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Masters Degrees (Restorative Justice)

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About the course. This course is distinctive because it includes elements of international criminology, restorative justice and research training. Read more

About the course

This course is distinctive because it includes elements of international criminology, restorative justice and research training. The strong focus on restorative justice reflects a view of criminal justice found on several continents.

The course is flexible. You can choose the taught path, the restorative justice path or the research route.

Who we are

We’re a forward-thinking, innovative law school. Our research helps shape global policy. We do what we do to empower people, to protect people and improve people’s lives.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us joint tenth in the UK, with Oxford and Warwick. Ninety per cent of our research was judged world-leading or internationally excellent.

We offer a wide range of law and criminology courses. Our leading criminology courses are delivered by internationally-renowned academics within our Centre for Criminological Research; one of the four original criminological centres of excellence in the UK.

Uniquely among English Russell Group law schools, we also offer the opportunity for you to complete both the academic and vocational stages of qualifying as a solicitor in our Centre for Professional Legal Education.

Your career

Our graduates include CEOs, lawyers, partners in big corporate firms, judges and barristers. Others are solicitors, academics, politicians and policy makers or work in criminal justice or at the Home Office.

Many of our graduates become legal practitioners. But you can use your postgraduate training in different ways, including business, policy development, teaching or research. Our staff can support you in whichever path you choose, having a wealth and variety of experience across all these areas.

Your course will give you the opportunity to meet and engage with professional organisations. And our excellent careers service will support you from the outset, helping you to identify your strengths and plan your next move. At the School of Law we also have an in-house careers adviser, offering specialised advice to Legal Practice Course, Graduate Diploma in Law and other postgraduate students who wish to pursue a career in the legal profession.

How we teach

Many of our academics are internationally respected for their research. Their groundbreaking work informs what we teach.

Our research groups cover a lot of ground, including criminology, commercial law and law in its international context. You’ll benefit from their expertise and that of their professional contacts. Your course will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of your chosen area of law or criminology. Our Legal Practice Course is highly regarded. It will provide you with all the skills and knowledge you need to enter the legal profession in England or Wales.

We have our own courtroom, a dedicated postgraduate computer room and quiet study space. Wi-Fi is available throughout the building so you can easily access the library’s online collections. Our students can also access our e-resources from anywhere in the world.

Core modules

Taught path:

  • Responding to Crime in Europe
  • Issues in Comparative Penology
  • The Cultures of Criminology
  • The Research Process
  • Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

A choice of several modules including:

  • International Criminal Justice
  • Policing and Society
  • Restorative Justice
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Methods of Criminological Research

For details of our Research Pathway please see http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/law

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays and a dissertation.



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The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Read more

The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Students have the opportunity to exit the programme with either an LLM in Criminal Justice or an LLM in Criminology and Criminal Justice, depending on optional modules undertaken.

The Institute’s particular strengths lie in the following areas: policing; transitional justice; critical criminology; sex offending; young people, crime and justice; community safety; prisoner reintegration; and restorative justice. Staff members have strong links with local criminal justice agencies and community organisations as well as extensive comparative and international expertise, providing for a unique student experience. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of crime and justice and draws on original staff research. Modules are rooted in relevant theoretical frameworks with a strong criminological focus and provide students with methodological training in addition to supporting the development of critical analysis and other transferable skills. Through the dissertation students can explore a wide variety of criminological and criminal justice topics.

The programme is delivered through a series of taught modules and culminates in the submission of a dissertation on an original topic.

http://www.law.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofLaw/Study/PostgraduateTaught/llm-criminal-justice/

Compulsory modules

Criminal Justice Processes

Theoretical Criminology

Dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words

Optional modules

Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

Transitional Justice

Crime, Justice and Society

Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights

Methodology mini-modules

Criminology Methods 1

Criminology Methods 2

Approaches to Legal Research



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On this programme, modules on specialist academic themes explore issues at the forefront of contemporary criminology. Read more

On this programme, modules on specialist academic themes explore issues at the forefront of contemporary criminology. You will engage with tasks such as Rapid Evidence Assessment, or analysing historical case file materials on sexual offences, thus developing valuable skills for working in relevant areas of public sector or third sector organisations. You will also undertake a work-based research project. This will normally be focused on current concerns and the needs of a host organisation, and you will collect and examine evidence that can be used to shape effective professional practice. This work benefits from our strong links with a wide range of bodies offering opportunities for collaboration.

You will be encouraged and supported to enrich your learning beyond the formal curriculum, helping you to explore ideas for your dissertation and opportunities for your future career. You are invited to participate in the work of the Centre for Learning and Innovation in Public Protection, including the Homicide Research Group and the Sexual Violence Research Group. There are also fieldtrips – both within the UK and overseas. The MSc in Criminology is suitable for students wishing to extend their knowledge and skills gained in an undergraduate degree in criminology, or in another social sciences discipline.

Modules

  • Applied Criminology
  • Work-based Research Project
  • Public Protection
  • Criminal Investigation
  • Restorative Justice
  • International Security
  • Issues in Sexual Offending
  • Cyber Criminology
  • Policing Communities
  • Dissertation

Study style

Assessment is through coursework, research reports, presentations and a dissertation.

Work on live projects with partner organisations

Benefits from our relationships to work on live projects. We have links with public bodies (such as Gloucestershire Constabulary, the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Gloucestershire and Restorative Gloucestershire), community organisations active in crime prevention, and charities providing support and training around issues such as domestic violence and homicide.

Fieldtrips in the UK and abroad

Attend field visits to criminal justice or community institutions, including prisons. There will be the opportunity to attend a residential field trip to explore a specialist theme such as community policing or restorative justice – recent trips have included Belfast, Cornwall and Toronto, Canada.

Research-active teaching staff

Benefit from the experience of our research-active teaching team and underpin your knowledge with the very latest theory and techniques.

Careers

  • Police officer or staff
  • Youth justice and prison service
  • Diversionary schemes
  • Victim support organisations
  • Crime analyst
  • Housing, community, development, and work with ex-offenders.


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About the course. This course is directed at students seeking a short, tailored programme in criminology, criminal justice and restorative justice as well as practitioners and policy-makers in these fields who may wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding of recent domestic and international developments. Read more

About the course

This course is directed at students seeking a short, tailored programme in criminology, criminal justice and restorative justice as well as practitioners and policy-makers in these fields who may wish to deepen their knowledge and understanding of recent domestic and international developments.

The Certificate will suit people who wish to gain expert, relevant and up-to-date information about contemporary and emergent theoretical, empirical and policy-related developments in

these fields, with a particular emphasis on the comparative aspects of these developments.

You’ll take fewer modules than classmates studying toward the MA International Criminology. The PG Certificate allows you to choose four taught modules from the MA programme, with the option to study on a full or part-time basis.

Upon successful completion, you also have the option to apply for transfer to the MA International Criminology, with the completed modules counted towards the masters degree.

Who we are

We’re a forward-thinking, innovative law school. Our research helps shape global policy. We do what we do to empower people, to protect people and improve people’s lives.

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us joint tenth in the UK, with Oxford and Warwick. Ninety per cent of our research was judged world-leading or internationally excellent.

We offer a wide range of law and criminology courses. Our leading criminology courses are delivered by internationally-renowned academics within our Centre for Criminological Research; one of the four original criminological centres of excellence in the UK.

Uniquely among English Russell Group law schools, we also offer the opportunity for you to complete both the academic and vocational stages of qualifying as a solicitor in our Centre for Professional Legal Education.

Your career

Our graduates include CEOs, lawyers, partners in big corporate firms, judges and barristers. Others are solicitors, academics, politicians and policy makers or work in criminal justice or at the Home Office.

Many of our graduates become legal practitioners. But you can use your postgraduate training in different ways, including business, policy development, teaching or research. Our staff can support you in whichever path you choose, having a wealth and variety of experience across all these areas.

Your course will give you the opportunity to meet and engage with professional organisations. And our excellent careers service will support you from the outset, helping you to identify your strengths and plan your next move. At the School of Law we also have an in-house careers adviser, offering specialised advice to Legal Practice Course, Graduate Diploma in Law and other postgraduate students who wish to pursue a career in the legal profession.

How we teach

Many of our academics are internationally respected for their research. Their groundbreaking work informs what we teach.

Our research groups cover a lot of ground, including criminology, commercial law and law in its international context. You’ll benefit from their expertise and that of their professional contacts. Your course will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of your chosen area of law or criminology. Our Legal Practice Course is highly regarded. It will provide you with all the skills and knowledge you need to enter the legal profession in England or Wales.

We have our own courtroom, a dedicated postgraduate computer room and quiet study space. Wi-Fi is available throughout the building so you can easily access the library’s online collections. Our students can also access our e-resources from anywhere in the world.

Module options

Students will choose four from the following:

  • Policing and Society
  • International Criminal Law
  • Responding to Crime in Europe
  • Restorative Justice
  • Crime and Globalisation
  • Issues in Comparative Penology
  • The Cultures of Criminology
  • Gender and Violence

Teaching and assessment

Teaching in each module takes place through fortnightly seminars. Modules will be assessed by 3,000 words of written work, normally in the form of an essay.



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This pathway draws upon Birmingham Law School's research strengths in International Law, International Humanitarian Law, Criminal Law and Justice, and Human Rights, enabling students to develop expertise in a wide range of relevant International law subjects. Read more

This pathway draws upon Birmingham Law School's research strengths in International Law, International Humanitarian Law, Criminal Law and Justice, and Human Rights, enabling students to develop expertise in a wide range of relevant International law subjects.

Students can study modules in international, transnational and European criminal law and justice alongside more nationally rooted specialisms and a breadth of human rights modules. Through our long-standing dedicated counter-terrorism modules, and those focusing upon specific theoretical or practical criminal justice issues (ranging from restorative justice to mentally disordered offenders) as well as our specialist human rights modules, we offer our students a unique opportunity for broad study and in-depth specialisation.

For those seeking a deeper understanding of the increasingly global structures which govern criminal justice as well as the finer issues challenging criminal justice structures, this course offers a unique learning opportunity and is an excellent choice for those seeking legal opportunities around the world.

Course details

In our research at Birmingham Law School we increasingly encounter the challenges of internationalised legal problems, regionalised or globalised criminal justice intervention and enforcement and the severe challenges posed to human rights by them. In developing this course we set out to encourage students to explore these with us.

Alongside the intellectual challenge, we also recognise a distinct increase in employment opportunities arising beyond the traditional jurisdictions of lawyers, let alone criminal justice professionals. By undertaking a combination of the modules available on this pathway, our students will become uniquely knowledgeable of dynamic, vital and growing aspects of international law theory and practice.

Learning and teaching

Birmingham's LLM pathways have been designed to provide in-depth analysis of important legal topics. Modules are all 20 credits in value, comprising 10 two-hour seminars to enable students to develop significant expertise in each area of law.

Birmingham offers small-group teaching on the LLM, and students opting for popular modules with large groups of students will receive (where possible) additional teaching time: classes will be split into two separate seminar groups so as to provide an equal opportunity for class interaction compared to those in smaller modules. 

The LLM course last 12 months, running from September to September. All LLM pathways follow the same basic structure:

  • In part I of the course, you take six 20 credit modules: the range available depends on the pathway you decide to follow. Assessment in those modules, by essay or formal examination, is in May and June.
  • In part II of the course, you research and write a 15,000-word dissertation on a selected topic of law under the supervision of a member of staff. 

The LLM pathways enable you to develop expertise in a range of subjects. You will acquire a systematic understanding of these along with a critical appreciation of the problems that arise in these fields. You will be encouraged to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge together with a practical understanding of how established research techniques are used to create and interpret knowledge.

Law School induction

At the start of the course there is a comprehensive welcome and induction programme designed to help you settle in and gain an understanding of the Birmingham LLM. You will familiarise yourself with the various ways in which we can support you throughout the year to ensure that your LLM course is an exciting and rewarding experience.

Students can register for modules before arrival as well as at the start of the academic year. As part of the induction process you will get the opportunity to learn more about the various modules available and make choices that correspond to your interests. 

Studying part-time

All the LLM pathways may be taken part-time and completed over a period of two years. This mode of study is particularly suitable for barristers and solicitors who wish to combine professional practice with university-level study, gaining CPD points in the process.

Classes for part-time students on the LLM will be scheduled between 9am-6pm and students will typically have between 2-4 hours of teaching each week. Fees are the same as for full-time study but are split over two years. 

International students

For students from outside the UK, there will be an opportunity during induction to familiarise themselves with the English legal system, as it forms the basis for the modules on offer. The English for International Students Unit provides a range of support in reading and writing academic English.



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About the MSc programme. The MSc Criminal Justice Policy provides an opportunity to apply the concepts and theoretical perspectives from criminology, sociology, law and psychology to the subjects of crime, social order and criminal justice institutions. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Criminal Justice Policy provides an opportunity to apply the concepts and theoretical perspectives from criminology, sociology, law and psychology to the subjects of crime, social order and criminal justice institutions.

It will provide you with the intellectual tools, from theory, empirical research, and policy analysis, to engage with current debates within criminology and criminal justice, such as restorative justice and increasing rates of incarceration. You will also learn to use historical and comparative perspectives to understand current trends. The teaching is provided by internationally renowned criminologists in the Departments of Social Policy, Law and Sociology. 

You will consider challenging questions such as: How can we explain the significant crime drop seen in most Western nations in recent decades? What can government or other agencies do to reduce fear of crime? Should people go to prison for punishment or as punishment? Will reduced government spending on the police lead to an increase in crime? How can political economy and cultural analysis account for variations in penal policy across states? 

You will also be able to attend the Mannheim Centre for Criminology’s seminar series and events, which are run in association with the British Society of Criminology Southern Branch. These provide an opportunity to hear about scholars’ current research as well as meet informally with speakers, other criminologists, and criminal justice professionals.

Graduate destinations

On graduation, most students move into careers in the criminal justice professions, academic or policy research in criminology and criminal justice, and policy work in governments or charities.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. Read more
Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. It is a fascinating and absorbing area of law in its own right, encompassing bodily integrity rights, such as the right to life, the right not to be tortured and the right not to be detained, procedural rights such as the right to a fair trial (both civil and criminal), and expressive rights such as freedom of religion, of assembly and of free expression itself.

Nottingham Law School has significant academic expertise in the areas of human rights and justice. The LLM Human Rights and Justice is based on the significant expertise of academic staff in Nottingham Law School, particularly from its Centre for Conflict, Rights and Justice. The course parallels the historical and contemporary significance of these aspects of law, in particular their growth as topics of both domestic and international importance over recent decades.

The course will help you develop a strong analytical understanding of the key legal issues in the area, with a particular focus on European and international human rights and key aspects of international justice systems.

Modules Include: Public International and Humanitarian Law; Terrorism and International Response; Victims' Rights and Restorative Justice; Human Rights in Europe; Theory and Principles of International Law; Expression Rights; Human Rights and Criminal Justice; Discrimination Law in Employment; International Human Rights; International Criminal Court and International Crime; and Data Protection and Privacy.

Scholarships are available, visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/scholarshipsnls for details.

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This MSc aims to produce postgraduates able to take on policy challenges in the field of crime, safety and justice. Read more

This MSc aims to produce postgraduates able to take on policy challenges in the field of crime, safety and justice. Our problem-orientated learning approach emphasises how to apply subject-specific knowledge to the analysis of, and response to, instances of crime, safety and justice in the public, voluntary and commercial sectors.

Overview

The overall aim of this course is to produce graduates capable of ‘problem-solving’ in the fields of crime, safety and justice.

The structure of the scheme is based on the ‘SARA’ mnemonic (Scanning, Analysis, Response, Assessment) which is familiar in policing and crime prevention practice as well as in the academy and in applied as well as in basic criminological research.

We aim to develop your research skills by providing training in research methods and to maximise your career prospects by providing transferable skills.

Distinctive features

The course is informed by the priorities of the UK College of Policing, as well as dialogue with members of the School of Social Sciences external advisory group, including representatives from the police, local government and other regulatory agencies with an interest in issues of crime and community safety.

The course includes, when possible, guest lectures from analysts concerned with issues of community safety in outside agencies such as the police, local government, commercial security and other relevant organisations.

Learning and assessment

Modules employ a diverse range of teaching including lectures, seminars, group and individual tutorials, and independent guided study. All modules within the programme make use of Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Learning Central, on which you will find course materials, links to related materials and information on assessment.

The programme benefits from being located in an inter-disciplinary environment so that in parts of the course, you will come into contact with staff and students from other subject areas and, in other parts of the course, with staff and students in the same substantive area.

You will be expected to attend lectures, seminars and tutorials as set out in the timetable for MSc students. These sometimes sit outside the regular pattern of university attendance and may include day, evening and weekend study and on occasion may fall outside the standard semester dates. You will also be expected to undertake independent study in preparation for lectures, seminars and assessments.

Career prospects

The general shift from subject-centred to problem-oriented learning reflects, in part, the interests of prospective employers in graduates with the skill set to apply subject specific knowledge about crime, safety and justice to the analysis of, and response to, particular instances of these problems in the public, commercial and voluntary sectors. 

In this regard, it is anticipated that the career prospects for graduates from this programme could include the following:

Job Roles: Crime analysts, security managers, crime prevention partnership co-ordinators, community safety managers, pressure group campaigners, commercial loss prevention officers.

Public Sector: Police, local authorities, environment agencies, food standard agencies, health and safety executive, public health organisations, offender management services.

Commercial Sector: Retail companies (e.g. clothing stores, electronic goods, supermarkets), financial services, commercial security organisations, new media companies including business analytics.

Voluntary Sector: Non-governmental organisations concerned with victim support, the care and resettlement of offenders, restorative justice approaches, offender-victim reparations, diversion from custody, social cohesion and integration.



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Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. Read more
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. It offers an exciting opportunity to study both theoretical criminology and the more applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice issues.

The course has three formal stages:
-The Diploma stages consist of three taught modules, a proposal module that is delivered through work groups and a practice-based module involving reflection upon work or volunteering experience.
-Those proceeding to the Master's stage will be required to complete an extended project to be determined individually.
-It is possible to complete your studies at any of the Certificate, Diploma or Master's stages.

Full-time students will complete all these stages in one year. Part-time students would normally complete the diploma and masters stages over two years.

What's covered in the course?

During study, you are asked to reflect upon your experience of crime and the criminal justice system, looking at significant factors involved in crime in contemporary society. These include globalisation, consumerism and political economy, as well as considering more psychological and theoretical drivers of harmful and criminal behaviour and the responses to crime.

In order to provide an engaging and flexible educational experience to diverse range of students, the course utilises a wide range of learning and teaching methods and technologies. Given the small size of each group of students recruited, the postgraduate status of the programme and the experience which many of its recruits have had of the criminal justice system, the course is highly participative. While sessions will provide periods of structured teaching, they will also provide a forum, within which you will take responsibility for your own learning, and share your knowledge and views with other students and staff.

The precise nature of sessions and delivery will vary with the year, the cohort of students, and the general and specific experience possessed by individual students. The programme team also makes increasing use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, where teaching staff will upload lecture notes, web links, video programmes and extracts from academic sources. Moodle is also used for general announcements and communication with a group of students, many of whom are unlikely to be on campus every day.

The course has a strong link with research practice, and will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, as well as enabling you to form judgements on the relative merits of, and relationships between, different research tools and methods. You will also develop the capability to design, manage and disseminate a research project to a professional standard.

Why Choose Us?

-The course has strong links with the University’s Centre for Applied Criminology, a leading research centre staffed by established criminologists. They are renowned for their international reputations, with their specialist areas including homicide, violence and organised crime.
-You’ll have flexible study options, enabling you to focus on either an academic route or a more practice-based approach.
-The course will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, and allow you to form judgements on different research tools.
-The course team has valuable links with the regional criminal justice system and leading non-Government organisations, including therapeutic prison HMP Grendon, where the University holds an annual debate.

How you learn

The course is taught in weekly seminars, tutorials and workshops, which encourage substantial student participation. Our virtual learning environment is also used to deliver some content and facilitate communication remotely.

The MA Applied Criminology will normally be studied on a one-year full-time basis and a two-year part-time basis, with the taught elements of the programme being delivered over a teaching period of approximately 30 weeks from September to May/June.

The programme is divided into study units called modules, each of 20 credits (excluding the Extended Project which amounts to 60 credits). Most modules on the programme are core, but there is also optional modules which cover influential areas of work undertaken in the Centre for Applied Criminology. You’ll complete 120 credits at the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Stage, and a further 60 credits at the Master’s stage. It is expected that most applicants will wish to progress to Master's stage, which is delivered and assessed through an extended project supervised through evening workgroups and through one-to-one supervision, which will come from an expert academic attached to the Centre for Applied Criminology.

The taught Master’s component covers a range of core and option modules, including topics such as - Research Methods (where you will develop your proposal for the final Applied Research Proposal module); Criminological Thought; Criminal Psychology; Penal Theory and Practice; Crime and Rehabilitation in Media; and Reflective Practice or Criminological Issues.

At the Diploma stage, you may select options modules covering topics such as Restorative Justice, Crime Prevention in Homicide and Organised Violent Crime (HAVOC), and Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence (UDSV). Additionally, the MA is awarded on the completion of the Applied Research Project [Dissertation] module (60 credits), which contains a taught component with evening sessions.

Employability

The teaching team draws on the combined with the expertise of members of the Centre for Applied Criminology, who will give you cutting-edge criminological knowledge from their impactful and high-profile research, as well as giving you excellent access to experienced practitioners and Criminal Justice System organisations.

The access provided to professionals, the presence of practitioners among fellow students and the capacity to reflect upon relevant volunteering or work experience within the structure of the course means that the course provides excellent opportunities for building contacts and networking, as well as developing opportunities for employment.

The School of Social Sciences has relationships with a number of criminal justice agencies and non-government organisations, including the local Community Safety Partnership, HMP Grendon and the Howard League.

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Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this LLM in Criminal Law and Criminology you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice. . Read more

Criminal law and criminology lie at the heart of questions and debates on how we as a society should respond to crime. On this LLM in Criminal Law and Criminology you’ll study an exciting range of topics, covering theory, policy and practice. 

Our research informs our teaching on the LLM. You’ll be taught by lecturers who specialise in critical work in areas including: 

  • Criminal law theory 
  • Comparative criminal justice 
  • International crimes 
  • Financial crimes 
  • Human rights and criminal justice 
  • Youth justice 
  • Policing and restorative justice 

Our course addresses the most challenging issues of criminal law including the law of homicide and sexual offences, as well as important questions of criminal procedure and practice such as the role of the police, youth justice and penal policy.

You’ll engage in advanced criminal law theory and, separately, criminological theory to examine how societies can better understand and effectively respond to crime.

Why Choose Sussex?

  • The LLM in Criminal Law and Criminology is taught by academics from the Crime Research Centre – a team of experts from across the University and beyond.
  • Benefit from an interdisciplinary approach to understanding problems with the criminal justice system exposing you to a wide variety of viewpoints.
  • Students studying the LLM in Criminal Law and Criminology will learn key approaches and be able to apply them to critical contemporary issues by working alongside academics on real projects which provides you with a good representation of criminal law in practice.

How will I study?

Our core modules give you the necessary theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations. They cover: 

  • Criminal law 
  • Criminal justice 
  • Criminology 
  • Research methods 

Our options – from both law and criminology – are taught by specialist academics based on their areas of expertise. Find out more about our core modules and options on our LLM Criminal Law and Criminology website.

Teaching methods include lectures, workshops and seminars. Assessment modes include essays and briefing papers as well as a 10,000-word dissertation.

Funding opportunities

The University of Sussex is proud to offer a range of postgraduate funding awards up to £5000, in order to help talented students to come and study at Sussex. Find out more about funding awards available to you by visiting our funding database.

Careers

You’ll gain practical abilities as well as critical and problem-solving skills valued in contemporary job markets. 

You will be able to apply your analytical skills to a range of careers in legal practice and criminal justice administration as well as careers in the private and voluntary sectors. 

The LLM in Criminal Law and Criminology can also provide a strong foundation for further academic study or a career in research. 



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The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond. Read more

The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond.

What is the Master of Criminology all about?

The programme is characterised by a strong link between education and research, an explicitly international orientation, and a comparative approach, with special attention to the cross-border character of criminality. 

General subjects include criminological theories and models of law enforcement, psychology, law and criminal justice, youth criminology and juvenile justice, and research methods. The programme also offers cutting-edge courses on international police and judicial cooperation, political crimes and transitional justice, restorative justice, terrorism, and organised and corporate crime – research fields in which our Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) professors are internationally renowned experts.

LINC is the most recent institutional incarnation (2007) of the criminological tradition in Leuven, which began with the establishment of the School for Criminology in 1929. Excellence in criminology continues today, combining solid research with a deep commitment to society structured within ten research lines. LINC is composed of 11 professors and more than 70 assistants and fellows involved in criminological research and education. 

Is this the right programme for me?

 Prospective students should possess:

  • a critical-reflective attitude towards law (as a normative behavioural regulating framework), community and crime;
  • genuine interest in (inter)personal and social interactions;
  • theoretical knowledge of applied psychology, sociology and anthropology within the field of crime and the treatment of crime;
  • extensive knowledge of basic research methodology
  • familiarity with specific criminological sources as well as legal, psychological and sociological sources
  • the ability to formulate research questions from existing literature
  • basic knowledge concerning (quantitative and qualitative) data collection
  • the ability to independently carry out analysis and report results
  • basic skills of oral and written reporting, especially in a criminology context;
  • an ability to apply criminological theory in practice (for instance, in an internship, case study, etc.);
  • basic knowledge of English, that is, the ability to read and understand English texts and comprehend seminars and lectures taught in English

Objectives

Goals

  • the criminological program provides an appealing specialized, European and internationally oriented and research-based study of crime and the way of dealing with it as well as the study of the processes of (de)criminalization
  • to optimize methodological skills and attitudes in order to make autonomous constructive and high standing contributions to the field as well as further research possible
  • an international and comparative approach has been highlighted in the Master program, bearing in mind however the characteristic Belgian situation

Final terms

Knowledge: The graduates need 1) to obtain specialized and more in-depth theoretical insights into the criminology; 2) to know facts concerning the developments and (the possible solutions for) problems in policy and practice of institutions that are involved in dealing with criminality. 3) to have specialized knowledge of recent developments in the field of methodology that allows to examine the problems from a point of legal and empirical-criminological view.

Skills: The graduates must be able to make an autonomous contribution in the development in the search to solutions for complex social and individual questions on the field of crime and the treatment of crime. More specifically: to be able to formulate relevant challenges for further criminological research; to observe, detect and analyze the large variables and indicators; to collect information independently; to comment and report in a methodically founded statement; can possibly function in (multidisciplinary) surroundings with eye for its own input and the guarantee of its quality.

Attitude: the graduates need to develop a discerning mind and recognize the importance of theoretical, methodological and moral reflection, both to guarantee the quality of policymaking as the quality of the own vocational practice. From an ethical notion the students develop further sensitivity for the tensions which occur at the treatment of crime and (in)security, at the individual, institutional and social level on the one hand and between these levels on the other hand.

Career perspectives

The programme is intended to prepare students for research and professional employment in national and international policy and operational agencies in the fields of criminal justice and victim assistance.

Graduates find employment in the domains of:

  • safety, police, justice
  • youth care
  • execution of sentences and penal measures
  • forensic mental healthcare
  • private security and safety
  • the civil service
  • the non-profit sectors at the national, European and international level


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Ideal for practitioners, managers and policy makers, this Masters degree is the first of its kind in the UK with a specialist focus on the theory and practice of offender management. Read more
Ideal for practitioners, managers and policy makers, this Masters degree is the first of its kind in the UK with a specialist focus on the theory and practice of offender management.

With recent changes to the organisation and management of community orders in the UK, and the partial privatisation of probation, there is now a greater focus on developing practices for managing post-sentence work with people who have been convicted.

This specialist Criminology Masters will provide graduates with the knowledge and theory to further influence and lead the development of practice in post-custody supervision. Throughout your studies, you’ll delve into the philosophy, theory and practice of working with individuals who are sentenced to either serve a community order or a prison sentence and who are subject to post-custody supervision.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1852-msc-working-with-adult-and-young-offenders

What you will study

You’ll be encouraged to explore the criminal justice system in detail covering theories of crime, rehabilitation, retribution, deterrence, desistance and restorative justice. You’ll gain an insight into how different civil services (including prison and probation) work with offenders whilst also gaining a better understanding of the work carried out in the third and private sectors.

Guided independent study, a module in research methods, and a dissertation will also form part of your studies. You will also study a further option module available from a choice of topics including drug interventions, managing and leading interdisciplinary teams, supervision and support skills, ethics, reflection and safeguarding, restorative and approaches.

Learning and teaching methods

Taught by a team of lecturers with long-standing expertise in the field, you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials. As part of your studies you’ll also undertake independent study that will be supervised by a member of the teaching team.

The teaching team comprises of active researchers who specialise in drug use, crime prevention, homicide and violence, animal abuse, youth justice and youth policy, policing protests, informal justice and alternatives to prosecution and imprisonment.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Upon successful completion of this Masters degree you could pursue a career in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, prison, probation services and youth offending services.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods are varied and include essays, critiques, written examinations, multiple choice tests, and oral and poster presentations. You’ll also be required to complete a dissertation of around 20,000 words on an individual piece of research, which may be work-related.

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Overview (General information) This one-year part-time flagship Diploma programme is a comprehensive learning and practice experience. Read more
Overview (General information) This one-year part-time flagship Diploma programme is a comprehensive learning and practice experience. The course is based on the theoretical foundations of mediation and includes analysis of conflict theory, negotiation theory and approaches to conflict intervention and marries this with intensive practice skills development throughout the year. It explores multiple fields for the application and practice of mediation and conflict intervention in society today including Families, Workplace Mediation, Commercial Mediation, Restorative Justice, Conflict Resolution in Education, Peacemaking, Community Mediation and Multiparty Policy Disputes. The programme prepares students for professional certification in mediation with the Mediator’s Institute of Ireland.

The course is structured around theoretical presentations and skills development through exercises and role-play and the introduction to specialised areas of mediation practice as mentioned above.

Accreditation

The Diploma is aimed at those who wish to develop mediation skills for application in their area of work or for developing a career in mediation. Graduates will receive a Diploma in Mediation from the Edward Kennedy Institute, Maynooth University and those who successfully take the Mediation Roleplay Competency Assessment can apply to the Mediator’s Institute of Ireland for Certified Status as a Mediator.



Gain knowledge of the theory and practice of mediation, conflict paradigms and conflict intervention theory principles and practice, so that they have a strong theoretical base to their practice.
Develop mediation and conflict intervention skills through the application of theory to practice in role-play so that they are skillful mediation practioners.
Develop self awareness in their communication skills through reflective exercises and coaching so that they are aware and reflective in their mediation practice.
Gain ability to analyse conflict through systemic analysis so that they can process and plan conflict intervention strategy.
Have knowledge and practice skills in reality testing, bargaining and negotiation to enable negotiations between parties in mediation.
Recognize and can work with power issues in mediation.
Are congruent in their practice with the value base of mediation.
Are ethically sensitive and competent.
Have ability in conducting caucus, shuttle mediation and co-mediation through knowledge and role-play so that they are able to enact these practices in mediation.
Are competent in drafting mediation agreements using clear and concise and neutral language.
Have ability in facilitating expressions of regret and apology between parties in mediation.
Are prepared to take a Mediation Competency Assessment.
Have an introduction to Community & Workplace Mediation, Mediation & Labour Relations, Multiparty Mediation for Public Policy Disputes, School and Family Mediation, Peacemaking and Restorative Practice.

The course comprises five modules each of five days duration, held on Mondays from 09.30 to 17.00 over the academic year (end September to beginning May). Students learn through lectures, skills training and project work. Students are obliged to attend 80% of the course.

Assessment

Students must complete two assignments per module and take part in a competency assessment of mediation skills at end of year.


The Diploma is aimed at those who wish to develop mediation skills for application in their area of work or for developing a career in mediation. Successful graduates of the programme will receive a Diploma in Mediation from the Edward Kennedy Institute, Maynooth University and will have passed a competency assessment whereupon they may register with the Mediator’s Institute of Ireland as a certified mediator.

Graduates will generally find work in this field through self employment. Agencies which provide a conflict management consultancy and/or mediation service employ mediators. Many graduates use the knowledge and skills gained on the course for application in their current employment.

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Why this course?. This programme caters for those interested in law generally but who have not yet identified a particular area of speciality. Read more

Why this course?

This programme caters for those interested in law generally but who have not yet identified a particular area of speciality. Thus, this programme allows for flexibility and choice.

Students can construct their own programme of law studies drawn from the full range of courses on offer. Students will have the opportunity to enjoy masterclasses from guest speakers/lecturers.

You'll study

At Master’s-level, there will be two compulsory elements, five electives and a dissertation. The compulsory classes are: Legal Research (20 credits) (already taught in the Law School) Dissertation (60 credits) (again, a standard element already provided for in the school).

Because of the general nature of the course, there will be no requirement for designated core modules.

It's expected that students will elect to take modules from the existing LLM/MSc within the Law School.

Course content

Compulsory classes

  • Legal Research
  • Dissertation

Elective classes

  • Arbitration Law
  • Business & Human Rights
  • Carbon Markets & Climate Finance
  • Childhood & Crime Climate
  • Change & Global Economy
  • Climate Change & Litigation
  • Comparative Company Law & Regulation
  • Comparative Law of Obligations
  • Competition Law & Policy in the EU
  • Conflict Resolution & the State
  • Contemporary Employment Relations
  • Contemporary Security Challenges and Responses
  • Context of Construction
  • Cybercrime & Society (Attendance and DL)
  • Dispute Resolution (Construction Law)
  • E-Commerce (Attending and DL)
  • Employment Law: Theory & Practice
  • Employment Mediation
  • Equity & Adaptation
  • EU Environmental Law I
  • EU Environmental Law II
  • Financial Regulation & Compliance
  • Forests, Land Use & Climate Change
  • Global Environmental Law: Issues of Equity & Sustainability
  • Homicide
  • Human Rights Protection in the UK
  • Intellectual Property Law (Attending and DL)
  • International Banking Law
  • International Climate Change Law
  • International Environmental Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • International Investment Law
  • International Migration Law
  • Internet Governance
  • Justice & Penal Decision Making
  • Labour Law in the Global Economy
  • Law of International Business
  • Law of the Construction Industry
  • Legal Process & the Law of Contracts & Other Obligations
  • Mediation in Practice
  • Mediation, Policy & the Law
  • Negotiation
  • Oceans Governance & International Law
  • Oceans Governance & Other Areas of International Law
  • Offending Supervision & Management
  • Privacy, Crime & Security (Attendance and DL)
  • Punishment & Process of Penal Change
  • Restorative Justice
  • Surveillance, Technology & Crime Control
  • Sustainable Energy Governance
  • Telecommunications Law (Attending and DL)
  • Terrorism & the Law
  • Theory & Principles of Conflict Resolution
  • World Trading System: Law & Policy

Classes are subject to availability year on year.

Learning & teaching

The course is taught through a mix of the following:

  • lectures
  • practical intensive weekends
  • teaching seminars
  • distance learning

Assessment

Assessment will be through a mix of exams and assessments that may be written or practical, depending on the subject.



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The course is intended for anyone wishing to demonstrate a commitment to contentious law in public and private international and commercial legal contexts. Read more

The course is intended for anyone wishing to demonstrate a commitment to contentious law in public and private international and commercial legal contexts. The taught part of the programme includes modules which reflect the three main forms of dispute resolution process, namely adjudication (litigation and arbitration), alternative dispute resolution (ADR – principally mediation), and negotiation.

This course differs from the International Commercial Law LLM course which is primarily concerned with non-contentious aspects of commerce (modules include competition law, trade, and insurance).

Class sizes are, in general, quite small, and you will be able to mix with students on other Masters courses at Westminster Law School.

The course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of the substantive and procedural issues involved in the field, and also the acquisition of skills involved in some of the processes. It is centrally concerned with law and other rules (international and commercial) which are applicable in adjudication and also in the other dispute resolution processes.

In addition to taught modules, there is also the Dissertation module which provides an opportunity for developing a specialist knowledge of a small area of the field, which might lead to a publishable article.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Other approved modules such as International Commercial Litigation and Private International Law might be made available depending on demand and the Head of Westminster Law School’s approval.

Core modules

Option modules

Career path

This course is designed to benefit a wide range of individuals, including graduates progressing towards PhD programmes; practising lawyers; other practitioners such as arbitrators, civil servants, diplomats, insurers, journalists, judges, linguists and mediators; and commercial directors and managers.

The course is ideal for anyone with a gap year between career stages, and for anyone from the European Union and other countries wanting to improve their English for career purposes.



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