• Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
University of Sussex Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
"risks"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Risks)

  • "risks" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 344
Order by 
The aim of the Master's program Management of Cultural Diversity at Tilburg University is. First, to equip students with the necessary expertise, tools and skills to analyze cases of cultural diversity in organizations and societal fields like education, health care, labor market and arts and culture. Read more
The aim of the Master's program Management of Cultural Diversity at Tilburg University is:
First, to equip students with the necessary expertise, tools and skills to analyze cases of cultural diversity in organizations and societal fields like education, health care, labor market and arts and culture.
Second, based on such an analysis they will be able to design management interventions to neutralize the risks and to take advantage of the opportunities stemming from cultural diversity.

A master's program about the impact of globalization and intercultural communication:
Globalization means movement. People, images, symbols, information, capital, goods and so on increasingly move from one corner of the world to another and people communicate with other people many miles away. As a consequence, individual people are increasingly being confronted with (all kinds of) different influences and ideas from other parts of the world.

About collaboration between people with different cultural backgrounds and world views:
Global communication media like the internet and means of rapid transportation facilitate such encounters. The same holds true for multinational organizations that expand globally and thus incorporate people with all kinds of cultural orientations in their workforce.
Organizations and societal fields such as the labor market, education, health care and arts and culture are increasingly made up of employees and citizens with different identities and have to deal with customers and citizens with diverse orientations and world views.

Numerous questions are raised in this multicultural, multinational framework, such as:
•What does it mean to a hospital when patients with various religious beliefs need tailor-made care?
•How are production and service delivery affected when people from all parts of the world come together to communicate and work in a company?
•What are the consequences when citizens representing different identities, traditions, languages and beliefs send their children to mixed schools?
•Do people with different ethnic backgrounds get equal opportunities in the labor market?

Cultural diversity entails both risks and opportunities
•Risks: think of miscommunication, conflict and exclusion.
•Opportunities: think of innovating ideas, creativity and renewal of production and service delivery.

Consequently, there is need for management, policy and intervention to deal with these risks and opportunities, i.e. to neutralize the risks and take advantage of the opportunities presented by cultural diversity.

Do you want to identify these issues and provide management and policy solutions?
There are as yet no management and policy solutions available. New answers need to be developed in each specific case, place, organization or field based on a sound understanding of the issues involved at that moment and in that particular context.
Tilburg University is well-positioned to offer such a program. It has at its disposal of high-level and internationally oriented expertise in the various relevant academic fields, embodied by teaching staff firmly embedded in and intellectually nourished by relevant research programs.

Career Perspective Management of Cultural Diversity

The program offers a Master’s career to prepare students for jobs focusing on management and policy intervention regarding cultural diversity in organizations and societal fields. The program will have an explicit international orientation so students are expected to find a place on the labor market in a variety of countries in Europe and beyond. Your work will either focus on management of a culturally diverse workforce within companies and organizations (profit and non-profit) or you will be working on policy development and implementation regarding issues of cultural diversity in society within governmental organizations or NGOs.

Read less
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage. Read more
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials – such as graphene – and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised, practical skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Completion of the programme will provide you with the skills essential to furthering your career in this rapidly emerging field.

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Energy Economics and Technology
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Renewable Energy Technology
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

NANOTECHNOLOGY AT SURREY

We are one of the leading institutions developing nanotechnology and the next generation of materials and nanoelectronic devices.

Taught by internationally-recognised experts within the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), on this programme you will discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of- the-art equipment and facilities.

The ATI is a £10 million investment in advanced research and is the flagship institute of the University of Surrey in the area of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. The ATI brings together under one roof the major research activities of the University from the Department of Electronic Engineering and the Department of Physics in the area of nanotechnology and electronic devices.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning – know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin Nanoscience and nanotechnology for renewable systems
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within Nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoelectronics for renewable energy
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research and development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability.
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
​The safety and quality of food is a major concern to consumers, retailers, manufactures and regulators. High profile incidents have highlighted the need for the effective management systems and regulatory frameworks for food safety at the local, national and international levels. Read more

Course Overview

​The safety and quality of food is a major concern to consumers, retailers, manufactures and regulators. High profile incidents have highlighted the need for the effective management systems and regulatory frameworks for food safety at the local, national and international levels.

Increasingly, professionals within this field require specialised knowledge and skills to help them identify and effectively manage risks. In response to these challenges, this PgCert/PgDip/MSc has been designed to meet the development needs of UK and international food safety specialists working in commerce and industry and enforcement agencies.

The aims of the programme are to:
- Enable students to evaluate international, national and sector specific frameworks for the prevention and management of and crisis response to food safety risks

- Provide opportunities for students to develop academic and subject specific knowledge and skills of relevance to employment in the field of food safety

- Support the development of reflective practitioners who have the knowledge and skills to appraise, develop and evaluate responses to food safety risks​.

​Course Content​​

The programme utilises theoretical frameworks and practical case studies to enable students to identify potential hazards, assess risk and to develop and monitor risk management strategies. The teaching team has many years experience in policy development, research and consultancy working in industry and the enforcement of legislation. The team operates at the international level and this is reflected in the teaching sessions.

The taught element of the programme comprises the equivalent of 6 modules of 20 credit points each (comprising 4 half modules and 4 full modules).

The taught modules offered are as follows:
- Risk Perception and Communication (10 credits)
- Frameworks for the Assessment of Risk (10 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Epidemiology (10 credits)
- Evaluating Global Food Safety Management Standards (20 credits)
- Implementing Global Food Safety Management Standards (20 credits)
- ​Food Safety Emergency Management (20 credits)
- Product Conformity and Labelling (10 credits)

The dissertation phase of the module is comprised of a number of components including the development of a research proposal, an in-depth literature review and presentation of the findings of self-directed research in the form of an academic paper. This phase of the studies allows students to develop specific knowledge in relation to a food safety issue of particular interest to them.

Upon completion of the Programme, students should be able to:
- Critically evaluate global and national policy, legal and sector specific frameworks for food safety management and propose evidence based approaches for best practice
- Appraise psychosocial factors impacting upon the perception, communication and response to food safety risks.
- Critically evaluate models of risk assessment and risk management
- Critically review relevant research
- Critically appraise approaches to the assessment and management of risk and inform the development of food safety management strategies and the implementation of food safety management systems.
- Evaluate and apply approaches to emergency preparedness and crisis response.
- Critically review relevant research
- Demonstrate the ability to design, plan, and undertake research in the discipline of food safety management and present the findings.
- Critically reflect on professional and personal practice, skills and competencies.​

Learning & Teaching​

​The teaching and learning strategy for the Programme places a strong emphasis on application of theoretical frameworks to real problems and situations. Teaching and assessment focuses on case studies and exercises and scenarios reflecting contemporary issues in food safety management.

The Learning and Teaching strategies adopted, encourages substantial input from students. Whilst lectures are seen as opportunities for imparting key information and pointing students in a particular direction for further study, they are also intended to be interactive and debate is encouraged.
Lectures are complemented by seminar sessions designed to encourage a more detailed examination of issues. In addition to enhancing understanding, these sessions are seen to be important as a means of helping students to develop analytical and critical appraisal skills.

Finally, case study and role-play sessions are scheduled. During these sessions, there is further opportunity not only to develop those skills appropriate for the achievement of learning outcomes but also to develop skills that will enhance performance within a workplace setting.

The Learning and Teaching Strategy emphasises the value of evaluating ones performance and developing approaches to maximize learning and the application of skills and knowledge. Assumptions underpinning the analysis of information and response options are explored and alternative interpretations (that are often based upon cultural orientations) are examined. It is the intention that students graduating from the programme will operate as reflective practitioners.​

Assessment

Students' performance is assessed via a course work of a variety of forms including essays and reports. Tutors will offer advice in relation to the development of assignments; each student is allocated a personal supervisor to support their dissertation phase of studies.

Employability & Careers​

The Programme is seen to be of particular relevance to those wishing to further their expertise in food safety management.

The programme is also of relevance to students with a general enforcement background or food industry background who wish to specialise in food safety. Expertise exists within the teaching team to support graduates of the programme who wish to embark on PhD studies.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

Read less
This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. Read more
This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. The Department of Geography is especially well-suited to examine these in relation to security- and health-related risk, but students are encouraged to develop their thinking in relation to any aspect of risk, including, for example, climate risk and disaster risk reduction. For students interested in security-related risk, the MA programme offers in-depth and advanced understanding on geo-political security challenges and politics, including the ways in which they are governed increasingly through the prism of risk. The course responds to the growing realisation that many risks are being created through social processes bound to questions of security, including the ways that risk techniques are emerging and being employed as a means of securing uncertain futures. Since the 9/11 attacks in New York City and the 7/7 bombings in London, governments have become more concerned with terrorist threats to security. Surveillance has become more commonplace, preventing some risks while also creating new ones never before seen in society.

For students interested in health-related risk, the MA programme offers advanced training in research methods on the determinants of health and well-being, and their implications for health policy and service provision. Led in part by experts in population health from a social science and public health perspective, the MA programme responds to the observation that we often overlook the critical role played by communities in creating and managing risks, and that we need to develop new approaches to building community resilience. Students learn about the 'social determinants' associated with public health risks including unemployment and poverty. The socioeconomic impacts of financial crises, for example, have large implications for public health risk creating new challenges for research and governance. Students will be trained in both quantitative and qualitative methods to learn how to produce evidence relating to the wider determinants of health that is likely to benefit population health. Graduates from this programme will be well-suited to the needs of social and community work, to health professionals, and the pursuit of research degrees.

Course Structure

Students take the following core modules, and a selection of elective modules, which, when combined, add up to 180 credits:
Core Modules:
-Understanding Risk (30 credits)
-Risk Frontiers (15 credits)
-Fundamentals of Risk Research (15 credits)
-Dissertation by Research (or) Vocational Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective Modules available in previous years include:
-Hydrological Hazards (30 credits)
-Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Hazard (30 credits)
-Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience (30 credits)
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East (15 credits)
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis (15 credits)
-European Security (15 credits)
-Social Policy and Society (30 credits)

Learning and Teaching

Understanding and managing risk is ultimately about choice. All elements of society, from individuals to governments, must make decisions – conscious or not – about the ways in which they perceive, interpret, balance, and mitigate risk. Risk permeates our day-to-day lives in ways that are now recognised to be much more complex than the hazard-vulnerability paradigm, which dominated risk research until the 1990s, recognised. A deeper understanding of the nature of risk, its emergence, and its interface and position within societies, has emphasised the need to take a much more complex view in which a general understanding of the ways in which risk is generated, experienced and managed needs to be combined with a specific understanding of particular science or policy areas.

The primary aim of this Masters programme is to equip students with a general understanding of risk; whilst simultaneously providing specific training in elements of risk-related research. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary framework for understanding risk from a variety of perspectives. Students will learn theoretical and practical approaches to identifying and framing risk, as well as the underlying physical and social mechanisms that generate it. They will also examine the relationship of risk to knowledge and policy, and will be made aware of the array of advanced tools and techniques to assess the physical and social dimensions of risk under conditions of uncertainty. They will also be trained in the substance and methods associated with a range of science and policy areas, and be expected to demonstrate that they can combine their general training in risk with their specific understanding of the substance and method associated with the chosen area, through either a research-based or a vocational dissertation.

All students will undertake a suite of core modules (120 credits) which provide students with a range of skills and knowledge which result in a unique focus in risk combined with training in interdisciplinary research methods. These modules are: Understanding Risk, Fundamentals of Risk Research, Risk Frontiers and the Dissertation.

Students then also select a suite of elective modules (another 60 credits). Students can choose to receive specialised scientific training in:
-The social dimensions of risk and resilience
-Determinants of health and well-being, and their implications for health policy and service provision, and/or:
-A combination of approaches to risk.

Electives can be selected from:
-Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience
-Strategic Asia
-European Security
-International Relations in the Middle East
-Social Policy and Society

Read less
Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risk. They make financial sense of the future for their clients by applying advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to solve complex financial problems. Read more
Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risk. They make financial sense of the future for their clients by applying advanced mathematical and statistical techniques to solve complex financial problems.

Qualifying as an actuary is a passport to a wide variety of careers in insurance companies, investments, pensions, health care and banking – not just in the UK, but throughout the world. Kent is one of a very few universities in the UK to teach the subject.

Our Postgraduate Diploma (PDip) in Actuarial Science, MSc in Applied Actuarial Science and International Master’s are all fully accredited by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries; they also provide a fast-track route to qualifying as an actuary, because students who achieve a high enough overall mark in these programmes can obtain exemptions from the professional examinations included within their studies.

This PDip in Actuarial Science programme gives you the opportunity to gain exemptions from eight of the Core Technical subjects (CT1 to CT8) of the professional examinations and provides you with a firm foundation for the later subjects. If you perform well enough on this course to obtain the full set of exemptions available, you could reduce your time to qualify as an actuary by three years or more.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1/actuarial-science

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

MA319 - Probability and Statistics for Actuarial Science (15 credits)
MA501 - Statistics for Insurance (15 credits)
MA529 - Probability and Statistics for Actuarial Science 2 (15 credits)
MA639 - Time Series Modelling and Simulation (15 credits)
MA816 - Contingencies 1 (15 credits)
MA817 - Contingencies 2 (15 credits)
MA819 - Business Economics (15 credits)
MA820 - Financial Mathematics (15 credits)
MA825 - Survival Models (15 credits)
MA826 - Finance & Financial Reporting (15 credits)
MA835 - Portfolio Theory and Asset Pricing Models (15 credits)
MA836 - Stochastic Processes (15 credits)
MA837 - Mathematics of Financial Derivatives (15 credits)
MA840 - Financial Modelling (15 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is usually by a mixture of coursework and examination; exact weightings vary from module to module.

- Accreditation
Students who are considered to have performed sufficiently well in the programme (both in examinations and coursework), as determined by an examiner appointed by the UK Actuarial Profession, will be exempt from all the CT subjects studied within the programme. If a student fails to achieve a suitable overall standard, they might still be awarded individual module exemptions as recommended by the Profession’s examiner. Please note that individual exemptions are granted based on the final written examinations only.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- give you the depth of technical appreciation and skills appropriate to a Master’s level programme in actuarial science

- provide successful students with eligibility for subject exemptions from the Core Technical series of examinations of the actuarial profession. This means obtaining a thorough knowledge and understanding of various core actuarial techniques and gaining current knowledge and understanding of the practice of some of the major areas in which actuaries are involved

- ensure you are competent in the use of information technology, and are familiar with computers, together with the relevant software

- introduce you to an appreciation of recent actuarial developments, and of the links between subject theories and their practical application in industry

- prepare you for employment within the actuarial profession and other financial fields

- provide suitable preparation for students who wish to proceed to the MSc in Applied Actuarial Science.

Research areas

- Genetics and insurance risks

Advances in human genetics, and medical sciences in general, have led to many gene discoveries; a number of single-gene disorders have been successfully identified and studied in detail. Researchers are now increasingly focusing on common multifactorial genetic disorders such as cancer, heart attack and stroke, caused by interaction of genes and environmental factors. It is important for the insurance industry to understand the full implications of these latest developments. First, can an insurer justify charging different premium rates to different risk groups? Second, if insurers are not allowed to discriminate between individuals based on their genes, by regulation or by law, is there a risk of adverse selection?

- Economic capital and financial risk management

Financial services firms are in the business of accepting risks on behalf of their customers. Customers do not always have the time or expertise to handle financial risks on their own, so they pass these on to financial services firms. However, even the most reputable firms can sometimes get it wrong, so it is fundamentally important for all stakeholders that financial services firms hold an appropriate amount of capital calculated on a robust scientific basis, to back the risks they are running. Economic capital can provide answers by specifying a unifying approach to calculating risk-based capital for any firm in the financial services sector.

From a public policy perspective, regulators and governments face the dilemma of whether to regulate against genetic underwriting or to allow market economies to take their own course. On one hand, there is a moral obligation not to discriminate against individuals for their genetic make-up. On the other hand, risk of adverse selection against insurance firms cannot be ruled out altogether. Maintaining an appropriate balance between the two is key.

Careers

- The UK Actuarial Profession

The UK Actuarial Profession is small, but influential and well rewarded. There are more than 6,500 actuaries currently employed in the UK, the majority of whom work in insurance companies and consultancy practices.

Survey results published by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries suggest that the average basic salary for a student actuary is £36,842 with pay and bonuses increasingly sharply as you become more experienced. The average basic salary of a Chief Actuary is £209,292.

As an actuary, your work is extremely varied and can include: advising companies on the amount of funds to set aside for employee pension payments; designing new insurance policies and setting premium rates; pricing financial derivatives and working in fund management and quantitative investment research; advising life insurance companies on he distribution of surplus funds; and estimating the effects of possible major disasters, such as earthquakes or hurricanes, and setting premium rates for insurance against such disasters. For more information about the actuarial profession, see http://www.actuaries.org.uk

- Employability support

Helping our students to develop strong employability skills is a key objective within the School and the University. We provide a wide range of services and support to equip you with transferable vocational skills that enable you to secure appropriate professional positions within industry. Within the School we run specialist seminars and provide advice on creating a strong CV, making job applications and successfully attending interviews and assessment centres.

Our graduates have gone on to successful careers in the actuarial, finance, insurance and risk sectors.

Professional recognition

Offers exemptions from subjects CT1 to CT8 of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries professional examinations, with the option to take further subjects for exemption purposes.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. Read more
The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. The Risk and Disaster Science MSc aims to meet the growing need for experts trained in disaster science in sectors ranging from finance to humanitarian response.

Degree information

In a science-led programme, students will explore the characterisation of risk from a fundamental understanding of hazard, statistical modelling, appreciation of causes of vulnerability, and quantifying exposure to the management and reduction of disaster risks. There is an emphasis on scientific analysis and statistical methods. Students will enjoy a wide range of taught modules covering scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, six core modules and two optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules
-Decision and Risk Statistics
-Earthquake Hazard Risk
-Emergency and Crisis Management
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
-The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks

Optional modules - choose options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:
-Climate Risks to Hydro-ecological Systems
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Seismic Risk Assessment
-Statistical Computing

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, practicals, field visits, directed reading and problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in industry and commerce, research, research communication and public policy including insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, business continuity, humanitarian assistance, engineering and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities forum for students; this has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, and headhunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction.

Employability
This is a new programme and no information on graduate destinations is currently available. Career destinations of recent IRDR graduates include: a London-based international economic consultancy in the field of micro-finance; a consultancy role in disaster risk for an insurance company; a PhD studentship; the World Food Programme; and Rescue Global - an NGO based in London. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across twelve departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with non-governmental organisations, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policymakers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

Read less
This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry. Read more
This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry.

The optional professional placement component gives you the opportunity to gain experience from working in industry, which cannot normally be offered by the standard technically-focused one-year Masters programme.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Electronic Engineering Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering graduates and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies. Current pathways offered include:
-Communications Networks and Software
-RF and Microwave Engineering
-Mobile Communications Systems
-Mobile and Satellite Communications
-Mobile Media Communications
-Computer Vision, Robotics and Machine Learning
-Satellite Communications Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Space Engineering
-Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy
-Medical Imaging

Please note that at applicant stage, it is necessary to apply for the Electronic Engineering (Euromasters). If you wish to specialise in one of the other pathways mentioned above, you can adjust your Euromaster programme accordingly on starting the course.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 24 months and part-time over 60 months. It consists of ten taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VHDL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering Optional
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-Engineering Professional Studies 1 (with industrial Placement)
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

PARTNERS

The MSc Euromasters complies with the structure defined by the Bologna Agreement, and thus it is in harmony with the Masters programme formats adhered to in European universities. Consequently, it facilitates student exchanges with our partner universities in the Erasmus Exchange programme.

A number of bilateral partnerships exist with partner institutions at which students can undertake their project. Current partnerships held by the Department include the following:
-Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
-University of Prague, Czech Republic
-Universität di Bologna, Italy
-Universität Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
-Universita' degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in electronic engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, computing and communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Enhanced capabilities of MSc (Euromasters) graduates:
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Use of quantitative methods for problem solving. Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space. Read more
Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space.

Degree information

Students will learn about a wide variety of natural hazards, how to prepare and plan for emergencies and disasters and how to respond. Students will also learn practical aspects of designing, building and operating satellites and spacecraft including the challenges and risks posed by the environment of outer space.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Emergency and Crisis Management
-Research Appraisal and Proposal
-The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks
-Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
-Space Systems Engineering

Optional modules - students choose two 15-credit optional modules from the following:
-Decision and Risk Statistics
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Global Monitoring and Security
-Mechanical Design of Spacecraft
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Risk and Disaster Research Tools
-Space-Based Communication Systems
-Space Instrumentation and Applications
-Spacecraft Design - Electronic Sub-systems

Optional modules are subject to availability of places.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent project culminating in a report of between 10,000 and 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching is delivered by lectures, seminars and interactive problem sessions. Assessment is by examination, poster, presentation and written essay coursework.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The unique selling point of the programme is the direct access to key government and business drivers in the field of space weather, with invited seminars and reserch projects supported by the UK Met Office, EDF, Atkins and other institutions interested in the hazards of space.

The natural hazard of space weather is a "new" hazard which has only recently been identified as a significant risk to human society. As the first generation of researchers, practitioners and engineers in this field, students will be at the forefront of major new issues in an expanding sector of the economy. As disaster response comes to rely on more advanced technology aid, relief and disaster response agencies require experts trained in the technological infrastructure to innovate, explain, operate and understand the limitations of these novel systems and the help they can provide before, during and after disasters.

The programme will also provide students will advanced training in many transferable skills, such as computor programming, technical writing, oral and written presentation, the use of engineering design tools and graphic visualisation software.

Read less
During the MSc Crowd Safety and Risk Analysis, you will learn from one of the world's leading experts in crowd safety Prof. Dr. Keith Still. Read more
During the MSc Crowd Safety and Risk Analysis, you will learn from one of the world's leading experts in crowd safety Prof. Dr. Keith Still. The course will allow you to work with your site, events, venues and case studies. Prof. Still will demonstrate the principles and applications of crowd safety and risk analysis for your event, for example, how and when your crowd reaches critical mass, how the effects of design, information and management systems can influence your crowd's behaviour.

This course will take you from a basic understanding of crowd safety and risk analysis in places of public assembly and work through the principles of major accident and incident causes. You will gain an in-depth understanding of crowd safety and crowd risks in the built and complex environment, establish how crowd accidents and incidents can occur, explore the underlying causes of crowd related accidents and incidences, and learn how to implement techniques for crowd safety engineering. You will also be made aware of essential legal obligations relevant to this industry.

This course is for those who need to understand crowd safety including professionals who are involved in managing large numbers such as venue managers, events organisers or attraction managers. This course is transferable to the hospitality and tourism industries and suitable for applicants wishing to engage in professional development.

Units of study

Typical units may include:

Year 1
Crowd Science
Crowd Science outlines the uses and applications of the crowd and event modelling approach to risk analysis. In this unit we demonstrate the applications of the DIM-ICE meta model, RAMP Analysis, Risk and Congestion Mapping, and Decision support matrix/analysis methods. By the end of this unit, you will be modelling crowd risks for events.

Crowd and Event Modelling
Crowd and Event Modelling uses crowd science and introduces the student to the use and application of crowd simulations for more complex environments (such as religious festivals, mass gatherings in city streets, transport systems and sporting events).

Year 2

Major Incidents and Accident Investigation
Major Incident and Accident Investigation reviews previous accidents and incidents involving crowds. You will be introduced to the liability and legal aspects of a major incident and the disaster database where common causes are reviewed. You will also be introduced to the role and responsibility of an expert witness involved in crowd related injuries.

Real-Time Decision Support Tools
Real-time Decision Support reviews the requirements for a control room to evaluate crowds risks in real-time. You will create and use two key systems; the first for real-time fill prediction and the second for real-time evacuation crowd management.

Year 3

Dissertation
The Dissertation is an individual choice (with Tutor's guidance) of a crowd risk and safety research project to produce a report and analysis utilising the core units in the MSc.

Read less
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Banking and financial services represents a highly competitive and rapidly changing sector in every modern economy. Changes in customer requirements, technology, competitive conditions and regulation create the need for managers, traders and analysts to make rapid and often far-reaching decisions about their short term operations and long term strategies. The MSc and MA in Banking and Finance degree courses at Bangor offer you a unique opportunity to study advanced theory and practice relating to financial services, and to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in this vitally important and dynamic sector of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MA/MSc Banking and Finance degree programme include:

Why are the banking systems in different countries (such as the UK, Germany, Japan and the US) so diverse?
What determines the structure, performance and efficiency of banking and financial markets?
Why do banks and financial intermediaries exist?
What are the main theories of the banking firm?
How relevant are financial intermediaries in a world of increasing securitization and with the evolution of virtual banking?
How do banks optimally allocate capital?
Does bank regulation increase or decrease risks?
How do we measure the risks undertaken by banks?
Can regulators reduce the likelihood of systemic (system-wide) risk?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Can market risk be priced accurately? Can credit risk be priced accurately?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How can we assess the investment performance of pension funds, insurance companies and unit trusts?
How do banks use futures, options, derivatives and swaps to manage their balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How do banks manage their business so as to maintain customer relationships, improve operational efficiency and add shareholder value?

With these needs in mind, the MSc and MA Banking and Finance programmes at Bangor are designed to develop participants' existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to banking, finance and capital markets. These programmes provide a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of financial techniques in a real-world setting.

The availability of parallel MSc and MA degrees in Banking and Finance allows you to choose between registering for a more technical MSc degree (including a compulsory element in Financial Econometrics), and a less technical MA degree (for which Financial Econometrics is optional). The MSc degree may be more suitable for applicants with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, while the MA degree is more suitable for applicants who prefer to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies. However, both degrees include a compulsory module in Research Methods, which includes coverage of both quantitative and non-quantitative research techniques.

ESRC Recognition

The MA Banking and Finance is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as the first year of a 1+3 PhD training programme.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Financial Management: In this module the financial management of multinational companies and the influence of macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Optional modules

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business.

Read less
This course looks at risks in the business and organisational environment and considers the consequences when things go wrong. Businesses and organisations increasingly need to anticipate the likelihood and consequences of unexpected events and the necessary short and long term responses. Read more
This course looks at risks in the business and organisational environment and considers the consequences when things go wrong. Businesses and organisations increasingly need to anticipate the likelihood and consequences of unexpected events and the necessary short and long term responses.

The programme is structured around three core management themes:

• Risk: You will study a wide range of risks in business, organisational and geographical environments. You'll get the opportunity to learn how to identify, assess and manage these risks.

• Disaster: The disaster management element of the course will enable you to develop your ability to analyse the consequences when things go wrong, and will give you the opportunity to develop the practical skills for disaster prevention, preparedness, mitigation and management.

• Environment: The course will enable you to understand how we interact with the natural environment and will explore how human activity can be managed to minimise negative environmental damage.

Read less
In an increasingly complex and rapidly changing global business environment, the management of risk requires a broad range of skills, knowledge and experience. Read more
In an increasingly complex and rapidly changing global business environment, the management of risk requires a broad range of skills, knowledge and experience.

Accredited by the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII) and the Institute of Risk Management (IRM), this programme is designed to provide you with the skills to excel in such roles as a risk manager, risk and insurance manager, risk analyst or business continuity manager within a variety of organisations and sectors.

You will develop the ability to establish risk policy and structures for business units, design and review processes for risk management, develop risk response processes including contingency and business continuity programmes.

The Glasgow School for Business and Society is one of the world's leading centres for the provision of risk management education, consultancy and research, with more than thirty years' experience in the field. Since 1982, our programmes have attracted students from around the world. Our programme is based on current research and publications in the field, and taught by staff who understand the key concerns of managers in both the private and public sectors.

This programme is offered full-time, part-time and by distance learning at our Glasgow and London campuses.

This course is available for study on different start-dates and methods of study - please view the respective web-pages for the different start dates and part time opportunities.

SEPTEMBER 2017 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/gsbs/study/courses/details/index.php/P02671-1PTA-1718/Risk_Management_(Part-time)?utm_source=YYYY&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2017 (Full Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/gsbs/study/courses/details/index.php/P02573-1FTAB-1617/Risk_Management_(Jan_start)?utm_source=YYYY&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Full Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/gsbs/study/courses/details/index.php/P02573-1FTAB-1718/Risk_Management?utm_source=YYYY&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

Our Research in Risk

Current and applied research is essential underpinning for a high quality postgraduate programme. Our academic staff are involved in a broad range of risk-related and business-focused research and publication.

Recent research projects carried out by staff include a government funded study into risk assessment relating to private finance initiatives in the construction industry, a survey on employment risks in conjunction with Marsh UK Ltd , a report on the risks associated with e-commerce, for the Association of British Insurers, and a series of reports and briefings for the Association of Local Authority Risk Managers.

Some of the areas in which staff research and publish include:
-Corporate governance
-Insurance Risk regulation
-Occupational health and safety
-Employment risks
-Risk assessment and management of Private Finance Initiative projects
-Public sector risk management
-Healthcare risk management
-Financial risk management

Study and Assessment

Study Information
We provide a wide variety of support, through tutors and materials, to our students studying by distance learning or on-campus.

Books & Materials
All modules use a range of paper-based and online materials.

Feedback
Students will receive feedback on all assessments as well as responses to specific queries raised during their study of any particular Module. Receipt of any communication will generally be acknowledged within 7 working days and written feedback will be supplied.

Contact
This will be mainly by post, our online 'Virtual Learning Environment' GCU Learn, or by email. The bulk of the contact for each Module will be with the Module Tutor concerned.

Assessment
Assessment will be continuous - a combination of formative and summative assessment. Assessment is by a variety of means - case studies, portfolios, essays and reports. You will be advised of the dates and times on which coursework must be submitted.

Submitting Work for Assessment
Campus-based students will submit a hard copy of any assessment, as well as an electronic copy via GCU Learn. Distance Learning students will submit by email and through GCU Learn.

Professional Affiliations

Holders of the MSc Risk Management are entitled to a standard award of 60 non unit specific credits at Advanced Diploma level from the Chartered Insurance Institute (CII).

Graduates holding the MSc Risk Management from GCU are also entitled to be granted substantial exemptions from the examination requirements of the Institute of Risk Management (IRM).

Career Opportunities

The focus of the degree is on equipping the professional ‘risk manager’. This role neither sets strategy nor runs operations - the professional risk manager (whether in private manufacturing or service industries, local government, healthcare, or non-profit sector) facilitates the risk management process, educates, informs and motivates others to manage risk, and provides expert advice and input on the tools of modern risk management. Job titles vary (risk manager, risk and insurance manager, risk analyst, risk co-ordinator, clinical risk manager) and the emphasis varies from organisation to organisation, sector to sector.

Read less
Health and safety is an integral and important part of any organisation - whether you work as an operations manager, office manager, engineer or technician, you will be involved with ensuring a safe working environment for everyone. Read more
Health and safety is an integral and important part of any organisation - whether you work as an operations manager, office manager, engineer or technician, you will be involved with ensuring a safe working environment for everyone. We will develop your knowledge of how different organisations use varying levels of safety procedures and you will assess their impact on the whole company.

By investigating an organisation as a whole, you'll gain a broad knowledge of other departments such as marketing, sales and human resources, and how they are affected by the procedures and processes you implement. You'll also enhance your understanding of the technical and human aspects of health and safety, such as identifying whether issues were caused by machine malfunctions or misjudgement by humans.

It also offers you the chance to look at past and present case studies to understand any errors made, what caused the mistakes and the preventative measures that should be put in place. These could range from dealing with harmful substances within a chemical facility, exposed wires and trip hazards in a busy office, to safety measures for maintenance work on rail tracks.

You may choose to continue your studies and gain an MSc by completing an additional two research modules.

NB: If you have already completed an IOSH-accredited PG Dip, this course offers you the chance to convert your qualification into an MSc by studying two additional research modules* (see Module Listings below). The duration for the course in this instance will be 1 year part-time, with fees charged pro-rata.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 20% of our research in the Public Health, Health Services and Primary Care unit is world leading or internationally excellent.

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will have the extensive health and safety grounding required for industries such as the public sector, healthcare, transport and logistics. You will also enhance your knowledge of the latest health and safety practices in your current job, be able to identify the risks that come with particular job roles, create health and safety training programmes and put safety measures in place for a host of companies and industries at home and abroad.

- Health and Safety Manager
- Facilities Manager
- Risk Manager

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Accredited by the Institution of Occupational Safety & Health (IOSH) - the world's leading Professional Body for Health and Safety Practitioners - our course provides the opportunity to learn directly from prominent health and safety experts, to keep you up to date with the latest health and safety issues, risks and practices.

Modules

Ergonomics
Examine the ways in which the working relationship between operator, machine and environment can be adapted for efficiency and safety.

Health and Safety Practice
Study the requirements that are placed upon organisations to ensure legal compliance to enable management of health and safety risks.

Quantitative Risk Analysis
Critically examine the concept of risk as the product of probability and consequences, and develop your knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the analytical techniques and data requirements for quantification.

Research & Practice Development

Sensible Risk Management
Develop your knowledge of the common types of hazards, the risk assessment process and skills in the completion of different types of risk assessment for these hazards.

Occupational Health and Wellbeing
Focus on the health aspects that may occur if good workplaces and practices are not developed, looking at both physical and mental health, and concepts of wellbeing.

Research Methods in Health & Wellbeing

Professional Practice and Development
Extend your knowledge and skills from within a set environment to be able to apply them in other work settings or environments.

Facilities

- Acoustics Lab
Our fully equipped, state-of-the-art acoustics laboratory has anechoic and reverberation chambers as well as modern noise analysis equipment.

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Read less
The focus of this course is corporate financial management, with particular emphasis on the international and global perspective. Read more

Why take this course?

The focus of this course is corporate financial management, with particular emphasis on the international and global perspective. It is particularly suited to graduates looking to pursue careers in corporate finance in large financial and non-financial companies, or corporate financial services in banking and investment banking. The course covers the three key areas of finance: corporate finance, financial markets and institutions, and investments, with the main focus being on corporate finance.

What will I experience?

On this course you will be taught by enthusiastic staff who not only are academically qualified, but also have research and consultancy experience, as well as links to industry.

You will also have access to extensive financial databases including Bloomberg, DataStream and Bank Scope along with excellent library facilities and with 24-hour internet access to leading databases.

On successful completion of your Bloomberg training you will be awarded the Bloomberg Certificate, an essential qualification for all city professionals.

What opportunities might it lead to?

The University of Portsmouth is recognised as a centre of excellence for finance teaching by the Chartered Institute for Securities and Investment (CISI). You will be eligible for student membership and this provides access to a range of networking and career opportunities. During the programme you will be prepared for CISI's Integrity Matters and Corporate Finance Technical Foundation examinations. Successfully completing these examinations allows you to achieve an industry-recognised professional qualification alongside your degree.

Module Details

You will study the following four units and complete your studies with a dissertation:

Financial Econometrics

Econometrics is a core tool used in the study of finance. This unit will give you a strong practical understanding of the econometric tools you will be using throughout your study of finance. We take an applied approach to provide you with an intuitive understanding of a range of econometric techniques and their applications to a wide variety of problem-solving situations in finance. You will gain extensive experience with econometric and statistical packages such as Eviews and SPSS. Your work in this unit is supported by lectures, tutorials and workshops. Many of the econometric techniques covered in this unit are used and applied in other units in the course, to help you gain a good understanding of how to apply them successfully to the theory and practice of financial management.

Multinational Corporate Financial Management

In this unit you will study international finance from the corporate perspective. The first half of the unit focuses on the primary financial decisions of the firm, working capital management, advanced capital budgeting techniques, the strategic analysis of capital investment decisions, capital structure theories, and the financing and dividend decisions. Corporate financial management in a multinational context introduces many new problems, challenges and opportunities. The second half of the unit the focuses on corporate financial management from the global and international perspective. Topics you will study include the measurement and management of currency and interest rate risks, taxation, regulatory and political risks, mergers and acquisitions, and the international capital investment, financing and dividend decisions.

International Money and Capital Markets

This unit covers international finance from the securities and markets perspective, and complements the unit on Multinational Corporate Financial Management. You will study the currency and Eurocurrency markets, the international equity, fixed income and derivatives markets, financial institutions, financial regulation, and the models used to price the financial securities trading in these markets. The topics in the International Money and Capital Markets unit are developed with a strong emphasis on their applications to multinational corporate financial management.

Derivatives: Options, Futures and Swaps Markets

In this unit you will study the main derivatives securities and markets, options, forwards, futures and swaps. The emphasis is on the study of derivatives pricing models and how these are applied in speculation, hedging, arbitrage and price discovery in financial investments as well as in the measurement and management of financial risks. In finance some models work better than others. The pricing models and techniques developed in derivatives work so well that all professionals working in derivatives markets use these models and techniques all the time, every day. In this unit you will acquire a high degree of theoretical understanding and practical competence in using and applying these techniques.

Research Methods and Dissertation

This is a scheme of independent research. We offer comprehensive training via lectures and workshops throughout the year to develop skills commensurate with standards of good research practice. You will be assigned a Dissertation supervisor who will provide feedback, guidance and support on an individual basis.

Programme Assessment

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, computer-based workshops, invited speakers and live case studies. Student participation is encouraged and classes are challenging but informal and friendly, which promotes discussion and debate. The course tutors are available to support your studies and you will also have a personal tutor to provide help and guidance for any problems that you might have.

You are assessed in a variety of ways to reflect the individual topics. Our approaches to learning, assessment and feedback are varied and constructive, to help you build the personal management and employability skills that are essential for a fulfilling career.

Student Destinations

This course will provide you with powerful analytical tools and methods to understand the complexities of modern financial markets. These skills are in high demand and you’ll be strongly placed to enter industry in the finance and industrial sectors. Previous graduates have gone on to secure roles in accountancy and general management as well as investment analysis, banking and investment banking in financial institutions. Alternatively, this course is also beneficial if you are aiming for careers in corporate financial management in large non-financial companies.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Commercial Finance Analyst
Bid Pricing Executive
Finance Internship
Graduate Econometrician
Hedge Fund Manager

Read less
Study for a Masters in Public Health (Addictions) at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. This innovative course examines the evidence base of harms and risks relating to addictions and how to reduce them. Read more
Study for a Masters in Public Health (Addictions) at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. This innovative course examines the evidence base of harms and risks relating to addictions and how to reduce them.

•Unique in the North West, this ground-breaking course enables you to study at LJMU's world renowned Centre for Public Health
•Explore the evidence base of addiction harms and risks and the policies used to reduce them
•Discover course content informed by key research in alcohol and drug addiction
•Support and guidance for placement learning opportunities
•This course will only run subject to minimum numbers

Developed by LJMU’s world renowned Centre for Public Health and offered since 2014, this programme aims to improve understanding of the impact of addictions on public health.

Students come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, psychology and criminology, many have also worked in drug or alcohol support capacities.

The Centre for Public Health offers a flexible approach to learning with full and part time study options available.
Many modules are stand-alone CPD courses, helping you to study at your own pace and plan your education around your work and family life.

With an emphasis on guided independent learning, you can expect to attend University two days a week (full time) or one day a week (part time). You can, however, spread your learning over a longer period if required.

On joining the course you will be appointed a personal tutor who will provide academic and pastoral support. You will also have at least one supervisor for the duration of your dissertation module.
Formal Teaching takes place in Tithebarn Street which is part of the city centre campus. This vibrant location offers everything you could possibly need during your studies. Tutorial space is also available in the Henry Cotton building.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Core Modules:

Understanding Addictions

Identifies the main explanations for addiction and addictive behaviour from a bio-psycho-social perspective. It assesses different models of addiction and its association and the mediators and moderators of addiction. Although there is a focus around drug and alcohol addiction as this constitutes the major public health risk the module also considers other addictive behaviours such as gambling. The module assists students to identify key risk factors for addiction and particularly the relationship between addiction and inequalities/deprivation.

Addictions: Policy and Interventions

Identifies core policies and strategies related to addiction from a UK and international perspective, how these are developed and operationalised. It examines how personal and structural forces impact on addiction and if these are related to policy objectives. Finally it evaluates policies and interventions designed to improve addiction outcomes.

Epidemiology

Examines the principles and tools of epidemiology and disease surveillance. These principles are then applied to an understanding of communicable and non-communicable diseases and assessment of health inequalities through tools such as health needs assessment and their role in protecting and improving population health.

Public Health: Policy and Practice

Introduces students to the concepts and underpinning theories associated with the public health approach and practices related to the promotion and protection of population health. The module reviews historical as well as contemporary public health approaches, policies and strategies. There is a particular focus on examining health inequalities and measures to reduce them. The aim is to identify local, national and international strategic responses to both improving health and reducing health inequalities.

Research Methods

This module encourages students to develop their skills as a potential producer of research, as well as their ability to systematically evaluate research outcomes from a variety of sources. In addition, students will engage in a variety of data analysis techniques. The module covers quantitative, qualitative, mixed, creative and participatory methodologies​.

Option Modules:

Violence

Violence is now regarded as a critical public health concern. The impact of violence on the health of individuals, families and the wider society adds to an increasing burden of ill-health and cost to health and other welfare services. This module critically examines a range of key issues related to violence and health from international, national and local perspectives. It demonstrates the need for an interdisciplinary public health approach when addressing the causes of violence, building prevention control strategies, and promoting safety. The Public Health Institute is a World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention http://www.cph.org.uk/expertise/violence/.

Health Improvement

Encourages students to develop knowledge and competence in the area of health improvement. The module covers a number of core health improvement approaches: health promotion, prevention, health behaviour change and community participation. It assists students to consider the relevancy and value of these approaches to different population groups from a global perspective.

Health Protection

In this module the components and structure of health protection activity are examined. The risks to public health from both communicable and non-infectious environmental hazards are explored in detail. The infrastructure of health emergency planning is critically analysed.

Systematic Review

Provides a complete guide and hands on approach to developing a research question and learning the methods and key processes involved in completing a systematic review. Systematic review is a cross-cutting methodology which can be used in a variety of disciplines and through interdisciplinary collaboration. The module can be taken by anybody from any discipline who wants to increase their skill set in the methodology. The focus is on application of the systematic review methods to a chosen field of investigation.​

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X