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Masters Degrees (Research Masters)

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The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS). Read more
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS).

All ResM students are supervised by college staff based in Cornwall on the Stoke Climsland or Newquay campuses and co-supervised by Plymouth University staff. The ResM culminates in the examination of a thesis based on a period of extended research, preceded by two taught modules that equip the student for research.

The ResM programme at Duchy is tailored to individual needs and commonly involves working with an industry partner. There are full-time and part-time routes.

Full and partial fees bursaries may be available, please contract Dr Peter McGregor for more information and eligibility criteria.

Indicative projects for Equitation Science:
• Welfare of the therapy horse
• Welfare and management of moorland ponies
• Effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in the equine
• Horse Coat Colour and BEF evaluations

Student case study: “I’m enjoying having the time to learn and feel as though this programme was written specifically for me!” (Robyn Petrie-Richie, ResM Equitation Science)

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The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS). Read more
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS).

All ResM students are supervised by college staff based in Cornwall on the Stoke Climsland or Newquay campuses and co-supervised by Plymouth University staff. The ResM culminates in the examination of a thesis based on a period of extended research, preceded by two taught modules that equip the student for research.

The ResM programme at Duchy is tailored to individual needs and commonly involves working with an industry partner. There are full-time and part-time routes.

Full and partial fees bursaries may be available, please contract Dr Peter McGregor for more information and eligibility criteria.

Indicative project titles for Biological Sciences:
• Infrared thermography as a tool in welfare assessments in animal rescue centres
• Seasonal variations of microplastic contamination in the estuaries
• Impacts of invasive species on native biodiversity
• Indicator species and conservation grazing

Student case study: "I am currently studying towards my ResM in Biological Sciences, having completed my BSc Applied Zoology. I very much enjoy studying here - the location is amazing and there are some great spots to study, especially the beach. My most memorable experiences so far are being involved in a group meeting with our local MP to discuss biodiversity, and presenting my work at a conference at Edinburgh Zoo. My tips for future students would be work hard, have fun and seek advice from your tutors. They want the best for you". Hayley Jones (ResM Biological Sciences).

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The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS). Read more
The Research Masters (ResM) is a Masters level degree awarded by Plymouth University through the Duchy College node - a research node of Plymouth University’s Centre for Agriculture and Rural Sustainability (CARS).

All ResM students are supervised by college staff based in Cornwall on the Stoke Climsland or Newquay campuses and co-supervised by Plymouth University staff. The ResM culminates in the examination of a thesis based on a period of extended research, preceded by two taught modules that equip the student for research.

The ResM programme at Duchy is tailored to individual needs and commonly involves working with an industry partner. There are full-time and part-time routes.

Full and partial fees bursaries may be available, please contact Dr Peter McGregor for more information and eligibility criteria.

Indicative project titles for Agriculture & Food:
• Agricultural change and its social, economic and environmental implications
• Farm family wellbeing
• Succession and retirement in farming
• Impact of organic farming on the rural economy
• Sustainable farming and food
• The food and farming economy of Devon and Cornwall

Proposed project titles:
• Generating virus free tulips: A collaborative project with the Botanic Garden Cambridge. You will be based in the nationally renowned micro-propagation laboratory at Duchy College Rosewarne (moving to Eden Project by Sept 2016) and undertake a series of experiments to generate virus free tissue and help preserve a rare and valuable tulip accession of the Botanic Garden Cambridge. Techniques will include tissue culture and molecular viral detection.

Student case study: “Study is flexible and fits in alongside my employment plus the tutors are experts in their field. When I finish I hope to use my knowledge and research to enhance the training offered to farmers in the South West” (Polly Gilbert, ResM Agriculture & Food).

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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A University of Hertfordshire Masters research degree is an internationally recognised degree signifying achievement in research. Read more
A University of Hertfordshire Masters research degree is an internationally recognised degree signifying achievement in research. While an MA/MSc is a taught, modular programme, a Masters by Research is a programme of research and skills development negotiated with your supervisors and based on your own research proposal.

About the course

The Masters by Research degree may be undertaken in full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 year) modes in any creative arts discipline that the School engages with and for which we have appropriately qualified supervisory staff. In the School of Creative Arts we have a wide range of expertise in historical and theoretical research, as well as in practice-led/practice-based research, relating to fine and applied arts, film, media and TV studies, interior and architectural design, music and the music industry.

During the period of study for the Masters by Research degree you will develop a greater depth of subject expertise and independent research skills. You will undertake a focused research project for the duration of the degree, under the supervision and guidance of two or more academic members of staff who are your supervisors. In addition you will engage with a negotiated programme of selected generic skills development and careers workshops provided by the University of Hertfordshire Doctoral College.

Your Masters by Research project project may be purely theoretical or contain elements of your own practice. If there is a practice element, one of your supervisors would be a practitioner in an appropriate discipline, and appropriate studio space and/or workshop facilities would be made available if necessary. The School has a wide range of outstanding facilities for researchers in the broad area of creative arts, and the University library has an excellent range of relevant and up-to-date resources to support research in this area.

During the course of the degree, you would typically be given opportunities present your research at seminars and conferences, and to exhibit your practical work if it is part of the research project. Some opportunities in this regard may be provided by the School or the University.

Why choose this course?

-An internationally recognised research qualification
-Develop subject expertise at postgraduate level
-Develop research skills through practice and research experience
-Employers are looking for high calibre graduates with advanced skills who can demonstrate independent creative thinking and problem-solving through research

Careers

Graduates with this degree will be able to demonstrate to employers a highly-valued ability to work independently on an original project and to maintain that focus over an extended period, and will have developed much sought after research skills. Research students also benefit from the School’s networks of international partners in the creative and cultural industries, which may offer valuable opportunities for career development, as well as from career development workshops and events.

The skills, knowledge and experience gained will also provide a valuable grounding if you wish to study at Doctoral level at some point after you have completed your MA by Research.

Teaching methods

Research degrees are not taught programmes, however, programmes of supporting studies are a key element.

The School of Creative Arts has a lively research community staffed by supervisors whose research is world leading, Supervisory teams provide guidance in helping you to formulate and develop your research during the course of the programme.

We offer a range of subject specific research training throughout various research group seminars. Our research students are strongly encouraged to participate in modules in our taught Masters programmes, and the University also has an extensive Researcher Development Programme, which is provided by the UH Doctoral College and offers generic research training.

The Masters by Research has two main assessment points after enrolment: Initial Registration for the degree after 3 months for both full-time and part-time students, and the final examination. Your research will be examined on the basis of the final submission which may include a combination of both written and non-textual material that must be "defended" in a viva and contain a thesis (a position that can be defended by substantiated argument).

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Our dual-language, dual-degree Master of Arts in International Affairs, Conflict Resolution, and Civil Society Development is a dynamic graduate program drawing on the rich resources of two prestigious educational institutions. Read more
Our dual-language, dual-degree Master of Arts in International Affairs, Conflict Resolution, and Civil Society Development is a dynamic graduate program drawing on the rich resources of two prestigious educational institutions.

The joint program between AUP and the Sorbonne-Paris I provides several unique features:
-An accredited American master’s degree plus an accredited French master’s certificate.
-A professional level of competence in written and spoken French.
-An interdisciplinary course of study across languages, cultures, and educational systems.
-A global network to launch a career in the NGO sector or with an international institution, national government, or multinational corporation.

Challenging course work, compelling experiences

The MA in International Affairs, Conflict Resolution, and Civil Society Development is a 62 credit Research Masters taken over the course of four semesters. The program requirements include 62 credits as follows:
-Five courses at AUP (20 credits) exploring international relations, conflict management, and issues of civil society development, among other subjects. A mix of core and elective courses ensures a solid foundation in the discipline plus the chance to investigate your own special interests.
-Four courses at Sorbonne-Paris I (16 credits) exploring international affairs at our French partner institution. The exposure to different perspectives in a different educational system is invaluable and fosters a truly international environment.
-Six modules (12 credits) taught by visiting professionals in the fields of international affairs, conflict resolution, and civil society development. These short, workshop style seminars offer practical, hands-on training—anything from a simulation of responding to a real-life conflict situation to creating plans for a virtual NGO to practice financial NGO management.
-One thesis writing seminar (2 credits) which will prepare you for…
-A thesis (12 credits), a 15,000 word in-depth examination of a topic related to your experience and interests.

Research Masters

The MA in International Affairs, Conflict Resolution, and Civil Society Development is a 62 credit Research Masters taken over the course of four semesters. Research Masters at AUP develop perspective and depth in your thinking by adding a twin discipline or language – in this case study at the Sorbonne in French. A Research Masters enables a student to build a solid profile as an expert problem-solver or researcher.

Student-centered learning

AUP emphasizes a student-oriented, discussion-based education featuring small classes in a European setting, programs tailored to the individual, a high international profile, and a seasoned research faculty. Our French partner institute embodies a similar interest in interdisciplinary education, ethical reflection, and internationalism.

It is our hope to create in Paris a community of scholars working across languages, cultures, and different educational systems to develop conflict resolution and humanitarian skills, global solidarity networks, and future civil society alliances.

Practical information

Students in the MA come from educational institutions from across the world, having earned the equivalent of a BA degree in International Affairs or a closely related field—and from the working worlds of international institutions, NGOs, and policymaking.
We strongly recommend that students applying for this dual degree have a solid grounding in the French language. During the first semester all students must enroll in the Sorbonne’s Tutorat Méthodologie which provides training in French academic writing.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Read more
Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Develop a sophisticated understanding of psychological research, from the creation of questions you’ll need to ask, through to the meaningful organisation of results. Be primed for a research role across a range of sectors, including consultancy and government agencies, and have the foundation for future PhD work.

Key features

-Designed to provide you with the understanding and skills to help you develop academic or commercial careers based on psychological research.
-Choose to study full time over one year, or take the flexible two year part-time pathway to fit in with your career plans or caring commitments.
-Be confident studying with us – this programme is provided by the School of Psychology, which was recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise with 85 per cent of activity judged to be of international standard, placing it in the top third of departments nationally.
-Benefit from a programme recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the research training within the 1+3 framework.
-Receive thorough training in research methodology and design, as well as the philosophical issues that underpin your research decisions.
-Learn to analyse a problem, select the appropriate methodology and understand the implications of your choice.
-Gain the skills and knowledge to conduct research in a rigorous, appropriate and ethical manner, using a range of techniques (qualitative and quantitative) in a range of settings (experimental, observational, fieldwork, and focus groups).
-Hone your ability to communicate your research findings effectively to different audiences, both orally and in writing.
-Equip yourself, as part of the masters programme, with the skills and experience to design and conduct a major psychological research project.
-Learn from a teaching team with the in-depth knowledge of many areas of psychology and experience of publishing both fundamental and applied research in the best scientific journals. Their expertise, spanning from ethics to research design and statistics, offers you the ideal environment to develop your research skills.
-Immerse yourself in our school’s newly refurbished laboratory and teaching space, including electrophysiology (ERP), Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), virtual reality and eye-tracking laboratories.
-Benefit from our school’s research expertise. The Centre for Brain, Behaviour and Cognition attracts substantial external funding from UK research councils, the EU, charities and industry.
-Acquire skills that are highly prized by a wide range of employers, and be ready to join previous students employed in academia, consultancy, government agencies and non-governmental bodies.
-Contemplating a PhD in the future? This programme will provide you with the essential pre-requisites for research at this level, including a thorough grounding in research methodology, design and analysis as well as the philosophical issues that underpin research decisions.

Course details

You’ll cover the whole spectrum of psychological research skills and most research methods used by psychologists, and have the opportunity to study methods that are particularly relevant to you. We aim to equip you with high-level research skills and give you the opportunity to apply these skills in original psychological research. Early in the programme, you’ll begin a substantial independent piece of research and continue this throughout the year. Special emphasis is placed on practical research skills and communication - these are integrated in project work to achieve professional standards of psychological research. If you study full time the programme lasts one year starting in late September and involves attendance for at least two days a week over two 12-week teaching periods. Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the postgraduate diploma award. If you want to study part time please discuss your requirements with the Programme Director.

Core modules
-PSY558 Evaluating Complex Interventions
-PSY556 Statistical Methods for Experimental and Clinical Research
-PSY561 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 1
-PSY557 Quantitative Analysis of Complex Clinical and Behavourial Data
-PSY555 Communication of Research for Psychology
-PSY562 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 2
-PSY572 Project
-PSY559 Experimental Research Design
-PSY560 Qualitative Research Methods for Psychology
-PSY571 Project Planning and Literature Search

Optional modules
-PSY567 Designing for Behaviour Change
-PSY566 Issues in Behaviour Change
-PSY568 Issues in Clinical Psychology
-PSY569 The Brain and its Disorders
-PSY564 Understanding Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
-PSY570 Issues in Cognitive and Brain Science
-PSY577 Foundations in Clinical Psychology: Children and Families
-PSY563 Understanding Risky Behaviour

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies.

Are people living in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods more inclined to turn inwards and to ‘hunker down’ compared to people of ethnically homogeneous settings? Are there cross-country differences in the causes of hooliganism, and in the effectiveness of methods used to combat hooligans in different European countries?

More and more comparative questions on societies are being raised. At Radboud University we believe that answers to comparative questions are more informative, lead to a better understanding of societal phenomena and processes, and therefore have more scientific and social importance than answers to questions about one society in one historical period.

This programme therefore fully focuses on teaching students how to perform high-quality comparative research. We look into the degree of inequality, cohesion and modernisation in both Western and non-Western societies. You’ll learn how to translate social problems into empirical research questions and understand the diverse theoretical approaches, research designs, data collections and analyses you need to get the answers you are looking for.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Why study Social and Cultural Science at Radboud University?

- A majority of our courses are exclusively created and offered for the research students enrolled in this programme, and therefore perfectly match the needs and desires of social and cultural researchers.
- This programme is linked to the Nijmegen Institute for Social and Cultural Research (NISCO) who offer an excellent research environment and have extensive social science databases that students are free to use.
- You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.
- You’ll be given your own workplace (equipped with a computer) in a room with your fellow students to enhance solidarity. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision.
- You’ll write two scientific journal papers which will not only give you plenty of practise but will also give you a good academic research portfolio that you can use when applying for research positions.
- A large majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions; almost all of our graduates found work shortly after graduating.

Multidisciplinary

The programme combines the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, development studies and communication science. This programme is therefore ideal for Bachelor’s students from these disciplines with an interest in research. However, we believe that students from disciplines such as political science, economics and human geography can also profit from this Master’s.

The Research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science trains aspiring researchers and is ideal preparation for PhD positions or research positions in relevant non-academic research institutes. Or you could build a bridge between academic research and the world of practice, thereby influencing policy-making in the public and private sphere.

Quality label

This programme was recently awarded the quality label ‘Top Programme' in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Social and Cultural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni found a job or research position immediately after graduating.

Job positions

There are plenty of options open to graduates of the research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science:
- Scientific research career (academia)
The programme provides an excellent basis for a scientific research career and attaining PhD positions.

- Societal research career
Our graduates can also go on to have careers in relevant non-academic research and policy institutes like government ministries, Statistics Netherlands (CBS), The Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP) and The Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and foreign equivalents.

- More
Of course, this Master’s programme does not close other doors. Students with a research Master’s are also highly sought after by (commercial) businesses and organisations because of their analytical and communication skills and in-depth understanding of social and cultural behaviour. Other careers, such as policymaker, manager, journalist, etc are certainly within reach.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Our research in this field

Half of the Master’s programme in Social and Cultural Science consists of practical research training.

In the first year, you’ll do a research project in which you conduct a small-scale empirical research under guided supervision of a senior researcher. The comparative research issue is typically part of the ongoing research within a Radboud chair group. Finally, you’ll write a scientific journal paper regarding the research results. The project is done in small groups (2-3 students) and prepares you well to independently conduct a comparative empirical social science study for your Master’s thesis in the second.

- Master’s thesis topics in the field of Social and Cultural Science
For your Master’s thesis you are completely free to tackle any social issue in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, communication science or development studies. Important is the ability to reflect on the societal significance of your research question and the societal importance of your research. Thesis topics vary widely:
- Many theses are concerned with cross-country comparisons of behaviour or attitude measures using European cross-sectional survey data on, for example, xenophobia or gender roles.
- Others theses compare classrooms and the effect ethnic composition has on interethnic bullying or the impact of the economic crisis on African migrants in Athens, Greece, or the utilisation of different sexual health services by Aboriginal adolescents.
- Thesis topics can also be found in the field of communication science, like examining the news on extreme right political parties in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and correlating it with election results, or studying patterns in TV drama (e.g. increasing Americanisation) and comparing these media trends with societal processes such as individualisation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

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The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course. Read more
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course.

You’ll share a breadth of experience – the multi- disciplinary nature of the taught component means you will share a broad experience of methodological and research issues, allied with subject specific supervision, allowing you to develop a unique awareness of knowledge and experiences across the natural and social sciences in addition to a focus on your own research topic.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/social-and-applied-sciences-research.aspx

Course detail

This exciting course “develops innovative training provision which cuts across disciplines and works at the boundaries with other scientific traditions”. It explicitly recognises the need to “offer high-quality integrated core provision in research skills and research methods training as well as subject-specific training” while using “flexible and imaginative methods of training provision and delivery”. (ESRC 2009).

It offers you the opportunity to complete an MSc in your chosen subject area over the course of one year (two years if part time). Beginning in early September, the course combines 60 credits of taught modules in the first (Michaelmas) term with 120 credits of research during the remainder of the year. The taught component of the course will be multi-disciplinary in nature with lectures and seminars led by experts from across the range of subjects in the Faculty.

Suitability

This course is suitable for students who wish to continue their studies beyond undergraduate level.

The course is ideal if you:
• may want to continue to doctoral level;
• wish to enhance your qualifications for career reasons;
• would like to undertake a research-based, rather than taught Masters;
• recognise the need for research training in your chosen career;
• wish to learn in a multi-disciplinary environment.

Content

You’ll follow a course of advanced study and research under the guidance of academic tutors and supervisors. This MSc aims to develop researchers who are conceptually aware, who can utilise a range of skills and methods, and who, in a multi-disciplinary environment, can practice and develop their own research capabilities, and disseminate that research in a meaningful way.

It offers you a wide range of specifically named pathways located within research subject areas.

See website for a list of named pathways.

Format

You will work closely with a supervisor on a research topic(s) leading to research output(s). The choice of topic will depend on your subject area, your expertise and that of your supervisor. In some instances you will have a research topic identified in advance by your supervisor, working on a specific project within existing research clusters in the Faculty.

Your MSc will be awarded based on grades obtained for the 40 credits of taught modules and 140 credits for a dissertation or other research-based outputs. The 40 credits taught component of the course is comprised of two modules:
• Research Praxis
• Research Methods

In the first week of your studies you will meet with your supervisor and familiarise yourself with your research topic.

The second week of the course will be an intensive week of lectures and practicals spread across the two modules. The following six weeks will include a range of optional sessions in both modules, or some specific sessions identified for students in specific subject areas.

After the second week all lectures, seminars and practicals will be held on Wednesday afternoons.

Assessment

Assessment will take many forms including traditional essays, team assignments, reflective logs, oral presentations, etc. All assessments will be completed before the end of the first term. You must pass all modules (40 credits) to progress to the research stage of the course. If any module is failed you’ll have one opportunity to resubmit prior to continuing with the research component of the module.

The largest part of the assessment will be based on your research output(s). Working with your Supervisor, you will have to decide what format the research output(s) will take. It may be a dissertation of approximately 16,000-20,000 word equivalent or a couple of research reports or research papers each of approximately 8,000 words in length. It may be possible that the research output could take some different form, e.g. an invention or patent, but a written component would still be required. The research output(s) will be assessed by an external examiner and you must pass this component of the module to receive the award of MSc. The Research Output(s) must be submitted by August 31, 2016.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons. Read more
Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons.

Why study Social Research Methods at Dundee?

Social research methods are important not just to social scientists wishing to study a particular problem or to test a theory in a way that is be considered rigorous. They are also fundamental tools of value to government, service providers and to business. There are of course a diverse range of research methods available to social scientists.

The aims of the MSc/Diploma programme in Social Research Methods are:
To advance your knowledge and understanding of the nature of research in social science.
To enhance your skills in areas that will equip you as a social scientist for employment in a government, business or a public policy environment as well as in an academic context.

"I undertook the Social Research Methods MSc in 2009/2010. This was a really interesting course which not only helped me develop a range of research skills which have been extremely relevant and useful in my PhD, but also helped me to critically engage with broader issues of social justice. This sparked an interest in my current research field, and ultimately, has been invaluable in giving me a solid foundation for continuing onto an academic career. Beyond the academic knowledge however, this MSc also provides a useful set of practical and applicable skills which many employers value, such as in GIS and statistics"
Andrew Wooff, studied full-time 2009-10

Researcher, Centre for Criminological Research, University of Sheffield

Specialism in population and welfare

The MSc in Social Research Methods offers a specialism in population and welfare issues under the title MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare). This option is an accredited course for the ESRC Population Investigation Council funding. This specialism is particularly relevant for students interested in demographic and welfare issues.

What's so good about Social Research Methods at Dundee?

The staff teaching the MSc in Social Research Methods course have wide experience of both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and have deployed these skills not only to pursue frontline research in social science, but also as expert advisers to governments and as consultants to international organisations.

This course emphasises that it is important not only to understand how to use a particular research tool, but also to consider the wider meanings of how knowledge can be constructed in different ways and for diverse range of purposes. One particular feature of the course is the comprehensive and in-depth coverage of a variety of research methods including ethnographic and participatory tools; the analysis of large datasets plus GIS skills. The course seeks to encourage students to think critically not only about the methods they use, but also to reflect on the limitations of what is knowable from the evidence presented by others.

"As a part time student on the MSc Social Research Methods course, my experience was exceptionally inspiring. Coming from an arts background it was a real challenge, but one that allowed me to broaden my horizons and bring back to my day job teaching design in an art college an understanding of human geography and how it informs us of local and global social issues. My experience was invaluable in so many ways and staff were always very supportive"

Jackie Malcolm, studied part-time 2010-12
Lecturer in Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Dundee

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

There are core modules in:

Research Training
Social Theory
Quantitative Methods in Social Research
Qualitative Methods in Social Research
Plus students choose one from:

Research in Practice (work placement)
Applied GIS and Geospatial Data Analysis
Population Vulnerability and Resilience

For students following the MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare) route, ‘Social Impacts on Population’ is a core module, and ‘Qualitative Methods in Social Research’ is an option module.

Students enrolled on the MSc programme also complete a dissertation.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework (essays, practical classes, projects), examination and dissertation (for Masters students).

Careers

The course seeks to offer students a wide range of skills suitable for entry into careers as information officers and analysts, research assistants and geographical system experts working in a business or government environment.

Research by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) shows that the demand for Social Science Masters students with quantitative research skills far outstrips supply. This degree programme course has strong emphasis in this area, but the optional modules allow you to tailor the course to your personal career ambitions.

Previous students from our other MSc programmes have gone on to work for local authority planning departments, the General Registrars Office Scotland (census office), GIS analysts for Tayside Police, ONS social analysis unit, and also as research assistants within the University sector.

"The course allowed me to develop on an academic and personal level through its range of critical thinking and skill based modules. I appreciated the broad themes set out by lecturers as it provided an opportunity to integrate my own research interests into class assignments and discussions, enhancing the individual relevancy it had for my classmates and I. Since completing the course in September 2012, I have started working towards a PhD in the Geography department at Dundee, incorporating many of the attributes that I learned at MSc level. The training, support and enthusiasm offered on the course gave me the confidence to undertake fieldwork overseas and inspired me to pursue a future career in academia"

Jade Catterson, studied full-time 2011-12
ESRC-funded PhD student, University of Dundee

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Study for your MPhil at Sheffield Hallam’s. Cultural, Communication and Computing Research Institute (C3RI). C3RI an inspiringly diverse multidisciplinary group which makes connections between the research traditions of. Read more

Study for your MPhil at Sheffield Hallam’s Cultural, Communication and Computing Research Institute (C3RI). C3RI an inspiringly diverse multidisciplinary group which makes connections between the research traditions of

  • art
  • design and media production
  • communication studies
  • computing.

The Institute consists of two research centres

We provide an environment in which each discipline can develop its own approach to research. At the same time we bring people together on questions that cut across traditional subject boundaries.

Research activity at C3RI

Our work covers strategic and applied research as well as covering research into teaching and learning. Much of it is through partnerships with businesses and professional collaborators.

Research is supported by research councils, the European Union, commercial clients, charitable bodies and government.

We support a PhD research programme with over 80 students. We also maintain many knowledge transfer partnerships that support close collaboration between academics, researchers and industrial partners.

Design Futures

C3RI also houses Design Futures, a commercially-focused product and packaging design consultancy group based within Sheffield Hallam University.

Design Futures has had specialist design teams working exclusively on commercial consultancy services for several years. These teams have developed award winning, innovative solutions for many clients, some of which have been patented.

Course Structure

MPhil – two years full-time, or three years part-time

Start dates – September, January or May.

Candidates are required to critically investigate and evaluate an approved topic, to demonstrate an understanding of research methods appropriate to their chosen field and to present and defend a thesis by oral examination.

Supervision

Each student is allocated a director of studies and a supervisor. Regular meetings between the student and supervisors are scheduled, with targets set for written and oral presentation of research progress.

Research training

Some students may be required to complete research training modules if not already studied as part of a masters degree. This can have fee implications for part-time students, but is included in the full-time fee.

Additional training sessions to benefit doctoral students will be arranged and advertised to students, by the Faculty and the central Doctoral School, throughout the year at no additional cost.

Training is followed by, or delivered in conjunction with, theoretical and textual research, analysis and writing, working closely with the supervisors. Students are expected to present seminar papers on their work and to submit written papers for comment. Students will also be expected to attend relevant seminars and presentations from the research seminar series and other doctoral students.

Assessment

Thesis followed by oral examination 

Employability

Research degrees are a vital qualification for most academic careers and for professional specialisation within an existing or planned career. The rigorous analytical thinking they involve is also an attractive feature for potential employers of all kinds.



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Social media and other emerging communication technologies are becoming a key aspect of social research practice. The data they generate contain insights into how entire populations communicate, behave and interact with each other. Read more
Social media and other emerging communication technologies are becoming a key aspect of social research practice. The data they generate contain insights into how entire populations communicate, behave and interact with each other.

The Social Media and Social Research masters provides the practical research skills and conceptual foundations needed to conduct studies in this new field.

Course content

The Social Media and Social Research masters degree examines the role of social media in contemporary societies, and their potential for ethical research. You'll develop a foundation in traditional social science research skills, as well as explore new methods of analysis for both large- and small-scale data.

Modules
The Social Media and Social Research masters consists of six modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis
-Qualitative Methods
-Metrics and Society
-Advanced Methods in Social Research
-Themes and Issues in Contemporary Sociology

You will develop, design, implement and manage your own original research project, supervised by a member of staff. You will analyse the data and produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Careers

The Social Media and Social Research masters degree develops skills employers need in many fields, and especially those requiring awareness of digital social research practice and theory.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is a one year full time programme, which provides an ideal opportunity and environment in which to gain practical training in Research Methods and to join a thriving research team within Swansea University College of Medicine. The Medicine and Life Sciences course has been developed with an emphasis on providing students with a research-oriented approach to their learning. Students are able to tailor their studies towards a career in one of the College’s internationally recognised research themes:

– Biomarkers and Genes,

– Devices,

– Microbes and Immunity,

– Patient & Population Health and Informatics.

Key Features of MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is committed to supporting the development of evidence within the areas of Health, Medicine and Life Science through the training of researchers whose findings will directly inform their own understanding and that of others. The ethos of this programme is to produce graduates with the research skill and knowledge to become effective researchers, who will contribute to the body of knowledge within their chosen area of interest that will have an impact upon the health and well-being of all.

- The advantage of a MRes over other formats is that it provides a structured yet in-depth approach, taking the taught component of FHEQ Level 7 teaching as a framework for conducting research on the candidates own practice.

- Innovative and integrated curriculum that reflects the various aspects of the research process.

- Multidisciplinary teaching team with vast experience and expertise in conducting high quality research.

- Research informed teaching.

- Teaching is supported by online learning and support.

-Flexibility for you to gain specialist knowledge.

- A one year full-time taught masters programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required for a successful research career.

- This course is also available for two years part-time study.

- The opportunity to conduct an individual research project with an interdisciplinary team within a supportive environment.

- Students will be assigned a research-active supervisory team

The aim of the MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is to provide students with a broad research training to prepare them for a research career in Medical and Life Science research with emphasis on: Biomarkers & Genes, Devices, Microbes & Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. The course has been developed to enable graduates to pursue a variety of research careers in Medical and Life Sciences. The programme comprises both taught and research elements.

By the end of the Medicine and Life Sciences programme students will have:

Developed necessary skills to critically interpret and evaluate research evidence; Gained experience the in analysis and interpretation of research data; Advanced knowledge at the forefront of Medical and Life Science research, with the ability to integrate the theoretical and practical elements of research training; Developed the ability to conceptualise, design and implement a research project for the generation of new evidence that informs Health, Medicine and Life Science; Developed practical research skills by working with an interdisciplinary research team; The ability to confidently communicate research ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences; Acquired transferable skills which enhance your employability and future research career.

Modules

Modules on the Medicine and Life Sciences course may include:

PMRM01 Critical Appraisal and Evaluation

PMRM02 Data Analysis for Health and Medical Sciences

PMRM03 Research Leadership and Project Management OR any topic specific FHEQ Level 7 module from the College of Medicine ’s portfolio

Mode of delivery:

The 60 credits of the taught element will be delivered face-to-face, combining formal lecturing, seminars, and group work in addition to tutor-led practical classes. The remaining 120 credits for the research element will be available as distance learning either off or on-site. Irrespective of the location for conducting the research project, students will supported through monthly online (Skype)/or face-to-face supervisory meetings.

Course Structure

Students must complete 3 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 120 credits thesis on a research project aligned to one the College’s research theme. Each taught module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is designed in two phases:

Phase 1 – Training and Application (October – January; 60 credits)

Taught modules in Research Methods and their application to Medicine and Life Science. Personalised education and training relevant to student’s research interests. Identification of research questions and how they might be addressed.Focused on students existing knowledge and research skills.

Phase 2 – Research Project (February – September; 120 credits)

The project is selected by the student in combination with an academic supervisory team. Focussed on one of the College’s four main research themes: Biomarkers and Genes, Devices, Microbes and Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. At the end of Part 2 students submit a 40,000 word thesis worth 120 credits leading to the award of Master of Research in Medicine and Life Science.

Attendance Pattern

Students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Phase One. Attendance during Phase Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

You are also encouraged to attend the Postgraduate Taught Induction Event during the induction week and any programme associated seminars, together with Postgraduate research events.



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This programme trains you in the fundamental aspects of quantitative and qualitative research, including research design, data collection and data analysis, and provides practical, ‘hands-on’ experience- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-research-methods-psychology/. Read more
This programme trains you in the fundamental aspects of quantitative and qualitative research, including research design, data collection and data analysis, and provides practical, ‘hands-on’ experience- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-research-methods-psychology/

The programme will appeal to you if you would like to develop your career in experimental research, or to enhance your ability to apply research skills in either the public or the private sector.

The programme will enable you to:

gain a thorough knowledge of a range of behavioural and social science methodologies
understand the principles of quantitative and qualitative research
correctly apply advanced statistical and computing techniques
enhance your skills in critical analysis and evaluation of research findings
consider philosophical and ethical issues in relation to science in general and to psychological research in particular
develop expertise in data collection, handling large data sets and data analysis
appropriately plan and design, present and evaluate, effective psychological research studies
You also complete a research project leading to a dissertation, and you participate in general research skills training modules with students from other departments at Goldsmiths.

For more than ten years now, the programme has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the generic and specific research training required by students in receipt of ESRC studentship awards.

Since 2011, the programme has been the research methods training masters for the psychology pathway within the Goldsmiths and Queen Mary ESRC-funded Doctoral Training Centre (2011-2015).

Students in receipt of an ESRC 1+3 PhD studentship in the psychology pathway have to take this course as the first year of a 4-year PhD programme; students who have completed the Masters self-funded, are eligible to bid for an ESRC funded +3 PhD studentship in the psychology pathway at Goldsmiths or Queen Mary.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

The MRes runs for one academic year full-time or two years part-time. Most of the lectures, seminars and workshops on the programme run in the first two terms, but you are expected to pursue your studies beyond formal term times, particularly in respect of your research project.

Lectures, seminars and workshops for the programme are timetabled mainly for Mondays and Tuesdays, but you may occasionally be required to attend other seminars and workshops held by the Department and College. You must take all the modules listed in the syllabus.

Research Project (60 credits)

You will produce an empirical piece of research leading to a research project, supervised by at least one member of the lecturing staff in the Department. The project provides invaluable, practical ‘hands on’ experience of evaluating a particular research question. You have the opportunity to set your research question, determine and apply the methods to obtain the answers, and present, discuss and interpret the results. You normally start your project in the second term, together with necessary literature reviews and research design. Work on your project will continue full-time following the formal examinations in May up until project submission in mid-September.

Additional workshops and seminars

You are also required to attend some of the Department’s programme of Invited Speakers’ talks given by distinguished academics in psychology, and to produce a written critique on one of these. You are welcome to attend the Department’s other seminar series, which are hosted by eminent academics and practitioners.

Assessment

Written examinations; coursework; dissertation.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research (Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings).

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills

The programme aims to equip you with a sound understanding of methods and skills necessary to conduct high-level research in psychology, using a wide range of approaches and techniques.

Careers

The programme provides the ideal preparation for a research career. Many students go on to do a PhD, or to conduct experimental research in a wide variety of settings.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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