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Masters Degrees (Research Ethics)

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This course is about researching the moral conflicts and ethical issues in contemporary Western culture and setting them against the backdrop of continental European philosophy. Read more

Master's specialisation Philosophical Ethics (Research)

This course is about researching the moral conflicts and ethical issues in contemporary Western culture and setting them against the backdrop of continental European philosophy.

There is no philosophical discipline that is more deeply rooted in the current and controversial socio-cultural debates than practical philosophy and more specifically than philosophical ethics. The rejuvenation of the philosophical tradition, when it comes to contemporary issues, is never more necessary or more exciting than in this field of philosophy. The hermeneutical perspective – which is so characteristics of philosophical ethics at Radboud University – combines the precise interpretation of influential texts with a focus on culture philosophical approaches, phenomenological analysis and ethical applications. A unique addition in the ethical discussion is the attention for ethical issues, especially in literary sources.

Key authors for this specialisation are, in chronological order, Aristoteles, Thomas van Aquino, Kant, Hegel, Schleiermacher, Heidegger, Gadamer, Levinas, Ricoeur, Habermas, Taylor and Toulmin.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophical Ethics, you investigate the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). This section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.
The department of ethics participates both in the research programme 'The project of a hermeneutic philosophy' as well as in the research programme ‘Ethos, Polis, Religion' (research programme in practical philosophy).
This section of the faculty investigates the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). For its ethical research it cooperates closely with the Centre for Ethics of Radboud University (in Dutch). The section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/ethics

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Philosophy or in a related discipline (in the latter case, students must have acquired at least 60 EC in Philosophical disciplines).
The applicant must have a degree with merit or distinction or equivalent. Meaning: a student’s weighted grade-point average in philosophy in the 2nd and 3rd year of their Bachelor's programme must be the equivalent of 7.5 or more (on the Dutch scale of 10).
On the page "Conversions of international grades" you will find an indication of what the equivalent of a Dutch 7.5 or 8 might be in the country where you obtained your Bachelor’s degree.

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Master's degree must either have obtained a higher diploma from an English-teaching institution or be in possession of one of the following certificates:
- A TOEFL score of >577 (paper based) or >233 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- An IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Highly motivated
An applicant must be able to demonstrate to the Examination Board that they have serious research interests and skills. Applicant must write a motivation letter and send a writing sample which can help evaluate their research and writing skills.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, including he ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- A big offer of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/ethics

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The MA Methods of Social Research provides essential training for employment where an understanding of social research is important, as well as for further academic research in a social science discipline. Read more
The MA Methods of Social Research provides essential training for employment where an understanding of social research is important, as well as for further academic research in a social science discipline.

This MA programme at Kent exposes students to a wide range of thinking and approaches in social science research presented in a multi-disciplinary context and at an advanced level.

The focus of the programme is on developing practical skills in data collection, in data analysis and interpretation, and in the presentation of research findings so that students gain insight into the research process from design to the production of new knowledge.

More generally students will broaden their understanding of the philosophical, theoretical and ethical issues that matter in research, and will become aware of debates about the relationship between theory and research and between research and policy/practice.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/119/methods-of-social-research

About the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR):
SSPSSR has a long and distinguished history, and is one of the largest and most successful social science research communities in Europe. It has received top ratings in Research Assessment Exercises, and most recently had 70% of its work judged as either “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” in terms of its “originality, significance and rigour”.

The School supports a large and thriving postgraduate community and in 2010 distributed in excess of £100,000 in Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) quota awards, and in University and SSPSSR bursaries and scholarships to new students.

Academic staff specialise in research of international, comparative and theoretical significance, and we have collective strengths in the following areas: civil society, NGOs and the third sector; cross-national and European social policy; health, social care and health studies; work, employment and economic life; risk, ‘risk society’ and risk management; race, ethnicity and religion; social and public policy; sociology and the body; crime, culture and control; sociological theory and the culture of modernity.

Course structure

Master's (MA):
The MA programme consists of:

- four compulsory one-unit modules (total of 80 credits, 40 ECTS)
- two optional one-unit modules or one two-unit module (total of 40 credits, 20 ECTS)
- and a supervised dissertation (60 credits, 30 ECTS).

The compulsory modules are:

- Qualitative Research
- Quantitative Data Analysis
- Critical Social Research: Truth, Ethics and Power
- Design of Social Research

The dissertation will be on a topic of your choosing and involves carrying out original empirical research using the research methods covered in modules.

Postgraduate Certificate/Diploma (PCert/PDip):
There is the option to take this programme as a Postgraduate Certificate, where you just take the four compulsory modules (80 credits). The Certificate is offered to all registered PhD students (part-time or full-time) within the Faculty of Social Sciences (not only to SSPSSR students) free of charge subject to supervisors’ consent.

You can also take it as a Postgraduate Diploma, where you take the four compulsory modules and two optional modules but without taking the dissertation (120 credits).

Full time or part time?:
The Programme can be taken either full-time over one year or part-time over two years. For part-time students, in the first year you take 'Design of Social Research' and 'Qualitative Data Analysis.' In the second year, you take 'Quantitative Research' and 'Using Research – Advanced Critical Skills'. Additional credits will be obtained from optional modules offered within the Faculty.

Assessment

Teaching for the MA will take a variety of forms, including lectures, tutor-led seminars, student-led seminars, small group work, workshops on data analysis, guided search of on-line data sources, and self-directed learning based on the University Library.

Students will be assessed in each module and on a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice.

Module assessments vary. Some require either one 5,000-word or two 2,500-word essays; others require more of a portfolio of work, including in-class tests. The individual module outlines contain the necessary information on assessment.

This programme aims to:

•provide appropriate methods training for students preparing an MA dissertation or MPhil/DPhil theses, or for students going on to employment involving the use of social science research

•introduce you to a variety of different approaches to social science research, presented in a multidisciplinary context

•cover the principles of research design and strategy, including formulating research questions or hypotheses and translating these into practicable research designs

•make you aware of the range of secondary data available and equip you to evaluate their utility for research

•develop skills in searching for and retrieving information, using library and internet resources in a multidisciplinary context

•introduce you to the philosophical, theoretical and ethical issues surrounding research and the debates about the relationship between theory and research, the problems of evidence and inference, and the limits of objectivity

•develop skills in the use of SPSS and other statistical techniques of data analysis, including multivariate analysis

•develop skills in writing, the preparation of a research proposal, the presentation of research results, and verbal communication

•help you to prepare your research results for wider dissemination, such as seminar papers, conference presentations, reports and publications to a range of audiences, including academics, policymakers, professionals, service users and the general public

•give you an appreciation of the potential and problems of social research in local, regional, national and international settings.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills.

We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills.

You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Read more
Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Develop a sophisticated understanding of psychological research, from the creation of questions you’ll need to ask, through to the meaningful organisation of results. Be primed for a research role across a range of sectors, including consultancy and government agencies, and have the foundation for future PhD work.

Key features

-Designed to provide you with the understanding and skills to help you develop academic or commercial careers based on psychological research.
-Choose to study full time over one year, or take the flexible two year part-time pathway to fit in with your career plans or caring commitments.
-Be confident studying with us – this programme is provided by the School of Psychology, which was recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise with 85 per cent of activity judged to be of international standard, placing it in the top third of departments nationally.
-Benefit from a programme recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the research training within the 1+3 framework.
-Receive thorough training in research methodology and design, as well as the philosophical issues that underpin your research decisions.
-Learn to analyse a problem, select the appropriate methodology and understand the implications of your choice.
-Gain the skills and knowledge to conduct research in a rigorous, appropriate and ethical manner, using a range of techniques (qualitative and quantitative) in a range of settings (experimental, observational, fieldwork, and focus groups).
-Hone your ability to communicate your research findings effectively to different audiences, both orally and in writing.
-Equip yourself, as part of the masters programme, with the skills and experience to design and conduct a major psychological research project.
-Learn from a teaching team with the in-depth knowledge of many areas of psychology and experience of publishing both fundamental and applied research in the best scientific journals. Their expertise, spanning from ethics to research design and statistics, offers you the ideal environment to develop your research skills.
-Immerse yourself in our school’s newly refurbished laboratory and teaching space, including electrophysiology (ERP), Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), virtual reality and eye-tracking laboratories.
-Benefit from our school’s research expertise. The Centre for Brain, Behaviour and Cognition attracts substantial external funding from UK research councils, the EU, charities and industry.
-Acquire skills that are highly prized by a wide range of employers, and be ready to join previous students employed in academia, consultancy, government agencies and non-governmental bodies.
-Contemplating a PhD in the future? This programme will provide you with the essential pre-requisites for research at this level, including a thorough grounding in research methodology, design and analysis as well as the philosophical issues that underpin research decisions.

Course details

You’ll cover the whole spectrum of psychological research skills and most research methods used by psychologists, and have the opportunity to study methods that are particularly relevant to you. We aim to equip you with high-level research skills and give you the opportunity to apply these skills in original psychological research. Early in the programme, you’ll begin a substantial independent piece of research and continue this throughout the year. Special emphasis is placed on practical research skills and communication - these are integrated in project work to achieve professional standards of psychological research. If you study full time the programme lasts one year starting in late September and involves attendance for at least two days a week over two 12-week teaching periods. Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the postgraduate diploma award. If you want to study part time please discuss your requirements with the Programme Director.

Core modules
-PSY558 Evaluating Complex Interventions
-PSY556 Statistical Methods for Experimental and Clinical Research
-PSY561 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 1
-PSY557 Quantitative Analysis of Complex Clinical and Behavourial Data
-PSY555 Communication of Research for Psychology
-PSY562 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 2
-PSY572 Project
-PSY559 Experimental Research Design
-PSY560 Qualitative Research Methods for Psychology
-PSY571 Project Planning and Literature Search

Optional modules
-PSY567 Designing for Behaviour Change
-PSY566 Issues in Behaviour Change
-PSY568 Issues in Clinical Psychology
-PSY569 The Brain and its Disorders
-PSY564 Understanding Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
-PSY570 Issues in Cognitive and Brain Science
-PSY577 Foundations in Clinical Psychology: Children and Families
-PSY563 Understanding Risky Behaviour

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The aims of the course are to provide an understanding of key contemporary research problems in a range of disciplines in either the humanities and social sciences or physical sciences relating to the Arctic and Antarctica, and for students to undertake original research on a topic selected in consultation with members of staff. Read more
The aims of the course are to provide an understanding of key contemporary research problems in a range of disciplines in either the humanities and social sciences or physical sciences relating to the Arctic and Antarctica, and for students to undertake original research on a topic selected in consultation with members of staff.

Taught material is presented in the Michaelmas Term, usually in the form of seminars. The material is organized in two strands, suitable for students interested in the humanities and social sciences or in the natural sciences. It is examined through the submission of three essays, which can take the form of research papers. In the Lent and Easter terms students carry out research towards their dissertations. Dissertation topics are agreed with supervisors and are closely integrated with the ongoing research activities of the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI). Students are expected to participate in internal and external research seminars, and a research forum.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/eaggmpmps

Course detail

The outcomes of the course are achieved both through focused study of specialised aspects of research on the Arctic and Antarctic, either in terms of Arts and Humanities or the Sciences, and through the development of research skills and methods. The following outcomes of student learning are sought:

Knowledge of ideas: Students gain familiarity with an appropriate range of intellectual and methodological traditions relevant to the study of the Arctic and Antarctic. For the humanities and social science strand, students draw on material from Geography, Anthropology, Political Science and other social sciences, and understand the significance of different epistemological positions that provide the context for research. For the physical sciences strand, students will become familiar with theories and empirical work from, amongst other areas, the fields of glaciology, oceanography and atmospheric science. They will gain knowledge and understanding of the field-based, remote sensing and modelling techniques used in polar science research. The teaching is provided via lectures and seminars, research supervision via bi-weekly meetings between students and their supervisor and sessions concerning research skills. Students also attend the research seminars held in their research groups. This allows exchange of ideas and debate with more experienced academic researchers and their peers;

Critical skills: Students become skilled and critical readers of Arctic and/or Antarctic publications and data sets. This is achieved through structured reading associated with each module, as well as via supervision on the essays and dissertation;

Substantive knowledge of ideas: Students gain in-depth knowledge of substantive areas of Arctic and/or Antarctic research. This knowledge is gained in the modules on The Emerging Arctic, Northern Peoples, Polar Remote Sensing, Glacier and Ice Sheet Dynamics: Present and Past. Students gain an in-depth knowledge either of underlying patterns of development, conservation and cultural transformation in the Arctic and/or Antarctic regions, or of the physical processes at work in these regions, how these have changed in the past and are changing currently, and the methods and techniques for investigating them;

Research design skills: Students develop their capacity to frame research questions, to derive appropriate research designs, and develop awareness of different epistemological approaches. This is achieved through the ‘Research Training’ sections of course;

Practical research skills: Students gain a competence and confidence in using a range of qualitative and/or quantitative methods for gathering, analysing and interpreting data. This is achieved through the ‘Research Training’ sections of course and the dissertation;

Presentation skills: Students gain skills in the presentation of research-based evidence and argument. Students are expected to take an active role in the research seminars of the research groups to which they belong and to contribute actively to seminar discussions. They are also expected to present their dissertation aims, methods, preliminary results, and plans for future work at a student forum held part way through their dissertation research period;

Management and other transferable skills: Students gain skills in managing a research project, and its execution (including, where appropriate, elements of data management, understanding ethics and codes of good practice in cross-cultural research, understanding uncertainty, disseminating research). Several of these elements are taught in the ‘Research Training’ sections of course, and then are extended and applied via the dissertation research, which has individual supervision from an experienced researcher.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation that, at the discretion of the examiners, can include an oral examination on the thesis and the essays and on the general field of knowledge.
- Three essays or other exercises of up to 4,000 words each.

Continuing

70% overall in MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

AHRC for Arts and History topics approved by the AHRC DTP at University of Cambridge.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Our MSc is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the research training guidelines for undertaking a PhD in Sociology, Social Policy, Social Work or Socio-legal Studies, as well as preparing you for an ESRC-recognised interdisciplinary PhD in Families, Relationships and Demographic Change and Social Care. A course on Applied Social Research (Criminology) is also available.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January See
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin social scientific research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative social research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Social Research comprises six compulsory taught core modules, and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: The Nature of Social Enquiry; Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Comparative Social Research; Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research.
These modules comprise a series of reading groups in which a number of central ideas are debated.

In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original social science research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- A Study of High Risk Behaviour
- Young People and National Identity
- Substance Use Prevalence and Looked-after Young People in Scotland
- Women’s Decisions about Returning to Work After Childbirth

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of the research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was ‘Internationally Excellent’ with the top 10 percent of that judged to be ‘World-leading’.

Career opportunities

Over the past five years, over half of our graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, for example, a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation.
In general, one in ten graduates have enhanced their practice in current posts by undertaking studies in Applied Social Research, with support from their employer. Over one third of our graduates continue with academic study and undertake a PhD.

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The research interests of staff members include theological ethics, social and political ethics, chaplaincy and pastoral studies, homiletics, the ethics of communication (with special reference to the media) and environmental ethics. Read more

Research profile

The research interests of staff members include theological ethics, social and political ethics, chaplaincy and pastoral studies, homiletics, the ethics of communication (with special reference to the media) and environmental ethics. Both staff and student bodies are ecumenical in composition.

There is a research seminar for staff and students to which visiting speakers are invited. Taught courses, at an advanced level, which contribute to your interest and research needs, may be undertaken where available.

The School of Divinity is home to a thriving research community. All of our academic staff are engaged in individual research and writing projects and many are also involved in collaborative projects with colleagues across the globe.

The School of Divinity has consistently scored exceptionally highly in the Research Assessment Exercise, the most recent assessment putting us among the best schools in theology, philosophical theology and religious studies in the UK.

Our researchers currently boast the highest percentage of 4* scores (world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour) of any Scottish university in theology and religious studies.

We have the largest number of divinity research-active staff in Scotland, and the third largest in the UK. Overall, the RAE ranked us third in the UK with 60 per cent of our research activity judged internationally excellent or world-leading.

Our community comprises 450 students (undergraduate and postgraduate) and nearly 30 full-time academic staff, including internationally respected scholars in a wide range of specialisms.

We welcome students from around the world, from religious and non-religious backgrounds, taking pride in our status as a renowned research centre in a broad spectrum of subject areas.

Training and support

We take a personal interest in our students and offer a welcoming and friendly setting in which to pursue the exciting and demanding study of theology and religious studies.

The large graduate school and the presence of visiting academics from around the world help ensure a diverse and stimulating research environment.

All research students are assigned a primary and secondary supervisor. You are offered a training course in research methods, and are given conscientious supervision from your first weeks through to submission of your thesis.

There are also special orientation events for international students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate researcher you can draw on the outstanding library resources of New College, the University of Edinburgh and the nearby National Library of Scotland.

New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection, including the papers of Thomas Chalmers, John Baillie, JH Oldham and James S Stewart.

The strengths of the Library collections contribute greatly to the teaching and research of members of the School as well as students elsewhere in the University.

These collections are complemented by the many resources available in the University and beyond. The total holdings in all the University libraries exceed 2.25 million volumes. In addition, the National Library of Scotland holds more than five million volumes.

The New College Library boasts a magnificent reading hall, originally built as the sanctuary of the Free High Kirk.

The School provides extensive and well-equipped computing facilities for coursework and research at all levels, including dissertations. We provide all students with access to PCs, scanners and printers, across four labs.

Research opportunities

We offer two types of research-based masters degree, as well as PhD programmes.

Masters by Research (MSc by Research/MTh by Research)

These one-year masters degrees by research are designed for students with an academic training in divinity or religious studies (or other relevant subject) who wish to focus on a particular topic.

The programme may be taken as either a Master of Theology by Research or a Master of Science by Research. The difference is one of nomenclature only.

Both involve research training and orientation courses, after which you may either research and submit a dissertation of about 30,000 words, which comprises the remaining assessment for the degree, or write three supervised research essays to provide appropriate background and preparatory study for the topic of your research, and then submit a dissertation of about 15,000 words.

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This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Read more
This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Taught units provide intensive training in research methodology, experimental design, statistical analyses and data interpretation. Skills training in verbal and written communication is also emphasised.

The core of the programme is an eight-month research project, conducted within one of the University of Bristol's internationally recognised research groups in either the Faculty of Health Sciences or the Faculty of Biomedical Sciences. Opportunities will be available in laboratory or clinical-based investigations.

The programme is suitable for medical, dental and veterinary students interested in pursuing a research-intensive intercalation option after three years of study. It is also suitable for graduates in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science and bioscience subjects who wish to develop their research skills.

Programme structure

This programme is delivered by research scientists and clinicians through lectures, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials.

Unit 1: Introduction to Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit introduces a variety of research methods used in basic and applied clinical research including: finding and reading relevant research information; presenting research results; basic statistical analysis; data interpretation; ethics; public engagement; and commercialising research.

Unit 2: Further Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit aims to develop further knowledge and practical experience in statistical analyses, experimental design and laboratory methods and includes training in the use of a statistical software package and practical experience in several laboratory techniques.

Unit 3: Project Proposal in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit involves planning and writing a research project proposal (4500 words), which includes a literature review, aims, impact, research plan, ethical considerations, contingency plans, timetable and references.

Unit 4: Research Club in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit aims to develop your ability to present, critically evaluate and discuss scientific findings by contributing to journal clubs, attending and summarising research seminars and presenting your own research.

Unit 5: Research Project in Health Sciences Research (120 credits).
During this unit you will gain extensive experience in scientific/clinical research by conducting an independent project related to an area of interest to you. You will write up your research in the form of a thesis (10,000 words), and present and discuss your work in a viva and research symposium.

Careers

This programme is suitable for those with a clinical or biosciences background who wish to develop their research skills before embarking on a research/clinical career in academia or the pharmaceutical industry. It provides the ideal foundation for further studies leading to a PhD.

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Within the health and care professions, the demand for evidence-based practice has led to an increasing need for high-quality. research to underpin practice. Read more
Within the health and care professions, the demand for evidence-based practice has led to an increasing need for high-quality
research to underpin practice. A Master of Clinical Research will provide graduates with the education and experience necessary in order to plan and undertake health-related, or clinically-based research.

This multi-disciplinary course aims to provide a broad, foundational research training for nurses, midwives and other
health and care professionals who wish to develop careers in clinical or academic research as well as those who may wish to continue on to doctoral studies. The course will focus on preparing students to undertake projects relevant to their practice through the development of skills and knowledge in research methodologies, project management, research governance and evidence-based practice.

Teaching, learning and assessment

The course will comprise of two 30-credit taught modules - Research Methods and Applied Research - plus an extended research project. These modules will focus on research methodologies, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, research
ethics, patient and public involvement, research governance, project management and disseminating research. The two taught modules will incorporate a range of teaching and learning activities which will be underpinned by the assumption that the adult learners on this course will already possess transferable skills and knowledge related to evidence-based practice. Considerable use will be made of the virtual learning environment through which students will be supported to develop their autonomy and self-direction in terms of learning further. Central to this will be the development of a community of practice through which students will support each
other to develop their research skills. Within this context, students will have the opportunity to engage with diverse teaching and learning activities which can include lectures, tutorials, asynchronous online discussions, collaborative working towards group presentations and/or seminar production, case study analysis, individual presentations and directed study. A key aspect of course is the research project. Assessment of the project will be staged, providing students with opportunities for formative feedback throughout. The final assessment will focus on the dissemination of the study findings in such a way as to have the maximum possible influence on practice.

Teaching hours and attendance

Research Methods classes run weekly during semester one and may be accessed either face-to-face or by distance learning. Applied Research classes run fortnightly over semesters one and two and are delivered face-to-face. During the research project, you will have up to 20 hours of one-to-one support from your supervisor.

Modules

30 credits: Research Methods / Applied Research
120 credits: Extended Research Project.

Careers

A non-medical clinical academic has been defined as a nurse, midwife or allied health professional who concurrently undertakes both clinical practice and research. A key aspect of their research is that it is focused on providing effective, quality healthcare services. Clinical academics will work within, and contribute to, an environment that will lead the way in achieving excellence in healthcare and health outcomes through evidence-based practice.

The introduction of our Master of Clinical Research, intended to support the development of clinical academics, will contribute to meeting this need. The Non- Medical Allied Health Professions (NMAHP) Clinical Academic Research Career Framework recommends this type of MRes education for those in the early stages of a clinical academic career and therefore the course will fit well with identified training needs of the NMAHP professions. Graduates may go on to develop research in their own practice areas, or continue to doctoral level studies.

Quick Facts

■■ This course provides students with the skills to develop a career in clinical or academic research.
■■ Students can focus their studies on their own area of clinical interest while working in highly supportive peer groups.
■■ The extended research project allows students to address questions that are clinically relevant.

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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The aim of the MSc in Psychiatric Research is to provide advanced training in the scientific and ethical principles common to all mental health research disciplines, together with skills in statistics, epidemiology methods and both biological and social methodology. Read more
The aim of the MSc in Psychiatric Research is to provide advanced training in the scientific and ethical principles common to all mental health research disciplines, together with skills in statistics, epidemiology methods and both biological and social methodology. The course is aimed at psychiatrists, psychologists, other mental health practitioners (nurses and psychotherapists), and those students with no clinical background interested in a career that involves mental health research. The rigorous training in research methods will suit both UK and international students wishing to prepare for a career in research, or combine clinical activities with research, or pursue a PhD or training in clinical psychology or further professional development.

Key benefits

- In-depth, practical and theoretical knowledge on performing, interpreting and applying psychiatric research.
- Flexible, modular programme, allowing you to develop specific areas of interest
- Taught by academics who perform world-leading psychiatric research
- Transferrable skills training, for career planning and progression
- Optional voluntary clinical placement scheme.
- Full-time and part-time study.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/psychiatric-research-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme gives equal priority to social, epidemiological and biological research methods, emphasising the interface between these approaches, but its modular structure allows you to focus on any of the areas. The course has a practical orientation, developing skills in critical appraisal of existing research, hypothesis formulation, study design, data gathering, research management, data analysis, writing research reports and scientific publications. The programme consists of a core study module covering Study Design, Basic Epidemiology and Statistics, and several optional study units, including Social Psychiatry, Neuroimaging, Psychiatric Genetics, Advanced Statistical Methods and Brain Behaviour Interface. You will be learning from leading experts at the cutting edge of psychiatric research.

- Course purpose -

The MSc in Psychiatric Research provides advanced training in scientific research across the mental health disorders. In the first term, the course focuses on development of core skills in biological, epidemiological and social research methods, statistics and ethics. Students then develop their own areas of interest, through elective modules including neuroimaging, clinical trials, translational psychiatry, psychopharmacology, psychiatric genetics and brain-behaviour interface. These skills are applied and further developed through research dissertation projects, supervised by expert staff. Students are supported in developing their transferrable skills in preparation for the next stages in their careers.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time students complete all required modules in one year.

- TERM 1 (September-December): Research Methods, Ethics and Statistics in Mental Health
- TERM 2 (January-March): Choice of 4 optional modules
- TERM 3 (April-September): Introductory Modules & Research Dissertation

Part-time students normally complete Research Methods, Ethics and two Optional Modules in Year 1; and Statistics, two Optional Modules, their Research Dissertation and the Introductory Modules in Year 2.

Teaching methods include lectures, computer-based practicals, workshops and tutorials.

Assessment is by computer-based or written examinations, written course-work, research project and poster presentation.

Career prospects

Further research (PhD); enhanced careers in mental health and social care as clinicians and policy makers.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/study/prospective-students/Masters-Scholarships.aspx

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The work-based Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is aimed at Senior Practitioners engaged in health, social work or higher education. Read more
The work-based Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is aimed at Senior Practitioners engaged in health, social work or higher education. Equivalent to the traditional PhD, the DProf in Professional Practice is an innovative blend of taught modules and research projects which investigates the students own sphere of professional practice and workplace.

Studying for a DProf is a truly challenging and deeply rewarding experience, and Swansea University provides an excellent environment in which to pursue your research studies in Professional Practice.

Key Features of DProf in Professional Practice

A research degree in Professional Practice gives you the chance to pursue a research project based around your own passions and interests, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career, boost employment prospects outside academia, or enhance your existing skill set.

The Doctorate in Professional Practice (DProf) is the equivalent of a PhD, but differs in that it incorporates a training element along with three, theme-based, research projects which are focused on your own practice and workplace. This means you do not need to take time out of work to upgrade your qualifications.

Key features of the Professional Practice DProf include:

- Two compulsory research training modules of 30 credits each: ‘Introduction to Work-based Research in Professional Practice’ and ‘Planning Work-based Research’.
- A focus on identifying, planning, implementing and evaluating three work-based research projects.
- Pursuing research in Professional Practice which is of relevance to your workplace and role.
- An environment in which you can develop and enhance transferable skills such as problem solving, independent thinking, project management, and critical thinking.
- The support of two academic supervisors throughout your studies in Professional Practice.
- The availability of structured training, interdisciplinary seminars, dedicated research facilities and software from both the College and University.
- Support from a dynamic community of research staff and students each pursuing their own lines of research.

The most recent UK-wide assessment of the quality of research in HEI’s (the Research Assessment Exercise 2008), revealed that 70% of the research carried out by the College was of international or world-leading quality. With our research into the health disciplines demonstrating outstanding quality in originality, significance and rigour, students can be assured that they will be immersed in the dynamic and supportive research culture needed for their studies including the DProf in Professional Practice.

The DProf in Professional Practice is only offered on a part-time basis lasting six years in duration, and is open only to UK based students.

Drawing on cutting edge research, the College of Human and Health Sciences is bringing about real-life benefits for the healthcare, social care, voluntary and private sectors, ultimately leading to improvements for patients, users, practitioners, managers and policy makers.

As a forerunner in the field, the College is well placed to respond rapidly to changes in the delivery of care, whilst also establishing links with the main service providers in Wales, such as the NHS. Our researchers are continually working to tackle the challenges facing the health and social care system across the full range of areas, from biomedical studies, service organisation, workforce practices and public health through to policy and ethics.

Currently Professional Practice students are looking at effecting change in an elderly rehabilitation service, creating, implementing and evaluating an equitable lymphoedema service in Wales.

Facilities

Professional Practice students benefit from the College of Human and Health Sciences' state-of-the-art facilities including:

- Simulated clinical practice facilities and bioscience practice rooms, for realistic workplace experiences.
- Specialised psychology laboratories hosting a sleep laboratory; computer controlled visual and auditory displays for work on perception, attention, memory and language; an eye movement laboratory; fMRI brain scanner; EEG facilities and a nutrition laboratory.

We also have access to many different facilities and further equipment at organisations that we work closely with, such as the NHS.

Other resources include:

- Service Users and Carers Group which can help in providing essential advice or improving engagement between your research project and the user community.
- Structured training programmes, interdisciplinary seminars from worldwide speakers, dedicated research/study facilities and specialist analytical software.

As well as being immersed in the vibrant research community of the College and its research groups, you will also be able to access wider support and advice through the research networks staff are involved in, such as,

- Wales Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience
- Older Person and Ageing Network Cymru (OPAN):
- Welsh Health Economic Support Service (WHESS):

Research

Delivering high quality research is a key step in enhancing the health, social and economic well-being of all sections of society. It is essential that decisions on policy and practice are informed by the latest research findings and evidence available if we hope to improve organisational effectiveness and sustainability, social welfare and cohesion, and quality of life.

Through our cutting edge research, the College of Human and Health Sciences is bringing about real-life benefits for the health care, social care, voluntary and private sectors, ultimately leading to improvements for patients, users, practitioners, managers and policy makers.

As a forerunner in the field, the College is well-placed to respond rapidly to changes in the delivery of care, whilst also establishing links with the main service providers in Wales, such as the NHS and Local Authorities.

Our research is delivered through discipline focused research centres. In doing so, we have secured funding from a number of prestigious collaborators and funding bodies in recent years such as the Welsh Government, NHS Wales, Public Health Wales; European Union; Amgen Europe; Ministry of Defence; GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals; British Medical Association; National Institute for Social Care and Health Research; Astrazeneca; and the Wellcome Trust. These collaborations have been crucial in ensuring research informs, and is informed by, the wider healthcare environment.

Student Profile

Meet Wendy Mashlan, Doctorate in Professional Practice: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/media/Wendy%20Mashlan.pdf

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This modular part-time programme is particularly suitable for academically gifted medical and dental trainees with the potential to be the independent researchers of the future. Read more
This modular part-time programme is particularly suitable for academically gifted medical and dental trainees with the potential to be the independent researchers of the future.

Applications for admisson in October 2016 are now open, the deadline to receive applications by is Friday 29 July 2016 (12 noon UK time).

Description

This progamme is designed to be taken by Academic Clinical Fellows alongside work commitments, the Health Research programme exists to enable students to:

- develop skills of research, design and data analysis in both qualitative and quantitative research

- critically evaluate health research

- identify, critically appraise and incorporate the results of medical and social science research into the day-to-day decision-making of clinical, scientific and administrative practice

- apply the principles of evidence-based practice in health care settings

- plan how to implement the findings of research to improve health care

- use theories and principles underpinning clinical research to inform their own research practice.

The programme is delivered through the Department for Continuing Education, with the expertise in curriculum design and teaching drawn from the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, and the Oxford University Clinical Academic Graduate School.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-health-research

Programme details

The Postgraduate Certificate is normally completed between 1-2 years. It consists of three assessed taught modules and includes thorough introductions to the principles of evidence-based practice in health, and to study design and research methods.

Compulsory Modules

• The Practice of Evidence-Based Health Care
• Introduction to Study Design and Research Methods

The third module may be chosen from the following list:

- Clinical Trial Management
- Ethics for Biosciences
- Mixed Methods in Health Research
- Knowledge into Action
- Evidence-based Diagnosis and Screening
- Introduction to Statistics for Health Care Research
- Systematic Reviews
- Randomized Controlled Trials
- Qualitative Research Methods
- The Structure of Clinical Trials and Experimental Therapeutics
- How to do Research on Therapeutic Interventions: Protocol preparation
- Biological Therapeutics
- Pharmacodynamics, Biomarkers and Personalised Therapy
- Adverse drug reactions, drug interactions and Pharmacovigilance
- Drug development, Pharmacokinetics and Imaging

Course aims

At the end of the course students will be able to:

- demonstrate a knowledge of the principles, methods and techniques appropriate for solving evidence-based health care/health-research problems and be able to translate (through a critical comprehension of the relative advantages and disadvantages) that understanding into good clinical practice

- demonstrate a range of research skills enabling them to complete research successfully, either as part of a research team or as an individual

- acquire, interpret and analyse biological information with a critical understanding of the appropriate contexts for their use through the study of the existing primary literature in the field

- apply skills and expertise gained across the medical and biological sciences expected of professional researchers

Students will know and understand:

- health-care organizations, their management and the changing context in which they operate

- the ethical issues in health research and research governance

- methods to integrate and synthesise different sorts of information, from diverse sources, when making both individual patient and health-policy decisions in a wide range of situations

- the key issues for evidence-based practice in their own professional area or specialty

- how to work comfortably in situations of uncertainty and make sound judgements in the absence of definitive evidence

- research methods and concepts in the field of health and health care

All graduates of the Postgraduate Certificate in Health Research will be able to:

- understand the role of most commonly used methods appropriate for specifying problems through a critical comprehension of the relative advantages and disadvantages of these methods

- understand and express the main principles of some commonly applied techniques and methods

- explain the rationale for the selection of tools used in the analysis of phenomena.

Assessment methods

To complete the Postgraduate Certificate students must:

- Attend and complete the 2 compulsory modules and 1 option module.

Students will also be expected to complete three written assignments, usually of no more than 4000 words, one on each of the chosen modules above.

With the exception of the online modules, the EBHC modules are based on an eight week study cycle. Week One is a preparatory week where you may be required to undertake some pre-reading and to familiarise yourself with the Virtual Learning Environment. During Week Two you are required to attend the face to face teaching week in Oxford. This is followed by an additional six weeks where you are expected to participate in online activities and submit your assignment

Level and demands

Candidates will, in all but exceptional circumstances be admitted to the Postgraduate Certificate with optional progression on successful completion to the Diploma, provided that a candidate:

- has successfully completed the final year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery or Bachelor of Dental Surgery or equivalent; or

- has an appropriate degree or equivalent professional qualification in a profession allied to medicine with post-qualification experience

Applicants will be expected to demonstrate an approach to their study which includes demonstrable skills of critical analysis, wide contextual knowledge and the ability to manage their own time.

Additionally candidates should:

- have a good working knowledge of email, internet, word processing and Windows applications (for communications with course members, course team and administration)

- show evidence of the ability to commit time to study and an employer's commitment to make time available to study, complete course work and attend course and University events and modules

Successful candidates will normally provide evidence of all of the following:

- A professional interest in Health Research, evidenced by prior experience, qualification and work

- Motivation and ability to complete the course

- A clear and well argued understanding of the benefits of the course to the candidate's current employment and future prospects

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

Visit the Postgraduate Certificate in Health Research page on the University of Oxford website for more details!

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Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO.

This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological).

What will this programme give the student an opportunity to achieve?

- The ability to read, write, speak and understand Nepali to a level suitable for field research in Nepal
- A grounding in the scholarly literature on Nepali history, society and culture
- Expertise in anthropological theory and practice that will provide a basis for research in a Nepali context

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/

Structure

- Year 1
Students take a 1.0 unit Nepali language course (either Nepali Language 1 or Nepali Language 2); 1.0 unit Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya; 1.0 unit Theoretical Approaches in Social Anthropology (or other anthropology options, chosen in consultation with programme convenor, for students with equivalent anthropology training); 0.5 unit Media Production Skills; and 0.5 units of anthropology options.

- Summer break between years 1 and 2
Two weeks of intensive Nepali language tuition at SOAS after the June exams, followed by two months in Kathmandu, attached to the Nepā School of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Bishwo Bhasa Campus of Tribhuvan University. At the end of the summer students will be required to submit a 5000-word preliminary fieldwork report and research proposal, accompanied by a 500-word abstract written in Nepali.

- Year 2
Students take the following courses: 1.5 unit Nepali for researchers; 1.0 unit Anthropological Research Methods (0.5 units Ethnographic Research Methods in term 1 and 0.5 units in Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research in term 2). They also attend the compulsory weekly MPhil Research Training Seminar in anthropology and write a 15,000 word MA Dissertation.

Language courses will be assessed though a mixture of written papers and oral examinations.

Non-language courses will be assessed on the basis of coursework essays and written papers.

Programme Specification (msword; 668kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/file68458.rtf

Teaching & Learning

What methods will be used to achieve the learning outcomes?

Knowledge:
1. How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research sources (particularly research library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.

2. The Research Methods course focuses on teaching the various research methods associated with anthropological fieldwork including: participant observation, historical research, qualitative interviewing, quantitative data collection, Rapid Participatory Assessment, how to design questionnaires and, especially, on how to formulate a research question and design a project and consider the ethical issues involved. The Statistics courseworks on how to compile statistics, and how to critically assess statistics.

3. The Research Training course, which is assessed by the Masters dissertation, works on students’ writing skills with an emphasis on thinking of the history of the discipline, writing to schedule, writing to requested word count, how to formulate a research question based on the material gathered, as well as how to do a presentation, how to comment on presentations and how to apply for funding. Term three looks at the strategies for working on the Masters’ dissertation and how to be upgraded at the start of the MPhil year.

4. A good grounding in the sociocultural and political history of and contemporary sociocultural and political issues in Nepal, and familiarity with the scholarly literature on these topics.

5. Proficiency in spoken and written Nepali sufficient for the purposes of anthropological field research: ability to conduct conversations and interviews, and read and synthesise information from Nepali written sources.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. They should be able to design a research project, set a timetable, understand the principles of fieldwork, and consider questions of ethics.

3. Students should learn to read each others’ work for both its strengths and weaknesses, develop their skills as public speakers, learn how to compose short abstracts of their project (for funding), be able to think critically and yet be open to being critiqued themselves.

Subject-based practical skills

The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing, in both English and (at a less advanced level) Nepali
2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources in both English and Nepali.
3. Present seminar papers.
4. Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
5. Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.
6. Be prepared to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD.

Transferable skills

The programme will encourage students to:

1. Write good essays and dissertations.
2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
3. Understand unconventional ideas.
4. Present (non–assessed) material orally.
5. Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
6. Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
7. Be prepared to enter an Anthropology PhD programme and to be upgraded from MPhil to PhD in the shortest possible time.

Destinations

Students who study MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
This course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (e.g. Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (i.e. evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiners’ Report (May 2012)

“Overall, students on these programmes (MSc Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology) are producing work of a very good quality. It is clear that the programme develops students’ theoretical and research knowledge base, critical thinking and evaluation skills, understanding of research methods and a range of analytical techniques, and communication and professional skills to a very high level.”

In addition to the above, students undertake an optional module from either Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching. They also study two additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

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The Department of Biology research has been judged world leading in biochemistry, chronic disease, microbiology, plant biology and ecology and it is competitive internationally in all fields of investigation. Read more
The Department of Biology research has been judged world leading in biochemistry, chronic disease, microbiology, plant biology and ecology and it is competitive internationally in all fields of investigation. With a commitment to interdisciplinary research, our research is arranged in eight foci that use state of the art technology to address three global challenges facing humanity.

Our almost 70 principal investigators are supported by current grants totalling £55 million. Every step of our research is carried out with the indispensable help of postgraduate students. No matter which area of Biology you specialise in, you will be working alongside some of the world’s biggest names in their respective fields, at the cutting edge of scientific exploration.

We have around 120 research students, and we take good care of them. As a research student you can expect:
-A supervisor who directs your research and training
-Your supervisor to spend at least 1 hour per week with you
-A Thesis Advisory Panel of 2 other staff to monitor progress and offer advice
-A progress meeting with your supervisor every 2 months
-A Thesis Advisory Panel meeting every 6 months for which you prepare a report
-A programme of training in research and transferable skills tailored to your needs
-Opportunities to attend seminars by leading scientists from around the world, and to present your own work through posters and talks

Training

All our research students benefit from a balanced programme of training in broader research-related skills that enhance their career prospects. This is tailored to individual needs, taking into account previous experience and future career aims.
-General courses for all students include project planning, writing and presentation, ethics, media, etc.
-Specific courses for individual needs might include advanced science training through our Masters modules in bioinformatics, etc.
-All students are expected to attend a UK GRAD school or similar intensive residential course.
-York Biology employs a Graduate Skills Coordinator who oversees this provision and develops it to meet the needs of all our students.
-Each student has a training record and needs to spend about two weeks each year on training activities
-Our programme is designed to meet and exceed the requirements of the UK research councils.

Careers

A research degree is internationally recognised as a demonstration that you have the skills, intellect and motivation to carry out original research and present it convincingly. It is more or less essential to have a research degree if you plan a career as an independent researcher with responsibility for your own research programme, whether in academia, research institutes, or industry. In this case, the next stage will probably be a postdoctoral position where you will broaden your research experience and perhaps do some teaching and help to supervise other staff and students.

A lifetime of research is not for everyone, though, and there are many other careers in which the skills you develop during your research degree will certainly not be wasted. You will have learnt to think rigorously for yourself, to find information and teach yourself what you need to know, to present your case convincingly in writing and to an audience, to meet deadlines, and to plan your work effectively on short and long timescales. Employers of all kinds recognise and value skills like these.

Facilities

All research students have access to:
-Modern, well-equipped research labs
-Your own desk in a write-up area outside the lab
-The Technology Facility – a very special feature of York – with advanced equipment and expert staff to help you use it; all research students get an annual allowance to use the TF for training and research
-Catering and social areas on site to meet your friends and keep yourself going through those late-running experiments.

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