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Masters Degrees (Research Masters)

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Overview. This structured research programme in Geocomputation aims to. Build capacity for independent research. Enhance advanced specialist knowledge in Geocomputation alongside transferable and generic skills. Read more

Overview

This structured research programme in Geocomputation aims to:

• Build capacity for independent research.

• Enhance advanced specialist knowledge in Geocomputation alongside transferable and generic skills.

• Enable students to disseminate their research.

In addition to the modules associated with this particular course, this structured programme offers postgraduate researchers the opportunity to select from modules taught on the MSc in Geocomputation and professional skills training modules offered by different faculties or modules offered by other Departments which are of particular interest, for example research commercialisation.

Closing date

Research applications are generally accepted at any time

Commences

September (or other agreed time)

Course Structure

Students must take a minimum of 10 credits in taught modules (at least 5 in generic/transferable modules and at least 5 in subject specific/advanced specialist modules) from the Structured PhD programme.

Duration: 2 years Full-time, 3 years Part-time



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Social media and other emerging communication technologies are becoming a key aspect of social research practice. The data they generate contain insights into how entire populations communicate, behave and interact with each other. Read more
Social media and other emerging communication technologies are becoming a key aspect of social research practice. The data they generate contain insights into how entire populations communicate, behave and interact with each other.

The Social Media and Social Research masters provides the practical research skills and conceptual foundations needed to conduct studies in this new field.

Course content

The Social Media and Social Research masters degree examines the role of social media in contemporary societies, and their potential for ethical research. You'll develop a foundation in traditional social science research skills, as well as explore new methods of analysis for both large- and small-scale data.

Modules
The Social Media and Social Research masters consists of six modules:
-Understanding Social Media
-Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis
-Qualitative Methods
-Metrics and Society
-Advanced Methods in Social Research
-Themes and Issues in Contemporary Sociology

You will develop, design, implement and manage your own original research project, supervised by a member of staff. You will analyse the data and produce a 15,000-word dissertation based on your research project.

Careers

The Social Media and Social Research masters degree develops skills employers need in many fields, and especially those requiring awareness of digital social research practice and theory.

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A University of Hertfordshire Masters research degree is an internationally recognised degree signifying achievement in research. Read more
A University of Hertfordshire Masters research degree is an internationally recognised degree signifying achievement in research. While an MA/MSc is a taught, modular programme, a Masters by Research is a programme of research and skills development negotiated with your supervisors and based on your own research proposal.

About the course

The Masters by Research degree may be undertaken in full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 year) modes in any creative arts discipline that the School engages with and for which we have appropriately qualified supervisory staff. In the School of Creative Arts we have a wide range of expertise in historical and theoretical research, as well as in practice-led/practice-based research, relating to fine and applied arts, film, media and TV studies, interior and architectural design, music and the music industry.

During the period of study for the Masters by Research degree you will develop a greater depth of subject expertise and independent research skills. You will undertake a focused research project for the duration of the degree, under the supervision and guidance of two or more academic members of staff who are your supervisors. In addition you will engage with a negotiated programme of selected generic skills development and careers workshops provided by the University of Hertfordshire Doctoral College.

Your Masters by Research project project may be purely theoretical or contain elements of your own practice. If there is a practice element, one of your supervisors would be a practitioner in an appropriate discipline, and appropriate studio space and/or workshop facilities would be made available if necessary. The School has a wide range of outstanding facilities for researchers in the broad area of creative arts, and the University library has an excellent range of relevant and up-to-date resources to support research in this area.

During the course of the degree, you would typically be given opportunities present your research at seminars and conferences, and to exhibit your practical work if it is part of the research project. Some opportunities in this regard may be provided by the School or the University.

Why choose this course?

-An internationally recognised research qualification
-Develop subject expertise at postgraduate level
-Develop research skills through practice and research experience
-Employers are looking for high calibre graduates with advanced skills who can demonstrate independent creative thinking and problem-solving through research

Careers

Graduates with this degree will be able to demonstrate to employers a highly-valued ability to work independently on an original project and to maintain that focus over an extended period, and will have developed much sought after research skills. Research students also benefit from the School’s networks of international partners in the creative and cultural industries, which may offer valuable opportunities for career development, as well as from career development workshops and events.

The skills, knowledge and experience gained will also provide a valuable grounding if you wish to study at Doctoral level at some point after you have completed your MA by Research.

Teaching methods

Research degrees are not taught programmes, however, programmes of supporting studies are a key element.

The School of Creative Arts has a lively research community staffed by supervisors whose research is world leading, Supervisory teams provide guidance in helping you to formulate and develop your research during the course of the programme.

We offer a range of subject specific research training throughout various research group seminars. Our research students are strongly encouraged to participate in modules in our taught Masters programmes, and the University also has an extensive Researcher Development Programme, which is provided by the UH Doctoral College and offers generic research training.

The Masters by Research has two main assessment points after enrolment: Initial Registration for the degree after 3 months for both full-time and part-time students, and the final examination. Your research will be examined on the basis of the final submission which may include a combination of both written and non-textual material that must be "defended" in a viva and contain a thesis (a position that can be defended by substantiated argument).

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The 1-year Electrical Power Systems Masters/MSc is good, the 2-year Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research Masters/MSc is even better!. Read more

The 1-year Electrical Power Systems Masters/MSc is good, the 2-year Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research Masters/MSc is even better!

The 3rd energy industry revolution is taking place where the key is the development of electrical power systems in the contexts of smart grids. Electrical power systems are playing a pivotal role in the development of a sustainable energy supply, enabling renewable energy generation. Globally there is a big shortage of skilled engineers for designing, operating, controlling and the economic analysis of future electricity networks – smart grids

The new 2-year MSc Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research will give you the timely advanced skills and specialist experience required to significantly enhance your career in the electrical power industry. The programme builds on a very close involvement with the power industry, the education of power engineers and extensive research work and expertise as well as the successful experience on the 1-year MSc Electrical Power Systems at the University of Birmingham. The 2-year MSc Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research will be able to fill in the gap of skills between the 1-year MSc and PhD research.

Some modules will be taught by leading industry experts, which will give you the exciting opportunity to understand the real challenges that power industry is facing, hence propose innovative solutions. In addition, students working on relevant MSc projects may have the opportunity to work with leading industry experts directly. 

The new 2-Year MSc Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research will run in parallel with the existing 1-Year MSc Electrical Power Systems. The taught credits in the 1st year of the 2 Year MSc are identical to that of the 1-Year MSc while the 2nd Year is mainly focused on a research project. 

This programme also aims to provide graduates with the ability to critically evaluate methodologies, analytical procedures and advanced research methods. Year 1 of the programme is focussed on the taught modules covering:

  • Control concepts and methods
  • Advanced energy conversion systems and power electronic applications
  • Advanced power electronic technologies for electrical power networks – HVDC and FACTS
  • Electrical power system engineering - using state-of-the-art computational tools and methods, and design of sustainable electrical power systems and networks
  • Economic analysis of electrical power systems and electricity markets. 

While Year 2 of the programme will give you the opportunity to work on an advanced research project. For some suitable projects, in conjunction with joint industry supervisions, industry placement may be available.

It is envisaged there will be the opportunity for students to transfer between the two programmes using the University’s procedures for transfers between programmes, subject to programme requirements. This opportunity would take place at the end of the taught part of the programme.

Course details

Electrical Power Systems with Advanced Research Masters/MSc (Two Year): 

This 2-year MSc programme meets the industrial demand for the training and education of both existing and future engineers in the advanced concepts of electrical power systems and renewable energy as well as advanced research skills. It aims to produce graduates of the highest calibre with the right advanced skills and knowledge who will be capable of leading in teams involved in the operation, control, design, and economic analysis of the electrical power systems and networks of the future – smart grids as well as developing and managing R&D programmes.

It will meet the demand for the research and development of sustainable electrical power systems and the demand for training and education of existing and future power engineers in the advanced concepts and designing of sustainable electrical power systems and renewable energy with significant research training.

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Learning and teaching

Patterns of study 

The majority of students study our Masters programmes full time. Our programmes are also suitable for practising engineers who wish to study part-time or take a single module to earn Continuing Professional Development (CPD) points. Many modules are completed in three-day sessions allowing you to focus on one topic at a time. Following each session of lectures there is an opportunity for you to deepen your understanding through private study and in most cases there is also an assessed assignment. 

Core modules 

These modules cover the advanced specialist topics required for your specific degree programme, such as Power System Operation and Control, HVDC and FACTS and Power System Economics. These technologies are at the heart of many current developments in electrical power systems. 

Cross-programme option modules 

These options specialize in topics relevant to each degree programme and give you the opportunity to adapt the programme that you have chosen to study. The prior knowledge needed for each module is specified in the student handbook to help you make the most appropriate choice. This allows you the greatest possible freedom to customise your study package appropriately. 

Individual project 

In Year 2, you will have 12-months to work on a dedicated research project to develop your comprehensive research skills, which would be helpful to fill in the gap between the 1-year MSc and PhD. This is an opportunity for you to develop advanced specialist knowledge. Some projects are undertaken in collaboration with companies and, in some cases, you may work on company premises investigating issues of direct concern to future product development. 

Assessment and awards 

Assessment is by a combination of written examination and course work. There is a strong emphasis on course work to deepen understanding. The pass mark is 50%. A merit is awarded to students with an average of 60% or more and a distinction is awarded to students with an average of 70% or more, in both taught and project modules. There are prizes for students who perform especially well overall and for those who complete exceptionally good individual projects.



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Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment. Read more

Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment.

Master of Research (MRes) degree provides preparatory training for academic research, ideal if you want to eventually progress on to a PhD and develop a research career, or if you wish to gain research skills within specialist areas before committing to a PhD. This course is also highly suited to medical students who want to intercalate.

Through this course, you will develop broad biomedical research skills, but with an emphasis on application to cardiovascular science.

It is now widely recognised by employers and research councils that unravelling the basis of cardiovascular disease and developing new therapies is a high-priority area for investment, especially since the economic burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing.

However, it is becoming increasingly clearer that a gap has opened up between the skills possessed by new graduates and the skills normally expected on entry to a research degree or an industrial research career. This MRes has been specifically designed to fill this gap for those who wish to pursue a research career in cardiovascular sciences.

Our course is suitable if you come from a medical or science background and have little or no previous research experience.

Aims

Our course is designed to provide you with:

  • specialist knowledge of the principles of the cardiovascular system in health and disease, with an emphasis on emerging technologies (taught lectures);
  • laboratory skills, research methodology and data analysis (two research projects);
  • critical analysis of scientific and medical literature (literature review);
  • intellectual skills for understanding and interpreting research problems (tutorials);
  • communication of scientific data and concepts (oral presentations and written reports).

Special features

Learn from the experts

The University is home to around 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields.

Additional course information

Research topic examples:

  • Coronary arterial contractility and endothelial function
  • Sick sinus syndrome and gene therapy
  • Can we un-stiffen arteries?
  • Cellular basis of cardiac arrhythmias
  • Elucidation of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis
  • The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure
  • Mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy
  • Cell signalling in vascular smooth muscle
  • Cellular dysfunction and EC remodelling in heart disease and ageing
  • Development of a novel therapeutic approach to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

Teaching and learning

We have nearly 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields. There is a wide spectrum of research spanning clinical trials, whole organs, tissues, cells and single molecule studies.

Contributors to this course include:

You will learn through a range of teaching methods, including seminars, workshops and tutorials, as well as through research projects (25 weeks).

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is through a combination of written reports (in journal format), literature review, problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials and oral presentations.

This range of training methods aims to promote a stimulating and dynamic learning environment. The different course units will enable the development of key transferable skills in the critical analysis of research methodologies, data interrogation, communication and time management.

Course unit details

Clinical Masterclass course unit:

The Clinical Masterclass course unit is a 15 credit unit specifically designed for intercalated medical students. The unit consists of a series of seminars, workshops and e-learning.

This unit contributes to personal and professional development in the experience, knowledge and skills training required for effective clinical practice and success, with a strong emphasis on clinical academic research.

Areas covered include:

  • advanced Good Clinical Practice (GCP)
  • research governance and the regulatory framework for research
  • the Human Tissue Act
  • practical clinical ethics
  • patient and public involvement in research
  • diversity/equal opportunities in research/cultural competence
  • research creativity and entrepreneurialism
  • leadership (practitioner, partner and leader roles)

Facilities

Most of our researchers are housed within the Core Technology Facility and AV Hill, purpose-built research centres that have state-of-the-art facilities and equipment. This close contact fosters collaboration and discussion and is an excellent environment for students.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office 

Career opportunities

After this course, many students continue their studies and register for a PhD.

However, the course is also of value if you want to progress in careers in the pharmaceutical industry or clinical research.

The MRes is also ideal for MBChB intercalating students who wish to undertake directly channelled research training in the field of cardiovascular medicine.

Many of the skills and training provided by the MRes are generic and will have wide application to the study of other disciplines.



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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Who is it for?. This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. Read more

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:

  • Cognitive Neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language)
  • Clinical Neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents)
  • and Social Neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in Clinical, Social or Cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Check our labs facilities in the Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit (CRNU)the Baby lab, the Autism Research Group (ARG), the Human Memory Research Group, etc. For a full list of facilities visit the Psychology Department.

Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging methods.  We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG)Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We facilitate clinical internships through our specialist research Centre for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) and with the local Mind centre.

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Check out what is going on in our laboratories and at the Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN).

Find our more about our work on our Facebook group.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.



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Our MClin Res Clinical Research course is aimed at nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and other non- medical/dental healthcare professionals who want to work in clinical research, or are already working in this area and want to develop the skills needed for other positions where research plays a key role. Read more

Our MClin Res Clinical Research course is aimed at nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and other non- medical/dental healthcare professionals who want to work in clinical research, or are already working in this area and want to develop the skills needed for other positions where research plays a key role.

You will develop in-depth knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of clinical research and skills in research methods relevant to applied research in a range of contemporary clinical practice settings.

The course is mainly delivered online, but is complemented by two compulsory four-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools, and one mid-semester study day in Semesters 1 and 2.

Most of the units that make up this course are shared with other students on master's and postgraduate research programmes at Manchester.

Aims

Our course has been designed to provide health professionals with the skills needed to manage and deliver research in clinical and health and social care settings, and to develop careers in clinical research, clinical and academic practice, or academic research with a strong clinical practice component.

The aims of the course are to:

  • enable you to further develop systematic, in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the nature, purposes, methods and application of research relevant to clinical practice at an individual and/or organisational level;
  • contribute to building capacity and capability for research and evidence-based practice by equipping you with in-depth knowledge and essential skills to critically appraise, apply, design and undertake high quality research in a range of clinical settings;
  • enhance the quality and evidence base for clinical research, practice and service development through the provision of robust research training in a stimulating, challenging and supportive learning environment that draws on outstanding resources and research and practice expertise;
  • promote lifelong learning in students and enhance opportunities to pursue a variety of research careers and/or further research training which support and advance clinical knowledge, research and practice;
  • equip you with key transferable skills in critical reasoning and reflection, effective communication, team and multi-disciplinary working, use of IT/health informatics, logical and systematic approaches to problem-solving and decision-making.

Special features

Interdisciplinary learning

You will learn from renowned lecturers and practitioners from various fields including nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, social work, speech and language therapy, audiology, psychology, and medicine.

Strong collaborations

We have strong links with other courses at Manchester and with experts from the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Manchester Academy for Healthcare Scientist Education (MAHSE).

Teaching and learning

The course content is primarily delivered online, giving you more flexibility over how you learn. You will also attend two four-day introductory and winter study schools and two mid-semester study days, allowing you to learn face-to-face and meet other students and staff at Manchester.

We use digital technology to ensure our supervision of and communications with students meet the high standards required for the learning process to work. This includes:

  • individual and group web-based audio-visual tutorials;
  • web-based collaboration areas and discussion boards
  • shared digital documents;
  • online, phone and face-to-face support from supervisors and academic advisors;
  • peer support through course-specific discussion boards and face-to-face meetings.

Find out more about postgraduate teaching and learning at Manchester.

Coursework and assessment

We will assess your progress using a variety of summative assessment methods that enable the integration of theory and practice. They also build on the continuous formative assessment exercises that come with each individual unit, which include interactive, stimulating online exercises with regular self-assessment and feedback.

Course unit details

Our MClin Res  comprises six taught units (90 academic credits in total) and a 90-credit dissertation unit comprising a thesis derived from the undertaking of a supervised, clinical research project.

The PGDip Clin Res  comprises six taught units from (90 academic credits in total) and a mini-dissertation (30 academic credits).

The PGCert Clin Res  comprises four taught units (60 academic credits in total).

Year 1

Full-time study

Six taught units in the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Research design
  • Managing research in the clinical setting OR Foundations of research
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Part-time study

Four taught units from the following areas:

  • Research design
  • Managing research in the clinical setting OR Foundations of research
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Year 2

Part-time study

Two taught units from the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Course collaborators

We collaborate with other courses at Manchester and with experts from the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Manchester Academy for Healthcare Scientist Education(MAHSE).

Facilities

We are based in Jean McFarlane Building, which houses seminar rooms, IT facilities, clinical and interpersonal skills laboratories, and lecture theatres.

The University of Manchester also offers extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is predominantly aimed at health professionals from a range of disciplines who wish to enhance their skills and knowledge in clinically focused research.

It is aimed at those who wish to pursue clinical/academic research careers eg research nurses, clinical trials coordinators and principal investigators.

The course provides comprehensive training in research, providing an excellent foundation for students who wish to go on to study for a PhD.



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Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Read more
Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Develop a sophisticated understanding of psychological research, from the creation of questions you’ll need to ask, through to the meaningful organisation of results. Be primed for a research role across a range of sectors, including consultancy and government agencies, and have the foundation for future PhD work.

Key features

-Designed to provide you with the understanding and skills to help you develop academic or commercial careers based on psychological research.
-Choose to study full time over one year, or take the flexible two year part-time pathway to fit in with your career plans or caring commitments.
-Be confident studying with us – this programme is provided by the School of Psychology, which was recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise with 85 per cent of activity judged to be of international standard, placing it in the top third of departments nationally.
-Benefit from a programme recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the research training within the 1+3 framework.
-Receive thorough training in research methodology and design, as well as the philosophical issues that underpin your research decisions.
-Learn to analyse a problem, select the appropriate methodology and understand the implications of your choice.
-Gain the skills and knowledge to conduct research in a rigorous, appropriate and ethical manner, using a range of techniques (qualitative and quantitative) in a range of settings (experimental, observational, fieldwork, and focus groups).
-Hone your ability to communicate your research findings effectively to different audiences, both orally and in writing.
-Equip yourself, as part of the masters programme, with the skills and experience to design and conduct a major psychological research project.
-Learn from a teaching team with the in-depth knowledge of many areas of psychology and experience of publishing both fundamental and applied research in the best scientific journals. Their expertise, spanning from ethics to research design and statistics, offers you the ideal environment to develop your research skills.
-Immerse yourself in our school’s newly refurbished laboratory and teaching space, including electrophysiology (ERP), Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), virtual reality and eye-tracking laboratories.
-Benefit from our school’s research expertise. The Centre for Brain, Behaviour and Cognition attracts substantial external funding from UK research councils, the EU, charities and industry.
-Acquire skills that are highly prized by a wide range of employers, and be ready to join previous students employed in academia, consultancy, government agencies and non-governmental bodies.
-Contemplating a PhD in the future? This programme will provide you with the essential pre-requisites for research at this level, including a thorough grounding in research methodology, design and analysis as well as the philosophical issues that underpin research decisions.

Course details

You’ll cover the whole spectrum of psychological research skills and most research methods used by psychologists, and have the opportunity to study methods that are particularly relevant to you. We aim to equip you with high-level research skills and give you the opportunity to apply these skills in original psychological research. Early in the programme, you’ll begin a substantial independent piece of research and continue this throughout the year. Special emphasis is placed on practical research skills and communication - these are integrated in project work to achieve professional standards of psychological research. If you study full time the programme lasts one year starting in late September and involves attendance for at least two days a week over two 12-week teaching periods. Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the postgraduate diploma award. If you want to study part time please discuss your requirements with the Programme Director.

Core modules
-PSY558 Evaluating Complex Interventions
-PSY556 Statistical Methods for Experimental and Clinical Research
-PSY561 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 1
-PSY557 Quantitative Analysis of Complex Clinical and Behavourial Data
-PSY555 Communication of Research for Psychology
-PSY562 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 2
-PSY572 Project
-PSY559 Experimental Research Design
-PSY560 Qualitative Research Methods for Psychology
-PSY571 Project Planning and Literature Search

Optional modules
-PSY567 Designing for Behaviour Change
-PSY566 Issues in Behaviour Change
-PSY568 Issues in Clinical Psychology
-PSY569 The Brain and its Disorders
-PSY564 Understanding Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
-PSY570 Issues in Cognitive and Brain Science
-PSY577 Foundations in Clinical Psychology: Children and Families
-PSY563 Understanding Risky Behaviour

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The School of Education provides wide and varied opportunities for students to undertake research. More than 82% of its research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*) in the . Read more

The School of Education provides wide and varied opportunities for students to undertake research. More than 82% of its research was rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*) in the 2014 REF

The MA by Research is research-based Masters programme. It is assessed by a thesis of 40,000 words maximum. Students are encouraged to participate in a research training programme, but they are not required to complete assignments for research training modules they attend.

This programme is suitable for applicants who are interested in developing their independent research skills and many students who complete this course progress onto PhD study afterwards.

Course details

We have a national and international reputation as a centre of excellence and provide wide and varied opportunities for students to undertake research. Our academic expertise covers a broad range of disciplines grouped into three main departments:

We also have a number of highly successful research centres which reflect the diversity of our research activity

The interdependence of research with development and professional practice means that we particularly welcome the contribution of research students to our work. We provide a comprehensive programme of research training, together with opportunities to take part in research seminars where speakers with national and international reputations present work that is at the forefront of current debates within the field. 

The Education MA by Research 

The MA by Research is a pure masters level research course. Students will need to complete a thesis of 40,000 words maximum and a research training programme.

This programme is suitable for applicants who are interested in developing their independent research skills and many students who complete this course progress onto PhD study afterwards.

Please view our postgraduate research webpage to find out more about the type of research degrees on offer in the School of Education.

Research interests

Perhaps the most important step in the formulation of your research project is to identify a member of academic staff with appropriate expertise to supervise your area of interest. Your supervisor will act as the main source of academic supervisory support and research mentoring during your time as a doctoral researcher at the University and as such, it is vital that you ensure that the department to which you are applying is able to offer appropriate supervisory support in your relevant research area. Before submitting your application to the University you will need to identify potential supervisors in your desired field of research and contact them directly about your research proposal.

Applicants are encouraged to view the research activity within each school department as well as on the individual staff profiles. You may also download a summary of staff research interests (PDF, opens new window).

Employability

Over the last five years, an impressive 98.3 % of Education postgraduates have been in work and/or further study six months after graduation.

Birmingham’s Education graduates choose to work in variety of education roles in schools and administrative roles in public and private sector organisations. Work in retail, sales and administration are also popular options. Some chose to continue their education and apply for professional courses such as teacher training. Some of our graduates are attracted to careers in education such as teaching, community and youth work or other public sector occupations such as social work, police, housing and probation. New opportunities in partnership enterprises within sport, leisure, education and community schemes appeal. Some graduates also consider work in the private sector such as retail, finance or marketing.

What type of career assistance is available to those who complete the Education MA by Research?

The College of Social Sciences, to which the School of Education belongs, has specially designated careers advisors and careers consultants who can provide guidance for students on career paths, CVs, training opportunities, application and interviews. The University’s central Careers’ Service also runs workshops and offers personally tailored advice and guidance including 1-1 careers advice and 1-1 CV advice. The Career’s Service runs CV writing workshops especially for postgraduates in the College of Social Sciences, giving advice on how to compile CVs for both employment and for academic roles. 

The University also has dedicated careers advisors who run workshops and provide networking opportunities with potential employers. These are especially popular with international postgraduate students.



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You can choose to complete this programme as a PGC, PGD or MA. This programme is suitable for students completing research in Business, Education or Social Science. Read more
  • You can choose to complete this programme as a PGC, PGD or MA.
  • This programme is suitable for students completing research in Business, Education or Social Science.
  • External assessors have rated the innovative "general research skills" module very highly and commented favourably on the assessment mix.
  • The course has 1+3 recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council.

Summary

This course is perfect if you are looking to embark on a successful career as a researcher or academic and will provide you with the necessary training as part of your study for your MPhil/PhD.

The course is distinctive in providing students with an exciting opportunity to develop expertise in a range of both quantitative and qualitative research methods of data collection and analysis with a focus on their application to real-world issues.

The course has 1+3 recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council. Only three Education Departments in post-92 universities have this prestigious kitemark.

In order to enhance your engagement with the issues to be examined, and to allow flexibility over how you manage your time, the Social Research Methods programme will be delivered through weekly sessions in the Autumn and Spring semesters supplemented by tutorial support available (both face-to-face and electronically). Evening sessions are provided for part-time students.

Content

All three levels of the programme will include an introduction to the processes and issues involved in designing a quantitative or qualitative research project. You will also undertake modules that will introduce you to the methods of quantitative (including use of SPSS) and qualitative (including use of CAQDAS) research, giving you the skills and confidence to use these approaches to data collection and analysis in your own research.

If you progress to do a PGD or MA you will also explore the philosophy of social science research where you will examine the relationship between epistemology, ontology and methodology. Furthermore, you will explore concepts that underpin educational and social research including empiricism, rationalism, hermeneutics, feminism, post-modernism and critical realism and critique their relation to objectivity, causation, and validity.

You will also focus on key elements of the Research Councils’ Joint Statement of Skills Training for Research Students. You can then choose to study interpretations of the concept of education - and their implications for research - and the role of values in educational theory and research methodologies, or the basic theoretical concepts in social theory, with a particular emphasis on sociology and social policy.

Masters students will complete a dissertation in an area of their choosing in the fields of education or the social sciences.

The PG certificate course addresses core features of social research methods, focusing on different forms of data and how they can be collected and analysed. MA-level study is aimed at students who either want a discrete research-based MA or want to run a pilot study for an MPhil/PhD research project.

Modules

The following is a list of modules that you need to take to complete the different awards:

PGC

PGD

All of the PGC modules and

plus one of two optional modules:

MA

All of the PGD modules and

Compulsory and Required modules

Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Above is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules

Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.

Career options

This is THE course for those wishing to be employed in the research field of education and/or social sciences.



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Overview. Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies.

Are people living in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods more inclined to turn inwards and to ‘hunker down’ compared to people of ethnically homogeneous settings? Are there cross-country differences in the causes of hooliganism, and in the effectiveness of methods used to combat hooligans in different European countries?

More and more comparative questions on societies are being raised. At Radboud University we believe that answers to comparative questions are more informative, lead to a better understanding of societal phenomena and processes, and therefore have more scientific and social importance than answers to questions about one society in one historical period.

This programme therefore fully focuses on teaching students how to perform high-quality comparative research. We look into the degree of inequality, cohesion and modernisation in both Western and non-Western societies. You’ll learn how to translate social problems into empirical research questions and understand the diverse theoretical approaches, research designs, data collections and analyses you need to get the answers you are looking for.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Why study Social and Cultural Science at Radboud University?

- A majority of our courses are exclusively created and offered for the research students enrolled in this programme, and therefore perfectly match the needs and desires of social and cultural researchers.

- This programme is linked to the Nijmegen Institute for Social and Cultural Research (NISCO) who offer an excellent research environment and have extensive social science databases that students are free to use.

- You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.

- You’ll be given your own workplace (equipped with a computer) in a room with your fellow students to enhance solidarity. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision.

- You’ll write two scientific journal papers which will not only give you plenty of practise but will also give you a good academic research portfolio that you can use when applying for research positions.

- A large majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions; almost all of our graduates found work shortly after graduating.

Multidisciplinary

The programme combines the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, development studies and communication science. This programme is therefore ideal for Bachelor’s students from these disciplines with an interest in research. However, we believe that students from disciplines such as political science, economics and human geography can also profit from this Master’s.

The Research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science trains aspiring researchers and is ideal preparation for PhD positions or research positions in relevant non-academic research institutes. Or you could build a bridge between academic research and the world of practice, thereby influencing policy-making in the public and private sphere.

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Social and Cultural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni found a job or research position immediately after graduating.

Job positions

There are plenty of options open to graduates of the research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science:

- Scientific research career (academia)

The programme provides an excellent basis for a scientific research career and attaining PhD positions.

- Societal research career

Our graduates can also go on to have careers in relevant non-academic research and policy institutes like government ministries, Statistics Netherlands (CBS), The Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP) and The Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and foreign equivalents.

- More

Of course, this Master’s programme does not close other doors. Students with a research Master’s are also highly sought after by (commercial) businesses and organisations because of their analytical and communication skills and in-depth understanding of social and cultural behaviour. Other careers, such as policymaker, manager, journalist, etc are certainly within reach.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Our research in this field

Half of the Master’s programme in Social and Cultural Science consists of practical research training.

In the first year, you’ll do a research project in which you conduct a small-scale empirical research under guided supervision of a senior researcher. The comparative research issue is typically part of the ongoing research within a Radboud chair group. Finally, you’ll write a scientific journal paper regarding the research results. The project is done in small groups (2-3 students) and prepares you well to independently conduct a comparative empirical social science study for your Master’s thesis in the second.

- Master’s thesis topics in the field of Social and Cultural Science

For your Master’s thesis you are completely free to tackle any social issue in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, communication science or development studies. Important is the ability to reflect on the societal significance of your research question and the societal importance of your research. Thesis topics vary widely:

- Many theses are concerned with cross-country comparisons of behaviour or attitude measures using European cross-sectional survey data on, for example, xenophobia or gender roles.

- Others theses compare classrooms and the effect ethnic composition has on interethnic bullying or the impact of the economic crisis on African migrants in Athens, Greece, or the utilisation of different sexual health services by Aboriginal adolescents.

- Thesis topics can also be found in the field of communication science, like examining the news on extreme right political parties in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and correlating it with election results, or studying patterns in TV drama (e.g. increasing Americanisation) and comparing these media trends with societal processes such as individualisation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs



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The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course. Read more
The MSc by Research in the Faculty of Social and Applied Sciences has been designed to offer a range of pathways for you to research your chosen subject interests within Social and Applied Sciences, whilst sharing in the multi-disciplinary nature of the taught component of course.

You’ll share a breadth of experience – the multi- disciplinary nature of the taught component means you will share a broad experience of methodological and research issues, allied with subject specific supervision, allowing you to develop a unique awareness of knowledge and experiences across the natural and social sciences in addition to a focus on your own research topic.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/social-and-applied-sciences-research.aspx

Course detail

This exciting course “develops innovative training provision which cuts across disciplines and works at the boundaries with other scientific traditions”. It explicitly recognises the need to “offer high-quality integrated core provision in research skills and research methods training as well as subject-specific training” while using “flexible and imaginative methods of training provision and delivery”. (ESRC 2009).

It offers you the opportunity to complete an MSc in your chosen subject area over the course of one year (two years if part time). Beginning in early September, the course combines 60 credits of taught modules in the first (Michaelmas) term with 120 credits of research during the remainder of the year. The taught component of the course will be multi-disciplinary in nature with lectures and seminars led by experts from across the range of subjects in the Faculty.

Suitability

This course is suitable for students who wish to continue their studies beyond undergraduate level.

The course is ideal if you:
• may want to continue to doctoral level;
• wish to enhance your qualifications for career reasons;
• would like to undertake a research-based, rather than taught Masters;
• recognise the need for research training in your chosen career;
• wish to learn in a multi-disciplinary environment.

Content

You’ll follow a course of advanced study and research under the guidance of academic tutors and supervisors. This MSc aims to develop researchers who are conceptually aware, who can utilise a range of skills and methods, and who, in a multi-disciplinary environment, can practice and develop their own research capabilities, and disseminate that research in a meaningful way.

It offers you a wide range of specifically named pathways located within research subject areas.

See website for a list of named pathways.

Format

You will work closely with a supervisor on a research topic(s) leading to research output(s). The choice of topic will depend on your subject area, your expertise and that of your supervisor. In some instances you will have a research topic identified in advance by your supervisor, working on a specific project within existing research clusters in the Faculty.

Your MSc will be awarded based on grades obtained for the 40 credits of taught modules and 140 credits for a dissertation or other research-based outputs. The 40 credits taught component of the course is comprised of two modules:
• Research Praxis
• Research Methods

In the first week of your studies you will meet with your supervisor and familiarise yourself with your research topic.

The second week of the course will be an intensive week of lectures and practicals spread across the two modules. The following six weeks will include a range of optional sessions in both modules, or some specific sessions identified for students in specific subject areas.

After the second week all lectures, seminars and practicals will be held on Wednesday afternoons.

Assessment

Assessment will take many forms including traditional essays, team assignments, reflective logs, oral presentations, etc. All assessments will be completed before the end of the first term. You must pass all modules (40 credits) to progress to the research stage of the course. If any module is failed you’ll have one opportunity to resubmit prior to continuing with the research component of the module.

The largest part of the assessment will be based on your research output(s). Working with your Supervisor, you will have to decide what format the research output(s) will take. It may be a dissertation of approximately 16,000-20,000 word equivalent or a couple of research reports or research papers each of approximately 8,000 words in length. It may be possible that the research output could take some different form, e.g. an invention or patent, but a written component would still be required. The research output(s) will be assessed by an external examiner and you must pass this component of the module to receive the award of MSc. The Research Output(s) must be submitted by August 31, 2016.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons. Read more
Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons.

Why study Social Research Methods at Dundee?

Social research methods are important not just to social scientists wishing to study a particular problem or to test a theory in a way that is be considered rigorous. They are also fundamental tools of value to government, service providers and to business. There are of course a diverse range of research methods available to social scientists.

The aims of the MSc/Diploma programme in Social Research Methods are:
To advance your knowledge and understanding of the nature of research in social science.
To enhance your skills in areas that will equip you as a social scientist for employment in a government, business or a public policy environment as well as in an academic context.

"I undertook the Social Research Methods MSc in 2009/2010. This was a really interesting course which not only helped me develop a range of research skills which have been extremely relevant and useful in my PhD, but also helped me to critically engage with broader issues of social justice. This sparked an interest in my current research field, and ultimately, has been invaluable in giving me a solid foundation for continuing onto an academic career. Beyond the academic knowledge however, this MSc also provides a useful set of practical and applicable skills which many employers value, such as in GIS and statistics"
Andrew Wooff, studied full-time 2009-10

Researcher, Centre for Criminological Research, University of Sheffield

Specialism in population and welfare

The MSc in Social Research Methods offers a specialism in population and welfare issues under the title MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare). This option is an accredited course for the ESRC Population Investigation Council funding. This specialism is particularly relevant for students interested in demographic and welfare issues.

What's so good about Social Research Methods at Dundee?

The staff teaching the MSc in Social Research Methods course have wide experience of both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and have deployed these skills not only to pursue frontline research in social science, but also as expert advisers to governments and as consultants to international organisations.

This course emphasises that it is important not only to understand how to use a particular research tool, but also to consider the wider meanings of how knowledge can be constructed in different ways and for diverse range of purposes. One particular feature of the course is the comprehensive and in-depth coverage of a variety of research methods including ethnographic and participatory tools; the analysis of large datasets plus GIS skills. The course seeks to encourage students to think critically not only about the methods they use, but also to reflect on the limitations of what is knowable from the evidence presented by others.

"As a part time student on the MSc Social Research Methods course, my experience was exceptionally inspiring. Coming from an arts background it was a real challenge, but one that allowed me to broaden my horizons and bring back to my day job teaching design in an art college an understanding of human geography and how it informs us of local and global social issues. My experience was invaluable in so many ways and staff were always very supportive"

Jackie Malcolm, studied part-time 2010-12
Lecturer in Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Dundee

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

There are core modules in:

Research Training
Social Theory
Quantitative Methods in Social Research
Qualitative Methods in Social Research
Plus students choose one from:

Research in Practice (work placement)
Applied GIS and Geospatial Data Analysis
Population Vulnerability and Resilience

For students following the MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare) route, ‘Social Impacts on Population’ is a core module, and ‘Qualitative Methods in Social Research’ is an option module.

Students enrolled on the MSc programme also complete a dissertation.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework (essays, practical classes, projects), examination and dissertation (for Masters students).

Careers

The course seeks to offer students a wide range of skills suitable for entry into careers as information officers and analysts, research assistants and geographical system experts working in a business or government environment.

Research by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) shows that the demand for Social Science Masters students with quantitative research skills far outstrips supply. This degree programme course has strong emphasis in this area, but the optional modules allow you to tailor the course to your personal career ambitions.

Previous students from our other MSc programmes have gone on to work for local authority planning departments, the General Registrars Office Scotland (census office), GIS analysts for Tayside Police, ONS social analysis unit, and also as research assistants within the University sector.

"The course allowed me to develop on an academic and personal level through its range of critical thinking and skill based modules. I appreciated the broad themes set out by lecturers as it provided an opportunity to integrate my own research interests into class assignments and discussions, enhancing the individual relevancy it had for my classmates and I. Since completing the course in September 2012, I have started working towards a PhD in the Geography department at Dundee, incorporating many of the attributes that I learned at MSc level. The training, support and enthusiasm offered on the course gave me the confidence to undertake fieldwork overseas and inspired me to pursue a future career in academia"

Jade Catterson, studied full-time 2011-12
ESRC-funded PhD student, University of Dundee

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Study for your MPhil at Sheffield Hallam’s. Cultural, Communication and Computing Research Institute (C3RI). C3RI an inspiringly diverse multidisciplinary group which makes connections between the research traditions of. Read more

Study for your MPhil at Sheffield Hallam’s Cultural, Communication and Computing Research Institute (C3RI). C3RI an inspiringly diverse multidisciplinary group which makes connections between the research traditions of

  • art
  • design and media production
  • communication studies
  • computing.

The Institute consists of two research centres

We provide an environment in which each discipline can develop its own approach to research. At the same time we bring people together on questions that cut across traditional subject boundaries.

Research activity at C3RI

Our work covers strategic and applied research as well as covering research into teaching and learning. Much of it is through partnerships with businesses and professional collaborators.

Research is supported by research councils, the European Union, commercial clients, charitable bodies and government.

We support a PhD research programme with over 80 students. We also maintain many knowledge transfer partnerships that support close collaboration between academics, researchers and industrial partners.

Design Futures

C3RI also houses Design Futures, a commercially-focused product and packaging design consultancy group based within Sheffield Hallam University.

Design Futures has had specialist design teams working exclusively on commercial consultancy services for several years. These teams have developed award winning, innovative solutions for many clients, some of which have been patented.

Course Structure

MPhil – two years full-time, or three years part-time

Start dates – September, January or May.

Candidates are required to critically investigate and evaluate an approved topic, to demonstrate an understanding of research methods appropriate to their chosen field and to present and defend a thesis by oral examination.

Supervision

Each student is allocated a director of studies and a supervisor. Regular meetings between the student and supervisors are scheduled, with targets set for written and oral presentation of research progress.

Research training

Some students may be required to complete research training modules if not already studied as part of a masters degree. This can have fee implications for part-time students, but is included in the full-time fee.

Additional training sessions to benefit doctoral students will be arranged and advertised to students, by the Faculty and the central Doctoral School, throughout the year at no additional cost.

Training is followed by, or delivered in conjunction with, theoretical and textual research, analysis and writing, working closely with the supervisors. Students are expected to present seminar papers on their work and to submit written papers for comment. Students will also be expected to attend relevant seminars and presentations from the research seminar series and other doctoral students.

Assessment

Thesis followed by oral examination 

Employability

Research degrees are a vital qualification for most academic careers and for professional specialisation within an existing or planned career. The rigorous analytical thinking they involve is also an attractive feature for potential employers of all kinds.



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