• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
London Metropolitan University Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
University of Bath Featured Masters Courses
University of Sheffield Featured Masters Courses
"revolution"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Revolution)

We have 193 Masters Degrees (Revolution)

  • "revolution" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 193
Order by 
The programme examines a range of US literary and historical contexts, introducing ways in which the production of an idea of 'America' is variously achieved and contested between 1776 and the present. Read more

The programme examines a range of US literary and historical contexts, introducing ways in which the production of an idea of 'America' is variously achieved and contested between 1776 and the present.

You will explore the way literary, cultural, political and philosophical texts have contributed to the development, interrogation and revision of American identity and culture between 1776 and the present day.

You will be introduced to the rich diversity of American writing over the past 250 years by academic staff who can offer outstanding research and teaching expertise in this fascinating field. The compulsory courses, specifically developed for this masters programme, offer you the opportunity to think critically about some of the most pressing concerns in literary and cultural studies.

You will find a wealth of resources on hand at the University’s many libraries and the National Library of Scotland, which holds both the Hugh Sharp Collection (more than 300 volumes) of first editions of English and North American authors, and the Henderson Memorial Library of Books on America (more than 700 volumes), containing 19th and early 20th century works mainly on cultural history, description and travel, sociology and biography, and relating mostly to the Civil War.

Programme structure

You will take two courses per semester, one compulsory and one chosen from a range of options, each consisting of a weekly two-hour seminar. You will also take courses in research skills and methods. After your two semesters of taught courses you will work towards your dissertation, with supervisor support.

Compulsory courses:

  • Enlightenment to Entropy: Writing the American Republic from Thomas Jefferson to Henry Adams
  • New Beginnings to the End of Days: Writing the American Republic from Reconstruction to 9/11
  • Research Skills and Methods.

Option courses may include:

  • Poet-Critics: the Style of Modern Poetry
  • Modernism and Empire
  • Cities of Literature: Metropolitan Modernities
  • Global Modernisms: Inter/National Responses to Modernity
  • Victorian Transatlanticism
  • Contemporary American Fiction
  • Green Thoughts: Landscape, Environment and Literature
  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this programme will gain:

  • a detailed knowledge of a range of literary writing that responds to and informs concepts of American identity
  • an understanding of the role of political and ideological structures in the production of national historiographies
  • a grounding in the research methods of literary studies

Career opportunities

You will develop research and analytical skills that can be extended into future advanced study in English literature. You will also be equipped with skills that could be beneficial for a teaching career or a role within a cultural institution. The array of transferable skills you will acquire, such as communication and project management, will prove highly valuable to potential employers in whatever field you choose to enter.



Read less
The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. Read more
The course furnishes the student with the opportunity to pursue English literary studies at an advanced level, developing the skills and knowledge required for textual, theoretical and historical analysis in the candidate’s chosen field. It offers one-to-one supervision from experts in the field. You are also encouraged to participate in the lively research environment of the School and College, which includes the English Literature research seminar series, scholarly reading groups, workshops and conferences.

The course consists of taught modules (Part One) mainly assessed by essays, followed by a dissertation (Part Two). The modules within the English Literature programme are grouped into four ‘pathways’ . Each of these represents a particular area of research strength at Bangor and offers an aspect of literary study in which MA students may choose to specialise.

The four pathways:

1. Medieval and Early Modern Literature

2. Material Texts

3. Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present

4. Four Nations Literature

Students who prefer not to specialise by following one of the pathways may alternatively pursue a broader portfolio of advanced literary studies in English by completing the compulsory module (see below) and a free choice of three other modules.

Course Structure
Part One:

In the first part of the MA programme, all students are required to study FOUR modules of 30 credits each; for full-time students, this means two modules per semester. Of these four modules, one is compulsory: Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research (in semester 1). This module lays the foundation for the MA by introducing you to key ideas in literary theory, the analysis of texts and the techniques of advanced scholarly writing.

In addition, students are required to choose three further modules from those listed below. You may make an open selection of modules OR follow one of the four pathways described above. In order to complete a pathway, you must choose at least TWO of your three optional modules from that pathway, with the final module being a free choice (from the pathway, from elsewhere in the English Literature MA programme, or from other relevant postgraduate programmes in the School or College).

1. Modules on Medieval and Early Modern Literature:

Pre-Modern Travel
Manuscripts and Printed Books
The European Renaissance
Myth and the Early Modern Author
Women’s Devotional Writing
Medieval Arthur
Post-Medieval Arthur
Advanced Latin for Postgraduates
Editing Texts
2. Modules on Material Texts:

Manuscripts and Printed Books
Material Texts and Contexts
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Editing Texts
3. Modules on Revolution and Modernity, 1750 to the Present:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Material Texts and Contexts
Modernisms
Print, Politics & Popular Culture
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
4. Modules on Four-Nations Literature:

Revolution, Modernity: 1790-1930
Welsh Literature in English
Modernisms
Irish Literature
Editing Texts
In addition to the above pathway-related modules, the following modules are offered:

Open Essay
The Postgraduate Conference
It is possible to take one optional module from the MA in Creative Writing (if the prerequisites of creative writing experience are met). If you should so wish, and in consultation with the Director of the MA in English Literature, there is also the option of taking one MA module from another School in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Part Two:

After the completion of the four modules which make up Part One of the programme, Part Two consists of a 20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) on a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist. If you are following one of the four pathways, you are expected to write your dissertation in a research area relevant to that particular pathway.

Students who have completed Part One of the MA programme but elect not to write a dissertation are awarded the postgraduate diploma.

Read less
Some time ago the Wall Street Journal wrote. "Why Software is Eating the World". This refers to the fact, that software systems are revolutionizing all business processes and models, enable completely new applications and shape how we live. Read more
Some time ago the Wall Street Journal wrote: "Why Software is Eating the World".
This refers to the fact, that software systems are revolutionizing all business processes and models, enable completely new applications and shape how we live. A revolution is underway! – A revolution triggered and shaped through computer science and the applications for which it provides the basis. Do you want to be part of this revolution, shaping computer science and through it the world? Then the Master’s Program Applied Computer Sciences is what you are looking for!

The study program Applied Computer Science (ACS) will help you to gain a deeper understanding of computer science and will enable you actively contribute to the progress of computer science in a wide range of fields. Building on the fundamentals obtained during a Bachelor’s program in ACS or a related program, students learn to develop large, complex and novel software. You will be able to specialize in different fields like software development, information systems, machine learning, etc. You will be able to choose your specialization from elective courses for a significant part of their studies. In addition you will obtain knowledge in the fields of business administration and information management.

Core Modules

* Machine Learning
* Software-Architectures
* Distributed Learning Systems
* Media Informatics
* Marketing / Logistics
* Business Modeling
* Computational linguistics
* Knowledge Management and E-Learning

Application and Admission

The program starts at University of Hildesheim twice a year: in April and in October. For details on how to apply please visit our website https://www.uni-hildesheim.de/en/studium/bewerbung/bewerbung/.
Please note that this is a german language based program. Thus, you need proof of German language capabilities as a prerequisite for enrollment.

International Applicants

If you live outside of Germany and need additional information about college and study fees, entry requirements beyond the ones stated below, accommodation or the application procedure: Please visit our International Office at https://www.uni-hildesheim.de/en/io/.

Read less
Your programme of study. If you want to get involved in our next industry revolution - Industry 4.0 this degree will go a long way to providing you with many skills needed in this high growth industry area which has continued from where the mass communications revolution. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to get involved in our next industry revolution - Industry 4.0 this degree will go a long way to providing you with many skills needed in this high growth industry area which has continued from where the mass communications revolution. You must have covered either computer science or electrical and electronic engineering as your first degree or a suitable combination to study this Master's degree. The digital age is changing the way we live, communicate, interact and our quality of life rapidly. Cloud based networks are now normal, autonomous vehicles are being explored, visual recognition, GIS aligning to our search interests, data mining to inform us automatically at any point in time what is happening around us and new methods to inform us of danger, awareness, alerts and so on.

Artificial Intelligence provides in depth knowledge of data mining, natural language, information visualisation and communication used in Industry 4.0 innovation industries such as autonomous vehicles, sensor data collection and computation, visual computer recognition software and machine to machine technologies. It is also said that artificial intelligence has the potential to change how we research and act to provide immediate solutions to energy, travel, and gridlock before it happens by setting up more alerts and warnings to us. We now already have the capabilities in smart technology to alert us on maps, apps, weather stations, lighting, sensors and other electronic and wired machine to machine devices to provide instant relevant information.

You are also advised to visit the organisation websites via the link below to find out about the innovations which may be influenced by AI:

Scottish Innovation Centres -

Courses listed for the programme

SEMESTER 1

Compulsory Courses

  • Foundations in AI
  • Machine Learning
  • Evaluation Systems of AI Systems
  • Engineering of AI Systems

SEMESTER 2

Compulsory Courses

  • Data Mining and Visualisation
  • Natural Language Generation
  • Software Agents and Multi-Agent Systems
  • Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

SEMESTER 3

You can broaden and deepen your skills with industry client opportunities where possible

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • AI or Artificial Intelligence is part of a major industrial revolution globally, linking to the Internet of Things
  • Aberdeen gives you a strong worldwide reputation for teaching in computing science, data science and natural language generation
  • You can be involved in cutting edge innovations which will shape our world in the future

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs

You may also be interested in:

Information Technology MSc - Campus or Online



Read less
The M.Phil course in Early Modern History offers well-qualified graduates in History, the Humanities and the Social Sciences an introduction to research in the political, social, cultural and religious history of Ireland, Britain and Europe across the early modern period. Read more
The M.Phil course in Early Modern History offers well-qualified graduates in History, the Humanities and the Social Sciences an introduction to research in the political, social, cultural and religious history of Ireland, Britain and Europe across the early modern period. This one-year course (or two years part-time) is designed to introduce students to a wide range of issues in, and approaches to, early modern history. It also provides students with training in research methods and skills. The course is built around Trinity College Library's unparalleled resources for the period from the Reformation to the French Revolution. The course may also serve as an introduction to graduate study for students intending to pursue doctoral studies.

The core module for this course is From Reform to Revolution: Cultural Change and Political Conflict in Early Modern Europe. Students also choose two major of study, one in each term. Availability of modules alters from year to year. Subjects recently offered include: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe; War and Society in Early Modern Ireland and Europe; The War of Ideas in the English Revolution; Gender, Identity and Authority in Eighteenth-Century France; Renaissance Kingship. In addition, students take modules focussed on research training and skills. These are designed to introduce the diverse resources and methodologies that historians encounter in their research while also equipping students with the practical skills that are required for the study of early modern history. The Research Seminar in Early Modern History provides an opportunity for invited early modernists from Ireland and elsewhere to discuss their work with graduate students. The capstone of the course is the independent dissertation project. Students complete dissertations of between 15,000 and 20,000 words based on their own primary research. Each student is assigned a supervisor who provides individual academic guidance on their research project.

Read less
Increasingly, big data are used to track and trace social trends and behaviours. In turn, governments, business and industries worldwide are rapidly recruiting graduates who can understand and analyse big data. Read more
Increasingly, big data are used to track and trace social trends and behaviours. In turn, governments, business and industries worldwide are rapidly recruiting graduates who can understand and analyse big data. This course addresses how big data challenge traditional research processes, and impact on security, privacy, ethics, and governance and policy. You will learn practical and theoretical data skills, both in quantitative methods and the wider theoretical implications about how big data are transforming disciplinary boundaries.

You will take three core modules and a dissertation. Three option modules (see below) allow further specialisation. Lab work, report writing, data skills training and guest lectures by industry experts will form an integral part of your learning experience. You will be invited to attend short certified ‘Masterclasses’ to further extend your methodological repertoire. An annual Spring Camp on a key theme (e.g. health; networks; food) is also provided, allowing you to gain expertise in a wide range of cutting-edge quantitative methods.

You don’t need a computer science, mathematics or statistics background to apply. The focus is on conducting and understanding applied quantitative social science, so a willingness to engage with real world social science issues is essential.

Course Overview

Core Modules
-Big Data Research: Hype or Revolution?
-Principles in Quantitative Research
-Advanced Quantitative Research
-Dissertation

Masters Optional Modules
-Visualisation
-Social Informatics
-Big Data Research
-Hype or Revolution?
-Complexity in the Social Sciences
-Media and Social Theory
-Digital Sociology
-Post Digital Books
-User Interface Cultures
-Design, Method and Critique
-Playful Media
-Ludification in the Digital Age

Assessment
A combination of essays, reports, design projects, technical report writing, practice assessments, group work and presentations and an individual research project.

Read less
The digital revolution has led to an unprecedented volume of information about consumers, which progressive organisations are eager to understand and use. Read more

The digital revolution has led to an unprecedented volume of information about consumers, which progressive organisations are eager to understand and use. This innovative masters degree will give you the practical skills to analyse consumer data and provide insights for successful marketing strategies.

Taught by leading academics from Leeds University Business School and School of Geography, you’ll explore a range of analytical techniques including applied Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and retail modelling, consumer and predictive analytics and data visualisation. You’ll also develop the softer skills to use the results of these analyses to inform decisions about marketing strategy.

Thanks to our connections with businesses worldwide, you’ll have access to emerging trends in topics such as consumer behaviour, decision science and digital and interactive marketing. You’ll further develop your practical skills with the opportunity to work on a live data project provided by a company.

Academic excellence

This courseoffers you a rare combination of teaching expertise; the Business School’s academic excellence in Marketing alongside world-class teaching from the School of Geography, which draws on the knowledge of the Centre for Spatial Analysis and Policy.

The University of Leeds is a major centre for big data analytics and you’ll benefit from affiliation with the UK’s Consumer Data Research Centre. The centre aims to make data that are routinely collected by businesses and organisations accessible for academic purposes. Coordinating and analysing this large and complex data has the potential to increase productivity and innovation in business, as well as to inform public policy and drive development.

Read an interview with the academic team to learn more about our expertise and the growing importance of this emerging subject area.

Course content

Core modules will introduce you to a range of analytical methods, ensuring you develop a solid foundation in the essential skills for consumer analytics and marketing strategy.

You’ll learn how to analyse geographic data using GIS software and understand the application of this in retail modelling, to evaluate new markets and locations. You’ll study predictive analytics, big data and consumer analytics, business analytics and decision science, and learn how to communicate results through data visualisations.

Alongside this, you’ll learn how to deploy data to inform decisions about marketing strategy. Marketing modules include marketing strategy, consumer behavior and direct, digital and interactive marketing. You’ll also deliver your own data-driven marketing research project for a company.

Optional modules allow you to further your knowledge in a related area of interest, either corporate social responsibility, internal communications and managing change, or applied population and demographic analysis.

By the end of the course, you’ll submit an independent project. You can either research a topic in-depth and submit a dissertation, or gain practical experience through a consultancy project working with an external organisation.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

You’ll take the nine compulsory modules below, plus your dissertation, which can be a choice of either a research dissertation or marketing consultancy project.

  • Geographic Data Visualisation & Analysis 15 credits
  • Big Data and Consumer Analytics 15 credits
  • Predictive Analytics 15 credits
  • Applied GIS and Retail Modelling 15 credits
  • Business Analytics and Decision Science 15 credits
  • Consumer Behaviour 15 credits
  • Marketing Research Consultancy Project 15 credits
  • Direct, Digital and Interactive Marketing 15 credits
  • Marketing Strategy 15 credits
  • Dissertation OR Marketing Consultancy Project 30 credits

Optional modules

You'll take one further optional module.

  • Applied Population and Demographic Analysis 15 credits
  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability 15 credits
  • Internal Communications and Change Management 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Consumer Analytics and Marketing Strategy MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching methods so you can benefit from the expertise of our academics, including lectures, workshops, seminars, simulations and tutorials. Company case studies provide an opportunity to put your learning into practice.

Independent study is also vital for this course, allowing you to prepare for taught classes and sharpen your own research and critical skills.

Assessment

Assessment methods emphasise not just knowledge, but essential skills development too. You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including exams, group projects, written assignments and essays, in-course assessment, group and individual presentations and reports.

Career opportunities

As a graduate of this course you will be equipped with advanced skills in consumer analytics and marketing strategy, ideal for those wishing to pursue a career in consumer data analytics, marketing and/or management.

Due to the digital revolution, companies from around the world and in many industrial sectors have access to greater amounts of data.

The most progressive companies in the world are particularly interested in marketing graduates with strong analytical skills, and typical roles could include marketing or consumer data analyst, direct marketing manager, marketing manager, retail manager, or marketing or management consultant.

Careers support

As a masters student you will be able to access careers and professional development support, which will help you develop key skills including networking and negotiating, and put you in touch with potential employers.

Our dedicated Professional Development Tutor provides tailored academic and careers support to marketing students. They work in partnership with our academics to help you translate theory into practice and develop your interpersonal and professional business skills.

You can expect support and guidance on career choices, help in identifying and applying for jobs, as well as one-to-one coaching on interpersonal and communication skills.

Read more about careers support at the Business School.



Read less
This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. Read more

This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. The programme's graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

About this degree

Students will gain a broad empirical knowledge of the diverse societies of Latin America and the Caribbean from the perspective of at least two disciplines, together with an awareness of the general patterns of differences and commonalities in the histories, politics, economies and cultures of the different linguistic territories of the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core modules

  • The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
  • Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules

Students choose four optional modules from a selection that includes the following:

  • Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
  • Democratisation in Latin America
  • Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
  • Money and Politics in Latin America
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges to Democratization
  • Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Latin American Economics
  • Globalisation and Latin American Development
  • The International Politics of Latin America
  • State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
  • The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
  • From Slavery to Freedom? Race, Class, Gender and Union in the Nineteenth Century United States

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report

All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a topic relating to the Caribbean, or Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, independent reading and research. Assessment is through varied assignments including essays, an oral presentation and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Many of our Master's students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.

There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Caribbean and Latin American Studies MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance and international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Employability

Students will have excellent opportunities to expand professional networks enhancing their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive contacts in the region, and through participating in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the diplomatic service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent graduates have found employment in government (Foreign & Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position at the core of academic study of the region in the UK, promoting research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic, third sector and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
Your programme of study. There is a lot you can do with data in any organisation. Read more

Your programme of study

There is a lot you can do with data in any organisation. With the increase in technology and IOT plus the 'Big Data' revolution the collation of data and the power it holds to transform organisations, ensure health and safety in difficult to reach places, keep ahead of life cycles, drive change and innovation has huge potential for any organisation. Within the oil and gas and energy sectors and related supply chain the revolution of supply and demand is already happening.

If you already work in data either in the energy sector or other related sectors this programme specialises in its application to the oil and gas sector and it is partnered with Common Data Access Ltd which is a not for profit subsidiary of Oil and Gas UK. It provides data management services to the oil and gas industry. The programme is developed with academics at University of Aberdeen and industrial partners and it covers data protection, governance and quality plus project and data management and legal commercial and security aspects of data management.

The programme develops your key data management requirements working in interdisciplinary teams in the energy industry and is sponsored and input by multinationals within those industries. You can study this programme either on campus full time or part time or online part time from anywhere with an internet connection. The part time delivery is designed to fit around your work and life.

Courses listed for the programme

Campus Delivery

Semester 1

  • Fundamentals of Petroleum Geoscience
  • Petroleum Data Governance
  • Petroleum Data Management Tools and Techniques
  • Petroleum Data Quality Management

Semester 2

  • Reference, Project and Corporate Data Management
  • Petroleum Data Management Tools and Techniques 2
  • Service and Project Management
  • Petroleum Information Security, Entitlements and Obligations

Semester 3

  • Project in Data Management

Online Delivery:

Semester 1

  • Fundamentals of Petroleum Geoscience
  • Petroleum Data Management Tools and Techniques
  • Petroleum Data Governance
  • Petroleum Data Quality Management

Semester 2

  • Reference, Project and Corporate Data Management
  • Service Project Management
  • Petroleum Data Management Tools and Techniques
  • Legal, Commercial and Security Aspects of Petroleum Data Management

Semester 3

  • Project in Petroleum Data Management

Courses listed for the programme

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page for campus delivery and online delivery

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • The advanced degree provides you with modules from Law, Engineering, Business, Geography, Geology and Computing Science
  • The degree is designed with leading industry organisations
  • University of Aberdeen is in the heart of the energy industry with very close links to major FTSE 100 companies in the city

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 30 Months
  • Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about international fees:

Find out more about fees on the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs 

You may also be interested in:



Read less
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher. Read more
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher.

Course overview

The MA Historical Research is for students who want to develop their understanding of history and of the nature of historical research. It is a flexible course that will encourage you to develop as an independent researcher. You will be able to pursue your interests in history while discovering the ways in which historians work. You will also engage with the intellectual, practical and social facets of the profession.

Core modules emphasise the nature of the discipline or historical research, its evolution (History in the Past or Historians on History) and the preparatory work for independent research (The Profession of the Historian or the Dissertation Feasibility Study). These modules will give you the grounding needed to engage with your own research project in the dissertation module.

Design your MA studies according to your preferred methods of learning. If you prefer to work independently you may choose to opt for the Extended History Dissertation, whereas if you prefer more taught elements you can opt for the History Dissertation. This will allow you to place more or less emphasis on independent work and research. The Extended History Dissertation is a great opportunity for those wanting to move on to further research or who want to develop a career in which research is a key element. In both cases, the project will be negotiated with the teaching team to reflect both you and your lecturers’ research interests.

The course is designed to implement the research-led curriculum of the university in which you become involved in research through the guidance of research-active members of staff - all staff members on the teaching team are research active.

You will graduate with a firm grounding in the way history evolves through an understanding of the nature of the discipline in all its diversity and of the challenges it faces. This, combined with an engagement with a specific subject area, will foster a critical understanding of history, necessary for a wide range of careers in research, academia, law, journalism and the cultural sector.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core module:
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-Dissertation Feasibility study (30 Credits)
-The profession of the historian (15 Credits)
-The Profession of the historian (Symposium/Webinar) (15 Credits)

Dissertation modules:
-History Dissertation (60 Credits)
-Extended History Dissertation (90 Credits)

Optional modules (for students choosing the Dissertation module HISM40) would typically include:
-Suicide Until the Reformation
-Suicide Since the Reformation
-Law, Family and Community Relations 1550-1800
-Law, Treason and Rebellion 1550-1800
-Britain Between the Wars: The Changing Party System
-Britain Between the Wars: The Challenges of the Inter War Years
-Foundations of Liberty - Obedience and Resistance
-Foundations of liberty - Religious toleration
-Human Rights in History: Ideas and Movements
-Human Rights in History: Organizations, Activists and Campaigns
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920

You will normally choose your options during the induction week when the full list of optional modules available that year will be presented to you. The number of optional modules offered will depend on the size of the cohort and the availability of staff. Not all options will be available every year. In any one academic year no more than three optional modules (3 x 15 credits) will be offered. Optional modules all run in Semester 2.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to history, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-House of Commons Parliamentary Papers including bills, registers and journals
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers, with full runs of 48 titles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database

Archives
The Murray Library at the University also contains the physical archive of the North East England Mining Archive and Resource Centre. This contains mining records, technical reports, trade union records and health & safety information.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of professions, highlighting as it does critical and analytical skills and an ability to develop and effectively advance an argument. A large number of transferable skills will be gained: research skills, writing skills, presentation skills, analytical and critical skills. These will be valuable in a huge range of careers and activities.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, with a focus on the way research skills can be transferred to the work place.

History by nature is a subject that includes a number of transferable skills such as critical thinking, collecting and analysing data critically, working independently and to a deadline, developing a coherent argument, writing, and oral skills. The QAA Subject Benchmark statement for History (December 2014) lists the some following (§3.3):
-Self discipline
-Independence of mind, and initiative
-A questioning disposition and the ability to formulate and pursue clearly defined questions and enquiries
-Ability to work with others, and to have respect for others' reasoned views
-Ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and familiarity with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information
-Analytical ability, and the capacity to consider and solve problems, including complex problems to which there is no single solution
-Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of both oral and written expression
-Imaginative insight and creativity
-Awareness of ethical issues and responsibilities that arise from research into the past and the reuse of the research and writing of others

These transferable skills will be fostered through each module and particularly emphasised in core modules. Furthermore, the research skills module The profession of the historian Symposium/Webinar will involve the organisation of a mini symposium. You will be expected to engage with some of the administrative and practical skills involved in organising an academic event.

During the dissertation feasibility study, you will be expected to deliver papers to an audience of staff and peers, allowing you to practice your oral and presentational skills.

MA Historical Research graduates can expect to be employed in:
-Teaching
-Archives
-Libraries
-Museums
-Journalism
-Law

Read less
Lead the revolution. With a postgraduate degree in genetics, you will be at the forefront of the revolution in biology that is rapidly changing our knowledge of ourselves and the world around us. Read more

Lead the revolution

With a postgraduate degree in genetics, you will be at the forefront of the revolution in biology that is rapidly changing our knowledge of ourselves and the world around us.

Find out more about the Master of Science parent structure.

Massey’s Master of Science with a major in genetics will allow you to work alongside internationally-recognised researchers, on projects of national and global significance.

World-class facilities

You will have access to world-class facilities including the Manawatu Microscopy and Imaging Centre and the Massey Genome Service (part of New Zealand Genomics Limited). You will also be able to utilise Massey’s broad range of expertise in the sciences, working with other departments and experts as you need to for your research.

Wide range of specialities

Massey offers a very broad range of research areas in genetics, ranging from classical through molecular, biomedical, genomic and computational projects. These utilise a wide range of biological systems including microbial, plant, animal and human species.

Flexibility and industry links

At Massey you have the flexibility to choose from different locations for your study, including both the Manawatu and the Auckland campuses, as well as other research institutes such as AgResearch, Scion, and Plant & Food Research. This flexibility provides a great deal of project choice, as well as providing important industry linkages that enhance job prospects.

Friendly environment - passionate scientists

A critical part of the genetics postgraduate experience at Massey is being part of the vibrant, well-established community of fundamental scientists and students. We have a large active student group - the Fundamental Science Students Association (FUSSTA) - where we work together to share discoveries and research and provide peer support.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Science will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning, time management, setting goals and milestones and undertaking research.



Read less
The onset of big data has led to an explosion of datasets with a far more complex structure and beyond standard physics. In this program, we will provide new theoretical and computational tools to tackle this challenge within the physicist mindset. Read more

The onset of big data has led to an explosion of datasets with a far more complex structure and beyond standard physics. In this program, we will provide new theoretical and computational tools to tackle this challenge within the physicist mindset.

The program intends to build an academic and professional figure that combines advanced knowledge in the field of Physics with a high-level training in Data Science.

The modeling and the theoretical interpretation of complex natural phenomena from large amounts of data are at the core of the research in Physics. The Big Data revolution presents in this sense the challenges and opportunities for the physicist of today. In addition to the figure of Data Scientist, specialized purely in the analysis of large amounts of data, it is increasingly clear the need to also train figures able to develop the methods and techniques that are fundamental for such analysis - in this sense we named the program of Physics of the Data. Training in Physics, Mathematics and Computation is increasingly necessary to generate such innovation and development. The program will thus train a new generation of physicists, which we could define as "data physicists", equipped with tools that will allow them to face the challenges that the digital revolution has brought in our society .

Career Opportunities

Graduates will have jobs opportunity in Italy and abroad in:

  • academic institutions
  • research centers
  • internet companies, consulting companies
  • startups and high tech industries
  • public administrations.

Scholarships and Fee Waivers

The University of Padova, the Veneto Region and other organisations offer various scholarship schemes to support students. Below is a list of the funding opportunities that are most often used by international students in Padova.

You can find more information below and on our website here: http://www.unipd.it/en/studying-padova/funding-and-fees/scholarships

You can find more information on fee waivers here: http://www.unipd.it/en/fee-waivers



Read less
This cutting-edge MA programme explores the sources and consequences of political violence and terrorism, as well as the crucial ethical questions involved. Read more

This cutting-edge MA programme explores the sources and consequences of political violence and terrorism, as well as the crucial ethical questions involved. It should appeal to students interested in careers in foreign services, security, some non-governmental or intergovernmental organisations, and many areas of the private sector.

We offer a flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome).

In the Department of Political Science and International Studies we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School. 

Course details

This cutting-edge MA programme explores the sources and consequences of political violence and terrorism, as well as the crucial ethical questions involved. It should appeal to students interested in careers in foreign services, security, some non-governmental or intergovernmental organisations, and many areas of the private sector.

Issues and topics examined include:

  • The sources and nature of political violence and terrorism
  • Debates regarding the prevention of terrorism, counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency policy
  • The politics, legality and ethics of the 'war on terror' and the balance between public security and individual freedom
  • The circumstances under which armed resistance and revolution can be permissible
  • Whether democracies can justify or excuse the use of torture in combating terrorism 

One of the real strengths of our masters programmes is the wide range of available modules, giving students the ability to tailor their course of study to their own academic interests.

More information on: International Relations MA (with specialist pathways)

Learning and teaching

We advocate an enquiry-based approach to learning, which means that we encourage you to become an independent and self-motivated learner. Through the programme of study we offer, we will develop the qualities that employers value in today's university graduates - qualities that will set you apart in your future career.

To help you develop the above-mentioned skills, we adopt a range of teaching methods. They may include:

  • Lectures - listening to experts sharing their knowledge and discoveries in challenging and provocative ways. Students are expected to 'read-around' the subject matter of their lectures, adding to their understanding and developing their critical faculties and analytical skills.
  • Seminars - where you present and discuss your ideas and knowledge in smaller groups and debate interpretations and opinions with other students.
  • Tutorials - are your opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor, usually in small groups.
  • Workshops - are problem solving sessions facilitated by a member of academic staff; these sessions usually involve students working in groups.

Our lecturers and tutors will ensure you have all the resources you need to make the transition from A levels to the more rigorous demands of a degree.

Skills gained

You will gain specialist knowledge of the following:

  • The sources and nature of political violence and terrorism
  • Debates regarding the prevention of terrorism, counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency policy
  • The politics, legality and ethics of the ‘war on terror’ and the balance between public security and individual freedom
  • The circumstances under which armed resistance and revolution can be permissible

You will also have the opportunity to learn about other fields within the broader disciplines of political science and international relations through your choice of optional modules.

Learning and teaching

Learning and teaching methods are based centrally on:

  • Seminar teaching: students engage in weekly two-hour seminars in which they participate in debate, discussion and other activities led by specialists from POLSIS. Readings are set for each session.
  • One-to-one dissertation supervision: students develop a specialist research project for their dissertation, working with one member of staff in particular who acts as supervisor during the concluding part of the programme.

Assessments vary according to module but may involve a combination of essays, presentations and written examination.

More about teaching and learning at the University of Birmingham.

Enhancing your student experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Some of these are targeted to help you build skills and experience for your CV, others are more open events designed to expose you to high-level speakers on current debates relevant to all Government and Society students.

Read more of our students' experiences and profiles on the school website.



Read less
This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. Read more
This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The programme is administered from Queen Mary, so you register as a Queen Mary student � once you complete the programme, your degree will be a joint University of London-UCL MA. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the Twenty-First Century. You will also be provided with an essential grounding in the various methods and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the list below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Below is a typical sample of module options that may be offered in a given year:

Democracy: Ancient and Modern Richard Bourke (Queen Mary)
Propaganda and Ideology in Rome Valentina Arena (UCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500 Serena Ferente (KCL)
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe Iain McDaniel (UCL)
Early-modern theories of the state Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary)
The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476 - 1800 Jason Peacey (UCL)
Signs, Mind, and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language Avi Lifschitz (UCL)
Enlightenment and Revolution: Political Ideas in the British Isles 1688-1800 Ian McBride (KCL)
Selfhood, Sensibility and the Politics of Difference in the European Enlightenment Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
From Hume to Darwin God, Man and Nature in European Thought Niall O'Flaherty (KCL)
Visions of Capitalism Jeremy Jennings (Queen Mary) [please note: not running 2011-12]
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1790-1890 Gareth Stedman Jones (Queen Mary)
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism Maurizio Isabella (Queen Mary)
Crisis and Future in Nineteenth-Century European Thought Axel K�rner (UCL)
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, 19th�20th Centuries Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

Read less
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X