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The global challenges of the twenty first century place important demands on students of international politics. Read more
The global challenges of the twenty first century place important demands on students of international politics. Not only do we need to understand the on going changes in the nature of war and conflict, but we are also today faced with important transformations in global power relations, international flows of goods, people and diseases and, indeed, shifts in the nature of political communities on the globe. Whatever your background, whether in international politics or another discipline, this flagship MA programme provides you with the necessary tools to tackle these shifting landscapes.

The scheme will introduce you, first, to the core notions that help shape the analysis of and the practices of international politics but also encourages you to think creatively about the kinds of concepts we need today to capture complex political realities. Taught by a team of world-leading research staff, the core module will challenge you to reflect on the way you think about international politics and the issues facing individuals, societies, states and humanity as a whole. Beyond the core module students pursue their own interests by
choosing specialist modules. The options, ranging from the study of war, conflict, strategy and security to the study of global order, international theory and ethics, are designed to stimulate you in pursuing your own pathway to an advanced study of international
relations.


Visit the website: https://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/international-politics-masters-research/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

-If you want to study international politics in a global context at Masters level
-If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of international politics
-If you wish to nurture a career in international diplomacy and work internationally
-If you desire formal recognition of skills highly sought-after by any postgraduate employer

Course detail

The Department is renowned for its pioneering research and is recognised as number one in the UK for the study of international politics. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014), the Department of International Politics was placed best in Wales with 69% of publications submitted rated as world leading.

The Masters in International Politics (Research Training) is a pathway designed to emphasise social science or humanities research training as well as specialist provision, and is likely to be of most interest to students who have already studied extensively in that particular subject area and who are planning to undertake a PhD following the completion of their Master’s course. Students following this pathway take the Departmental core module (compulsory), a suite of research training modules (compulsory) and select a smaller number of modules from a bespoke basket of degree scheme related options and other choices offered by the Department/other academic departments. Like the Specialist degree scheme, this pathway culminates in a dissertation.

Format

In Semester One you will normally have eight hours per week of specific Research Training Modules and one two-hour seminar per week for your degree scheme core module. In Semester Two you will normally have one two-hour seminar per week for each of the three modules you take (one Research Training specific and two subject specific modules). You will also have contact with academic staff through participation in research groups, attendance in departmental research seminars and masters workshops and through staff office hours (two one hour sessions per week). There will also be additional sessions working towards developing your master’s dissertation. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment will be through a combination of examinations, project work, short reports, essays and dissertation. It may, depending on the modules chosen, include seminar presentations, review essays and literature searches.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your Masters will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained international relations specialist with a strength in depth of knowledge on vital subjects such as anarchy, sovereignty, power, peace, war, justice, ethics, realism, the global distribution of wealth and resources and trust in world politics. You will also graduate with a wealth of postgraduate-level skills which are transferable into any workplace. On the research training pathway you also develop advanced skills in quantitative and qualitative research skills and data analysis. In addition, the prestige of masters from our department of International Relations wills open doors for you into workplaces in every industry.

Key Skills and Competencies

- Study Skills -

Alongside the wealth of world-class critical expertise, you will master highly desirable skills in academic research, analysis, argument-formation, presentation and debate. The research training pathway provides you with a specific set of study skills focused on interrogating and analysing a range of different types of data from multiple sources. You will also prove your abilities in reflection and self-improvement; you will be able to identify your academic weaknesses and remove them whilst building on your strengths.

- Self-Motivation and discipline -

Studying at Masters level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, but you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills -

The International relations Masters programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines. You will also have advanced skills in data analysis that can be applied in a wide variety of work environments from business to the public sector and non-governmental organisations.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Faculty of Natural Sciences offers a range of MSc programmes in Scientific Research Training which includes an option to undertake an international placement at a institute/industry in which an extensive 8 month research project is undertaken. Read more

Overview

The Faculty of Natural Sciences offers a range of MSc programmes in Scientific Research Training which includes an option to undertake an international placement at a institute/industry in which an extensive 8 month research project is undertaken.
Masters in Research Training with International Placement are available in a range of disciplines;

Keele University has developed collaborative relationships with a number of international research institutes and industries which has enabled well qualified students to develop their scientific training and employment skills within an international context. We believe that this will help to develop future employees with an international outlook, competent in at least one international language in addition to English. For all students the course offers an opportunity to carry out a project within Keele University under the supervision of international experts in their appropriate discipline. International students thus have an opportunity to receive extensive training in English.

All students will spend the first part of the course at Keele, and either remain at Keele to undertake their approximately eight month research project or will undertake a placement in an international research institute/industry as laboratory research assistants, working on projects in the host institution and pursuing a programme of research training. Financial support for example through the EU ERASMUS Scheme may be available to support students undertaking their project/placement outside the UK in Europe. International students may opt to undertake their placement within the UK or at Keele University.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/scientificresearchtrainingwithinternationalplacement/

Within these courses training is available in a range of Research areas for example in the MSc in Biosciences Research Training: Immunology, Fisheries, Entomology, Parasitology, Medical Sciences. Please consult Prof Dave Hoole for further information.

Applicants who are not fluent in English are expected to have attained the equivalent of an IELTS score of at least 6.5. Candidates who do not meet these criteria, but can evidence appropriate, alternative professional qualifications and/or experience will be considered.

Course Aims

The aim of the courses is to enhance the employment prospects of science graduates within their chosen research discipline by developing and improving their scientific, laboratory and language skills. The courses will also provide basic skills in vocational and education training through the students’ work programmes. At the end of the training period students will:

- Have systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of the subject of their chosen discipline

- Have conceptual understanding to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their discipline

- Be able to evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses

- Have developed scientific skills and knowledge, and transferable skills, in a international workplace setting

- Have comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research

- Be able to record and reflect on skills and learning from the research laboratory experience through the ‘Realise’ career development scheme.

- Be conversant with the running of a modern research laboratory.

- Have developed skills in an appropriate international language, including scientific vocabulary.

- Have developed organisational and commercial awareness.

For those students undertaking a placement/research project in Europe the work and achievement on the programme will be documented in the EU Europass, a record of achievement signed by all parties. All students are required to pursue a self reflecting activity which enables them to identify their personal and professional skills and development needs

Teaching & Assessment

Students must complete formal assessment on all modules. During the placement this will include keeping an extensive record of the training attended and skills obtained, with a reflective report (for the research training portfolio), as well as a dissertation on the project undertaken during the placement.

Additional Costs

Although students who under a placement project within another EU member state may be entitled to an ERASMUS scholarship there may be additional costs required to meet living expenses and insurances within the host country. The amount required will be dependent on the cost of living in each country.

Distinctive Keele Curriculum

MSc programmes at Keele offers the added value of the Distinctive Keele Curriculum (DKC), which develops students' intellectual, personal and professional capabilities (Keele Graduate Attributes) through both subject-specific and generic workshops and activities.

Scholarships

There are substantial scholarships available, please see this link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/internationalfunding/postgraduate/
or
http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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T he Faculty of Natural Sciences offers a range of MSc programmes in Scientific Research Training which includes an option to undertake an international placement at a institute/industry in which an extensive 8 month research project is undertaken. Read more

MSc Neuroscience Research Training with International Placement

T he Faculty of Natural Sciences offers a range of MSc programmes in Scientific Research Training which includes an option to undertake an international placement at a institute/industry in which an extensive 8 month research project is undertaken.

Masters in Research Training with International Placement are available in a range of disciplines (see wbesite).

Keele University has developed collaborative relationships with a number of European research institutes and industries which has enabled well qualified students to develop their scientific training and employment skills within an international context. We believe that this will help to develop future employees with an international outlook, competent in a foreign language in addition to English.

Neuroscience Placements‌

All students will spend the first part of the course at Keele, and either remain at Keele to undertake their approximately eight month research project or will undertake a placement in a European research institute/industry as laboratory research assistants, working on projects in the host institution and pursuing a programme of research training. We have links in several countries including Sweden, Poland and Germany. Financial support for example through the EU ERASMUS Scheme may be available to support students undertaking their project/placement outside the UK in Europe. International students may opt to undertake their placement within the UK or at Keele University, and further English language training can be provided.

Entry Requirements

Usually applicants will hold an honours degree in a scientific discipline appropriate to the project area and final postgraduate award, although consideration will be given to related programmes. The minimum degree category for entry is 2:2 (or international equivalent), although consideration will be given to candidates who do not meet these criteria, but can evidence appropriate, alternative professional qualifications and/or experience.

Applicants who are not fluent in English are expected to have attained the equivalent of an IELTS score of at least 6.5. Candidates who do not meet these criteria, but can evidence appropriate, alternative professional qualifications and/or experience will be considered.

Distinctive Keele Curriculum

MSc programmes at Keele offers the added value of the Distinctive Keele Curriculum (DKC), which develops students' intellectual, personal and professional capabilities (Keele Graduate Attributes) through both subject-specific and generic workshops and activities.

Scholarships

There are substantial scholarships available, please see this link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/internationalfunding/postgraduate/

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course equips you with the knowledge, understanding, skills and aptitudes to undertake advanced research. This includes doctoral research in the social sciences, arts and humanities, or in either the public or private sector. Read more

Course Overview

This course equips you with the knowledge, understanding, skills and aptitudes to undertake advanced research. This includes doctoral research in the social sciences, arts and humanities, or in either the public or private sector.

The qualification meets the learning outcomes at Certificate level in the national higher education qualifications framework.

This Research Training PGCert is delivered at faculty level in an interdisciplinary environment and is relevant to students from a wide range of disciplines.

It is also open to international students in the second or third year of PhD courses in their own country who want to study abroad for a minimum of six months.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/research-training-pgcert/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/research-training-pgcert/#howtoapply

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Studying Modern History at York is a lively and stimulating experience. The programme combines an advanced level introduction to the historiographical debates, methodologies and techniques of modern history together with a choice of thematic taught modules, culminating in a research dissertation. Read more
Studying Modern History at York is a lively and stimulating experience. The programme combines an advanced level introduction to the historiographical debates, methodologies and techniques of modern history together with a choice of thematic taught modules, culminating in a research dissertation. Students are introduced to a wide range of sources and approaches drawn from the entire span of the modern period and from across different localities, and thereby gain an unusual breadth of vision which transcends more conventional boundaries.

The MA is run by the Department of History and students are encouraged to participate in the lively scholarly community of the department's active graduate school through attendance at relevant MA seminars and masterclasses, research training sessions and the weekly departmental research seminar. Students also have full access to the Centre for Modern Studies which provides an active programme of academic seminars, small conferences and reading groups involving both academic staff and graduate students.

Programme of study

The programme consists of four taught modules (20 credits each), a 20,000 word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits), which make up the 180 credits required for an MA in the UK higher education system. For students registered for full-time study, the programme is as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Approaches to Modern History
-Option Module 1
-Research Training (taught content)
All students take the core module Approaches to Modern History. Taught by weekly seminars, this module introduces students to the key concepts, debates, methods and practices which inform the work of historians of "modern times". Additionally, all students take an Option Module chosen from a list approved by the Course Convenor. All students follow a research training module across both the Autumn and Spring terms.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Option Module 2
-Option Module 3
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)
Students choose two Optional Modules which should include at least one related to their pathway. With the approval of the convenor they may also choose a module from other MA programmes in and outside of the department, e.g. the MA in Public History, including its very popular placement module, or the MA in Culture and Thought after 1945.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, all students will write a research dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing and under the supervision of a member of staff, and submitted at the end of the academic year.

Students receive advice about research topics and instruction in bibliographical research, plus additional specialist advice and guidance from a supervisor. Because of the range of expertise of staff members and the wealth of source material available in York and electronically, it is possible to provide supervision on a wide range of topics, both chronologically and geographically. Past dissertations have covered such diverse topics as The West Indies Federation, British abolitionism after emancipation, and violence in the American South in the interwar years.

Part-time students
Students registered for part-time study over two years take in Year One the MA Core module in the Autumn Term (20 credits), an Option in the Spring Term (20 credits), plus the 10-credit Research Training module: a total of 50 credits in the first year. In Year Two, they take two more Option modules (40 credits in total), normally scheduled in second Autumn and Spring Terms respectively, and a research dissertation (90 credits): a total of 130 credits.

Although this gives Year Two disproportionate formal credit-weighting, the work flow spreads slightly more evenly because planning and preliminary research of the dissertation is undertaken in the Year One, and significant research and writing is undertaken the Year Two; the Research Training module taken in Year One also provides support in dissertation planning.

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The MA in Medieval History offers an unparalleled opportunity to study at one of the world's leading centres of expertise in medieval history. Read more
The MA in Medieval History offers an unparalleled opportunity to study at one of the world's leading centres of expertise in medieval history. The degree is equally suitable for students who wish to pursue doctoral research or careers in teaching, public history, or archives, or for those with enthusiasm for the subject but not yet a clear career direction.

Since few students will have had the opportunity to study medieval history in depth at Undergraduate level, the programme offers both wide-ranging training in sources and methods and Option Modules in specialised areas. The University of York’s Medieval MA programmes (in History, Literature, Archaeology, Stained Glass) are some of the most popular and sought after, making York the largest centre in the UK for medieval masters level study across the Humanities disciplines.

This degree offers both thorough research training and the opportunity to explore new approaches to the history of medieval Britain and Europe with seminars led by experts in the area. You will be introduced to a wide range of sources and approaches from across the period. Team teaching on the core and training modules brings the chance to get acquainted with most staff not on leave.

You will be able to participate in the lively scholarly community surrounding the active graduate school, and also have full access to the Centre for Medieval Studies and its active programme of seminars, conferences and reading groups involving both staff and graduate students.

Programme of study

The MA programme consists of five taught courses (80 credits in total), a 20,000-word dissertation (90 credits), and a Research Training module (10 credits). Note that the most effective means of teaching the specific medieval study skills result in the course being split slightly unevenly in terms of credit-weighting, with students taking 50 credits in Autumn and 30 in Spring. This will, nevertheless, give students the space to begin thinking about their dissertation earlier in the Spring Term.

For students registered for full-time study, the programmme runs as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
-Core Module: Perspectives on Medieval History
-Option Module 1
-Skills Module 1: Latin
-Skills Module 2: Palaeography
-Research Training (taught content)

All students take the core module, Perspectives on Medieval History. This module introduces students to a diverse range of themes and areas of debate within Medieval History. Students also take an option module chosen from a list approved by the Course Convenor. (When enrolment numbers permit, students may also select options from the Centre for Medieval Studies and its other parent departments as well as from the MA in Public History.)

All students also take the two skills modules, in Latin and Palaeography, and follow a research training programme. The research training includes specific sessions for Medieval History MA students, which will explore some of the resources available in York and may involve opportunities to handle original source materials.

Spring Term (January-March)
-Option Module 2
-Skills Module 1: Latin
-Skills Module 2: Palaeography
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal)

During the Spring Term students take a second Option module and continue the two skills modules in Latin and Palaeography, as well as writing their dissertation proposal.

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, students write a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their choice and under the supervision of a member of staff, submitted at the end of the academic year. Dissertations should be focused on a well considered research question and should based on primary source material. Students receive generic advice about selecting research topics, setting up the research questions and assembling bibliographies, followed be specialist advice and guidance from an advisor with relevant expertise. The range of expertise of staff members and the wealth of source material available at York enables a wide range of topics, both chronologically and geographically.

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