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Masters Degrees (Research Method)

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This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills. Read more
This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills.

Students will acquire a general overview of the philosophy of social research, and understand how this informs research design, methods of data collection and analysis. They will also develop an ability to use a range of research methods, to communicate research findings effectively and an understanding of the potential use of and impact of their research within and beyond academia.

Core Modules

Philosophy of Social Science Research

The module considers fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences. Teaching addresses (natural) science as a method of obtaining knowledge and the interpretative tradition in the social sciences. Students explore fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences and apply these discussions to their own disciplines and field of study.

Research Design, Practice and Ethics

The module introduces students to social science research designs and ethical issues in research practice. Learning supports students to be able to make strategic choices when developing their own projects, and to assess the design and research ethics decision making in others’ published research work.

Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods

Concepts, methods and skills central to quantitative research, including data collection approaches and concept operationalization, are core throughout this module. Building on a grounding in ideas relating to probability sampling, sampling error and statistical inference, coverage of techniques extends from comparisons of means and simple cross-tabular analyses to a discussion of multivariate analysis approaches, focusing on linear and logistic regression.

Foundations in Qualitative Research

Qualitative research is examined across a range of topics, from different approaches and methods including ethnographic and observational research, discourse and conversation analysis, documentary and archival analysis, participatory research and the use of interviews. Ethics in qualitative research is specifically considered, as is the evaluation of qualitative research.

Advanced Training Programme

Unless stated, all advanced training courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These advanced training courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These advanced training courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to do so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Advanced Training courses run in Semester 3, unless otherwise stated:

Analysing Hierarchical Panel Data
An Approach To Research On Discourse
Case Study Research Design
Documentary Research In Education
Factor Analysis
Introduction To Econometric Software
Introduction To Time Series Regression
Narrative Research
Multivariate Linear To Logistic Regression
Policy Evalution
Q Methodology - A Systematic Approach For Interpretive Research Design
Questionnaire Design
Researching Disability
Role Of Thinking: Philosophy Of Social Science Research
Visual Research Methods

NB: some courses have pre-requisites, e.g. to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis, or Narrative Research, you will need to have passed Social Research Methods II (20 credits module), or equivalent. You will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

To register for the above advanced training courses, please e-mail: specifying which courses you are interested in. When registering for courses, please provide your name, student ID, department/programme you are affiliated to, and your e-mail address.

In addition, you will write a 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.
Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Programme overview. Social researchers employ a constantly evolving range of qualitative and quantitative methods to explore attitudes and experiences, and to understand patterns of social behaviour. Read more

Programme overview

Social researchers employ a constantly evolving range of qualitative and quantitative methods to explore attitudes and experiences, and to understand patterns of social behaviour.

This programme won't just train you in the application of specific research techniques: it will illuminate the connections between sociological theory and empirical research, and relate research to the development of public policy and the analysis of substantive social issues.

Wider issues of the social research process are also covered and include: the planning and management of research projects; the methodological, theoretical, philosophical and ethical aspects of research; and the presentation and publication of research findings.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Work experience

On the MSc Social Research Methods, we offer the opportunity to take four weeks of work experience during the Easter vacation. This will provide you with first-hand experience of large-scale and real-life research in action.

Where the full period is not practical, as may be the case for part-time students, it is also possible to take up the opportunity of a shorter period of two to four weeks, usually during the summer. Work experience is arranged with the help of the Department’s placement tutor.

Please note that while we try to meet all requests for work experience, in some cases it may not be possible.

Sociology Scholarships Available for 2017/18

Thomas Asdell Bursary

Thanks to the generosity of the family of former student Thomas Asdell the department can offer a bursary of £1000 to one new MSc student for 2017/18- please email the course director for details.

Sociology Scholarships

Two scholarships of up to £3,000 will be available across all Sociology MSc programmes, to be awarded on a competitive basis to self-funding students accepting an offer of a place on the MSc for the academic year 2017/18.

Both types of scholarship will be paid in the form of a fee remission of the appropriate amount, and will be open to both home and overseas students. Part-time students will be eligible to apply and, if successful, will receive a scholarship which is reduced pro rata but may be continued for a second year of study subject to successful completion of the first year.

Residential conference and day conference

The MSc Social Research Methods includes a residential conference, usually in November.

The conference provides an opportunity for discussion in an informal atmosphere, around current research issues and debates, technologies and methods at the forefront of social research; it includes lectures from eminent guest speakers and members of staff, seminars and small group discussions.

The Department also organises a day conference for MSc students at the University, with student presentations and guest speakers.

Sociology research

The Department of Sociology is internationally recognised as a centre of research excellence. A particular area of strength is research methodology and research training.

Members of staff undertake a wide variety of internationally renowned individual scholarship including work on gender, employment, organisations, cross-national survey, culture, ethnicity, sociological theory, environment, youth and identities, sociology of sleep and the sociology of social policy.

The Department’s commitment to developing technical competence in research methods, and encouraging the use of appropriate information and communication technologies in social research, is reflected in the fact that it houses the UK national centre for software for qualitative data analysis (CAQDAS).

The Department runs a successful international fellowship scheme which enables international researchers to visit Surrey each year. These strengths in research, and in innovative research methods in particular, feed into our master’s-level teaching and inform the continued updating of content within modules.

Educational aims of the programme

The main aims of the programme are to:

  • Provide an appropriate training for students preparing MPhil/PhD theses, or for students on to employment involving the use of social science research
  • Introduce students to a variety of different approaches to social science research at an advanced level
  • Cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs
  • Make students aware of the range of secondary data available and equip them to evaluate its utility for their research
  • Develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and Internet resources
  • Introduce students to the philosophical, theoretical and ethical issues surrounding research and to debates about the relationship between theory and research, about problems of evidence and inference, and about the limits of objectivity
  • Develop skills in the use of SPSS, and in the main statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis
  • Develop skills in the use of CAQDAS software for the analysis of qualitative data
  • Develop skills in writing, in the preparation of a research proposal, in the presentation of research results and in verbal communication
  • Help students to prepare their research results for wider dissemination, in the form of seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications, in a form suitable for a range of audiences, including academics, policy makers, professionals, service users and the general public

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Read more
This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Taught units provide intensive training in research methodology, experimental design, statistical analyses and data interpretation. Skills training in verbal and written communication is also emphasised.

The core of the programme is an eight-month research project, conducted within one of the University of Bristol's internationally recognised research groups in either the Faculty of Health Sciences or the Faculty of Biomedical Sciences. Opportunities will be available in laboratory or clinical-based investigations.

The programme is suitable for medical, dental and veterinary students interested in pursuing a research-intensive intercalation option after three years of study. It is also suitable for graduates in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science and bioscience subjects who wish to develop their research skills.

Programme structure

This programme is delivered by research scientists and clinicians through lectures, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials.

Unit 1: Introduction to Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit introduces a variety of research methods used in basic and applied clinical research including: finding and reading relevant research information; presenting research results; basic statistical analysis; data interpretation; ethics; public engagement; and commercialising research.

Unit 2: Further Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit aims to develop further knowledge and practical experience in statistical analyses, experimental design and laboratory methods and includes training in the use of a statistical software package and practical experience in several laboratory techniques.

Unit 3: Project Proposal in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit involves planning and writing a research project proposal (4500 words), which includes a literature review, aims, impact, research plan, ethical considerations, contingency plans, timetable and references.

Unit 4: Research Club in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit aims to develop your ability to present, critically evaluate and discuss scientific findings by contributing to journal clubs, attending and summarising research seminars and presenting your own research.

Unit 5: Research Project in Health Sciences Research (120 credits).
During this unit you will gain extensive experience in scientific/clinical research by conducting an independent project related to an area of interest to you. You will write up your research in the form of a thesis (10,000 words), and present and discuss your work in a viva and research symposium.

Careers

This programme is suitable for those with a clinical or biosciences background who wish to develop their research skills before embarking on a research/clinical career in academia or the pharmaceutical industry. It provides the ideal foundation for further studies leading to a PhD.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Research Methods in Psychology at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This master's degree in Research Methods in Psychology aims to provide an opportunity to research and learn about a wide range of topics in psychology; from basic learning and cognition, to neuropsychology, and to applied topics in clinical and educational psychology.

Key Features of Research Methods in Psychology

Performance:

- One of four Psychology departments to achieve a 100% 4* rating (maximum score possible) for the reach and significance of its work in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Based on this measure Psychology at Swansea was ranked 14th (out of 82) in the UK

- Top third ranking for UK Psychology Departments (2016 Complete University Guide)

- Joint 12th UK ranking for Psychology (Graduate prospects)

Teaching and Employability:

- High-level training in advanced research methods and skills

- Exciting opportunities to conduct basic and applied research projects in a wide range of areas.

- Unique mix of small-group teaching in seminars, workshops, and practical sessions, as well as a diverse range of assessment methods and access to staff and other one-to-one teaching support from demonstrators for technical subjects.

- International student mentor to all international/overseas fee-paying Psychology students

- Opportunity to gain funding for Ph.D. places, and to gain access to professional training courses in Clinical Psychology and Educational Psychology

This MSc in Research Methods in Psychology provides students with high-level training in advanced research methods and skills, and offers exciting opportunities to conduct basic and applied research projects in a wide range of areas.

Research Methods in Psychology students learn to use a range of research tools, such as databases, statistical software, and computer programmes.

By the end of this training, students on the Research Methods in Psychology course will have acquired a wide range of practical research skills to apply in any context where human behaviour is important. They will have gained practical knowledge of the nature and limitations of the scientific method and the main alternatives, and knowledge of the general historical, theoretical, and philosophical issues underlying psychological and behavioural science.

Modules

Modules on the Research Methods in Psychology MSc typically include:

Generic Research Skills

Computing Skills

Empirical Projects

Philosophy of Psychology

Special Research Skills

Statistical Methods

Qualitative Methods

Dissertation (MSc Research Methods)

Research Methods in Psychology Course Structure

The full-time Research Methods in Psychology course, which will last one year, will normally involve attending the University for two full days a week (Monday and Tuesday). The part-time course, which lasts two years, will normally involve attending the University one full day a week.

Who should apply?

The Research Methods in Psychology course is suitable for:

- Anybody with an interest in developing a career in research, either in psychology, or social and health sciences, or those wishing to apply research skills in the private sector.

- Students who wish to pursue further professional training in professional and applied areas of psychology have found the research training provided very helpful in developing this aspect of their skills portfolio.

Staff Expertise

Many of the College of Human and Health Sciences team are leaders in their specialist fields of research. They undertake novel and original research in a variety of areas, including clinical and health psychology, brain injury, sleep, cognition, neuroscience and developmental psychology.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the physiology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. Read more
This programme has been designed provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of the psychology of sport and exercise. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Students learn about these themes through a “learning by teaching” paradigm via the development of a statistics oriented verbal presentation and written assignment resembling a book chapter/resource. The verbal presentation will be conducted first in order to obtain developmental feedback for the written assignment.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. Students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules:

In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. Read more
This programme has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the principles and application of research design and analytical methods relevant to the scientific study of sport and exercise sciences. In contrast to our MRes programmes in Sport and Exercise Physiology and Psychology, this programme gives students the option to study elements of both physiology and psychology. The programme facilitates the integration of theory and professional practice, and throughout the programme the research process and emphasis on student autonomy of learning become increasingly important.

Programme Structure and Content
Research skills oriented modules form the bedrock of SHES’ MRes programmes. As a result taught modules are aligned with both discipline specific and the (higher) cognitive skills our MRes programmes aim to provide. Within a modular structure all students undertake compulsory modules in research skills totalling 40 credits:

Research Skills (20 credits)
and 20 credits from the following modules:

How to Conduct Statistics (20 credits);
Presentation of Statistics (10 credits);
Peer Reviewing (10 credits);
Latent Variable Modelling (10 credits);
plus 20 credits from optional modules and a final compulsory Research Project comprising 120 credits.

Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

How to conduct Statistics and Presentation of Statistics modules
The purpose of these two taught modules is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and critical appreciation of statistical procedures. As independent study based modules, they will enable students to gain a comprehensive understanding of a statistical procedure of their choosing (following consultation with the staff member responsible for the module). Towards this end, students will likely cover (i) relevant background issues; (ii) when to use utilise particular statistical tests;(iii) how to conduct statistical testing via appropriate software; (iv) how to correctly interpret computational output; and (v) how to present the findings following analysis.

Peer Reviewing Scientific Research
Students work closely with their supervisor to perform an initial review of a previously submitted (and subsequently published) research article. Students will then follow the paper along the peer review process, discussing their review with their supervisor, and then be required to adequately address concerns which have been raised. Collectively this will mean that the student will cover a contemporary research topic in a highly focused and in-depth manner gaining a comprehensive understanding of how to prepare their own manuscripts (eg research proposal, Research Project) and how to evaluate the research of others. In order to place their highly specialised knowledge into a more holistic perspective, students will also attend the School’s Research Seminar series.

Latent Variable Modelling
This module introduces postgraduate students to the concepts of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and to give a basic grounding in their implementation. It also covers an introduction to SEM using LISREL and topics including: measurement models and structural models; exploratory factor analysis; confirmatory factor analysis (CFA); structural modelling with observed and latent variables; conceptual issues, common misunderstandings and limitations.

Research Project
Under the guidance of their supervising tutor(s), students will pro-actively determine the content of this unit. The initial stages of the Research Project will develop the work of the project proposal and taught phases of the MRes programmes. This will involve the surveying and reviewing of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to their area of inquiry. Ethical approval of the study will be obtained before data may be collected, thereby introducing students to this integral part of the research process. Throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field. It is expected that the resulting projects will be publishable in international, peer-reviewed journals.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Optional Modules
In addition to the core/compulsory modules students choose a further 20 credits from the following optional modules:

Clinical Exercise Physiology;
Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Exercise Psychology;
Performance Physiology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The taught programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. Read more

Course Description

If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. If you want to study for a PhD, and are seeking ESRC funding, you will be required to take this or one of our other ESRC-recognised research-training Masters degrees, unless you have already achieved a similar level of research training at a university elsewhere.

At the end of your first year, you graduate with a Masters degree before proceeding to the PhD (this is called 1+3 study).

In the fields of economics, psychology and science, technology and innovation, our specialist Masters degrees are recognised by the ESRC as providing research training suitable for 1+3 study. All other social sciences at Sussex offer research training through the MSc in Social Research Methods. This is for students in the fields of anthropology, contemporary European studies, development studies, education, gender studies, human geography, international
relations, politics, law, migration studies, social work and social care, and sociology.

The degree is designed to provide research training for those intending to move directly to doctoral study. It can also be taken as a standalone one-year degree if you wish to apply advanced research methodologies to an area of academic or policy interest without continuing to a doctorate.

Course structure

We continue to develop and update our modules for 2016 entry to ensure you have the best student experience. In addition to the course structure below, you may find it helpful to refer to the Modules tab.

During the MSc you study the philosophical underpinnings of research, research design, research ethics, and both quantitative and qualitative methods. You also take a series of options on advanced research methods, which provide the key skills necessary for carrying out doctoral-level research. You also take a research option in your chosen discipline or interdisciplinary area, which comprises independent reading, attendance at research seminars, and regular individual supervisions with a dedicated member of academic faculty.

Autumn term: you take modules in introductory quantitative and qualitative methods, as well as Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific Research Practice or a theoretical core module within your chosen discipline.

Spring term: you take Research Design and Ethics and either three intermediate methods modules or one intermediate methods module and a subject-specific module. Intermediate methods modules include Action Research • Comparative Method • Discourse Analysis • Ethnographic Methods • Evidence for Policy and Practice • Participatory Methods • Policy and Programme Evaluation Research • Researching Childhood and Youth.

Summer term: you take a series of advanced methods options and undertake supervised work on a dissertation focused on research methods. This dissertation can be the full research outline for doctoral study.

Assessment

Taught modules are variously assessed by term papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent coursework portfolios. The research option is assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Scholarships

The University of Sussex aims to attract the most talented students to postgraduate study and offers one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university. For full details of our scholarships please visit: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/money/scholarships/pgt2016/

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The language and concepts of infection and immunity, from basic science to translational clinical research, are taught by our world-class investigators. Read more

The language and concepts of infection and immunity, from basic science to translational clinical research, are taught by our world-class investigators. The programme emphasises data interpretation, critical analysis of current literature and culminates in a full-time research project: excellent preparation for a research career.

About this degree

The programme provides insight into state-of-the-art infection and immunity research, current issues in the biology of infectious agents, the pathogenesis, prevention and control of infectious diseases, and immunity and immune dysfunction. 

Students learn from UCL scientists about their research and are trained in the art of research by carrying out a full-time research project in a UCL laboratory.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising four core modules and four optional modules (120 credits, full-time nine months, part-time, flexible study two to five years) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate comprising four core modules (60 credits, full-time three months, and flexible study up to two years) is offered.

Core modules

  • Laboratory Introduction to Basic Bacteriology
  • Molecular Virology
  • Immunology in Health and Disease
  • Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases
  • Data Interpretation

Optional modules

  • Microbial Pathogenesis
  • Tropical Microbiology
  • Advanced Virology
  • HIV Frontiers from Research to Clinic
  • Immunological Basis of Disease
  • Immunodeficiency and Therapeutics
  • Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
  • Global eradication of viruses

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake independent research which culminates in a 4,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, paper review sessions, laboratory practicals, an independent research project and self-directed learning. A diverse range of assessment methods is used; coursework may be in the form of presentations, essays, data interpretation exercises, poster preparation, and group working. Many modules also have unseen written examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Infection and Immunity MSc

Careers

The programme produces graduates who are equipped to embark on research careers. Immersion in the superb research and teaching environment provided by UCL and the Division of Infection & Immunity, gives our graduates a unique understanding of the cutting edge of infection and immunity research and how world-class research is carried out. 

Opportunities for networking with UCL senior investigators with international reputations and their worldwide collaborators can provide the inside track for career development. Graduates are well placed to move onto PhD programmes, research positions in diverse biomedical fields, clinical research positions, further training and positions in associated professions.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • PhD Student, Universitホ catholique de Louvain
  • Research Assistant, Imperial College London
  • Research Assistant, UCL
  • PhD in Molecular Immunology, UCL

Employability

Graduates are exceptionally well prepared for a career in research. The combination of research-informed teaching and practical research training provides an ideal preparation for a PhD and is equally applicable for clinicians seeking specialist training or wishing to pursue the clinical academic career track.

More broadly, a rigorous grounding in scientific method, critical analysis, data interpretation and independent thinking provides a pallet of marketable and transferable skills applicable to many professional career paths.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Infection & Immunity is a vibrant and world-class research community. Students are embedded in this superb training environment which provides a challenging and stimulating academic experience. 

Programme content reflects the research and clinical excellence within the division as well as cross-disciplinary research from all over UCL. First-class teaching and research supervision is provided by UCL academics, many of whom have international reputations.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Infection & Immunity

80% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. Read more
If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. If you want to study for a PhD, and are seeking ESRC funding, you will be required to take this or one of our other ESRC-recognised research-training Masters degrees, unless you have already achieved a similar level of research training at a university elsewhere.

At the end of your first year, you graduate with a Masters degree before proceeding to the PhD (this is called 1+3 study).

In the fields of economics, psychology and science, technology and innovation, our specialist Masters degrees are recognised by the ESRC as providing research training suitable for 1+3 study. All other social sciences at Sussex offer research training through the MSc in Social Research Methods. This is for students in the fields of anthropology, contemporary European studies, development studies, education, gender studies, human geography, international
relations, politics, law, migration studies, social work and social care, and sociology.

The degree is designed to provide research training for those intending to move directly to doctoral study. It can also be taken as a standalone one-year degree if you wish to apply advanced research methodologies to an area of academic or policy interest without continuing to a doctorate.

Assessment

Taught modules are variously assessed by term papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent coursework portfolios. The research option is assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Course Description

We continue to develop and update our modules for 2016 entry to ensure you have the best student experience. In addition to the course structure below, you may find it helpful to refer to the Modules tab.

During the MSc you study the philosophical underpinnings of research, research design, research ethics, and both quantitative and qualitative methods. You also take a series of options on advanced research methods, which provide the key skills necessary for carrying out doctoral-level research. You also take a research option in your chosen discipline or interdisciplinary area, which comprises independent reading, attendance at research seminars, and regular individual supervisions with a dedicated member of academic faculty.

Autumn term: you take modules in introductory quantitative and qualitative methods, as well as Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific Research Practice or a theoretical core module within your chosen discipline.

Spring term: you take Research Design and Ethics and either three intermediate methods modules or one intermediate methods module and a subject-specific module. Intermediate methods modules include Action Research • Comparative Method • Discourse Analysis • Ethnographic Methods • Evidence for Policy and Practice • Participatory Methods • Policy and Programme Evaluation Research • Researching Childhood and Youth.

Summer term: you take a series of advanced methods options and undertake supervised work on a dissertation focused on research methods. This dissertation can be the full research outline for doctoral study.

Scholarships

The University of Sussex aims to attract the most talented students to postgraduate study and offers one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university. For full details of our scholarships please visit: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/money/scholarships/pgt2016/

Read less
If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. Read more

Course Description

If you are interested in studying for a research degree in the social sciences, or want to learn about research methods, you may consider our innovative MSc in Social Research Methods, run by the ESRC Doctoral Training Centre. If you want to study for a PhD, and are seeking ESRC funding, you will be required to take this or one of our other ESRC-recognised research-training Masters degrees, unless you have already achieved a similar level of research training at a university elsewhere.

At the end of your first year, you graduate with a Masters degree before proceeding to the PhD (this is called 1+3 study).

In the fields of economics, psychology and science, technology and innovation, our specialist Masters degrees are recognised by the ESRC as providing research training suitable for 1+3 study. All other social sciences at Sussex offer research training through the MSc in Social Research Methods. This is for students in the fields of anthropology, contemporary European studies, development studies, education, gender studies, human geography, international
relations, politics, law, migration studies, social work and social care, and sociology.

The degree is designed to provide research training for those intending to move directly to doctoral study. It can also be taken as a standalone one-year degree if you wish to apply advanced research methodologies to an area of academic or policy interest without continuing to a doctorate.

Course Structure

We continue to develop and update our modules for 2016 entry to ensure you have the best student experience. In addition to the course structure below, you may find it helpful to refer to the Modules tab.

During the MSc you study the philosophical underpinnings of research, research design, research ethics, and both quantitative and qualitative methods. You also take a series of options on advanced research methods, which provide the key skills necessary for carrying out doctoral-level research. You also take a research option in your chosen discipline or interdisciplinary area, which comprises independent reading, attendance at research seminars, and regular individual supervisions with a dedicated member of academic faculty.

Autumn term: you take modules in introductory quantitative and qualitative methods, as well as Philosophy of Science and Social Scientific Research Practice or a theoretical core module within your chosen discipline.

Spring term: you take Research Design and Ethics and either three intermediate methods modules or one intermediate methods module and a subject-specific module. Intermediate methods modules include Action Research • Comparative Method • Discourse Analysis • Ethnographic Methods • Evidence for Policy and Practice • Participatory Methods • Policy and Programme Evaluation Research • Researching Childhood and Youth.

Summer term: you take a series of advanced methods options and undertake supervised work on a dissertation focused on research methods. This dissertation can be the full research outline for doctoral study.

Assessment

Taught modules are variously assessed by term papers of 3,000-5,000 words or equivalent coursework portfolios. The research option is assessed by a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Scholarships

The University of Sussex aims to attract the most talented students to postgraduate study and offers one of the most generous scholarship programmes of any UK university. For full details of our scholarships please visit: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/money/scholarships/pgt2016/

Read less
This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more
This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiner for Physiology Programmes (May 2011)

"I viewed a range of Research Projects this year. As always they are aligned to staff expertise – I strongly support this focus as I think it enriches the student experience to work with a knowledgeable and often highly motivated staff member."

In addition to the core modules listed above, students choose an optional module from:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
Students also undertake two further compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology and Performance Physiology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

Read less
The course programme will suit graduates in Sport Sciences or Physical Therapy who are interested in exercise rehabilitation in particular. Read more
The course programme will suit graduates in Sport Sciences or Physical Therapy who are interested in exercise rehabilitation in particular. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual patient;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (e.g. Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (i.e. evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

In addition to the above, students also undertake compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology (including disease and aging), Exercise Psychology and Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete. This latter module covers theoretical perspectives in sports injury rehabilitation; psychological response to sports injury; the role of confidence in injury and rehabilitation; exercise, training principles and biomechanics of rehabilitation; plus returning the athlete to competition; failure to rehabilitate; current trends in injury rehabilitation research and future research directions; and critical assessment of sports rehabilitation research.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

You will also have the opportunity to gain a REPs* accredited Level 2 Gym Instructor vocational qualification free of charge to supplement your MSc academic qualification. This will depend on prior learning and it is expected that MSc students on the Exercise Rehabilitation programme will be able to gain this qualification by carrying out approximately half the typical work load. This vocational qualification is a required qualification within the exercise referral industry.

* Register of Exercise Professionals

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Course description. Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management. Read more

Course description

Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management.

It is also a key tool in medical research and it is becoming increasingly possible to relate imaging studies to genetic traits in individuals and populations. Novel imaging biomarkers of disease can enable more rapid and precise diagnosis and inform decision making in drug discovery programmes.

As medical imaging involves knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology, physics, mathematics and computation, our course is suitable if you want to expand your disciplinary horizons and pursue a career in an image-related field in clinical medicine, medical research, or technological research or development.

You will cover the basic science and technology behind the principal imaging modalities currently used in medicine and medical research, as well as advanced imaging methods, clinical and research applications, imaging biomarkers and computational methods.

You will learn how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. You will also receive training in computational and quantitative methods of image analysis or in the interpretation of clinical images from different imaging modalities.

This course comprises both a taught component and a research project, giving you the skills and knowledge required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical or scientific research, or technical development.

Aims

We aim to provide you with:

  • with a systematic understanding of the scientific basis of the major medical imaging modalities;
  • a broad understanding of the principal clinical applications of medical imaging and its role in diagnosis, monitoring and therapy;
  • an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of medical imaging for deriving quantitative anatomical and physiological data;
  • knowledge of how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery;
  • the experience to plan, implement and complete a research project;
  • generic transferrable skills required in a multidisciplinary scientific or clinical research environment;
  • the knowledge and skills required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical research, scientific research or technical development.

Special features

Excellent facilities

Benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Learn from experts

Manchester has an imaging and image computing research group with a strong international reputation. Our research groups and facilities are staffed by scientists conducting research in novel imaging and image analysis methods, and clinicians who apply these methods in clinical practice.

Flexible learning

Learn when it suits you thanks to options for either full-time or part-time study.

Multidisciplinary learning

Study alongside physicists, engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, chemists, biologists and clinicians working in hospitals and research-dedicated imaging facilities.

Teaching and learning

As this course aims to produce graduates equipped to pursue either clinically or technically-focused careers in imaging, it is important to provide an adequate knowledge base. For this reason, much of the teaching takes the form of lectures.

However, in most course units, this is supplemented by group discussions and practical exercises. Other than the introductory units, most course units provide you with an understanding of research methods by requiring submission of a critical review of appropriate research literature or clinical material, either as a report or presentation.

Where appropriate, practical imaging exercises are provided, requiring you to cooperate in acquiring images and analysing results.

All units require a considerable component of independent research and study.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment will occur in a variety of forms.

Summative assessment takes the form of written assignments, examinations, oral presentations and online quizzes. Written assignments and presentations, as well as contributing to summative assessment, have a formative role in providing feedback, particularly in the early stages of course units.

Online quizzes provide a useful method of regular testing, ensuring that you engage actively with the taught material. As accumulation of a knowledge base is a key aim of the course, examinations (both open-book and closed-book) form an important element of summative assessment.

In addition, formal assessment of your research and written communication skills is achieved via the dissertation. This is a 10,000 to 15,000-word report, written and organised to appropriate scientific standards, describing the design, execution and results of the research project.

Course unit details

The MSc requires students to pass 180 credits composed of eight course units of 15 credits each and a 60-credit research project.

We provide course units in Human Biology and Introductory Mathematics and Physics to bring students up to the required level in these topics.

Semester 1: Compulsory units

  • Scientific Skills
  • Mathematical Foundations of Imaging
  • Radioisotope Imaging (PET/SPET)
  • Non-radioisotope Imaging (MRI, CT, US)

Semester 2: Compulsory units

  • Advanced MR Imaging
  • Advanced PET Imaging
  • Quantitative Imaging into Practice (Imaging Biomarkers for Healthcare and Research)

Semester 2: Elective units (select one)

  • Imaging in Clinical Diagnosis
  • Medical Image Analysis and Mathematical Computing

Semester 3: Research project

Facilities

You will benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Each student will have an identified personal tutor who can provide advice and assistance throughout the course. During the research project, you will be in regular contact with your research supervisor.You will also be able to access a range of other library and e-learning facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email:



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