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The global challenges of the twenty first century place important demands on students of international politics. Read more

About the course

The global challenges of the twenty first century place important demands on students of international politics. Not only do we need to understand the ongoing changes in the nature of war and conflict, but we are also today faced with important transformations in global power relations, international flows of goods, people and diseases and, indeed, shifts in the nature of political communities on the globe. Whatever your background, whether in international politics or another discipline, this flagship MA programme provides you with the necessary tools to tackle these shifting landscapes.

The scheme will introduce you, first, to the core notions that help shape the analysis of and the practices of international politics but also encourages you to think creatively about the kinds of concepts we need today to capture complex political realities. Taught by a team of world-leading research staff, the core module will challenge you to reflect on the way you think about international politics and the issues facing individuals, societies, states and humanity as a whole. Beyond the core module students pursue their own interests by choosing specialist modules. The options, ranging from the study of war, conflict, strategy and security to the study of global order, international theory and ethics, are designed to stimulate you in pursuing your own path to an advanced study of international relations.

At the heart of the scheme is a desire to expose students to envisioning new, different, better ways forward in our efforts to cope with the challenging political, military, social, economic and environmental contexts we live in today.

MA students taking this course will be integrated into the unique world-leading research culture, including contributing to research groups, participating in a range of events, seminars and round-tables, and attending the weekly departmental research seminar. Whether you are interested in understanding the conceptual underpinnings of international politics or tackling practical policy implications by taking this flagship Masters degree you will be part of a department at the forefront of understanding and tackling the challenges of ‘how we might live’ in the 21st century.

Why study International Politics at Aberystwyth?

Founded in 1919 after the end of World War I, the Department of International Politics at Aberystwyth is the world’s first university department of International Politics. The Department is renowned for its pioneering research and is recognised as number one in the UK for the study of international politics. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014), the Department of International Politics was placed best in Wales with 76% of publications submitted rated as world leading and internationally excellent. This research excellence is mirrored in our teaching, as evidenced in the recent 2016 National Student Satisfaction survey. The 2016 NSS placed us in the top ten in the UK and best in Wales among Politics and International Relations departments, with 95% overall Student satisfaction, well above the average for the subject nationally. Our staff’s commitment to excellence in both teaching and research, provides you with an outstanding and dynamic learning environment. Finally our Department’s vibrant and cosmopolitan learning environment welcomes students from all over the world, and provides a lively venue for contemporary and international political debate.

This degree will suit you:

• If you want to study international relations at advanced level
• If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of past and contemporary international politics
• If you wish to nurture a career in areas such as international diplomacy, journalism or the NGO-sector or if you wish to work internationally
• If you desire formal recognition of skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course structure

The MA in International Politics pursued through the Specialist Pathway is the traditional Masters degree which offers the opportunity to for students to pursue specialised, advanced, subject-specific study in the discipline of international politics. Students following this pathway take the degree scheme core module (compulsory), two modules from a basket of options, and three further modules chosen from the baskets or any Masters options taught by the Department (including a maximum of one module offered by another department). More information on modules available from other departments is available at: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/modules/. Finally students complete a 13-15,000 word dissertation.

Core modules:

Dissertation
International Politics
Principles Of Research Design
Qualitative Data Collection And Analysis
Qualitative Data Collection And Analysis (1120)
Quantitative Data Collection And Analysis
Research In Politics And International Studies

Optional modules:

Cyber Security
Politics, Media, Performance: Transdisciplinary Critical Frameworks
Power And Postwar Reconstruction: A Critical Approach
The State Through The Ages
Thoughts Of War: Strategic Theory & Thinkers (s)
Understanding Wales In An Age Of Global Transformation
Critical Security Studies: Contemporary Theories
Intelligence, Security And International Politics Since 1945
International Communications In Asia-pacific: Power, Peoples And Propaganda
Islam And Modernity
Political Responsibility In A Globalized World
Postcolonial Politics

Contact time

In Semester One you will normally have eight hours per week of specific Research Training Modules and one two-hour seminar per week for the degree scheme core module. In Semester Two you will normally have one two-hour seminar per week for each of the three modules you take (one Research Training specific and two subject specific modules). You will also have contact with academic staff through participation in research groups, attendance in departmental research seminars and masters workshops and through staff office hours (two one hour sessions per week). There will also be additional sessions working towards developing your master’s dissertation. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment will be through a combination of examinations, project work, short reports, essays and dissertation. It may, depending on the modules chosen, include seminar presentations, review essays and literature searches.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your Masters will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained international politics specialist with a strength in depth of knowledge on vital subjects such as conflict, power, peace, justice and injustice, security, the global distribution of wealth and resources and trust in world politics. You will also graduate with a wealth of postgraduate-level skills which are transferable into any workplace. On the research training pathway you also develop advanced skills in quantitative and qualitative research skills and data analysis. In addition, the prestige of masters from our department of International Relations wills open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

Study skills

Alongside the wealth of world-class critical expertise, you will master highly desirable skills in academic research, analysis, argument-formation, presentation and debate. The research training pathway provides you with a specific set of study skills focused on interrogating and analysing a range of different types of data from multiple sources. You will also prove your abilities in reflection and self-improvement; you will be able to identify your academic weaknesses and remove them whilst building on your strengths.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at Masters level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Masters degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable skills

The International relations Masters programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines. You will also have advanced skills in data analysis that can be applied in a wide variety of work environments from business to the public sector and non-governmental organisations.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course equips you with the knowledge, understanding, skills and aptitudes to undertake advanced research. This includes doctoral research in the social sciences, arts and humanities, or in either the public or private sector. Read more
This course equips you with the knowledge, understanding, skills and aptitudes to undertake advanced research. This includes doctoral research in the social sciences, arts and humanities, or in either the public or private sector.

The qualification meets the learning outcomes at Certificate level in the national higher education qualifications framework.

This Research Training PGCert is delivered at faculty level in an interdisciplinary environment and is relevant to students from a wide range of disciplines.

It is also open to international students in the second or third year of PhD courses in their own country who want to study abroad for a minimum of six months.

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Studying Modern History at York is a lively and stimulating experience. The programme combines an advanced level introduction to the historiographical debates, methodologies and techniques of modern history together with a choice of thematic taught modules, culminating in a research dissertation. Read more
Studying Modern History at York is a lively and stimulating experience. The programme combines an advanced level introduction to the historiographical debates, methodologies and techniques of modern history together with a choice of thematic taught modules, culminating in a research dissertation. Students are introduced to a wide range of sources and approaches drawn from the entire span of the modern period and from across different localities, and thereby gain an unusual breadth of vision which transcends more conventional boundaries.

The MA is run by the Department of History and students are encouraged to participate in the lively scholarly community of the department's active graduate school through attendance at relevant MA seminars and masterclasses, research training sessions and the weekly departmental research seminar. Students also have full access to the Centre for Modern Studies which provides an active programme of academic seminars, small conferences and reading groups involving both academic staff and graduate students.

Programme of study

The programme consists of four taught modules (20 credits each), a 20,000 word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits), which make up the 180 credits required for an MA in the UK higher education system. For students registered for full-time study, the programme is as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Approaches to Modern History
-Option Module 1
-Research Training (taught content)
All students take the core module Approaches to Modern History. Taught by weekly seminars, this module introduces students to the key concepts, debates, methods and practices which inform the work of historians of "modern times". Additionally, all students take an Option Module chosen from a list approved by the Course Convenor. All students follow a research training module across both the Autumn and Spring terms.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Option Module 2
-Option Module 3
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)
Students choose two Optional Modules which should include at least one related to their pathway. With the approval of the convenor they may also choose a module from other MA programmes in and outside of the department, e.g. the MA in Public History, including its very popular placement module, or the MA in Culture and Thought after 1945.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, all students will write a research dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing and under the supervision of a member of staff, and submitted at the end of the academic year.

Students receive advice about research topics and instruction in bibliographical research, plus additional specialist advice and guidance from a supervisor. Because of the range of expertise of staff members and the wealth of source material available in York and electronically, it is possible to provide supervision on a wide range of topics, both chronologically and geographically. Past dissertations have covered such diverse topics as The West Indies Federation, British abolitionism after emancipation, and violence in the American South in the interwar years.

Part-time students
Students registered for part-time study over two years take in Year One the MA Core module in the Autumn Term (20 credits), an Option in the Spring Term (20 credits), plus the 10-credit Research Training module: a total of 50 credits in the first year. In Year Two, they take two more Option modules (40 credits in total), normally scheduled in second Autumn and Spring Terms respectively, and a research dissertation (90 credits): a total of 130 credits.

Although this gives Year Two disproportionate formal credit-weighting, the work flow spreads slightly more evenly because planning and preliminary research of the dissertation is undertaken in the Year One, and significant research and writing is undertaken the Year Two; the Research Training module taken in Year One also provides support in dissertation planning.

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This innovative scheme provides a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding contemporary Wales. Read more

About the course

This innovative scheme provides a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding contemporary Wales. It complements the development of the WISERD-Centre for Welsh Politics and Society at Aberystwyth University as a world-leading research centre on contemporary political, social and economic issues of relevance to Wales with its core members drawn from the Department of International Politics, Department of Geography and Earth Sciences and Department of History and Welsh History. The scheme will equip postgraduate students with a strong grounding in the historical, cultural, socio-economic and political context of contemporary Wales; critical engagement with key intellectual debates regarding Wales’ politics, society and history; knowledge of the constitutional arrangements and institutional structures which shape devolved government and policy-making in Wales, and an understanding of the broader UK and European context and trends in territorial politics, regional policy and governance. It also places a strong emphasis on enhancing employability and work-based learning.

This degree will suit you:

• If you want to study Welsh Politics at Masters level
• If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of Welsh politics in society
• If you wish to nurture a career in politics within Wales
• If you desire formal recognition of skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course content

Core modules:

Principles of Research Design
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis (1120)
Quantitative Data Collection and Analysis
Understanding Wales in an Age of Global Transformation *

Optional modules:

Class and Community in Wales 1850 - 1939
Landownership and Society in Wales
Postcolonial Politics
Postgraduate Work Experience
Rural Economy, Society and Policy
The Making of Modern Wales
The State Through the Ages *
Welsh Politics and Society Dissertation *
Working with History

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Contact time

Approximately 12-14 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment will be through a combination of examinations, project work, short reports, essays and dissertation. It may, depending on the modules chosen, include seminar presentations, review essays and literature searches.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your Masters will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained political specialist with a strength in depth of knowledge on vital subjects such as the political, economic, cultural and social context of politics in Wales today as well as the key institutions and actors in contemporary Welsh political life. You will also graduate with a wealth of postgraduate-level skills which are transferable into any workplace. In addition, the prestige of masters from our department of International Politics wills open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

Key Skills and Competencies

Study Skills

Alongside the wealth of world-class critical expertise, you will master highly desirable skills in academic research, analysis, argument-formation, presentation and debate. You will also prove your abilities in reflection and self-improvement; you will be able to identify your academic weaknesses and remove them whilst building on your strengths.

Self-Motivation and discipline

Studying at Masters level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

Transferable Skills

The International relations Masters programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organising information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

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A higher degree by research involves training in research methods and systematic, high level study of a research project. The nature of the work and the time it takes to finish the research means a research degree is demanding and needs great commitment. Read more

A higher degree by research involves training in research methods and systematic, high level study of a research project. The nature of the work and the time it takes to finish the research means a research degree is demanding and needs great commitment.

You must present your results in a thesis, explain the methods used in your research and defend them in an oral examination.

To get an MPhil you must critically investigate and evaluate an approved topic and display an understanding of suitable research methods.

Materials and Engineering Research Institute (MERI)

MERI is a multi-disciplinary research institute encompassing four research centres each with their own specialist groups operating within them. We undertake high quality academic research across a range of disciplines and apply this research knowledge in a commercial and industrial context. Research areas include • polymers and composites • solar energy • structural integrity and corrosion • functional coatings • simulation and modelling • robotics.

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise we were the leading post–92 university in metallurgy and materials (UoA29). 75 per cent of our staff were judged to be internationally leading and we obtained a Times Higher Education average score of 2.15 reflecting the quality of our work and world class staff.

Our staff include • chemists • materials scientists • physicists • computer scientists • mechanical, electronic and electrical engineers, all working on individual or collaborative projects shared between research centres. Supported by a £6m equipment base, which will shortly undergo a £4m refurbishment, this inter-disciplinary approach enables us to solve complex problems ranging from fracture of artificial implants through to designing surfaces that can withstand frictional temperatures in excess of 1,000 degrees centigrade. Solutions to these kinds of problems put MERI at the top in terms of industrial collaboration.

The Materials Research and Analysis Service (MARS) is also a key strength in the research institute, established to provide regional business with access to research facilities and analysis, which enhances the capability of companies in terms of new and improved products.

Evidence of MERI’s research strength is reflected in the patent portfolio that currently consists of 22 granted patents with another 17 applications in progress.

MERI is made up of five centres of excellence

  1. The Thin Films Research Centre
  2. The Centre for Automation and Robotics Research
  3. The Polymers Nanocomposites and Modelling Research Centre
  4. The Structural Materials and Integrity Research Centre
  5. Materials Analysis and Research Services, Centre for Industrial Collaboration (MARS) (CIC)

Course structure

Training and development

An extensive range of training and development opportunities are available to doctoral researchers through the doctoral skills training series and MERI-based training.

MERI training:

Skills training for postgraduate research

This course will comprise 4 main sessions:

  • getting the most out of supervision
  • development needs analysis and personal development plans
  • research integrity and intellectual property
  • getting the most out of conferences

All of the sessions are mandatory for all MERI research students.

Weekly seminar programme

Speakers are invited weekly to discuss their latest research with our staff and students.

Research ethics

This session introduces you to the principle of research ethics and the Sheffield Hallam procedures for ethical clearance. It will also involve you doing an initial ethic checklist for your research project and introduce the online EPIGIUM module ethics 1, which all Sheffield Hallam research students must complete.

RefWorks

RefWorks is a web-based bibliographic system with which you can build up a database of all of your reference material. It is flexible and very powerful, particularly when it comes to outputting reference lists for papers and thesis.

Introduction to bibliographic databases

As a researcher it is vital to be able to access relevant high level information. Here you learn more sophisticated information retrieval skills and see how to use subject specific databases relevant to your research area.

Health and safety for postgraduate research

The session aims to provide clear health and safety guidelines for new postgraduate researchers around personal safety and safety of others within the university environment, including and laboratories & workshops.

Advanced measurement techniques

This module aims to equip you with the skills and knowledge to make informed decisions on experimental materials analysis techniques. A number of techniques are demonstrated, the emphasis being on what each can achieve and the potentials for synergy from combining results obtained using from different techniques. This promotes effective decision making in research planning and operation, as well as a broad understanding of what different approaches can be used for.

MATLAB

MATLAB is a powerful programming language for numerical computations. It is employed in a range of industrial and academic environments. MATLAB has numerous built-in functions for engineering, physical, graphical, mathematical and computing applications. Besides this it has a variety of specialised toolboxes for specific applications, such as control systems, machine vision, signal processing and many others. MATLAB also has the symbolic toolbox that allows operating on symbolic expressions. In the first sessions we will cover MATLAB fundamentals, and the following sessions will be tailored to the specific research needs of attendees.

MERI research symposium event

The MERI Research Symposium is an excellent opportunity for both staff and students who are either active researchers, or who are interested in engaging in research, to meet with colleagues from across the faculty, to raise awareness of current research projects. The event will incorporate talks from academic staff and second year MERI PhD students, with poster presentations from final year undergraduate engineering students and first year MERI students.

Poster preparation

This course is aimed at first year students to give tips and techniques on how to prepare for the MERI Research Symposium Event, at which they will present a poster.

Talk preparation

All second year students are required to give a talk at the MERI Research Symposium Event.

Assessment

Thesis followed by oral examination

Employability

Research degrees are a vital qualification for most academic careers, and for professional specialisation and development in an existing or planned career. The rigorous analytical thinking they involve also demonstrates ability to potential employers in all areas of work.



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The MA in Medieval History offers an unparalleled opportunity to study at one of the world's leading centres of expertise in medieval history. Read more
The MA in Medieval History offers an unparalleled opportunity to study at one of the world's leading centres of expertise in medieval history. The degree is equally suitable for students who wish to pursue doctoral research or careers in teaching, public history, or archives, or for those with enthusiasm for the subject but not yet a clear career direction.

Since few students will have had the opportunity to study medieval history in depth at Undergraduate level, the programme offers both wide-ranging training in sources and methods and Option Modules in specialised areas. The University of York’s Medieval MA programmes (in History, Literature, Archaeology, Stained Glass) are some of the most popular and sought after, making York the largest centre in the UK for medieval masters level study across the Humanities disciplines.

This degree offers both thorough research training and the opportunity to explore new approaches to the history of medieval Britain and Europe with seminars led by experts in the area. You will be introduced to a wide range of sources and approaches from across the period. Team teaching on the core and training modules brings the chance to get acquainted with most staff not on leave.

You will be able to participate in the lively scholarly community surrounding the active graduate school, and also have full access to the Centre for Medieval Studies and its active programme of seminars, conferences and reading groups involving both staff and graduate students.

Programme of study

The MA programme consists of five taught courses (80 credits in total), a 20,000-word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits). Note that the most effective means of teaching the specific medieval study skills result in the course being split slightly unevenly in terms of credit-weighting, with students taking 50 credits in Autumn and 30 in Spring. This will, nevertheless, give students the space to begin thinking about their dissertation earlier in the Spring Term.

For students registered for full-time study, the programmme runs as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Perspectives on Medieval History
-Option Module 1
-Skills Module 1: Latin
-Skills Module 2: Palaeography
-Research Training (taught content)

All students take the core module, Perspectives on Medieval History. This module introduces students to a diverse range of themes and areas of debate within Medieval History. Students also take an option module chosen from a list approved by the Course Convenor. (When enrolment numbers permit, students may also select options from the Centre for Medieval Studies and its other parent departments as well as from the MA in Public History.)

All students also take the two skills modules, in Latin and Palaeography, and follow a research training programme. The research training includes specific sessions for Medieval History MA students, which will explore some of the resources available in York and may involve opportunities to handle original source materials.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Option Module 2
-Skills Module 1: Latin
-Skills Module 2: Palaeography
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)

During the Spring Term students take a second Option module and continue the two skills modules in Latin and Palaeography, as well as writing their dissertation proposal.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, students write a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their choice and under the supervision of a member of staff, submitted at the end of the academic year. Dissertations should be focused on a well considered research question and should based on primary source material. Students receive generic advice about selecting research topics, setting up the research questions and assembling bibliographies, followed be specialist advice and guidance from an advisor with relevant expertise. The range of expertise of staff members and the wealth of source material available at York enables a wide range of topics, both chronologically and geographically.

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The MA is a distinctive programme designed for applicants whose interests lie in the study of early modern history, and who feel that they have much more to discover. Read more
The MA is a distinctive programme designed for applicants whose interests lie in the study of early modern history, and who feel that they have much more to discover. The course provides both a thorough research training and an opportunity to explore new approaches to the history of early modern Britain, Europe and their overseas empires. Students are introduced to a wide range of sources and approaches drawn from the entire span of the early modern period, and thereby gain an unusual breadth of vision which transcends more conventional boundaries, not only between British and European history but also between Europe and the differing cultures encountered on Europe's frontiers and overseas.

The MA is run by the Department of History and students are encouraged to participate in the lively scholarly community of the department's active graduate school through attendance at relevant MA seminars, research training sessions and the weekly departmental research seminar. Students also have full access to the Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies which provides an active programme of academic seminars, small conferences and reading groups involving both the academic staff and graduate students.

Programme of study

The programme consists of four taught modules (20 credits each), a 20,000 word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits). These make up the 180 credits that are normal for an MA in the UK higher education system. For students registered for full-time study, the programme is as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Approaches to Early Modern History
-Option Module 1
-Research Training (taught content)

All students take the core module Approaches to Early Modern History. The module, taught by weekly seminar, introduces students to the key concepts, methods and practices which contribute to the diversity of early modern history; and to the study of particular topics, such as new approaches to the Reformation, early modern globalisation, women in early modern Europe, and the scientific revolution. Additionally, all students take an Option Module chosen from a list approved by the Course Convenor or the Core Module of the interdisciplinary MA in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, which counts as an Option Module for Early Modern MA students. All students follow a research training module across both terms.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Option Module 2
-Option Module 3
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)

Students choose two optional modules which should include at least one related to their pathway. With the approval of the Course Convenor and the Module Tutor they may also choose a module from other MA programmes (e.g. English or History of Art).

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
-Research Dissertation

During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, all students will write a research dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing and under the supervision of a member of staff, and submitted at the end of the academic year.

Students receive advice about research topics and instruction in bibliography, plus additional specialist advice and guidance from a supervisor. Because of the range of expertise of staff members and the wealth of source material available in York, it is possible to provide supervision on a wide range of topics, both chronologically and geographically.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Master's degree in Social Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences.

Key Features of MSc in Social Research Methods

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of research areas and publishing in top international journals

- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities

- Specialist modules in criminology, social work and human geography, research leadership and management

- Emphasis on development of ethical, knowledgeable, skilful social researchers” through critical discussion, up to date information, debates and presentations

MSc Social Research Methods is a highly regarded and prestigious qualification which has been developed to:

- enable students to develop practical research skills and advanced methodological expertise (both qualitative and quantitative);

- instil familiarity with research ethics and governance, and

- gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Elective modules and a dissertation provide scope for specialisation in applied social sciences, including but not limited to: criminology, human geography, social work and health.

This Master’s degree in Social Research Methods has ESRC accreditation and provides advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences. The degree instils familiarity with research ethics and governance, and students gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Students on the Social Research Methods course are encouraged to devise research dissertations themselves (supported by an academic supervisor).

Modules

Modules on the Social Research Methods programme typically include:

Qualitative Research Methods

Introduction to Research and Study Skills

Data Collection Methods

Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

Quantitative Research Methods

Advanced Research in Human Geography

Research Leadership and Project Management

Case Studies in Applied Social Research: Social Work

Case Studies in Applied Social Res: Applied Research in Crime & Criminal Justice

Dissertation (Social Research)

Social Research Methods Course Structure

Teaching is in the form of lectures, seminars, group-project work and individual study. All Social Research Methods students are assigned a Personal Tutor and Dissertation Supervisor appropriate to their chosen area of study.

The Social Research Methods course is made up of six 20-credit modules (Part 1) and a 60-credit dissertation (Part 2).

Who should apply?

The Social Research Methods course is suitable for:

- students who want to prepare themselves for the challenge of MPhil or PhD study; who are already professionally involved in working with people in the social sector and want to develop their own skills and professional expertise

- students from different academic disciplines who are interested in conducting social research and are interested in seeking employment or already have employment in both public and private sectors

- previous students are those with backgrounds in social policy, sociology, law, criminology, human geography, politics, arts and humanities, ageing studies , psychology and health science

- anyone wanting to add a valuable qualification as part of developing a full academic career

- anyone who is interested in society, social behaviour, and social change and would like to learn more

- anyone working in, or wishing to work in, government or voluntary organisations, and commercial areas where social research is undertake

Career Prospects

Past Social Research Methods students have gone on to be employed in public and private sectors, research work, PhD , vocational work, the criminal justice system, social work, environmental health, teaching, local government, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and health and social care.

Staff Expertise

Contributing lecturers are renowned nationally and internationally. For example, Professor David Hughes has published on the universal coverage healthcare reforms of Thailand and Turkey, Debbie Jones jointly led on The Student Sex Workers' project from Swansea University's Centre for Criminal Justice and Criminology.

The MSc Social Research methods is serviced by research active staff, many of whom are leaders in their field of research. The team has strong links with Criminology whose staff have been awarded Howard league Research Medal 2013 for work on the Swansea Bureau Youth Scheme. Lecturers from the course also include those from the world renowned Centre for Innovative Aging and also Human Geography.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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The MA in Public History offers students cutting edge interdisciplinary academic training together with exciting opportunities for hands-on experience in the cultural sphere through a placement in the heritage sector. Read more
The MA in Public History offers students cutting edge interdisciplinary academic training together with exciting opportunities for hands-on experience in the cultural sphere through a placement in the heritage sector. The programme is designed to give students an understanding of the critical issues in public history and to analyse the variety of changing ways that the public engage with the past through not only traditional media, but also new digital and rich media products.

Programme of study

The programme consists of three taught modules (20 credits each), a public history placement (20 credits), a 20,000-word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits). These make up the 180 credits that is normal for an MA in the UK higher education system. For students registered for full-time study, the programme is as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Public History I: Meanings and Values in Public History
-Option Module
-Research Training (taught content)
All students take one core module taught by weekly seminar. Public History I: Meaning and Values in Public History introduces students to a broad range of conceptual and methodological frameworks for understanding the relationship between the past and its manifestations in contemporary society. Students also take an option module chosen from a list approved by the MA Convenor. Additionally, all students participate in the research training module which prepares them for independent work on their dissertation later in the year.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Core Module: Public History II: Methodologies and Practices in Public History
-Public History Placement
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)
All students take one core module taught by weekly seminar. Public History II: Methodologies and Practices in Public History introduces students to the deployment of the past in the public realm, and particularly the means by which it is put into practical use in a wide variety of contemporary social contexts. Students undertake a Public History Placement, which gives them hands-on experience of working in the field and allows them to reflect on the theory and practice of public history. Students also continue to participate in the research training module.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
-Research Dissertation
During the summer term and over the vacation, all students will write a Research Dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing, which may arise from their placement or one of their taught modules, under the supervision of a member of staff that is submitted at the end of the academic year.

Part-time students
Part time students on the MA in Public History will take in Year One the Core (Public History I, Autumn Term; and Public History II, Spring Term), and in Year Two, the Public History Placement and an Option. The Research Dissertation will be spread over two years, with preliminary work undertaken in Year One, and significant work undertaken in Year Two.

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Research profile. The MSc by Research in Counselling Studies provides students with a comprehensive understanding of research design, data collection and data analysis for research in the field of counselling and psychotherapy. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Counselling Studies provides students with a comprehensive understanding of research design, data collection and data analysis for research in the field of counselling and psychotherapy.

It offers an advanced education to students interested in developing research skills, including qualified counselling and psychotherapy practitioners and social science researchers.

Counselling and psychotherapy specialise in qualitative, reflexive and critical approaches to research, and have particular expertise in practice-based research that draws directly on practitioners' own therapeutic work, on the client's experience of therapy, and in narrative, reflexive and auto-ethnographic methods.

We are especially keen to encourage research concerned with the interface between counselling, psychotherapy and social, cultural and political life.

Our research portfolio is highly interdisciplinary, integrating concepts, practices and scholarship from counselling and psychotherapy, psychology, sociology, philosophy, education, cultural studies, health and social care, and other social sciences.

Our interests include disability, gender, trauma, abuse, counselling children and young people, and sexualities.

You can read more about our research interests and publications on our website:

Programme structure

The programme aims to provide students with advanced understandings of research design, data collection and data analysis issues in counselling research.

The programme enables students to develop their understandings of debates about research, evidence and practice in relation to counselling and related practices.

Distinctive features of this degree include:

  • integration of generic social science and discipline-specific counselling research training
  • social science approaches to research training in counselling
  • close links with social science research concerned with counselling and society
  • close links with social science research concerned with health, illness and health services

The degree may be taken as a free-standing MSc or as a foundation for PhD studies. Candidates must complete a programme of research training courses and submit a dissertation on an approved topic.

Teaching and learning methods

Teaching and learning methods include lectures, theory seminars, discussion groups and independent study.

Assessment is through essays and the dissertation.

Individual courses may have other learning and assessment methods such as student presentations, research projects and web-based learning.

Learning outcomes

The programme provides research training in counselling, opportunities to design research, a research-based appreciation of key elements of counselling practice, a critical appreciation of approaches to research in counselling and psychotherapy, and the ability to work across disciplinary boundaries.

Training and support

You will complete a programme of research training courses and submit a dissertation on an approved topic. The MSc by Research can be taken as a stand-alone qualification or as a foundation for PhD study.



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The MLitt in Law is a full-time course and may be awarded after two years of supervised research on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter. Read more
The MLitt in Law is a full-time course and may be awarded after two years of supervised research on the basis of a dissertation not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter. An MLitt dissertation must take due account of previously published work on the subject and must represent a useful contribution to learning. Candidates for the MLitt are registered in the first instance for the Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Legal Studies which provides training in legal research.

It is a requirement of the Certificate that candidates attend the weekly classes (during term-time only) provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme that offers instruction on research techniques and advice on matters such as getting work published and obtaining academic jobs. Candidates are required to submit, normally towards the end of May of their first year, four items for a progress review: a personal progress log, a 15,000-word dissertation, a short explanation of the proposed topic of the MLitt and copies of termly supervision reports. The work is formally assessed (normally by two teaching members of the Faculty) and candidates must attend an oral examination.

After this examination, the assessors' reports, along with a recommendation from the supervisor(s), are considered by the Faculty's Degree Committee whose members then decide whether to register the candidate for the MLitt Degree. The MLitt registration date is normally backdated so as to include the year spent working on the Certificate.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwlwmllaw

Fromat

The course is exclusively by research although students are required to attend, in their first year of study, the weekly(term-time only) two-hour research training classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training and Development Programme.

While individual arrangements vary, MLitt students may normally expect to receive one-to-one supervision at least once a month.

Students are required to attend, in their first year of study, the weekly (term-time only) two-hour research training classes provided by the Faculty's Research Training Programme.

Students are encouraged to attend Lectures, especially at LLM level, within the general field of their research.

The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law (CJICL) is an open access, peer-reviewed academic journal founded and run by the postgraduate community at the Faculty of Law.

Students have the opportunity to give a presentation on their current research at the termly Graduate Research Seminars.

Supervisors are required to submit termly reports to the Student Registry which students can access via their self-service accounts on CamSIS.

Assessment

A thesis, not exceeding 60,000 words inclusive of footnotes but exclusive of appendices, bibliography, table of contents and any other preliminary matter, is referred to two Examiners, appointed by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Law. Each Examiner shall make an independent report to the Degree Committee on the dissertation. Students are required to attend an oral examination and, following the oral examination, the Examiners submit a joint report to the Degree Committee stating whether or not they recommend the award of the degree.

Continuing

MLitt candidates may apply to continue to the PhD by completing and submitting a Graduate and Scholarships Application Form (GRADSAF) by the relevant deadline.

In appropriate circumstances, the terms spent working on the MLitt may be counted towards the PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For detailed information about all possible funding sources (Faculty funding, University funding, and College funding) please refer to the Faculty of Law's website and the Fees and Graduate Funding section of the Graduate Admissions Office website.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills. Read more
This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills.

Students will acquire a general overview of the philosophy of social research, and understand how this informs research design, methods of data collection and analysis. They will also develop an ability to use a range of research methods, to communicate research findings effectively and an understanding of the potential use of and impact of their research within and beyond academia.

Core Modules

Philosophy of Social Science Research

The module considers fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences. Teaching addresses (natural) science as a method of obtaining knowledge and the interpretative tradition in the social sciences. Students explore fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences and apply these discussions to their own disciplines and field of study.

Research Design, Practice and Ethics

The module introduces students to social science research designs and ethical issues in research practice. Learning supports students to be able to make strategic choices when developing their own projects, and to assess the design and research ethics decision making in others’ published research work.

Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods

Concepts, methods and skills central to quantitative research, including data collection approaches and concept operationalization, are core throughout this module. Building on a grounding in ideas relating to probability sampling, sampling error and statistical inference, coverage of techniques extends from comparisons of means and simple cross-tabular analyses to a discussion of multivariate analysis approaches, focusing on linear and logistic regression.

Foundations in Qualitative Research

Qualitative research is examined across a range of topics, from different approaches and methods including ethnographic and observational research, discourse and conversation analysis, documentary and archival analysis, participatory research and the use of interviews. Ethics in qualitative research is specifically considered, as is the evaluation of qualitative research.

Advanced Training Programme

Unless stated, all advanced training courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These advanced training courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These advanced training courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to do so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Advanced Training courses run in Semester 3, unless otherwise stated:

Analysing Hierarchical Panel Data
An Approach To Research On Discourse
Case Study Research Design
Documentary Research In Education
Factor Analysis
Introduction To Econometric Software
Introduction To Time Series Regression
Narrative Research
Multivariate Linear To Logistic Regression
Policy Evalution
Q Methodology - A Systematic Approach For Interpretive Research Design
Questionnaire Design
Researching Disability
Role Of Thinking: Philosophy Of Social Science Research
Visual Research Methods

NB: some courses have pre-requisites, e.g. to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis, or Narrative Research, you will need to have passed Social Research Methods II (20 credits module), or equivalent. You will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

To register for the above advanced training courses, please e-mail: specifying which courses you are interested in. When registering for courses, please provide your name, student ID, department/programme you are affiliated to, and your e-mail address.

In addition, you will write a 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.
Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This programme provides practical, career-orientated training in social science research methods, including research design, data collection and data analysis relating to both qualitative and quantitative modes of inquiry. Read more

This programme provides practical, career-orientated training in social science research methods, including research design, data collection and data analysis relating to both qualitative and quantitative modes of inquiry.

Students will have the opportunity to specialise in particular methodologies and to learn more about the application of these methodologies to illuminate important issues and debates in contemporary society.

Course Details

The programme is designed to provide a fundamental grounding in both quantitative and qualitative research skills, along with the opportunity to specialise in more advanced training in quantitative research, qualitative research or in practical applications of research techniques.

CORE MODULES:

Semester 1

Approaches to Social Research (20 CATS)

This module offers an introduction to the different styles of social science research as well as guidance and illustrations of how to operationalize research questions and assess them empirically. Students will be shown how to conduct systematic literature searches and how to manage empirical research projects. The module will also explore issues around the ethics of social science research as well as the connection between social science research and policy concerns. It is designed as preparation for undertaking postgraduate research and dissertation work.

Theory and Debates in Social Research (20 CATS)

This module aims to deepen students' understanding of key debates in social theory and research, providing advanced level teaching for those building upon basic knowledge and undertaking postgraduate research. It is designed to demonstrate and explore how social theory is utilised, critiqued and developed through the pursuit of social science research.

The Sources and Construction of Qualitative Data (10 CATS)

The purpose of this module is to illuminate the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research. The module will discuss the impact of various theories on the nature and conduct of qualitative research particularly around questions of epistemology and ontology. The role of different types of interviewing in qualitative research will be utilised in order to explore the relationship between theory and methods.

The Sources and Construction of Quantitative Data (10 CATS)

The aim of the module is to provide a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of measurement and constructing quantitative data in the social sciences. Through lectures and practical exercises, this module will provide students with relevant knowledge of secondary data sources and large datasets, their respective uses and usefulness, and their relevance for the study of contemporary social issues

Semester 2

Qualitative Data Analysis (10 CATS)

The module will provide students with an overview of different approaches to qualitative data analysis. It will include introductory training to this skill that includes such techniques as thematic analysis and discourse analysis, as well as computer assisted qualitative data analysis. It will provide the knowledge necessary for the informed use of the qualitative data analysis software package NVivo. The module gives students a base level introduction to the analytical and technical skills in qualitative data analysis appropriate to the production of a Master's dissertation and/or use of CAQDAS software for social science research purposes.

Quantitative Data Analysis: Foundational (10 CATS)

This module provides an introduction to the basics of quantitative data analysis. The module will begin with a brief review of basic univariate and bivariate statistical procedures as well as cover data manipulation techniques. The module is taught through a series of seminars and practical workshops. These two strands are interwoven within each teaching session. Please note that students may be granted an exemption from this module if they have already successfully completed a module that has the equivalent learning outcomes.

Quantitative Data Analysis: Intermediate (10 CATS)

This module advances students' confidence and knowledge in the use of SPSS. The module focuses on multivariate regression models, including the appropriate use and awareness of statistical assumptions underlying regression and the testing and refinement of such models.

Dissertation (60 CATS)

A dissertation of no more than 15,000 words on a topic relevant to social science research methods training. The thesis will involve either carrying out and reporting on a small social science research project which includes a full and considered description and discussion of the research methods employed or the discussion of a research issue or technique to a level appropriate for publication.

OPTIONAL MODULES (all 10 CATS)

We offer a range of advanced modules in quantitative and qualitative research methods, for example, logistic regression, internet-based research and visual research methods. We also provide specialist modules which reflect the teaching team’s diverse research interests, from the social logic of emotional life to conflict and change in divided societies. Optional modules generally run during the Spring semester and are offered subject to sufficient student demand and staff availability. Students will be able to choose a maximum of three to four option modules (depending on whether they need to complete Quantitative Data Analysis: Foundational). Please note that it is unlikely that all the following modules will be available for 2017/8. Please check with the Programme Director for queries about specific modules.

  • Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
  • Social Science Research Online
  • Visual Research Methods
  • Longitudinal Analysis
  • Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
  • Conflict and Change in Northern Ireland: New Sociological Research
  • Researching Emotions and Social Life
  • University Research and Civil Society Organisations


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This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. Read more

This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. The UCL Division of Psychiatry offers teaching and supervision from leaders in international research in fields from neuroscientific to social and epidemiological, along with a range of relevant options from other leading UCL departments. This diversity of options allows students to tailor a programme that closely fits their needs.

About this degree

This programme will equip students with the research skills needed to undertake doctoral-level research and/or to collaborate in major research projects. They will produce a piece of original research ready to submit for publication, and will acquire current knowledge of cutting-edge research in mental health.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Core Principles of Mental Health Research (double module)
  • Statistical Methods in Mental Health

Optional modules

Students will select at least 60 credits from the following modules of which at least 30 credits must be from the Division of Psychiatry’s own modules:

Division of Psychiatry modules

  • Culture in the Clinic
  • Current Research in Depression and Anxiety
  • Current Research in Dementia
  • Current Research in Intellectual and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities
  • Current Research in Psychosis and Bipolar
  • Epidemiological Research Methods in Mental Health
  • Introduction to Biological Research in Mental Health
  • Mental Health Care: Policy and Evaluation
  • Mental Health in Social and Global Context
  • Advanced treatment and management of dementia

Other approved modules

  • Health Inequalities across the Lifecourse (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
  • Higher Functions of the Brain (Institute of Neurology)
  • Neuroimaging: Introductory Science and Methods (Institute of Neurology)
  • Neuroimaging: Imaging Modalities (Institute of Neurology)
  • Social Determinants of Global Health (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
  • Or any other module approved by the Programme Director as having a large research component relevant to mental health.

The final 15 credits may be obtained from any available module at UCL, subject to the Programme Director approving the overall selection for each student.

Final report

All students undertake a final research project. This is reported as a research paper of up to 7,000 words ready for submission to a specified journal, a blog of 1,000 words and a 20-minute talk.

Teaching and learning

This programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical workshops, with considerable use of supporting online learning. Assessment methods include unseen exams, coursework including designing questionnaires and systematic review strategies, developing protocols, analysing data, giving talks and presenting posters. There is a strong emphasis on developing practical research skills.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Mental Health Sciences Research MSc

Careers

This new programme will equip graduates with strong practical research skills and understanding of the current status and direction of mental health research in their area of interest, preparing them to pursue doctoral studies, including through applications for nationally funded fellowships. Clinicians will be equipped to participate fully in collaborative studies and to begin to function as independent investigators. For those without clinical qualifications, the programme is likely to assist students in embarking on a career in mental health research by obtaining research posts and opportunities for PhD places.

Employability

Students will be taught by and carry out projects with leading researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields, learning about research directly from experts rather than from textbooks. Previous Division of Psychiatry MSc graduates have had a strong track record of publishing papers based on their research projects in peer-reviewed journals, and of going on to further academic posts and to doctoral studies. 

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a cluster of international research leaders in mental health in fields including genetics, epidemiology, and applied clinical research. Optional modules provide an entrance to other renowned departments at UCL e.g. in neuroscience and epidemiology.

The programme is strongly focused on student participation and acquisition of the practical skills needed to embark on a career in research. The wide range of research interests within our division allows us to offer a programme that integrates biological and psychosocial approaches.

We offer opportunities to get involved in the work of internationally significant research groups in a stimulating, friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychiatry

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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