms of social inclusivity

A choice of options or independent study constitutes the fourth component, and a dissertation on your individual research completes your programme of study.

Core modules

The three core modules consist of:

  • Cultural Theory, Performance, Interdisciplinary Perspectives: This module is an introduction to the whole programme and focuses on the interdisciplinary use of a range of theories from sociology, anthropology, theatre and other areas to understand live performance. As part of this module you are expected to see as many performances as possible.
  • Historicising Theatre: This module is concerned with exploring the problems and possibilities of theatre history, and the relationship between theatre, text and cultural context.
  • Corporeality, Embodiment, Alternative Spaces: This module includes work on rituals, shamanism, dance, hybrid forms, site-specific, multi-ethnic performance and theatres of exclusion.

Assessment

Each compulsory module and the option module carry equal weight, each representing 15% of the overall mark. The dissertation is worth 40%.

Skills

You will develop writing and oral skills at a high academic level, demonstrating the ability to think and work in an interdisciplinary manner using a range of methodologies. your ability to work collaboratively and to facilitate and participate in group discussions will be enhanced.

You will also develop skills in identifying the socio-cultural, historical and political issues and pressures specific to varied types of performance.

Careers

This programme provides a strong grounding in the principles of research and of learning through independent research. It is particularly suitable if you wish to pursue further academic work in creative, performative fields.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



Read less
ABOUT MA ACTING. The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CLASSICAL STRAND

The Classical strand follows the development of the theatrical art from its earliest ritual roots to the birth of naturalism:

> Greek Tragedy, Chorus and the Neutral Mask

> Clowning and Commedia dell’arte

> Shakespeare and the English Renaissance

> Stanislavski, the Method and ‘Realist’ Theatre.

The Classical strand draws on the hugely influential theories and techniques of the great French acting teacher Michel Saint-Denis, training the expressive body, voice and imagination. Working with some of the greatest dramatic texts ever written, students are asked to consider what they mean now, and how their 21st century reinterpretation and re-imagining still holds a ‘mirror up to nature’. Students are encouraged to understand the demands of both art and craft, as participants in, and practitioners of, the western theatrical tradition, through a course structure that examines, in chronological order, four key periods of innovation and transition.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage

of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa

Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools

Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.



Read less
Why study at Roehampton. An impressive, national and global reputation which attracts students and dance artists from all over the world. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • An impressive, national and global reputation which attracts students and dance artists from all over the world.
  • Collaborate and study with world-leading researchers in the field of anthropology of dance.
  • 94% of our research is rated world leading or internationally excellent (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • You will learn to situate dance practices within worldwide economies and post-colonial contexts. 
  • Roehampton is rated No. 1 for dance research in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

Attain the knowledge and tools to open a window into dance in any period and in any part of the world.

Explore the place of dance in society from the perspectives of those involved as dancers, dance makers, teachers and/or audience members. By studying these perspectives, you will learn how different people around the world understand dance and how dance influences their value-systems.

MA Dance Anthropology investigates dance from a non-Eurocentric perspective, placing the practices and values of the dancers into socio-cultural and comparative understanding. At the heart of the programme, is a focus upon ethnographic approach in dance to experience first-hand different cultural approaches to dance practice. You will interpret your findings from the field in light of contemporary debates in dance anthropology.

It will interest you if you wish to study non-Western, folk, social, or ritual dance practices, but the approach can be applied to ballet or Western theatre dance, too. This course provides a way to contextualise dance practice and deepen your understanding of dance and specific practices that helps define our humanity.

The Department is home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Dance Research, which foregrounds the research of dance as cultural and artistic expression beyond, and including, theatre performance. Through seminars, forums and conferences involving staff and international invited guests, the centre supports a compelling research culture.

We also have excellent links with dance companies and creative organisations. In easy reach of London’s vibrant dance scene, the campus has superb studios and a state-of-the-art theatre for dance students.

Content

The learning and teaching methods on the MA Dance Anthropology programme are designed to provide a range of opportunities for students to be introduced to new ideas and topics, to enhance understanding and to hone critical thinking and research skills.

You will take the compulsory research methods module Ways of Knowing and one compulsory programme core module and there is flexibility built into the programme to modules that suit your interests. 

In Ways of Knowing, a module shared with students of all dance postgraduate taught programmes, you will be introduced to research methods, including ethnography, dance analysis, and practice-as-research.

In Anthropology of Dance, you will be introduced to the multifaceted history of the anthropology of dance and making you experience what ethnographic fieldwork is all about.

Dissertation is an individually tutored module that allows you to delve deeply into a research project that reflects your interests and experience in dance.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules:

  • Ways of Knowing
  • Anthropology of Dance
  • Dissertation 
  • Choreographic Practice
  • Classicism and Power
  • People Moving, People Dancing
  • Performance of Heritage

Career options

Graduates’ career options are broadened to include roles such as a community dance practitioner, producer and curator of arts projects, teacher, or to continue into further study as an MPhil or PhD student.

Email Now



Read less
The MA History will allow you to focus on a particular period or geographical area, or to study a specific theme such as economic and social history, international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval and maritime, or gender history. Read more
The MA History will allow you to focus on a particular period or geographical area, or to study a specific theme such as economic and social history, international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval and maritime, or gender history. Students also have the option of following one of our specialist pathways or select from our full range of modules by following our open pathway.

Specialist pathways

Early Modern History; Maritime History; Medical History and War and Society

Modules

A wide range of optional modules are available which reflect the varied research interests of academic staff. These interests range widely from the early medieval period to the twentieth century and cover Britain, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. All aspects of the discipline are represented, from social, religious, cultural and gender history to the study of politics, economic development, international relations, and military conflict in a variety of contexts and eras. Particular areas of strength include early modern history, naval and maritime history, medical history, and the history of the connections between war, state and society.
Your choice of optional modules may include subjects as diverse as ritual in the Middle Ages; witchcraft and the supernatural in the 16th and 17th centuries; maritime and naval history; sexuality; health, medicine; gender and the body; party politics and international diplomacy; and the impact of modern wars on culture, economy, society and memory.

The programme

- offers an excellent education in a very wide range of historical subjects and geographical locations over a broad time-span from Anglo-Saxon England to modern Western and Eastern Europe, some parts of Asia, North and South America, and Africa;
- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;
- draws on the expertise of a number of highly respected research centres which are at the forefront of their respective disciplines;
- participation in joint seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms;
- excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Research Areas

Research is at the heart of History and our students are encouraged to come to Departmental Research Seminars and become an active part of wider research community. Our research centres regularly hold seminars and other research events which MA students are welcome to attend. Our current research centres include:
• Centre for Early Modern Studies
• Centre for Imperial and Global History
• Centre for Maritime Historical Studies
• Centre for War, State and Society
• Centre for Medical History
• Centre for Medieval Studies
• Institute of Cornish Studies

Read less
The MRes in Economic and Social History will allow you to focus specifically on economic and social history and its methods of analysis, while giving you the opportunity to study other topics in international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval or gender history. Read more
The MRes in Economic and Social History will allow you to focus specifically on economic and social history and its methods of analysis, while giving you the opportunity to study other topics in international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval or gender history.

You can select from option modules that include subjects such as ritual in the Middle Ages; witchcraft and the supernatural in the 16th and 17th centuries; sexuality; health, medicine; gender and the body; party politics and international diplomacy; and the impact of modern wars on culture, economy, society and memory.

The MRes provides essential training for PhD study in History, as well as an opportunity to develop particular interests in the history of different countries and periods through taught modules and a 25,000 word dissertation on a topic of your choosing within the MRes programme subject area.

The Programme

- offers an excellent education in a very wide range of historical subjects and geographical locations over a broad time-span from Anglo-Saxon England to modern Western and Eastern Europe, some parts of Asia, North and South America, and Africa;
- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;
- draws on the expertise of a number of highly respected research centres which are at the forefront of their respective disciplines;
- participation in joint seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms;
- excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules which may be available are; Qualitative Methods in Social Research; Applied Quantitative Data Analysis; Philosophy of the Social Sciences ; Gender, Society and Culture in Early Modern England; Medieval Research Skills; Interpreting the Middle Ages; Supervised Independent Study in the Humanities; Supervised Independent Study in the Humanities; British Naval Power in the Era of Sail 1660-1815; Approaches to War and Society in the Twentieth Century; Medicine in Medieval and Early Modern England; Everyday Life in the Soviet Union; War 1450 to the Presen and Empires and Globalisation, c.1800-2000.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

Read less
Why study at Roehampton. An impressive, national and global reputation which attracts students and dance artists from all over the world. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • An impressive, national and global reputation which attracts students and dance artists from all over the world.
  • A unique programme offered by a consortium of four internationally-renowned universities.
  • Study with scholars who are leading experts in their field.
  • Scholarships available.
  • Roehampton is rated No. 1 for dance research in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

Choreomundus is an Erasmus Mundus programme that investigates dance and other movement systems (ritual practices, martial arts, games and physical theatre) as intangible cultural heritage. To apply, please visit the website.

It is offered by a consortium of four universities (in Norway, France, Hungary and the UK) recognised for their leadership in the development of innovative curricula for the analysis of dance. The Choreomundus programme will help you make sense of intangible heritage within the post-colonial culturally diverse world of the 21st century. The programme will help you develop an appreciation of dance that is comparative, cross-cultural, applied and embodied. 

The universities that participate in this programme are Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (NTNU) as the coordinating institution Plaise Pascal University (UBP), Clermont-Ferrand, France, Scientific University of Szeged, Hungary (SZTE), University of Roehampton, London, UK (URL), in connection with their groundbreaking Masters in ethnochoreology/dance anthropology, led respectively by Professors Egil Bakka, Georgiana Wierre-Gore, László Felföldi, and Andrée Grau. 

The Department is home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Dance Research, which foregrounds the research of dance as cultural and artistic expression beyond, and including, theatre performance. Through seminars, forums and conferences involving staff and international invited guests, the centre supports a compelling research culture.

We also have excellent links with dance companies and creative organisations. In easy reach of London’s vibrant dance scene, the campus has superb studios and a state-of-the-art theatre for dance students.

Content

In the first semester all students start in Norway for an induction and an intensive course. For the rest of the first academic year, they are divided between NTNU Trondheim and UBP Clermont-Ferrand, and then spend their third semester in Hungary, and the fourth and final semester at the University of Roehampton. Students who successfully complete the programme will be awarded a joint Masters degree from all four universities.

Modules

  • Performance of Heritage
  • People Moving, People Dancing
  • Classicism and Power

Career options

This course prepares graduates for employment in the cultural, heritage and tourist industries including festival and museums, as well as in educational contexts dealing with cultural transmission at local, regional and national levels.

Email Now



Read less
The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching. Read more

The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching.

Course Structure

  • Choice of one of the three core modules
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • One of the following: The Bible and Hermeneutics, Classic Texts in Christian Theology, Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian 
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology
  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Literature and Religion
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography
  • Doctrine of Creation.

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study).

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world.

Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X