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Successful completion of this course will result in the award of a Practice Certificate in Independent Prescribing. The course of study involves. Read more

Why this course?

Successful completion of this course will result in the award of a Practice Certificate in Independent Prescribing.

The course of study involves:
- pre-residential course activity
- distance learning material
- two residential periods
- a period of learning in practice, under the supervision of a designated medical practitioner.

You'll be awarded 30 ScotCat credits on completion of the course.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/pharmacistindependentprescribing/

What you'll study

- therapeutics from a choice of cardiovascular, respiratory disease and infection, rheumatology, diabetes, substance misuse, renal medicine and palliative care
- communicating with patients & colleagues
- prescribing & public health
- care planning

You'll also undertake a Period of Learning in Practice (PLP). The aim is to provide you with opportunities to develop competencies in prescribing. This period focuses on the patient group(s) in which you'll be expecting to prescribe.

Facilities

Our high-quality, dedicated facilities include a dispensary with consulting area, clean room facility and pharmaceutical processing and analysis suites. You will have first-hand experience of the full range of professional activities in a modern training environment.

Entry requirements

All pharmacists must meet the following requirements:
- current registration with GPhC &/or PSNI as a practising pharmacist

- have at least two years appropriate patient orientated experience practising in a hospital, community or primary care setting following their pre-registration year

- have identified an area of clinical practice and need in which to develop their prescribing skills

- have up-to-date clinical, pharmacological and pharmaceutical knowledge relevant to their intended area of prescribing practice

- demonstrate how they reflect on their own performance and take responsibility for their own continuing professional development (CPD)

- demonstrate how they'll develop their own networks for support, reflection and learning, including prescribers from other professions.

- have a designated medical practitioner who has agreed to supervise period of learning in practice

Designated medical practitioner requirements

The designated medical practitioner must be able to confirm that they:
- have had at least three years medical, treatment and prescribing responsibility for a group of patients in the relevant field of practice

- work within a GP Practice or are a specialist registrar, clinical assistant or a consultant within an NHS Trust or other NHS employer

- have some experience or training in teaching and/or supervision in practice

- agree to provide supervision, support and shadowing opportunities, and are familiar with the requirements of the programme

Course content

The course of study involves pre-residential course activity, distance learning material, two residential periods and a period of learning in practice, under the supervision of a designated medical practitioner. Students will be awarded 30 ScotCat credits on completion of the course.

Residential training

This element of the course is at Scottish Masters (SHEM) level 5 throughout. It's delivered through two residential periods that are taught here at the University of Strathclyde.

The first residential period of five days includes four classes, worth five credits each:
- therapeutics from a choice of cardiovascular, respiratory disease and infection, rheumatology, diabetes, substance misuse, renal medicine and palliative care
- communicating with patients & colleagues
- prescribing & public health
- care planning

Full attendance during the residential period is essential.

The second residential period of half a day will normally take place approximately six weeks after the first residential period. It involves peer review sessions designed to demonstrate clinical and ethical practice.

Period of Learning in Practice (PLP)

The aim is to provide you with opportunities to develop competencies in prescribing. This period focuses on the patient group(s) in which you'll be expecting to prescribe. The PLP starts after the first residential period.

The PLP is made up of a series of sessions (combination of full and/or half days) that involve prescribing and clinical activities. This should equate to a minimum of 12 days, but is subject to decision by the pharmacist and their supervisor based on the challenges of the individual prescribing roles being adopted by different pharmacists.

This PLP time will be used to develop clinical skills including:
- accurate assessment
- history-taking
- recognition and response to common signs and symptoms and formulation of a working diagnosis

During this period you'll be supervised by a designated medical prescriber who will be responsible for confirming your competence to practise.

A portfolio providing evidence that the required time has been spent (minimum 90 hours) and the learning outcomes achieved will be submitted along with a statement of assessment from the designated medical supervisor. The assessment will confirm the pharmacist's clinical competence in the area(s) for which they intend to prescribe.

The period in practice must be completed within 12 months of the residential course.

Assessment

Some assessments will be completed before attending the residential period and some will be completed after.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

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The aim of our research into human health and disease is to apply our findings to improve patient care. We invite applications for MPhil projects in all of our clinical research areas. Read more
The aim of our research into human health and disease is to apply our findings to improve patient care. We invite applications for MPhil projects in all of our clinical research areas. You will work with a team of academic and clinical supervisors whose research interests match your own.

We offer supervision for MPhil, PhD and MD in the following areas:
-Anaesthesia
-Care of the elderly
-Child health
-Critical care
-Dermatology
-Diabetes
-ENT (ear, nose and throat)
-Liver
-Musculoskeletal disease
-Oncology
-Ophthalmology
-Neuroscience
-Primary care
-Psychiatry
-Renal medicine/urology
-Reproductive medicine
-Respiratory and cardiac medicine
-Transplantation

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Sports Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Sports Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has a flourishing research environment looking at elite sports performance and exercise health and medicine.

Key Features of MSc by Research in Sports Science

Sport and Exercise Science research at Swansea University takes place in the Applied Sports, Technology, Exercise and Medicine (A-STEM) research centre. Engaging in research, teaching and third mission activity that spans the artificial boundaries between traditional disciplines. Swansea University is unique as the only research-intensive university in the UK where Sport and Exercise Science is located in Engineering.

Research activity in Sport and Exercise Science is in two main areas:

Elite Sports Performance
Exercise Medicine and Health

Our research spans the areas of, science, technology, health and medicine applied to sport, exercise and health settings with children, older people, clinical groups and elite international sports people. Importantly, sport and exercise science research is applied in nature and populates teaching, third mission activities and work-related learning opportunities. It has impact on elite sport, students, industry, patients and the general public.

MSc by Research in Sports Science typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

The A-STEM Research Centre has developed its own laboratories that rank alongside the most prestigious and well known universities in the UK.

Find out more about the facilities used by Sports Science students and Researchers at Swansea University.

Swansea University also has a proud reputation for sporting excellence and outstanding sporting facilities. See a 365 degree panoramic of the Sports Village: including the Wales National Pool, Gym, Indoor Courts, Running Track, Astroturf and Indoor Track.

Links with Industry

In addition to teaching and research, academic staff are actively engaged with applied practice and consultancy in sport and exercise settings.
 
Our well-established links include organisations such as:
 


Diabetes UK
Haemaflow
Swansea NHS Trust
Carmarthenshire NHS Trust

UK Sport
Sport Wales
Welsh Rugby Union
International Rugby Board (IRB)

We also work with elite sports teams including:


Scarlets Rugby
Ospreys Rugby
Swansea City AFC
West Ham United AFC
British Bobsleigh
British Bobskeleton
British Cycling
Wales 7s Rugby

Our staff also regularly consult in exercise settings with populations with chronic disease, including diabetes, cardiac rehabilitation and renal care.

Research

Sport and exercise science research occurs within the world-leading Applied Sports Technology Exercise Medicine (A-STEM) Research Centre.

Significant research in diabetes and health as well as sedentary behaviour, physical activity, fitness, fundamental movement skills in childhood obesity is undertaken by a number of clinical exercise science staff.

Our elite sport performance group is leading a project supported by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government to position Wales at the forefront of Science, Technology and Medicine in elite sport and to promote its wider application in health and education. This project represents a unique collaboration of leading Welsh academics, businesses and sport, with the overall objective of enhancing their respective performances.

Fundamental links integrating engineering and sport and exercise science research are being developed by the Sports Visualisation Group who analyse video material to rapidly produce data for immediate analysis of sports performance. Recently the Engineering Behaviour Analytics in Sport and Exercise (E-BASE) research group was set up to investigate the use of advanced sensor and processing technology to quantify training and activity in sport and clinical populations respectively.

We have international research links and projects with universities in Southern and Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USE, Italy and Austria.

Student quote

I chose Swansea University to study my MSc Sports Science by Research because Swansea has a great reputation for sports and exercise research and the A-STEM research project is an exciting environment to be part of. Swansea also has great funding opportunities for postgraduate study and it is a really friendly and supportive university.

Zoe Marshall, Sports Science, MSc by Research

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The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Read more
The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Research areas include: genetic medicine, developmental genetics, neuromuscular and neurological genetics, mitochondrial genetics and cardiovascular genetics.

As a research postgraduate in the Institute of Genetic Medicine you will be a member of our thriving research community. The Institute is located in Newcastle’s Life Science Centre. You will work alongside a number of research, clinical and educational organisations, including the Northern Genetics Service.

We offer supervision for MPhil in the following research areas:

Cancer genetics and genome instability

Our research includes:
-A major clinical trial for chemoprevention of colon cancer
-Genetic analyses of neuroblastoma susceptibility
-Research into Wilms Tumour (a childhood kidney cancer)
-Studies on cell cycle regulation and genome instability

Cardiovascular genetics and development

We use techniques of high-throughput genetic analyses to identify mechanisms where genetic variability between individuals contributes to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. We also use mouse, zebrafish and stem cell models to understand the ways in which particular gene families' genetic and environmental factors are involved in the normal and abnormal development of the heart and blood vessels.

Complex disease and quantitative genetics

We work on large-scale studies into the genetic basis of common diseases with complex genetic causes, for example autoimmune disease, complex cardiovascular traits and renal disorders. We are also developing novel statistical methods and tools for analysing this genetic data.

Developmental genetics

We study genes known (or suspected to be) involved in malformations found in newborn babies. These include genes involved in normal and abnormal development of the face, brain, heart, muscle and kidney system. Our research includes the use of knockout mice and zebrafish as laboratory models.

Gene expression and regulation in normal development and disease

We research how gene expression is controlled during development and misregulated in diseases, including the roles of transcription factors, RNA binding proteins and the signalling pathways that control these. We conduct studies of early human brain development, including gene expression analysis, primary cell culture models, and 3D visualisation and modelling.

Genetics of neurological disorders

Our research includes:
-The identification of genes that in isolation can cause neurological disorders
-Molecular mechanisms and treatment of neurometabolic disease
-Complex genetics of common neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease
-The genetics of epilepsy

Kidney genetics and development

Kidney research focuses on:
-Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS)
-Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR)
-Cystic renal disease
-Nephrolithiasis to study renal genetics

The discovery that aHUS is a disease of complement dysregulation has led to a specific interest in complement genetics.

Mitochondrial disease

Our research includes:
-Investigation of the role of mitochondria in human disease
-Nuclear-mitochondrial interactions in disease
-The inheritance of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy
-Mitochondrial function in stem cells

Neuromuscular genetics

The Neuromuscular Research Group has a series of basic research programmes looking at the function of novel muscle proteins and their roles in pathogenesis. Recently developed translational research programmes are seeking therapeutic targets for various muscle diseases.

Stem cell biology

We research human embryonic stem (ES) cells, germline stem cells and somatic stem cells. ES cell research is aimed at understanding stem cell pluripotency, self-renewal, survival and epigenetic control of differentiation and development. This includes the functional analysis of genes involved in germline stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Somatic stem cell projects include programmes on umbilical cord blood stem cells, haematopoietic progenitors, and limbal stem cells.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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The Masters in Medical Sciences programme is the only one of its kind in the UK and is proven to give graduates the competitive edge in the job market. Read more
The Masters in Medical Sciences programme is the only one of its kind in the UK and is proven to give graduates the competitive edge in the job market. It is designed for high-calibre medicine graduates who want to explore and benefit from medical research, perhaps with a view to pursuing a PhD or a career
 in research.

We offer you the opportunity to undertake a research project in a laboratory or department relevant to your speciality. The choice of research projects carried out is wide and ranges from bench research to clinical research. Examples of completed projects are:

1. Therapeutic Hypothermia Decreases Intracranial Pressure in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
2. Renal Function in the 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Null Mouse
3. Immune cell populations in the mouse lung during RSV infection
4. Salt Appetite in Stable Heart Disease and Healthy Volunteers

You will need to secure a supervisor and project before starting the degree.

Programme Structure

The programme begins with a month of teaching, providing you with an overview of the whole range of techniques used in medical research. In the first two weeks you will attend lectures on subjects ranging from stem cell biology to ethics and clinical trials. You will also receive statistics training and practical workshops in cell biology and molecular medicine. You will be taught practical techniques, including basic tissue culture, how to do PCRs and run Western Blots.

Around 20 per cent of the course will consist of taught classes and seminars. The rest is spent in your host department.

To consider your research interests and opportunities we advise you to visit Edinburgh’s Clinical Academic Training Centre (ECAT) or speak to the Programme Director.

Career opportunities

Around a quarter of our students continue on to a PhD. Those who choose to return to clinical practice go back with a broader experience of research than is afforded by the undergraduate clinical medicine curriculum.

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MSc (Med) program involves courses and a thesis and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

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The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. Read more
The Faculty of Medicine of Memorial University of Newfoundland, one of 17 Canadian medical schools, was established in 1967. The Faculty is housed within the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, a modern facility which also includes the adult and women’s hospital, the Janeway Children’s Hospital, the H. Bliss Murphy Cancer Centre, and the Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy, plus specialized units and support services. The graduate programs in the Faculty of Medicine are structured to create an academic environment conducive to research training excellence. The programs are designed to provide formal instruction as well as to promote informal exchange in areas of health and health research. There are nine areas of concentration in graduate studies in the Faculty of Medicine: Applied Health Services Research, Cancer Research, Cardiovascular and Renal Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology, Community Health, Human Genetics, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Neuroscience, and Public Health.

These programs are based upon focal areas of health research within the Faculty and are dependent upon a critical mass of actively engaged faculty researchers in these areas. Each area of concentration has a program coordinator chair or director, and includes a core of graduate courses appropriate to the area of health research and mechanisms for formal and informal exchange of research ideas (journal clubs, seminar series, visiting speakers program). In addition to course work and thesis requirements, the broad education of graduate students includes the opportunity to attend and participate in a number of special events and lectureships. Although these opportunities are not formally required by the program of study, students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in these events.

The MPH program has two streams: Nutrition/Dietetics and Population/Public Health. The Nutrition/Dietetics stream involves courses, a research project, and an internship, and can be completed in two years of full-time study. The Population/Public Health stream involves courses and a capstone research project or practicum and can be completed in one year of full-time study.

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