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Masters Degrees (Rhetoric)

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This one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric combines both ancient and modern fields of research. It is designed equally for students with a background in classics, in other humanities disciplines, and in other subjects including law and social science. Read more
This one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric combines both ancient and modern fields of research. It is designed equally for students with a background in classics, in other humanities disciplines, and in other subjects including law and social science. The programme offers preparation not only for advanced research at PhD level but also for a wide range of other careers in which oral and written communication are important, such as the media, the legal profession, politics and public relations.

It is taught by members of the Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric in the Royal Holloway Classics Department, where there is a strong concentration of expertise in classical rhetoric and oratory. It offers opportunities for collaborative work with other RHUL departments. The programme includes a core course on Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric, incorporating training in a range of analytical and scholarly research skills. A wide range of optional courses is available (including courses offered by other London institutions) and there are opportunities to pursue independent projects in any aspect of ancient or modern oratory and rhetoric, either as a self-contained package (for the PGCert and PGDip) or as a preparation for embarking on a substantial piece of research work for the MRes dissertation. The MRes can be taken as a self-standing qualification or as a preparation for a PhD, while the programme as a whole offers valuable transferable skills for non-academic careers and for continuous professional development.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/mresrhetoric.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The only course of its kind in a major UK university

- Combination of analytical and historical perspective

- Enhances ability to construct and present persuasive argumentation, as well as analysing and evaluating that presented by others

- Wide choice of taught courses, independent projects and dissertation topics

- Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric – a concentration of scholarly expertise and a magnet for visiting experts from abroad

- Access to world-class research resources in Classics and related disciplines in and around London

Course content and structure

The course contains five elements with credit values as shown below.

1. Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric (core course incorporating research methods: 40 credits)

2. EITHER: Oratory and Identity (40 credits) OR: An optional course or courses to the value of 40 credits to be chosen from a list of courses offered by the Department, or by another department at Royal Holloway, or by other London institutions as part of the Intercollegiate MA programmes in Classics, Ancient History, or Late Antique and Byzantine Studies.

3. Independent Project 1 (20 credits): e.g. a ‘pilot’ study of an area to be covered in more detail in the dissertation, a critical survey of scholarly literature on a relevant topic, a rhetorical analysis of a text, or a comparative rhetorical study of texts from different traditions, cultures or periods.

4 . Independent Project 2 (20 credits): similar in scope to Project 1 but may also be a more creative type of project, e.g. a piece of original rhetorical composition, a reconstrution of the performance of a historical speech, or similar. Supporting audi-visual materials may be submitted as part of the project.

5. Dissertation (60 credits): a substantial piece of independent research on a topic in either ancient or modern oratory and rhetoric.

Students for the MRes take all five elements as shown above. Students for the PGDip take elements 1, 2, 3, and 4. Students for the PGCert take element 1 and at least one of elements 2, 3 or 4.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge of the foundations of rhetorical theory and practice

- an appreciation of the history of rhetorical theory and practice in the European tradition from Classical antiquity to modern times

- an appreciation of the applicability of rhetorical approaches to the study of communication in the modern world

- knowledge and understanding of such other areas of language, literature, history, politics, culture, or ideas as may be appropriate in order to pursue the chosen research project(s) to an advanced level

- the acquisition of appropriate knowledge of advanced scholarship in the chosen area(s).

- the ability to understand and analyse concepts relating to rhetorical theory and practice

- the ability to engage critically and at an advanced level in rhetorical analysis of texts (e.g. argumentation, character-projection, emotional strategies, structure, use of language)

- the ability to engage in the study of rhetoric and communication as historical and/or contemporary phenomena in human societies

- the ability to conduct research independently at an advanced level

- the ability to articulate and present arguments at an advanced level with clarity and persuasiveness

- the ability to engage in debate on scholarly issues, respecting the views of other participants

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including principally coursework essays, independent projects, and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

The MRes course is a new course and is designed to equip you with skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication which will be valuable in a wide range of careers, as well as providing a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

Graduates from the Classics Department are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in law, the media, politics, advertising, business, and the armed forces, as well as school and university teaching. We have also attracted mature students from a wide variety of previous careers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric. Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations. Read more

Literature

The English Department offers MAs in the areas of Literature, Renaissance Studies, and Composition/Rhetoric.

Department faculty mentor students at all stages of their graduate experience, from coursework to teaching to examinations and the writing of master’s theses and doctoral dissertations.

Graduate students in our Department not only have the opportunity to learn in an engaging environment but also to teach in one as well. Beginning in their first (for PhD candidates) and second (for MA candidates) years, they gain valuable classroom experience in composition classes, literature surveys, and courses they design themselves. Our program's scholarly and pedagogical preparation, as well as our detailed attention to professional placement, has enabled students to develop careers as teachers, scholars, publishers and editors.

Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies

"Bringing the Globe to Alabama"

The Strode Program is a privately endowed program to promote the study of English literature from Skelton to Milton. The endowment provides for lectures and residencies by distinguished scholars and fellowships for graduate study at the University of Alabama in the field of English Renaissance Literature.

Hudson Strode served on the University of Alabama faculty from 1916 to 1963. He was a prolific author and celebrated teacher of Shakespeare and of creative writing. The Strode program was endowed by Professor Strode and his wife, Thérèse.

Focus: The Graduate Student

The intellectual work and educational activities sponsored by the Strode Program, from fellowships to lecture series, from the Strode Seminar to summer research awards, converge upon a single focus: the graduate student. We have a lively and talented group of students specializing in English Renaissance literature in preparation for careers in colleges and universities, or for other professional or personal goals. The faculty is committed not only to teaching students but also to mentoring them, fostering a community of future scholars.

Our students have won departmental and college awards for teaching and they have won university-wide fellowships for dissertation research. A recent Ph.D. received the College of Arts and Sciences annual award for best dissertation. Topics treated in the dissertations produced by our students are diverse—from readings of Spenser which deploy the theories of Derrida and Lacan to studies of the representation of female sexuality which draw upon seventeenth-century London court records; from adaptations of Shakespeare for teen films to performance criticism of regional and university theatrical productions. Essays written by our students—on Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, on the agency of the letter in Hamlet, on class conflict in Coriolanus, on Leo Africanus and early modern imperialism, and on queer kinship in The Merchant of Venice—have appeared in Early Modern Literary Studies, English Literary History, English Literary Renaissance, Studies in English Literature, and Shakespeare, among other journals and essay collections.

We have an excellent record of placing Ph.D.s in tenure-track professorships. In the past ten years, 100% of our Ph.D. graduates who went on the academic job market eventually landed tenure-track jobs. Recent graduates have joined the faculty at Cornell College, High Point University, Mercer University, Stephen F. Austin State University, Xavier University, and Youngstown State University. M.A. students have matriculated to Ph.D. programs at Emory, Northwestern, Rutgers, University of California, University of Georgia, University of Oxford, University of Tennessee, and University of Washington, to name a few. Other M.A. students have gone on to law school, library school, the Peace Corps, high school teaching, or other opportunities.

Composition and Rhetoric

The graduate curriculum in CRES (Composition, Rhetoric, and English Studies) provides a solid foundation in English studies with a particular focus on the teaching of writing and studies in language, literacy, and rhetoric. The doctoral program is designed for those seeking academic positions as composition specialists (researchers, teachers, or administrators) in postsecondary English departments that emphasize writing instruction. The MA program is ideal for those who wish to do community college teaching or administrative work, and for students wishing to continue on to the PhD.

The graduate curriculum provides core courses in composition-rhetoric as well as elective opportunities in literature, linguistics, communication studies, education, and interdisciplinary areas such as gender and race. CRES students have opportunities to teach first-year writing, technical writing, and sophomore literature surveys. We also offer opportunities for writing center work and writing program administration.

Our graduates have obtained tenure-track positions at community colleges and four-year institutions such as Central Piedmont Community College (Charlotte, NC), Shelton State Community College (Tuscaloosa, AL), North Carolina Wesleyan College (Rocky Mount, NC), Judson College (Marion, AL), Charlotte School of Law (NC), Stillman College (Tuscaloosa, AL), the University of Houston, Itawamba Community College (Fulton, MS), Chattanooga State Community College (TN), Hinds Community College (Jackson, Mississippi), Marion Military Institute (Marion, AL), Louisiana Tech, Murray State (KY), the University of Alabama-Birmingham, the University of Texas-El Paso, Alabama A&M, St. Louis Community College (Meramec Campus), LaGrange College (GA), East Tennessee State, the University of South Alabama, Eastern Illinois University, and the University of North Alabama.

Application to all graduate programs offered by the Department of English is made through the University of Alabama Graduate School online application, which can be accessed by following the link on the English Department's Admissions page.

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Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. Read more
Our programmes cover a range of classical subjects. They include material culture and history, language and literature, philosophy and the history of science and medicine. We have strong links with related disciplines such as history, archaeology and modern languages. We welcome postgraduates in any of our areas of research expertise.

Classics and Ancient History at Newcastle has a long and distinguished international reputation. We deliver quality research and teaching. We have taught Latin and Greek since 1874. We have taught Ancient History since 1910 and Classical Archaeology since 1931.

Our staff include scholars of outstanding international reputation. Our research covers all major aspects of the study of the ancient world, with research strengths in:
-Rhetoric and historiography
-Ancient philosophy, science and medicine
-Reception and recreation of ancient texts
-Ancient concepts of divinity

Our research specialities include:
-The ancient Near East
-Greco-Roman culture and religion
-Early Christianity and patristics
-Greek art and archaeology
-Greek ethnography
-History and archaeology of Roman Italy
-Greek and Roman music
-Greek language and literature, including Homer, tragedy, historiography and rhetoric
-Latin language and literature, including historiography, rhetoric and Augustan poetry
-Reception of the classical tradition
-Ancient science and medicine
-Ancient Greek and Roman patristics and philosophy

MPhil supervision is usually available in:

Ancient history and classical archaeology

-The history and archaeology of pre-Roman and Roman Italy
-The late Roman Republic
-Greco–Roman religion
-The social and cultural history of the Roman Empire
-Roman Greece
-Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt
-History of the Jews
-Greek art and archaeology
-The history and archaeology of the ancient Near East

Classical language and literature

-Latin language and literature
-Ancient oratory and rhetoric
-Latin poetry
-Ancient historiography
-Greek tragedy
-Greek influence on later literature
-Greek and Roman music

Philosophy and science

-Ancient and early Christian philosophy
-The history of Greek and Roman medicine
-Greek and Roman music
-The exact sciences in Graeco-Roman antiquity

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The UBC English Graduate Program, one of the most vibrant and wide-ranging in Canada, has been awarding the M.A. degree since 1919 and the PhD degree since 1962. Read more

About the Graduate Program

The UBC English Graduate Program, one of the most vibrant and wide-ranging in Canada, has been awarding the M.A. degree since 1919 and the PhD degree since 1962. Students may earn these degrees in each of two areas: English Literature and English Language. Indeed, the UBC English Department is one of the few departments in North America to offer a language program in addition to its literary programs.

English Language

The English Language program includes specializations in history and structure of language, discourse and genre analysis, and history and theory of rhetoric. Faculty members in the Language program teach and supervise research in descriptive linguistics, historical linguistics, cognitive linguistics, functional grammar, semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis, stylistics, genre studies, and history and theory of rhetoric. Students in the English Literature program can take advantage of Language graduate courses; recent offerings include courses on reported speech and its rhetorical versatility across genres; the uses of classical rhetoric for contemporary critical practice; and cognitive approaches to the language of literature. By the same token, Language students can take advantage of the wide variety of Literature courses our department offers.

English Literature

The English Literature program includes specializations across the periods, genres, and major figures of British, North American and World Literature in English. Current research initiatives on the part of faculty include such diverse topics as the ecocritical study of Renaissance drama; the triumph of transport in Romantic poetry; the impact of radio and television on modernist poetics; the politics of post-identity in Asian American literature, and the role of war and its traumatic shocks in twentieth-century Canadian, U.S. and British literature. Graduate students can also choose to work across disciplinary fields, taking advantage of UBC's outstanding interdisciplinary programs in Medieval Studies, Canadian and U.S. Studies, Studies in Sexuality, and Science and Technology Studies, among others.

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This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to study the full range of classical literature and history, as well as improving your languages and learning new technical skills. Read more
This stimulating course offers opportunities for you to study the full range of classical literature and history, as well as improving your languages and learning new technical skills.

As this is an intercollegiate MA, jointly run with King’s College London and University College London, you will benefit from the choice of a wide range of fascinating subjects. These include the Greek and Latin literatures from Homer to Late Antiquity, classical reception, ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, as well as key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

This course is ideal if you are considering progressing to advanced research or wish to add an additional year of high level study to your undergraduate qualification.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/maclassics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We are an international centre of excellence in research and teaching, promoting understanding and knowledge of the ancient world and its culture.

- You will have the opportunity to take part in our departmental research seminars.

- As we are a College of the University of London, you will have the opporunity to choose intercollegiate course units at King’s College London and UCL.

- We offer units which cover not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

- We have an excellent track record of publications that advance the understanding of antiquity.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Department is home to two College Research Centres: the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome and the new Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric.

- Research in the Department covers the whole range of Classical Studies, from Homeric Greece to the very end of the Roman Empire.

- In classical language, literature and thought we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: Homer, epic tradition, Greek drama, the ancient novel, Greek literature under the Roman Empire, ancient rhetoric and oratory, Latin epic and elegy, ancient myth, ancient philosophy (especially Neoplatonism) and classical reception.

Course content and structure

You will study three elective course units and prepare a dissertation. The elective units must include either at least one taught course which tests knowledge of Greek or Latin in the original or one language acquisition course. The dissertation should normally be in the field of classical language, literature or thought, or the classical tradition. For more information about the course units, please see the Department of Classics' website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/informationforcurrentstudents/home.aspx .

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of classics
- an understanding of critical methodologies and their limitations
- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline
- a critical awareness of the main forms of material available to you when studying classical antiquity.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and in recent years have entered many classics related areas including academic positions at Oxford, Bristol, and Roehampton Universities, as well as teaching careers in the UK and overseas, archaeological and museum work, and a wide range of other roles.

This taught Master’s course will also provide you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

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The MA in International Communication and Cultures aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding of communication as a cultural process. Read more
The MA in International Communication and Cultures aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding of communication as a cultural process.

You will discover how cultural meanings are carried within every message and what their effects are at an international level – how they are mediated, interpreted and translated. You will gain the skills required to critically explore the (trans)formation and effects of messages and their meanings in a globalised world. You will also learn how to translate and interpret the delivery of these messages to international audiences and markets, and develop the ability to negotiate and promote intended meaning.

The programme is ideal for those who have studied culture or communication (history, education, communication, social sciences, linguistics or languages) and wish to gain a more practical element with a focus on international markets, or those who have worked in the industry and would like to get a more thorough understanding of transcultural communication, which is linked to their experience.

In the first semester, you will take modules in global studies of communication and culture and in relevant research methods (textual and image analysis). You will be introduced to a range of optional modules for further specialisation, such as, Negotiation and Business Strategies, Documentary Film-making or Intercultural Rhetoric, Translation and Mediation. In the second semester, you will consolidate the knowledge, understanding and skills acquired in the previous semester in the field of international media and intercultural communication. New aspects of your learning in semester two will be an introduction to cultural practices (cultural management, innovation and creativity), but also to the role and use of languages across different cultures. You will be introduced to a range of optional modules for further specialisation, such as World literature, Global Media Events and Latin-America Cinema.

Core modules:
•Analysing transnational and intercultural meaning: Images and film/Language, texts and discourses
•Negotiation in international contexts: The use of language across cultures
•Representing intercultural meaning: Exhibition project or film festival (alternate years)
•Transnational flows, mediascapes and global meaning-making in intercultural contexts

Optional modules:
•Global cultural cities: The visual representation of Barcelona – tourism, football, architecture, festivals
•Global media events: Spectacles, festivals and conferences
•Global online communication: Self-expression and identity
•Intercultural rhetoric, translation and mediation: Promotional, educational and public communication
•Mediating distant suffering: Pity, trauma and victimhood in a transnational context
•Memory beyond borders: The transnational politics of memory and remembering
•Cinematic Representations of Latin America: Local versus global
•Representing intercultural meaning: Film project
•Theories of culture and communication
•Transcultural and transnational aesthetic practices: Cinema, magazines, fashion and museums
•Understanding multilingual contexts: Ethnic minorities and the glocal level
•World literature: Narratives, genres and networks

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The Department of English, General Literature and Rhetoric offers students the opportunity to study literature and language in their many manifestations. Read more
The Department of English, General Literature and Rhetoric offers students the opportunity to study literature and language in their many manifestations. Although English and American literature and the practice of creative and expository writing are primary, the department conceives of neither literature nor writing in a narrow or parochial way. Literature courses deal broadly with genres and themes from the past and present, and teach students how to read and analyze texts; creative writing courses foster, in qualified students, the development of serious creativity; rhetoric courses deal with both the theory and practice of communication, as well as the history of oral and written argument.

Recent doctoral graduate employment placements include: Assistant Professor at Pfeiffer University, Assistant Professor at University of California Channel Island, Lead Editor and Writer at Kathy Layne & Associates, Assistant Professor at Virginia State University, Assistant Professor at Ithaca College.

MA English/American Literature with a creative writing concentration also available.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you have attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores
- Writing sample: All applicants: critical writing sample (10-20 pages). Creative writing applicants: portfolio of creative work (not more than 40 pages of fiction or 20 pages of verse)

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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The M.A. in English offers three tracks. one in literature; one in writing, teaching, and criticism; and, one in creative writing. Read more
The M.A. in English offers three tracks: one in literature; one in writing, teaching, and criticism; and, one in creative writing. In the literature and writing, teaching, and criticism tracks, students may choose between thesis and non-thesis options. Students in the creative writing track must write a creative thesis. The master of arts in English helps students attain a number of goals. It offers opportunities for the study of language, literature, rhetoric and composition, pedagogy, creative writing, and literary and cultural critical theory. The diverse and comprehensive selection of courses cultivates scholarly knowledge and enhances cultural literacy in an atmosphere that engages students intellectually and creatively. The program prepares students to enroll in advanced graduate programs (for the Ph.D. in literature or composition and rhetoric, for example), to teach literature or writing in secondary schools or two-year colleges, and to enter a range of other professions in which writing expertise and analytical thinking are valued.

Curriculum

Required core modules for all English MA students:

• ENG 500 The Discipline of English Studies
• ENG 501 Critical Theory

For additional modules taught on the literature track, please see the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/arts-humanities/english/english-ma-literature-track/

For additional modules taught on the creative writing track, please see the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/arts-humanities/english/english-ma-creative-writing-track/

For additional modules taught on the writing, teaching and criticism track, please see the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/arts-humanities/english/english-ma-writing-teaching-criticism-track/

Culture and Community

The English Department sponsors a vibrant cultural life that includes a renowned Poetry Center, readings by notable authors, two student literary journals (Daedalus and Literati), an English Club, an English Alumni organization, numerous student awards and scholarships, and local chapters of the Sigma Tau Delta English honors society and the National Council of Teachers in English (NCTE). Our students and faculty are also actively involved in the university’s ongoing sustainability efforts. All of these opportunities enable students to expand their learning experience beyond the classroom and collaborate with others who share their passions.

Careers

To the question "What can you do with an English degree?" we say: "What can't you do?" Our graduates enjoy successful careers in publishing, journalism, education, management, law, marketing, advertising, social media, human resources, and business. Many seek advanced degrees in English, law, information & library science, and other fields. Whatever career path you pursue, English will prepare you for any profession that values the kind of interpretive analysis, creative problem-solving, and polished communication central to the discipline of English Studies.

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The only graduate program in Cultural Studies in Western Canada, the University of Winnipeg's multidisciplinary Master of Arts in Cultural Studies is an innovative, 12-month, course-based program that offers specializations in Texts and Cultures or Curatorial Practices. Read more
The only graduate program in Cultural Studies in Western Canada, the University of Winnipeg's multidisciplinary Master of Arts in Cultural Studies is an innovative, 12-month, course-based program that offers specializations in Texts and Cultures or Curatorial Practices. Bringing together instructors from across the university and from the city's vibrant arts and culture community, the MA in Cultural Studies provides students with strong methodological and theoretical training in order to pursue further postgraduate studies or careers in a range of fields, including education, publishing, arts management, art curation, and journalism.

What is Cultural Studies?

Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary field, drawing on theories and practices from a range of humanities and social sciences disciplines, that seeks to investigate the ways in which cultures produce and are produced. At the centre of Cultural Studies sits a host of questions, such as what constitutes a text, how some texts, visual images, and cultural artifacts come to be valued over others, and how questions of value relate to the distribution of power and authority.

Rather than concentrating exclusively on the group of elite texts that make up so-called "high culture," Cultural Studies takes as its focus the whole complex of changing beliefs, ideas, feelings, values, and symbols that define a community’s organization and sense of itself. Culture in this sense is often understood to be a primary vehicle of globalization in the contemporary world and deeply enmeshed in particular social, economical and political environments. As such, when we study culture, we are studying the world we live in and how we function in it.

Cultural Studies MA at the University of Winnipeg

Small seminars, individual attention from dedicated instructors, and strong academic development are just some of the benefits of being a student in the MA in Cultural Studies. Students specialize in one of two areas: 1) Texts and Cultures, which emphasizes theoretically-grounded cultural analysis and 2) Curatorial Practices, which focuses on museum studies.

Students in the MA in Cultural Studies take a total of 24 credit hours (the equivalent of 4 full-year courses) in a range of topic areas, including Cultural Theory; Visual Cultures; Curatorial Practices; Cultures of Childhood; Gender, Sexualities and Culture; Local, National and Global Cultures; and Manuscript, Print and Digital Cultures.

What is a multidisciplinary degree?

A multidisciplinary degree is one that allows you to study courses in a variety of subject areas. The Cultural Studies MA degree incorporates theories and methods from a variety of disciplines, including Literary Studies, History, Art History, Women’s and Gender Studies, Politics, and Rhetoric and Communications. In the Cultural Studies MA program at the University of Winnipeg, instructors from these disciplines regularly teach courses in the program and are available for Special Studies courses in which they direct the research projects of individual students.

How to prepare for an MA in Cultural Studies?

Cultural Studies is an academic field that uses critical and cultural theories to study cultural phenomena. Therefore, it is recommended that a student choose classes that use feminist theory, social theory, political theory, literary theory, and/or media theory while pursuing their undergraduate degree in order to prepare for an MA in Cultural Studies.

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The MA in Education provides outstanding opportunities to study a wide range of educational issues. It will provide you with a clear understanding of the nature and significance of policy and practice in education, relevant to researchers as well as professionals in schools, colleges and universities. Read more

The MA in Education provides outstanding opportunities to study a wide range of educational issues. It will provide you with a clear understanding of the nature and significance of policy and practice in education, relevant to researchers as well as professionals in schools, colleges and universities.

A key feature of the programme is the facility for you to draw on your own professional and personal as well as academic and theoretical interests, through being able to choose from a range of optional modules to study (see below). And you will also be able to explore your own interests in depth through the completion of a dissertation.

In all of our modules, we aim to introduce you to key ideas and ways of thinking that enable you to engage with related issues in contexts that are relevant to you. Our programme is constructed in such a way that contexts as diverse as science education in schools, informal learning in the workplace and the management of schools outside the UK, can be explored through module assignments as well as the dissertation.

The degree has been designed to meet the needs of educational professionals, especially those in teaching, management or administration at all levels of education. Students likely to benefit from the programme are those who are interested in education, often teachers or people planning to become teachers, with a commitment to pedagogy, and educational managers in schools, colleges and higher education institutions, as well as those working in educational administration, in the UK and overseas.

Through its flexible delivery routes the MA in Education is suitable for students from all backgrounds and countries. In addition to a traditional full-time study route, the course is available via part-time and International Summer Postgraduate Institute routes. On the part-time route, teaching is delivered through intensive teaching weekends scheduled around (Durham) school half-term holidays making the programme more accessible for those working full-time. Meanwhile, the part-time International Summer Postgraduate Institute (ISPI) route is delivered through an intensive summer school teaching programme. The ISPI summer teaching runs in Durham throughout July each year and attracts students from a wide range of backgrounds and countries, including the UK, and is ideal for those seeking part-time study in a truly international context. ISPI students benefit from a range of extra academic and cultural activities organised by the School of Education. 

Students who have successfully completed the PGCE at Durham in the previous academic year have the option to use 90 credits they have accredited on this course. These students will only need to do the core modules, Education Enquiry and the Dissertation (if part-time, over 2 years), to complete the programme.

Course Structure

Full-time students study the four taught modules plus the dissertation over one year.

Part-time students normally study two taught modules per year in years one and two and the dissertation in year three.

Core Modules

  • Research Methods Education (30 credits)
  • Critical Perspectives in Education (30 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Optional Modules

You must select 60 credits from a list of optional modules which may include:

  • 21st Century Technology: Implications for Teaching and Learning (30 credits)
  • Arts in Education (30 credits)
  • Curriculum Analysis (30 credits)
  • Enhancing Teaching and Learning for Productive Thought (30 credits)
  • Improving Computer Education
  • Intercultural and International Education (30 credits)
  • Intercultural Communication (30 credits)
  • Policy Studies (30 credits)
  • Psychology of the Learner (30 credits)
  • Special Educational Needs and Inclusion: Rhetoric or Reality? (30 credits).

The above are examples of modules we have run in previous years. Modules are continually developed in response to student feedback and interests, as well as to reflect the changing nature of academic research within the department.

Course Learning and Teaching

In all of our postgraduate taught programmes we place an emphasis on empowering students to be autonomous, independent learners. The taught modules provide an introduction to module content which is then developed and extended through our use of online resources, key reading and independent study and research. We consider the development of independent learning and research skills to be one of the key elements of our postgraduate taught curriculum and one which helps our students cultivate initiative, originality and critical thinking.

On the MA Education programme you will take compulsory core modules worth a total of 60 credits plus two optional modules worth 60  credits. Modules are offered either mid-week or at weekends, which provides flexible study routes and a wide choice of options. Modules are delivered using a combination of lectures, seminars workshops, and tutorials. The core modules are designed to provide you with a critical understanding of theories, research and issues relevant to your chosen programme of study. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to devote significant amounts of time to reading, discussing and preparing for classes, assignments and project work.

In addition to the taught core and option modules all postgraduate taught students following a Master’s programme will undertake a 60 credit dissertation. This crucial piece of work is a significant piece of independent research that constitutes a synthesis of theory, method, and practice in education and is supported by an individual supervisor, specialist dissertation workshops and the Dissertation Coordinator.

Throughout the programme, all students meet regularly with an Academic Advisor, who provides academic support and guidance. In addition, Programme Leads have regular office hours where they meet students to discuss any issues. Module staff are also happy to meet with you to discuss module specific issues as needed.

In term time, the department also has an extensive programme of departmental and research group seminars which postgraduate students are encouraged to attend. Before the academic year starts, we provide information on preparation for the programme. On arrival, we have induction sessions and social events, headed by the Director of Postgraduate Studies and attended by both academic and administrative staff. 

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities in education are wide and include classroom teaching, educational leadership and management, administration and policy development.



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The course covers technologies used to design, realise and analyse micro and Nano-scale devices, materials and systems, coupled with general and technology management. Read more
The course covers technologies used to design, realise and analyse micro and Nano-scale devices, materials and systems, coupled with general and technology management. This, supported by project work, ensures graduates emerge trained in a wide-range of technical and management skills, and have a sharp appreciation of the relevance of the subject to industrial needs. 'Nanotechnology' is moving from the rhetoric of hype into a manufacturing reality. The popularised myths described in popular fiction like Michael Crichton's novel 'Prey', and serialised in TV dramas, are rapidly being pushed aside as large organisations such as Unilever and QinetiQ see the value of integrating miniature and Nano systems. In such a rapidly changing and vibrant atmosphere it is vital that the nanotechnology programmes are agile and satisfy industry's requirements.

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Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically. it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Read more

Introduction

Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically: it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Explore the strategic thinking underlying brands and look at how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Content

Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, this programme encourages students to challenge what is understood about the meaning of graphic branding. It explores the strategic thinking underlying brands and focuses on how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Look around you and you will see examples of the power of brands - on the High Street, within organisations and in the media. From Coca Cola to Virgin, the most successful brands are worth billions.

This MA course focuses on the role of visual identity within branding. The aim is to produce versatile and creative practitioners who understand design within a business, social and cultural context.

It addresses the subject from a broad perspective, covering individual, group, cultural, national, international, corporate and commercial identities. You will be encouraged to look critically at the graphic elements which make up a contemporary visual identity. The emphasis is on practical design, supported by theoretical components and the application of clear research methodologies. As well as developing a deeper knowledge of branding and graphic design, you will gain an understanding of how to develop brand strategies and propositions. An important part of the course involves developing an independent personal project that investigates these principles and their application.

Learning at this level will be about research, intellectual engagement, discovery, interaction and change. The final product for us is not in itself the goal - it is the research, exploration, evaluation and intellectual understanding of branding and identity that makes this MA distinctive.

Structure

Phase 1

Unit 1.1 Design Literacy
Unit 1.2 Research Methods (Visual Research)
Unit 1.3 Major Project Proposal

Phase 2

Unit 2.1 Workshop Options Project
Unit 2.2 Design + Rhetoric
Unit 2.3 Research Methods: Major Project Definition

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Major Project Resolution: Practical and Report or
Unit 3.2 Major Project Resolution: Thesis

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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Reconsidering the Renaissance.

Examples of optional modules – literature

Modules may include: Early Modern Paleography (i.e. training in reading sixteenth and seventeenth-century manuscripts); The English Civil War; The Country House; Directed Reading: Early Modern Books; Pastoral Literature (online module) and Shakespeare and Early Women Dramatists (online module).

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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