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Masters Degrees (Restorative Justice)

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This course is distinctive because it includes elements of international criminology, restorative justice and research training. The strong focus on restorative justice reflects a view of criminal justice found on several continents. Read more

About the course

This course is distinctive because it includes elements of international criminology, restorative justice and research training. The strong focus on restorative justice reflects a view of criminal justice found on several continents.

The course is flexible. You can choose the taught path, the restorative justice path or the research route.

Who we are

We’re a forward-thinking, innovative law school. Our research helps shape global policy. We do what we do to empower people, to protect people and improve people’s lives.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us joint tenth in the UK, with Oxford and Warwick. Ninety per cent of our research was judged world-leading or internationally excellent.

We offer a wide range of law and criminology courses. Our leading criminology courses are delivered by internationally-renowned academics within our Centre for Criminological Research; one of the four original criminological centres of excellence in the UK.

Uniquely among English Russell Group law schools, we also offer the opportunity for you to complete both the academic and vocational stages of qualifying as a solicitor in our Centre for Professional Legal Education.

Your career

Our graduates include CEOs, lawyers, partners in big corporate firms, judges and barristers. Others are solicitors, academics, politicians and policy makers or work in criminal justice or at the Home Office.

Many of our graduates become legal practitioners. But you can use your postgraduate training in different ways, including business, policy development, teaching or research. Our staff can support you in whichever path you choose, having a wealth and variety of experience across all these areas.

Your course will give you the opportunity to meet and engage with professional organisations. And our excellent careers service will support you from the outset, helping you to identify your strengths and plan your next move. At the School of Law we also have an in-house careers adviser, offering specialised advice to Legal Practice Course, Graduate Diploma in Law and other postgraduate students who wish to pursue a career in the legal profession.

How we teach

Many of our academics are internationally respected for their research. Their groundbreaking work informs what we teach.

Our research groups cover a lot of ground, including criminology, commercial law and law in its international context. You’ll benefit from their expertise and that of their professional contacts. Your course will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of your chosen area of law or criminology. Our Legal Practice Course is highly regarded. It will provide you with all the skills and knowledge you need to enter the legal profession in England or Wales.

We have our own courtroom, a dedicated postgraduate computer room and quiet study space. Wi-Fi is available throughout the building so you can easily access the library’s online collections. Our students can also access our e-resources from anywhere in the world.

Core modules

Taught path: Responding to Crime in Europe; Issues in Comparative Penology; The Cultures of Criminology; The Research Process; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

A choice of several modules including: International Criminal Justice; Policing and Society; Quantitative Methods; Methods of Criminological Research. For details of our Restorative Justice Pathway and Research Pathway please see http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/law

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays and a dissertation.

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Restorative practice puts repairing harm done to relationships and people over and above the need for assigning blame and dispensing punishment. Read more
Restorative practice puts repairing harm done to relationships and people over and above the need for assigning blame and dispensing punishment. This programme attracts graduates from a multitude of backgrounds, and will develop the role of anyone whose career has taken them into working with families, with local communities, within the criminal justice system or in education systems. It offers you the chance to develop the skills required to establish restorative justice processes, preparing parties, facilitating storytelling, dialogue and problem-solving and delivering restorative interventions. A PgCert exit award is available upon completion of three modules (60 credit points).

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/msc-restorative-practices-pt-j

Course detail

- Description -

The course is designed to help students apply learning in the contexts they work and live in. A central assumption is that participants want to critically engage with the concept of being a restorative practice practitioner. The teaching and learning style is participative; pragmatic; and underpinned by research, theory and experience.

- Qualifications -

Students may choose to exit with a Postgraduate Certificate (60 academic credits) upon successful completion of two of the optional modules listed below.

Students may choose to exit with a Postgraduate Diploma (120 academic credits) upon successful completion of four of the optional modules listed below.

The two compulsory modules must be completed in order to be awarded the MSc (180 academic credits).

- Teaching and learning assessment -

Teaching and learning methods set out to help students engage with the challenges of their own work setting and the wider world, enquire into what is effective, embed good practice and evaluate the impact if restorative interventions.

Assessment is by written assignment and reflective writings.

Career options

This course is recognised by the Restorative Justice Council as a qualification to be an accredited practitioner. This course has been undertaken by people working across the criminal justice, community restorative justice, and primary and post-primary systems.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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This course is directed at students seeking a short, tailored programme in criminology, criminal justice and restorative justice as well as practitioners and policy-makers in these fields who may wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding of recent domestic and international developments. Read more

About the course

This course is directed at students seeking a short, tailored programme in criminology, criminal justice and restorative justice as well as practitioners and policy-makers in these fields who may wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding of recent domestic and international developments. The Certificate will suit people who wish to gain expert, relevant and up-to-date information about contemporary and emergent theoretical, empirical and policy-related developments in these fields, with a particular emphasis on the comparative aspects of these developments

As a student on the Certificate you’ll take fewer modules than classmates studying toward the MA in International Criminology. The PG Certificate allows you to choose four taught modules from the MA programme, with the option to study on a full or part 
time basis.

Upon successful completion, you also have the option to apply for transfer to the MA in International Criminology, with the completed modules counted towards the masters degree.

Who we are

We’re a forward-thinking, innovative law school. Our research helps shape global policy. We do what we do to empower people, to protect people and improve people’s lives.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us joint tenth in the UK, with Oxford and Warwick. Ninety per cent of our research was judged world-leading or internationally excellent.

We offer a wide range of law and criminology courses. Our leading criminology courses are delivered by internationally-renowned academics within our Centre for Criminological Research; one of the four original criminological centres of excellence in the UK.

Uniquely among English Russell Group law schools, we also offer the opportunity for you to complete both the academic and vocational stages of qualifying as a solicitor in our Centre for Professional Legal Education.

Your career

Our graduates include CEOs, lawyers, partners in big corporate firms, judges and barristers. Others are solicitors, academics, politicians and policy makers or work in criminal justice or at the Home Office.

Many of our graduates become legal practitioners. But you can use your postgraduate training in different ways, including business, policy development, teaching or research. Our staff can support you in whichever path you choose, having a wealth and variety of experience across all these areas.

Your course will give you the opportunity to meet and engage with professional organisations. And our excellent careers service will support you from the outset, helping you to identify your strengths and plan your next move. At the School of Law we also have an in-house careers adviser, offering specialised advice to Legal Practice Course, Graduate Diploma in Law and other postgraduate students who wish to pursue a career in the legal profession.

How we teach

Many of our academics are internationally respected for their research. Their groundbreaking work informs what we teach.

Our research groups cover a lot of ground, including criminology, commercial law and law in its international context. You’ll benefit from their expertise and that of their professional contacts. Your course will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of your chosen area of law or criminology. Our Legal Practice Course is highly regarded. It will provide you with all the skills and knowledge you need to enter the legal profession in England or Wales.

We have our own courtroom, a dedicated postgraduate computer room and quiet study space. Wi-Fi is available throughout the building so you can easily access the library’s online collections. Our students can also access our e-resources from anywhere in the world.

Module options

Students will choose four from the following: Policing and Society; International Criminal Law; Responding to Crime in Europe; Restorative Justice; Crime and Globalisation; Issues in Comparative Penology; The Cultures of Criminology; Gender and Violence

Teaching and assessment

Teaching in each module takes place through fortnightly seminars. Modules will be assessed by 3000 words of written work, normally in the form of an essay.

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This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Read more
This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Critically combining the disciplines of translation and cultural studies, it breaks new ground both practically and theoretically in exploring a variety of different issues across the humanities and social sciences. It gives you the opportunity to shape the emerging field of translating cultures through independent in-depth research, and will appeal if you aspire to work at the cutting edge of debates and practices dealing with cultural interaction and transformation in the contemporary world.

Modules are taught and supervision given by expert staff who are specialists in a number of languages and disciplines, offering you the chance to follow particular themes in areas that most interest you. Recent work by staff includes books and articles on issues in translation, literature, migration, gender, religion, visual culture and museum studies to name a few, in Chinese, French, German, Russian, Spanish and other cultures.

We explicitly welcome applications for collaborative research projects and are happy to exploit our links with public and third sector partners to assist students in developing projects that fit with both the partners’ research needs and the demands and expectations of a Masters dissertation. The student will take the lead in the development of any such collaborative research project, but will be guided and assisted by the supervisory team and, where appropriate, other members of the course team.

Course content

You will take two core modules: Translating Cultures, which establishes frameworks for the close analysis of transcultural and translation concepts; and the Research Dissertation module, which provides training and personal supervision for the writing of an in-depth dissertation on an appropriate topic of your choice. The Research Dissertation module offers you the innovative possibility to develop your research project through an internship with a relevant external organisation. You will also choose an option module that matches your interests from a selection of modules offering advanced study in specialised areas, including translation, intercultural communication, diaspora, cultural identity, globalisation, democratisation and restorative justice. You are encouraged to attend the research seminars in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, particularly the Translating Cultures series run by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, at which visiting speakers, creative practitioners and teaching staff present their current work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-RESEARCH DISSERTATION
-TRANSLATING CULTURES

Option modules - Choose one from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-DEMOCRACY AND ISLAM
-GLOBALISATION, DEMOCRATISATION AND POST-AUTHORITARIAN TRANSITION
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
-READING THE NATION
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: CULTURES, INTEGRATION AND LAW
-THE CHINESE MEDIA
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

Read less
This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Read more
This interdisciplinary course offers you the rare opportunity to study how cultures translate across a wide range of fields. Critically combining the disciplines of translation and cultural studies, it breaks new ground both practically and theoretically in exploring a variety of different issues across the humanities and social sciences. It gives you the opportunity to shape the emerging field of translating cultures through independent in-depth research, and will appeal if you aspire to work at the cutting edge of debates and practices dealing with cultural interaction and transformation in the contemporary world.

Modules are taught and supervision given by expert staff who are specialists in a number of languages and disciplines, offering you the chance to follow particular themes in areas that most interest you. Recent work by staff includes books and articles on issues in translation, literature, migration, gender, religion, visual culture and museum studies to name a few, in Chinese, French, German, Russian, Spanish and other cultures.

We explicitly welcome applications for collaborative research projects and are happy to exploit our links with public and third sector partners to assist students in developing projects that fit with both the partners’ research needs and the demands and expectations of a Masters dissertation. The student will take the lead in the development of any such collaborative research project, but will be guided and assisted by the supervisory team and, where appropriate, other members of the course team.

Course content

You will take two core modules: Translating Cultures, which establishes frameworks for the close analysis of transcultural and translation concepts; and the Research Dissertation module, which provides training and personal supervision for the writing of an in-depth dissertation on an appropriate topic of your choice. The Research Dissertation module offers you the innovative possibility to develop your research project through an internship with a relevant external organisation. You will also choose an option module that matches your interests from a selection of modules offering advanced study in specialised areas, including translation, intercultural communication, diaspora, cultural identity, globalisation, democratisation and restorative justice. You are encouraged to attend the research seminars in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, particularly the Translating Cultures series run by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, at which visiting speakers, creative practitioners and teaching staff present their current work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-RESEARCH DISSERTATION
-TRANSLATING CULTURES

Option modules - Choose one from:
-CAPITALISM AND CULTURE
-DEMOCRACY AND ISLAM
-GLOBALISATION, DEMOCRATISATION AND POST-AUTHORITARIAN TRANSITION
-INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
-READING THE NATION
-REPRESENTING WORLD CULTURES
-RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: CULTURES, INTEGRATION AND LAW
-THE CHINESE MEDIA
-TRANSLATION STUDIES

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This course will provide you with an advanced understanding of the theoretical and applied issues in forensic psychology. Our scientist-practitioner approach equips you with the skills and knowledge needed to pursue a career in forensic psychology practice. Read more
This course will provide you with an advanced understanding of the theoretical and applied issues in forensic psychology. Our scientist-practitioner approach equips you with the skills and knowledge needed to pursue a career in forensic psychology practice.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology offers comprehensive professional training in forensic psychology. You will gain an in-depth experience of offending and victim pathways, as well as the investigative process. Through the use of a structured framework, you will also study theory and conduct research relating to forensic psychology practice. The course has two different routes:

Forensic Psychology, MSc (Accredited)
This route is fully accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), thereby accounting for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology. Students enrolling on this route must have a first degree in psychology providing Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the BPS. We will attempt to provide you with a placement within local forensic units (ie HM Prison Service, NHS, Police, or the Forensic Interview Laboratory within the School of Psychology), however, this is not always guaranteed for all students.

Forensic Psychology, MSc (Non-accredited)
This route is not accredited by the BPS and therefore does not fulfil Stage 1 of the BPS qualification in Forensic Psychology. If a student on this non-accredited route wanted to progress onto Stage 2 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology in the future, they would need to go back and complete the necessary conversion programme to give them the requisite GBC with the BPS.

This route is aimed primarily at those students who do not possess a first degree in psychology providing GBC with the BPS, but whose degree covers research methods and statistics relevant to psychology (eg a joint or combined honours degree which includes psychology, or an international psychology degree that does not confer GBC with the BPS). Other qualifications/experience may be acceptable and will be considered by the Programme Director (eg mental health specialists, police officers, prison officers).

No placements will be provided on this route (with the exception of the Forensic Interview Laboratory within the School of Psychology - space permitting). You are, however, free to gain access to your own placement.

Northumbria Police are proud to support this course and to be working in collaboration with the School of Psychology at Newcastle University.

You will develop your understanding of forensic psychology in a multi-disciplinary and professional context. We promote collaborative teaching and research through our strong links with UK forensic psychology practitioners, including Her Majesty's Prison Service, the National Health Service (NHS) and Police.

You will gain demonstrable, advanced knowledge and critical understanding in:
-Theories and professional issues of forensic psychology
-The breadth and depth of forensic psychology
-The role of psychology within the legal system (civil and criminal)
-The National Offender Management system
-Legislation under which forensic psychologists work
-Investigative psychology and forensic interviewing
-Investigative process from pre-trial/conviction to through/after-care and restorative justice
-Legal, ethical and contextual issues in the evaluation of research and practice
-Debating and using evidence from appropriate literature
-Legal processes

You will also gain professional skills in:
-Writing parole board and analytical reports
-Developing forensic case formulations
-Independent learning
-Project planning
-Problem solving
-Time management
-Teamwork
-Reflection

Your specialist skills and knowledge will be developed through a combination of:
-Written reports
-Reflective journals
-Interview guides
-Oral presentations

Facilities

The School of Psychology provides high quality facilities to all our students, researchers and staff. We are located in the Ridley Building where you will have access to a postgraduate resources room with networked computers and printer.

Accreditation

This course has been accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). The accreditation shows that the course meets the standards set by the BPS.

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Ideal for practitioners, managers and policy makers, this Masters degree is the first of its kind in the UK with a specialist focus on the theory and practice of offender management. Read more
Ideal for practitioners, managers and policy makers, this Masters degree is the first of its kind in the UK with a specialist focus on the theory and practice of offender management.

With recent changes to the organisation and management of community orders in the UK, and the partial privatisation of probation, there is now a greater focus on developing practices for managing post-sentence work with people who have been convicted.

This specialist Criminology Masters will provide graduates with the knowledge and theory to further influence and lead the development of practice in post-custody supervision. Throughout your studies, you’ll delve into the philosophy, theory and practice of working with individuals who are sentenced to either serve a community order or a prison sentence and who are subject to post-custody supervision.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1852-msc-working-with-adult-and-young-offenders

What you will study

You’ll be encouraged to explore the criminal justice system in detail covering theories of crime, rehabilitation, retribution, deterrence, desistance and restorative justice. You’ll gain an insight into how different civil services (including prison and probation) work with offenders whilst also gaining a better understanding of the work carried out in the third and private sectors.

Guided independent study, a module in research methods, and a dissertation will also form part of your studies. You will also study a further option module available from a choice of topics including drug interventions, managing and leading interdisciplinary teams, supervision and support skills, ethics, reflection and safeguarding, restorative and approaches.

Learning and teaching methods

Taught by a team of lecturers with long-standing expertise in the field, you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials. As part of your studies you’ll also undertake independent study that will be supervised by a member of the teaching team.

The teaching team comprises of active researchers who specialise in drug use, crime prevention, homicide and violence, animal abuse, youth justice and youth policy, policing protests, informal justice and alternatives to prosecution and imprisonment.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Upon successful completion of this Masters degree you could pursue a career in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, prison, probation services and youth offending services.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods are varied and include essays, critiques, written examinations, multiple choice tests, and oral and poster presentations. You’ll also be required to complete a dissertation of around 20,000 words on an individual piece of research, which may be work-related.

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You are lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible.

A key feature of the MA Criminology is its involvement in a Common Study Programme. The Common Study Programme is a biannual student-centred conference at which students are invited to present papers, meet students and staff from other countries and exchange ideas.

The School has international links with colleagues and institutions and our current Visiting Professor of Criminology, Jeff Ferrell is an example of this extended network. Professor Ferrell is based at the Texas Christian University, USA where he is Professor of Sociology. He is a leading proponent of cultural criminology and has conducted research on urban culture, graffiti and media.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/173/criminology

Course structure

The programme involves:

- the sociological study of crime and its application to criminal justice and social policy

- the study of issues at the cutting edge of current criminological debate with a strong emphasis on the cultural context of crime

- advanced criminological theory and research methods as applied to crime and criminal justice.

It also offers opportunities for you to develop your career in the areas of criminal justice, policy development and academic research.

We are constantly developing the modules available to you in line with current issues and staff expertise. Each year we announce new choices, for example we are currently working on developing a module convened by Dr David Redmon which looks at documentary film-making from a social science perspective.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. You will be required to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO869 - Theories of Crime (20 credits)
SO870 - Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
SO875 - Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
SO881 - Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
SO882 - Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)
SO885 - Social Suffering (20 credits)
SO940 - Prisons and Penal Policy (20 credits)
LW870 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (20 credits)
LW871 - Policing (20 credits)
SO824 - Sociology of Violence (20 credits)
SO825 - Terrorism and Modern Society (20 credits)
SO830 - Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (20 credits)
SO867 - Foundations of Sociology (20 credits)
SO868 - Critical Criminology (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by six coursework essays and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a post-graduate programme in criminology of the highest standard with teaching that is informed by internationally recognised research and scholarship

- give you a comprehensive overview and understanding of contemporary debates in criminology and criminal justice including those around diversity and inequality

- involve you in a critical analysis of crime and punishment in relation to developments in social theory, sociology and social policy

- provide an understanding of the social processes that influence the relationship between individuals, groups and institutions

- focus on the relevance of social science for the analysis and assessment of crime and criminal justice policy

- provide you with an advanced understanding of the ways in which quantitative and qualitative research methodologies may be used to study crime and criminal justice

- give you a critical awareness of the political and populist influences on criminal justice policy

- enable you to understand the emergence of social problems (including crime) and the responses of welfare and criminal justice institutions, including analysis of the theoretical, political and economic underpinnings of these responses

- build on the University’s close European ties by providing the potential for students to participate in the European Common Study programme in Criminology.

Research areas

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research.

- Crime, Culture and Control:

The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this course you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice. Read more
Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this course you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice.

Our research expertise informs our teaching on the LLM. You’ll be taught by lecturers who specialise in critical work in areas including:
-Criminal law theory
-Comparative criminal justice
-International crimes
-Financial crimes
-Human rights and criminal justice
-Youth justice
-Policing and restorative justice

Our course also draws on expertise from the Department of Sociology, which will enable you to develop an interdisciplinary perspective.

How will I study?

Our core modules give you the necessary theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations. They cover:
-Criminal law
-Criminal justice
-Criminology
-Research methods

Our options – from both law and criminology – are taught by specialist academics based on their areas of expertise.

Teaching methods include lectures, workshops and seminars. Assessment modes include essays and briefing papers as well as a 10,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

You’ll gain practical abilities as well as critical and problem-solving skills valued in contemporary job markets.

You will be able to apply your analytical skills to a range of careers in legal practice and criminal justice administration as well as careers in the private and voluntary sectors.

The LLM can also provide a strong foundation for further academic study or a career in research.

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Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. Read more
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. It offers an exciting opportunity to study both theoretical criminology and the more applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice issues.

The course has three formal stages:
-The Diploma stages consist of three taught modules, a proposal module that is delivered through work groups and a practice-based module involving reflection upon work or volunteering experience.
-Those proceeding to the Master's stage will be required to complete an extended project to be determined individually.
-It is possible to complete your studies at any of the Certificate, Diploma or Master's stages.

Full-time students will complete all these stages in one year. Part-time students would normally complete the diploma and masters stages over two years.

What's covered in the course?

During study, you are asked to reflect upon your experience of crime and the criminal justice system, looking at significant factors involved in crime in contemporary society. These include globalisation, consumerism and political economy, as well as considering more psychological and theoretical drivers of harmful and criminal behaviour and the responses to crime.

In order to provide an engaging and flexible educational experience to diverse range of students, the course utilises a wide range of learning and teaching methods and technologies. Given the small size of each group of students recruited, the postgraduate status of the programme and the experience which many of its recruits have had of the criminal justice system, the course is highly participative. While sessions will provide periods of structured teaching, they will also provide a forum, within which you will take responsibility for your own learning, and share your knowledge and views with other students and staff.

The precise nature of sessions and delivery will vary with the year, the cohort of students, and the general and specific experience possessed by individual students. The programme team also makes increasing use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, where teaching staff will upload lecture notes, web links, video programmes and extracts from academic sources. Moodle is also used for general announcements and communication with a group of students, many of whom are unlikely to be on campus every day.

The course has a strong link with research practice, and will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, as well as enabling you to form judgements on the relative merits of, and relationships between, different research tools and methods. You will also develop the capability to design, manage and disseminate a research project to a professional standard.

Why Choose Us?

-The course has strong links with the University’s Centre for Applied Criminology, a leading research centre staffed by established criminologists. They are renowned for their international reputations, with their specialist areas including homicide, violence and organised crime.
-You’ll have flexible study options, enabling you to focus on either an academic route or a more practice-based approach.
-The course will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, and allow you to form judgements on different research tools.
-The course team has valuable links with the regional criminal justice system and leading non-Government organisations, including therapeutic prison HMP Grendon, where the University holds an annual debate.

How you learn

The course is taught in weekly seminars, tutorials and workshops, which encourage substantial student participation. Our virtual learning environment is also used to deliver some content and facilitate communication remotely.

The MA Applied Criminology will normally be studied on a one-year full-time basis and a two-year part-time basis, with the taught elements of the programme being delivered over a teaching period of approximately 30 weeks from September to May/June.

The programme is divided into study units called modules, each of 20 credits (excluding the Extended Project which amounts to 60 credits). Most modules on the programme are core, but there is also optional modules which cover influential areas of work undertaken in the Centre for Applied Criminology. You’ll complete 120 credits at the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Stage, and a further 60 credits at the Master’s stage. It is expected that most applicants will wish to progress to Master's stage, which is delivered and assessed through an extended project supervised through evening workgroups and through one-to-one supervision, which will come from an expert academic attached to the Centre for Applied Criminology.

The taught Master’s component covers a range of core and option modules, including topics such as - Research Methods (where you will develop your proposal for the final Applied Research Proposal module); Criminological Thought; Criminal Psychology; Penal Theory and Practice; Crime and Rehabilitation in Media; and Reflective Practice or Criminological Issues.

At the Diploma stage, you may select options modules covering topics such as Restorative Justice, Crime Prevention in Homicide and Organised Violent Crime (HAVOC), and Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence (UDSV). Additionally, the MA is awarded on the completion of the Applied Research Project [Dissertation] module (60 credits), which contains a taught component with evening sessions.

Employability

The teaching team draws on the combined with the expertise of members of the Centre for Applied Criminology, who will give you cutting-edge criminological knowledge from their impactful and high-profile research, as well as giving you excellent access to experienced practitioners and Criminal Justice System organisations.

The access provided to professionals, the presence of practitioners among fellow students and the capacity to reflect upon relevant volunteering or work experience within the structure of the course means that the course provides excellent opportunities for building contacts and networking, as well as developing opportunities for employment.

The School of Social Sciences has relationships with a number of criminal justice agencies and non-government organisations, including the local Community Safety Partnership, HMP Grendon and the Howard League.

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You will be lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK as ranked by the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible. Where appropriate, research students are encouraged to teach part-time in the School.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/177/criminology

Research areas

Our research areas are listed below; wider research areas are also available from our European partner institutions.

- Crime, Control and Culture

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research. The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Staff research interests

Kent’s world-class academics provide research students with excellent supervision. The academic staff in this school and their research interests are shown below. You are strongly encouraged to contact the school to discuss your proposed research and potential supervision prior to making an application. Please note, it is possible for students to be supervised by a member of academic staff from any of Kent’s schools, providing their expertise matches your research interests.

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/staff/).

- Dr Phil Carney:

Lecturer in Criminology; Erasmus and International Co-ordinator; Kent Co-ordinator, Common Study Programme in Critical Criminology

Photographic theory; spectacle; radical criminology; cultural criminology; critical visual culture; post-structuralist critical theory; desire and power; the micropolitics of fascism.

- Dr Caroline Chatwin:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology; Director of Studies for Undergraduate Criminology

European drug policy; young people and victimisation; drug use and subcultural studies.

- Dr Simon Cottee:

Senior Lecturer in Criminology

Sociology of crime and deviance; sociology of intellectuals; terrorism and apostasy; coercion; political violence.

- Professor Chris Hale:

Professor of Criminology

How political debates around law and order have affected responses to crime; quantitative analysis of crime data, especially the relationships between crime and fear of crime with wider economic and social changes; evaluations of new interventions and crime reduction strategies; policing; youth crime.

- Dr Jonathan Ilan:

Lecturer in Criminology

Cultural criminology; street culture; urban ethnography; media and crime; youth crime; justice and policing.

- Professor Roger Matthews:

Professor of Criminology; Director of Studies for Postgraduate Criminology

Penology, community safety and crime prevention, prostitution, armed robbery, punitiveness, left realism. Recent publications include: Prostitution Politics and Policy (2008); Doing Time: An Introduction to the Sociology of Imprisonment (2009).

- Professor Larry Ray:

Professor of Sociology

Sociological theory; globalisation; race and ethnicity; violence.

- Dr Simon Shaw:

Lecturer in Criminal Justice Studies; Director of Studies

Youth crime; youth justice; politics of crime; criminal justice policy-making.

- Emeritus Professor K. Stenson:

Professor of Criminology

Criminological theory, risk and governance, youth crime.

- Professor Alex Stevens:

Professor of Criminal Justice; Deputy Head of School (Medway)

The politics and practice of criminal justice, with a specific emphasis on national and international drug policy, youth justice, gangs, organised crime, probation practice and the use of evidence in policymaking.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course embraces a wide range of public, private and domestic issues relevant to the prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes, including the roles of laws, decisions, risks and justice. Read more
This course embraces a wide range of public, private and domestic issues relevant to the prevention and resolution of conflicts and disputes, including the roles of laws, decisions, risks and justice. The course includes (but is not restricted to) negotiation and arbitration, and also the alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes such as mediation and conciliation.

You will be able to mix with students on other Masters courses at Westminster Law School. Classes are usually small, allowing for an interactive approach to learning. The course combines academic and practical approaches to teaching and learning.

Course content

The course aims to provide an opportunity for in-depth study of the issues and the practices involved in the field of conflict prevention and dispute resolution, including the mechanisms of prevention, emergence, avoidance, management, resolution and regulation.

The course content is not explicitly concerned with 'peace studies', but the processes of prevention and the processes of resolution embrace the concepts of securing and maintaining peaceful cooperation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-PERSPECTIVES ON CONFLICTS AND DISPUTES
-POSTGRADUATE DISSERTATION
-RESEARCH THEORY AND PRACTICE

Option modules
-CONFLICT RESOLUTION: NEGOTIATION
-INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION
-INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW
-INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DEVELOPMENT
-MEDIATION: CONCEPTS, EVOLUTION AND PRACTICE
-NEGOTIATION: THEORY, CONTEXTS AND PRACTICE
-RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: CULTURES, INTEGRATION AND LAW

Associated careers

This course is designed to benefit a wide range of individuals, including graduates progressing towards a PhD programme, practising lawyers wanting to further their knowledge and skills, other graduates and practitioners (such as arbitrators, civil servants, insurers, journalists, judges, linguists and mediators), and anyone managing people and risks. The course is also ideal if you are on a gap year between career stages, and for those from the European Union and other countries who want to improve their English for personal and career purposes.

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The course is intended for anyone wishing to demonstrate a commitment to contentious law in public and private international and commercial legal contexts. Read more
The course is intended for anyone wishing to demonstrate a commitment to contentious law in public and private international and commercial legal contexts. The taught part of the programme includes modules which reflect the three main forms of dispute resolution process, namely adjudication (litigation and arbitration), alternative dispute resolution (ADR – principally mediation), and negotiation.

This course differs from the International Commercial Law LLM course which is primarily concerned with non-contentious aspects of commerce (modules include competition law, trade, and insurance).

Class sizes are, in general, quite small, and you will be able to mix with students on other Masters courses at Westminster Law School.

Course content

The course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of the substantive and procedural issues involved in the field, and also the acquisition of skills involved in some of the processes. It is centrally concerned with law and other rules (international and commercial) which are applicable in adjudication and also in the other dispute resolution processes.

In addition to taught modules, there is also the Dissertation module which provides an opportunity for developing a specialist knowledge of a small area of the field, which might lead to a publishable article.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-PERSPECTIVES ON CONFLICTS AND DISPUTES
-POSTGRADUATE DISSERTATION
-RESEARCH THEORY AND PRACTICE

Option Modules
Arbitration
-COMPARATIVE COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION: LAW AND PRACTICE
-FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT ARBITRATION
-INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION

Mediation
-MEDIATION: CONCEPTS, EVOLUTION AND PRACTICE
-RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: CULTURES, INTEGRATION AND LAW

Negotiation
-NEGOTIATION: THEORY, CONTEXTS AND PRACTICE

Public International
-PEACEFUL SETTLEMENT OF INTERNATIONAL DISPUTES
-INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

Associated careers

The course is designed to benefit a wide range of individuals who are committed to developing their knowledge, skills and insights into contentious international and commercial dispute resolution. The range of individuals who can benefit include: experienced practitioners such as potential judges, arbitrators, and mediators; other professionals who need to have advanced appreciation of international and commercial law, such as civil servants, diplomats, directors, insurers, journalists, linguists, and managers; and paralegals and newly qualified practitioners who need to fill in the gaps left by their existing qualifications and experience to date;

The course will also ideal if you want to progress towards a PhD programme. The course will also be beneficial for you if you are taking a gap year between career stages, and if you are from continental European Union or other countries and want to improve your English for career purposes.

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The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Read more
The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Students have the opportunity to exit the programme with either an LLM in Criminal Justice or an LLM in Criminology and Criminal Justice, depending on optional modules undertaken.

The Institute’s particular strengths lie in the following areas: policing; transitional justice; critical criminology; sex offending; young people, crime and justice; community safety; prisoner reintegration; and restorative justice. Staff members have strong links with local criminal justice agencies and community organisations as well as extensive comparative and international expertise, providing for a unique student experience. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of crime and justice and draws on original staff research. Modules are rooted in relevant theoretical frameworks with a strong criminological focus and provide students with methodological training in addition to supporting the development of critical analysis and other transferable skills. Through the dissertation students can explore a wide variety of criminological and criminal justice topics.

The programme is delivered through a series of taught modules and culminates in the submission of a dissertation on an original topic.

Compulsory modules

Criminal Justice Processes
Crime, Justice and Society
Dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words

Optional modules

Theoretical Criminology
Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
Justice in Transition

Methodology mini-modules

Criminology Methods 1
Criminology Methods 2
Concepts, Issues and Methods in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Approaches to Legal Research

Note:
Students who take the module Theoretical Criminology may exit the programme with the award of

LLM in Criminology and Criminal Justice



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Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. Read more
Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. It is a fascinating and absorbing area of law in its own right, encompassing bodily integrity rights, such as the right to life, the right not to be tortured and the right not to be detained, procedural rights such as the right to a fair trial (both civil and criminal), and expressive rights such as freedom of religion, of assembly and of free expression itself.

Nottingham Law School has significant academic expertise in the areas of human rights and justice. The LLM Human Rights and Justice is based on the significant expertise of academic staff in Nottingham Law School, particularly from its Centre for Conflict, Rights and Justice. The course parallels the historical and contemporary significance of these aspects of law, in particular their growth as topics of both domestic and international importance over recent decades.

The course will help you develop a strong analytical understanding of the key legal issues in the area, with a particular focus on European and international human rights and key aspects of international justice systems.

Modules Include: Public International and Humanitarian Law; Terrorism and International Response; Victims' Rights and Restorative Justice; Human Rights in Europe; Theory and Principles of International Law; Expression Rights; Human Rights and Criminal Justice; Discrimination Law in Employment; International Human Rights; International Criminal Court and International Crime; and Data Protection and Privacy.

Scholarships are available, visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/scholarshipsnls for details.

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