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Masters Degrees (Remote Healthcare)

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Our masters programme will empower you to confidently meet the challenges of working in complex and unpredictable situations; overseas, on expedition, in low resource settings or within your UK practice. Read more
Our masters programme will empower you to confidently meet the challenges of working in complex and unpredictable situations; overseas, on expedition, in low resource settings or within your UK practice. Following comprehensive preparatory modules we provide you with the unique opportunity to undertake a placement in a global or remote environment as part of your immersive learning experience. Discover, discuss and debate with our expert faculty.

Explore the interactions between global, environmental and human factors that influence health and welfare. Learning in the field will demonstrate the multi-factorial aspects associated with remote and global medicine. Gain the advanced knowledge, skills and leadership qualities to deliver quality medical care, use evolving medical technologies and interact with health care professionals in multicultural settings, ensuring the best possible health outcomes for your unique patient population.

Key features

-Rise to the challenge on this part-time, one year masters programme – become a health professional ready to meet the unique challenges of providing care in complex and challenging global and/ or remote environments
-Experience teaching from faculty staff and visiting experts that have an active role in shaping healthcare systems locally and globally; working in global health partnerships, and leading expeditions to arctic, jungle, desert and mountainous terrains.
-Equip yourself with the advanced skills necessary to critically analyse and combine a range of information to make safe and effective decisions in unpredictable situations, demonstrate leadership qualities and contribute to improvement science in your placement setting.
-Benefit from a blended learning environment with delivery ranging between practical scenario-based training in the field, lectures and seminars, and supported distance learning.
-Take advantage of a collaborative educational partnership between local NHS services, higher education, clinical services and experts including the military.
-Enhance your learning with our established links to the British Antarctic Survey Medical Unit, Diving Diseases Research Centre, THET Health Links Partnerships, and the South West Global Health Collaborative.

Course details

During this programme you’ll have the opportunity to develop a comprehensive understanding of remote medicine and of the distinct environmental, physical and psychological factors associated with working as a remote clinical practitioner. You will plan, research and complete the dissertation associated with the masters programme. The dissertation is designed to enable you produce a project under supervision, and to demonstrate project design, development, evaluation and synthesis skills.

Core modules
-DIS731 Dissertation
-REM713 Global Health
-REM711 Remote Practitioner
-REM714 Remote & Global Placement Medicine

Optional modules
-PDD721DL Project Design, Development and Knowledge Transfer
-PDD721 Project Design, Development and Knowledge Transfer

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course. This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. Read more
Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course.

Who is it for?

This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. It is open to science and engineering graduates and those working within hospitals or related industry who want to work in healthcare organisations, in the medical devices industry, or in biomedical engineering research.

The course will suit recent graduates and/or clinical engineers with a technical background or those working in healthcare who want to move into a management position.

Objectives

With several medical conditions requiring extensive and continuous monitoring and early and accurate diagnosis becoming increasingly desirable, technology for biomedical applications is rapidly becoming one of the key ingredients of today and tomorrow’s medical care.

From miniaturised home diagnostic instruments to therapeutic devices and to large scale hospital imaging and monitoring systems, healthcare is becoming increasingly dependent on technology. This course meets the growing need for biomedical and clinical engineers across the world by focusing on the design of medical devices from conception to application.

One of the few accredited courses of its kind in London, the programme concentrates on the use of biomedical-driven engineering design and technology in healthcare settings so you can approach this multidisciplinary topic from the biological and medical perspective; the technological design and development perspective; and from the perspective of managing the organisation and maintenance of large scale equipment and IT systems in a hospital.

This MSc in Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course has been created in consultation and close collaboration with clinicians, biomedical engineering researchers and medical technology industrial partners. The programme fosters close links with the NHS and internationally-renowned hospitals including St. Bartholomew's (Barts) and the Royal London Hospital and Great Ormond street so that you can gain a comprehensive insight into the applied use and the management of medical technology and apply your knowledge in real-world clinical settings.

Placements

In the last few years there have been some limited opportunities for our top students to carry out their projects through placements within hospital-based healthcare technology groups or specialist London-based biomedical technology companies. Placement-based projects are also offered to selected students in City’s leading Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE). As we continue our cutting-edge research and industrial and clinical collaborations, you will also have this opportunity.

Academic facilities

As a student on this course you will have the opportunity to work with cutting-edge test and measurement instrumentation – oscilloscopes, function generators, analysers – as well as specialist signal generators and analysers. The equipment is predominantly provided by the world-leading test and measurement equipment manufacturer Keysight, who have partnered with City to provide branding to our electronics laboratories. You also have access to brand new teaching labs and a dedicated postgraduate teaching lab. And as part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught through face-to-face lectures in small groups, where there is a lot of interaction and feedback. Laboratory sessions run alongside the lectures, giving you the opportunity to develop your problem-solving and design skills. You also learn software skills in certain modules, which are taught inside computer labs. We also arrange hospital visits so you gain hands-on experience of different clinical environments.

We arrange tutorials for setting coursework, highlight important subject areas, conduct practical demonstrations, and offer support with revision. You are assessed by written examinations at the end of each term, and coursework assignments, which are set at various times throughout the term.

You also work towards an individual project, which is assessed in the form of a written thesis and an oral examination at the end of the summer. The project can be based on any area of biomedical engineering, telemedicine or technology management and will be supervised by an academic or clinical scientist with expertise in the subject area. Many projects are based in hospital clinical engineering departments, or if you are a part-time student, you can base the project on your own workplace. You will have regular contact with the supervisor to make sure the project progresses satisfactorily. Some of the programme’s current students are working on a project focusing on devices that use brain signals to move external objects such as a remote control car and a prosthetic arm.

Some of the previous projects students have worked on include:
-A cursor controller based on electrooculography (EOG)
-Modelling a closed-loop automated anaesthesia system
-Design of a movement artefact-resistant wearable heart rate/activity monitor
-Review of progress towards a fully autonomous artificial mechanical heart
-Design of smartphone-based healthcare diagnostic devices and sensors.

If you successfully complete eight modules and the dissertation you will be awarded 180 credits and a Masters level qualification. Alternatively, if you do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed eight modules, you will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. Completing four modules (60 credits) will lead to a postgraduate certificate.

Modules

Along with the 60 credit dissertation eight core modules cover diverse subject areas including biomedical electronics and instrumentation, technology infrastructure management, as well as the latest advances in medical imaging and patient monitoring.

The course includes a special module which gives you an introduction to anatomy, physiology and pathology designed for non-clinical science graduates.

The most innovative areas of biomedical and clinical engineering are covered and the content draws from our research expertise in biomedical sensors, bio-optics, medical imaging, signal processing and modelling. You will learn from academic lecturers as well as clinical scientists drawn from our collaborating institutions and departments, which include:
-Charing Cross Hospital, London
-The Royal London Hospital
-St Bartholomew's Hospital, London
-Basildon Hospital
-Department of Radiography, School of Community and Health Sciences, City, University of London

Modules
-Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology (15 credits)
-Physiological Measurement (15 credits)
-Biomedical Instrumentation (15 credits)
-Medical Electronics (15 credits)
-Cardiovascular Diagnostics and Therapy (15 credits)
-Medical Imaging Modalities (15 credits)
-Clinical Engineering Practice (15 credits)
-Healthcare Technology Management (15 credits)

Career prospects

This exciting MSc programme offers a well-rounded background and specialised knowledge for those seeking a professional career as biomedical engineers in medical technology companies or research groups but is also uniquely placed for offering skills to clinical engineers in the NHS and international healthcare organisations.

Alumnus Alex Serdaris is now working as field clinical engineer for E&E Medical and alumna Despoina Sklia is working as a technical support specialist at Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. Other Alumni are carrying out research in City’s Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE).

Applicants may wish to apply for vacancies in the NHS, private sector or international healthcare organisations. Students are encouraged to become members of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) where they will be put in touch with the Clinical Engineering community and any opportunities that arise around the UK during their studies. Application to the Clinical Scientist training programme is encouraged and fully supported.

The Careers, Student Development & Outreach team provides a professional, high quality careers and information service for students and recent graduates of City, University of London, in collaboration with employers and other institutional academic and service departments. The course also prepares graduates who plan to work in biomedical engineering research and work within an academic setting.

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This course combines the areas of remote sensing and spatial analysis (GIS), and is particularly suitable for those who wish to obtain a broad overview of the subject, with scope for specialisation. Read more

Summary

This course combines the areas of remote sensing and spatial analysis (GIS), and is particularly suitable for those who wish to obtain a broad overview of the subject, with scope for specialisation.

Modules

Core modules: Core skills in GIS; remote sensing for earth observation; research skills; project design; topographic data analysis technique and application; dissertation; plus options from: GIS for analysis of health; GIS for environmental management; census and neighbourhood analysis; environment and development; GIS for healthcare management.

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Under the patronage of SIT – the Italian Society of Telemedicine - The Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree Course in e-Health Management has been designed to supply training on organizational processes and technologies aimed at the proper introduction and management of ICT solutions and Telemedicine in Health Systems. Read more
Under the patronage of SIT – the Italian Society of Telemedicine - The Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree Course in e-Health Management has been designed to supply training on organizational processes and technologies aimed at the proper introduction and management of ICT solutions and Telemedicine in Health Systems.

E-Health is the combined use of information technology and electronic communication, especially the internet, in the health sector, for clinical, educational and administrative purposes; both on-site and at distance (in which case it is called Telemedicine). E-Health is not only a technical development, but also represents a way of thinking, a commitment, an organizational approach to improve health care locally or regionally by using the new opportunities presented by Information and Communication Technology.

By means of e-Health and Telemedicine, a Healthcare Institution or Ministry can achieve:
• More efficiency in health care: reducing costs by networking data and knowledge, avoiding duplication in diagnostic or therapeutic interventions, treating patients directly at home.
• A higher quality of care: by networking the Health professionals’ knowledge, enabling comparisons, and involving the patients and care givers.
• The empowerment of patients.
• The education of both physicians and patients about the management of pathologies
• More equity, for example by networking smaller hospitals with larger institutions and making virtual visits to remote areas.

In this scenario, it is crucial for a Manager to understand the potentiality, seize the opportunities, push and, above all, lead the e-Health and Telemedicine revolution in health care.
The Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree Course in e-Health Management has been designed to supply training on organizational processes and technologies aimed at the proper introduction and management of ICT solutions and Telemedicine in Health Systems.

TARGET RECIPIENTS

The Master’s Degree Course is designed for
• Directors and Managers of Healthcare Institutions,
• Directors and Managers of Social and Healthcare Ministries,
• Healthcare Decision-Makers,
• Clinicians,
• Clinical Engineers.

TRAINING OBJECTIVES
On completion of the training course, attendees will:
• Understand e-Health and Telemedicine terminologies and their areas of application.
• Be aware of the most widespread and innovative technology platforms and solutions available.
• Possess the skills to evaluate and choose the best e-Health projects and solutions.
• Be able to manage the organizational aspects stemming from the introduction of e-Health in an Institution, a Region, or a Country.
• Be able to apply the knowledge of the best-in-class European e-Health projects to the domestic contexts.
• Be e-Health evangelists.

PROFESSIONAL OUTLETS
On completion of this Master’s Degree Course, attendees will be able to work or improve their careers as:
• E-Health Managers
• Chief Information Officers for healthcare institutions
• E-Health executive consultants
• Managers of ICT Departments of Health Ministries
• E-Health and Telemedicine evangelists

Course Content
• Introduction, Terms and General Concepts
• Health Technology Assessment
• Electronic Medical Records
• National Electronic Health Records
• Chronic Disease Management
• EMR for Primary Care
• Clinical Decision Support Systems
• UK WSD “The Largest Randomised Control Trial of Telehealth and Telecare in the World”
• Better Health Through IT
• Standards and Interoperability
• Telemedicine: areas of use and technologies
• Introducing e-Health in Hospital environments
• Economics of e-Health
• Healthcare reform: changing the healthcare models in Europe
• ESA activities in Telemedicine: space technology for downstream eHealth applications
• E-Health experiences in the Italian regions
• E-Health in Hospitals
• Telemedicine for local organizations
• Telemedicine for developing Countries
• Public-Private Partnerships
• Designing of e-health projects
• European Structural Funding for e-Health management

STRUCTURE
The course is structured in:
• 20 two hour seminars (6 months) +
• A final project work (6 months).

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Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Applied Geographical Information Systems (Applied GIS) pathway aims to develop students in-depth knowledge of GIS-based methods for monitoring the social/human and natural environments. It will also help develop the student's understanding of the spatial interaction of social/human and environmental factors. Importantly, it seeks to increase the student's capability to extract social/human and/or environmental information from a variety of sources, such as remotely sensed data, and to undertake analysis and assessment using appropriate methods within a GIS framework.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
This is the only programme in the UK that will help you acquire advanced interpreting skills to work confidently in all modes of interpreting (consecutive, simultaneous, dialogue and telephone/video-mediated), and in a variety of contexts. Read more
This is the only programme in the UK that will help you acquire advanced interpreting skills to work confidently in all modes of interpreting (consecutive, simultaneous, dialogue and telephone/video-mediated), and in a variety of contexts.

We are the first university to teach remote interpreting based on research in this area.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA in Interpreting programme is offered in two pathways: a multilingual and a Chinese pathway. Experienced interpreters and academics will guide you through the main principles, specific techniques and professional requirements of interpreting.

Learning is conducted via a combination of regular language pair-specific practice, multilingual simulations of real-life interpreting scenarios and background lectures.

Our state-of-the-art facilities enable you to practise each interpreting mode in the most realistic environment possible.

You will have access to three conference suites equipped with ISO approved double interpreting booths, a portable interpreting system for training in mobile interpreting (used for museum or factory tours) and a two-way and multipoint videoconferencing system to simulate remote interpreting.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MA Interpreting is studied over one year (full-time mode) only.

Language-specific options are paired with English. If you are a native speaker of English, you can take up to two Consecutive and Dialogue Interpreting options (in another language). If you are not a native speaker of English, you will normally take one Consecutive and Dialogue Interpreting option (your mother tongue paired with English).

You can also choose one ab initio language if you wish to expand your portfolio of translation languages.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

WHAT MAKES THE PROGRAMME SPECIAL?

This highly specialised programme fills a gap in academic interpreter training throughout the UK by preparing you to work confidently in all modes of interpreting (including consecutive, simultaneous, dialogue and telephone/video-mediated interpreting), and in a wide variety of established and emerging contexts (including institutional, business, political/diplomatic, public service interpreting) and settings (including traditional onsite interpreting and novel settings of remote interpreting).

This will maximise your flexibility and career opportunities after graduation and will enable you to launch an exciting career as a well-rounded and flexible interpreting professional.

Learning from experienced interpreters and academics in a supportive environment, you will join a programme which covers the main principles, specific techniques and professional requirements of interpreting through a combination of regular language pair-specific practice, multilingual simulations of real-life interpreting scenarios and background lectures.

In the interpreting practice modules you will gain invaluable experience of real working conditions and opportunities for experiential learning and reflective analysis.Our simulations are joined by professionals from a variety of fields who participate as live guest speakers on a case-by- case basis.

The practice-based components of the programme are complemented by background lectures which will help you to understand the major principles of interpreting and provide you with a conceptual and methodological framework for analysing, discussing and justifying interpreting-related decisions.

State-of- the-art facilities are in place to enable you to practise each interpreting mode in the most realistic environment possible. You will have access to three conference suites equipped with ISO approved double interpreting booths to practise simultaneous interpreting according to professional standards.

A portable interpreting system allows for training in mobile interpreting, for instance simulating the tour of a museum, factory or plant.

Our facilities also include a two-way and multipoint videoconferencing system that makes it possible to simulate remote interpreting, with clients and interpreters interacting via video link.

The programme pays particular attention to the emerging forms of distance interpreting, which are an increasingly important feature in the professional landscape. We are the first university to teach remote and mobile interpreting based on research findings in this area.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

In addition to enjoying regular contact with professional interpreters in your practice-based modules, throughout the academic year you will benefit from course components that specifically address the business and industry aspects of the profession.

Insights into the industry will, for example, be provided by external guest speakers we invite to our Translation Studies seminars.

These include professional translators, interpreters, subtitlers and audio describers; professionals working in public services, companies and international organisations; representatives of professional translator/interpreter associations as well as translation/interpreting researcher.

Graduation from the MA Interpreting will enable you to apply for membership of the National Register of Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI).

In line with our aim to offer professionally relevant programmes, we have forged close links with the main professional bodies: the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) and the Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIoL). You can join these bodies as a student member during the course and then become a full member after graduation.

In addition, we work closely with many language service providers and are a member of the European Language Industry Association (ELIA), which gives you the possibility to apply for a work placement with its various translation and interpreting companies that are members of ELIA.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Thanks to our continued emphasis on professional development, you will be well-equipped to begin work as freelancer or in-house interpreter at international organisations, government bodies, universities and private companies.

We also regularly have students who decide to stay on to study for a PhD and pursue an academic career in Translation and Interpreting Studies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

This MA programme prepares graduates to work as interpreters at the highest levels of professional communication in a wide range of settings, including conference, dialogue and video-mediated ones.

Due to the requirements and complexities of interpreting in such contexts, the programme combines the study of the major principles of, and scholarly approaches to, Interpreting with opportunities for application and practice – with the aim of enabling students to:
-Perform relevant interpreting tasks in different contexts, including conference, business, legal and healthcare settings
-Reflect on their own practice, using scholarly and professional writing on relevant aspects of interpreting
-Transfer the acquired skills and knowledge to novel and unpredictable situations of interpreting

Furthermore, the need for interpreting is growing due to the impact of globalisation and migration, and the interpreting landscape is changing due to the impact of new technologies. In accordance with this, the programme will provide insights into recent developments and related research – with the aim of enabling the students to:
-Develop a broad understanding of current and future challenges of interpreting in different contexts
-Apply scholarly approaches to critically evaluate professional practice in the light of current and future requirements
-Instil in students the capacity for carrying out independent research in an area interpreting

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A thorough understanding of the main principles that underpin interpreting
-Sound knowledge of how interpreting has developed in relation to general as well as more specific socio-political issues
-A thorough understanding of key concepts, structures, procedures in public and private bodies and sound knowledge of related professional terminology
-A thorough understanding of the components of the interpreting process and the role of the interpreter
Sound knowledge of relevant genres/registers of both working languages
-A thorough understanding of advanced interpreting strategies and of techniques for background research and preparation
-A thorough understanding of the different modes of interpreting and the ability to explain their use and specific challenges of interpreting in different settings/situations
-High awareness of all issues of professional interpreter conduct and ethics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Strategically retrieve information crucial for the communication situation at hand and efficiently relay messages in oral mode
-Conduct conceptual and terminological research related to specific tasks
-Critically evaluate scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of aspects pertaining to interpreting
-Formulate and address research questions relating to the field of study

Professional practical skills
-Work confidently in all modes of interpreting, including consecutive, simultaneous, dialogue and whispered interpretation and sight translation
-Use appropriate interpreting strategies and preparation techniques
-Deal with interpreting tasks confidently, displaying stamina and using problem solving techniques under conditions of time and cognitive pressure
-Present mediated messages orally in a clear and appropriate fashion
-Where relevant, manage and co-ordinate dialogic interaction
-Use communication technologies in interpreting confidently
-Function professionally in all situations
-Monitor engagement and impartiality in interpreting situations
-Apply evaluation skills for interpreting purposes
-Where relevant, combine interpreting and translation skills in a market where flexibility and a varied professional portfolio is an advantage

Key / transferable skills
-Transfer techniques of interpreting to novel and unplanned situations
-Acquire knowledge in specialised subject areas and associated terminology
-Prepare and deliver a sustained piece of work to a high professional standard
-Collaborate by working in small teams to achieve a common goal
-Reflect upon the knowledge gained and practice, and incorporate this into independent learning and professional development strategies
-Manage learning and knowledge acquisition effectively
-Use a range of skills developed at post-graduate level, including advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments and presentation
-Conduct a sustained piece of guided research

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This unique Masters programme is delivered in partnership between the University of Exeter Medical School and World Extreme Medicine, the world’s leading provider of specialist training courses for medics taking their skills into challenging environments. Read more
This unique Masters programme is delivered in partnership between the University of Exeter Medical School and World Extreme Medicine, the world’s leading provider of specialist training courses for medics taking their skills into challenging environments.

The programme’s hallmarks are the practical skills, knowledge and understanding needed to perform at the highest possible level in the field of extreme medicine. Key features are the residential locations of the courses across the UK, and environment specific modules located in mountain, jungle, desert and polar regions. This is medicine at its best, crossing geographical and professional boundaries.

You will be likely to work with the wider healthcare community - paramedics, nurses, doctors, and military medics. You will be working or looking to work in situations of rapid change and uncertainty and you will be looking to demonstrate capabilities that extend beyond clinical competence into areas such as leadership, communications, teamwork, resilience, humanitarian relief, planning and logistics The programme’s foundations are rooted in the core values of collaboration, challenge, community, impact and rigour, embedded firmly within the University’s mission to make the exceptional happen, by challenging traditional thinking and defying conventional boundaries.

The programme is delivered part time over three years leading from the Post Graduate Certificate in Extreme Medicine in year one to the full Post Graduate Masters qualification in year three.

Programme structure

You will critically examine the challenges of providing safe and effective healthcare in a range of challenging environments. You will focus on both the evaluation of health issues to be expected in the field and the planning and preparation phase for any remote or wilderness activity. Key to the programme is that you learn to recognise and evaluate the unique ethical, professional and legal challenges of delivering medical care in challenging environments. The programme will develop in you, the skills necessary to evaluate research literature, and manage the challenge of implementing health interventions where evidence may be weak or conflicting.

A key part of the programme are the short residential courses designed to provide the challenge of learning in an unfamiliar environment and relying on the collaboration and support of the other participants.

Expert tutors will facilitate group discussions and project work and provide support for independent learning. Assessments are designed to provide opportunities for personal reflection, critical appraisal, evaluation and analysis to demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained throughout the programme.

Modules and delivery

The programme has a modular structure and consists of three modules for the PG Cert, with a further 60 credits of modules for the PG Dip, and the addition of the 60 credit MSc research project for the full MSc.
Below are some examples of the modules you might expect on this course include the following;

PgCert

For the PgCert, the following are residential modules; Core Concepts in Extreme Medicine; Pre-hospital Trauma, Assessment and Treatment and Human Factors – Situational Awareness

PgDip and MSc

Some examples of the modules under development for the PgDip and MSc are as follows;
• Pre Hospital Trauma Care
• Maternal and Children’s Health
• Mountain Medicine
• Polar Medicine
• Jungle Medicine
• Applied Research methods
• Disaster and Humanitarian Medicine Theory and Practical Pre hospital emergency care
• Obstetrics and Gynaecology and maternal and child health, in remote areas and
• Research/Dissertation

The modules we outline here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this programme based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see website for up to date information at http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/medicine/extrememedicinemsc/#Programme-structure

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Health departments have highlighted the importance of controlling infectious diseases within hospitals and less intensive health care settings. Read more
Health departments have highlighted the importance of controlling infectious diseases within hospitals and less intensive health care settings. Accredited training of infection control personnel has been recommended as a strategy to decrease health care related infections.

Who is this course for?

This course is particularly relevant for practitioners in rural and remote health settings, aiming to bring health practitioners up to date on the current knowledge and theories regarding those infectious diseases of relevance to populations in tropical Australia and its near neighbours.

Course learning outcomes

Graduates of the Graduate Certificate of Infection Control will be able to:
*Apply and adapt specialised knowledge, skills and technical competencies pertaining to infection prevention and control across a variety of health contexts, including rural, remote and Indigenous settings in developed and developing countries
*Critically analyse and synthesise a range of data and evidence to provide solutions to complex problems related to infection prevention and control
*Appraise the significance of healthcare-associated infections and their causative pathogens, and exercise high-level and independent judgement in the design, implementation and evaluation of strategies for their management across tropical, rural, remote and Indigenous communities
*Appraise and synthesise knowledge related to the education and continuing professional development of health personnel in infection prevention and control
*Communicate theoretical knowledge, skills and treatment modalities using high-level oral and written language skills, to a variety of audiences and cultural groups
*Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for professional development based on reflection on current competence, industry standards and published evidence.

This course is available to International students via external or distance education only

Award title

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE OF INFECTION CONTROL (GCertInfectCont)

Course articulation

Students who complete this course are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Nursing or Master of Nursing and may be granted advanced standing for subjects completed under this course.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3a - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 6.5), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3a – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University offers personal attention and ongoing support for you to achieve your goals. We have:
*Academic and professional staff across our four major campuses
*specialised biophysical science laboratories
*simulated hospital wards

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Our flexible Medical Ultrasound course is designed for healthcare professionals undertaking obstetrics, gynaecology and / or abdominal ultrasound training. Read more
Our flexible Medical Ultrasound course is designed for healthcare professionals undertaking obstetrics, gynaecology and / or abdominal ultrasound training.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for a range of health care professionals who have experience in radiography, nursing, midwifery or other related professions. The course enables students to achieve the academic qualifications and clinical skills needed to pursue a career in ultrasound or to develop current skills further.

Students need a clinical placement in a recognised department, to engage in a wide range of ultrasound examinations for the duration of the course.

Objectives

City’s Medical Ultrasound course offers flexible study options for healthcare professionals undertaking obstetrics, gynaecology and / or abdominal ultrasound training and for those wishing to develop their skills further using work based learning options.

Our expert staff provide a supportive environment, encouraging students to develop their academic abilities and clinical skills in preparation for working as a sonographer. Students learn a range of subjects to enable them to explore the underpinning knowledge of safe, effective and evidence-based ultrasound practice, with which to help them develop clinical skills in their own department. Teaching is also supported by specialist guest speakers who provide current, relevant course material.

Students can achieve competency to practice if they successfully complete both academic and clinical components of the programme to PgC level or above.

Placements

A clinical placement is required in a recognised ultrasound department, to provide a wide range of clinical experience and supervision. Students should have their own clinical placement arranged prior to application, with supervised training arranged for an average of three days per week.

The placement needs to provide support for a wide range of clinical examinations. In addition to hands-on clinical experience you need a named clinical supervisor/assessor to provide support during the course. The supervisor must attend supervisor training and provide regular updates on your clinical progress to the clinical co-ordinator.

Academic facilities

The ultrasound clinical skills suite is equipped with a real-time ultrasound machine and simulators. The facilities are used for tutorials, self-directed study and formative monitoring of clinical skills.

Students have access to the MedaPhor simulator during the working week and remote cloud based access to tutorials and resources.

Using a flipped classroom approach to teaching and learning ensure that a range of online lectures are available for learning and revision.

Teaching and learning

A blended learning approach is used: linking academic theory to clinical practice via work-based learning; formal key note lectures; seminars; film viewing tutorials; demonstrations/workshops; e-learning; shared learning; self-directed study and online case discussions. Participation in the learning is an essential component of the course.

The programme team consists of academic staff, many of whom are still practicing clinically. Guest lecturers are invited to share expert knowledge on a range of topics, such as fetal cardiology, fetal medicine and contrast ultrasound.

The department’s academic staff are highly regarded across the institution, with our current programme director, Gill Harrison, winning the institution's prestigious Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

Activities include online lectures and quizzes, lectures, tutorials, workshops and skills suite activities, group activities and group work, games and online case discussions.

A variety of assessment methods are used to cater for a range of learning styles and provide a link between theory and practice. Assessment methods include objective structured examinations, online case discussions, oral and/or poster presentations, written assignments, clinical portfolio and clinical competency assessments.

Modules

As a student on the Medical Ultrasound course you will learn the underpinning theory of ultrasound production, safe and effective practice, normal and abnormal ultrasound appearances and associated imaging pathways.

You will be able to select from a number of clinical options including obstetrics, gynaecology and / or abdominal ultrasound. Additional clinical areas can be studied via work-based learning modules, if appropriate clinical support is available within the students' clinical department. The course is also designed to develop transferable skills to support clinical practice development.

Modules will take place over one or two days per week, depending on the selected module options. The time in lectures varies, dependent on the nature of the module.

Core modules - core modules and specific named clinical modules have a blended learning approach, with online lectures, online quizzes and discussions supported by lectures, tutorials and workshops. The average contact time per module is approximately 30 to 35 hours.
-Fundamental Principles of Ultrasound Practice (15 credits)
-Developing Advanced Practice (15 credits)

Students progressing to MSc must undertake:
-Foundations in Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis module (15 credits)
-Dissertation module (60 credits)

Elective modules - students can then select a range of clinical modules such as:
-Obstetric Ultrasound (30 credits)
-Gynaecology Ultrasound (15 credits)
-Abdominal Ultrasound (30 credits)
-Work Based Learning in Practice (includes clinical areas such as early pregnancy, small parts, DVT scanning) (15 credits)

You must gain 60 credits for a Postgraduate Certificate and 120 credits for a Postgraduate Diploma. The most common route is for students to take the two core modules and 45 credits of clinical modules in year 1. For example:
-Fundamental Principles of Ultrasound Practice (15 credits)
-Developing Advanced Practice (15 credits)
-Obstetric Ultrasound (30 credits)
-Gynaecology Ultrasound (15 credits)

Modules are spread throughout one to three terms in year 1.

In year two many students undertake the remaining 45 credits in term 1 (September to December), with a view to completing the PgDip in 18 months. Modules are often:
-Abdominal Ultrasound (30 credits)
-Work Based Learning in Practice 2 (includes clinical areas such as early pregnancy, small parts, DVT scanning
OR
-Foundations in Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis module

Students progressing to MSc the begin the dissertation module.

Some students take a short break of 6 months between completing the PgDip and starting the MSc. The maximum registration period is 5 years.

Career prospects

On completion of a postgraduate certificate or diploma you can apply for jobs as an autonomous practitioner, working in the NHS or private practice. Many of our graduates have become advanced practitioners, developing additional skills during their career, whilst others have travelled to overseas to enhance their careers.

MSc graduates have also become managers of ultrasound departments, leading service change and developing services to improve patient care. A number of graduates have developed their role in specialist areas, where they undertake research and training and engage in dissemination of their work at national and international conferences and in peer review publications. Some of our graduates return to provide keynote lectures to future generations of ultrasound students or even take on the role of Programme Director running ultrasound programmes.

You can also become an independent practitioner, setting up your own company, providing services to local populations or travel the world and experience different ways of working. Most sonographers are employed at band seven in the NHS.

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Chelmsford. This course responds to the growing global demand for specialists in applications as varied as patient monitoring systems; diagnostic and screening tools; digitised patient records, referrals and prescriptions; and remote. Read more

Campus

Chelmsford

Overview

This course responds to the growing global demand for specialists in applications as varied as patient monitoring systems; diagnostic and screening tools; digitised patient records, referrals and prescriptions; and remote
healthcare delivery through telehealth and telecare.
The course provides a springboard into a career in the healthcare industry, the health service and academia with a working knowledge of medical technology.
You’ll gain an advanced knowledge and understanding of real world medical technology by exploring the medical,
technological and production aspects of this discipline in depth, blending theory with practice in order to develop a range of valuable skills, including skills associated with the end-to-end digital systems which will soon be in use in the health service.
You’ll undertake training in planning, design, regulation, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and distribution, so you can get the right product to market at the right
time and right cost.

Core Modules

Biomedical Basis of Disease
Diagnostic Technology
Innovative Product Design and Manufacture
Research Studies
Major Project
Please note that you will need to complete all of the above core modules. This course does not have any optional modules. Modules are subject to change and availability.

Start dates

September 2017

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Sport Rehabilitation is a dynamic profession focusing on understanding, preventing and treating sport and exercise related injuries. Read more
Sport Rehabilitation is a dynamic profession focusing on understanding, preventing and treating sport and exercise related injuries. It takes an evidence-based approach considering anatomical, physiological, biomechanical, and psychosocial factors. The course aims to provide graduates from a sports science background with the knowledge and application of the musculoskeletal system, enabling them to clinically assess and return athletes to full functional fitness through expertly developed evidence-based rehabilitation programmes. Students will develop key practical skills in our teaching clinic and world class sports science laboratories and we blend this with online technologies to enhance remote study. Intense teaching periods enable students opportunities to apply and develop their knowledge through work-based learning in our sports injury clinic. A minimum of 400 clinical hours of hands-on experience will be obtained in our Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinic.

In addition, students undertake professional work placements with our partners to broaden their experience. Graduates will be eligible to join the British Association of Sport Rehabilitators and Trainers (BASRaT) (pending, subject to validation). Foundation clinical and rehabilitation skills are developed through a blended learning approach. Integral periods of work-based learning and research skills development are embedded in the programme to enable students to apply an evidence-based approach towards sport rehabilitation. Students can also get accreditation to the Federation of Holistic Therapists (FHT). This is a new course starting in 2017 and is currently subject to validation.

Modules

All modules are compulsory:
-Manual Therapy
-Clinical Assessment
-Sport Rehabilitation
-Injury Management
-Professional Reflective Practice
-Research Methods
-Thesis

Career Opportunities

The University of St Mark & St John is renowned for producing excellent vocationally focused graduates. As the increasing participation and demands of sport and exercise continue to rise, proportional diverse demands are placed on healthcare practitioners in the field of Sports and Exercise Medicine and there is a growing demand for Sport Rehabilitators to work alongside other healthcare professionals or as an autonomous practitioners.This course is for those considering careers within professional sporting environments, the Ministry of Defence, sports injury clinics, sports clubs and the health and fitness industry.

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The Master of Science in Nursing degree at MTSU helps address a critical shortage of advanced nurses, educators, and administrators with high-quality, affordable, and time-efficient studies via the TN eCampus/Regents Online Campus Collaborative. Read more
The Master of Science in Nursing degree at MTSU helps address a critical shortage of advanced nurses, educators, and administrators with high-quality, affordable, and time-efficient studies via the TN eCampus/Regents Online Campus Collaborative. Coursework is completed online, except for clinical rotations through approved preceptors (in the student's home area when possible). Family Nurse Practitioner, Nursing Education, and Nursing Administration concentrations are offered. Family Nurse Practitioners deliver comprehensive primary health care services to all ages and help provide health care to underserved populations. Nursing Education students choose an advanced clinical-focused area from adult health, psychiatric/mental health, critical care, and women's health/perinatal nursing. Nursing Administration students learn about complex systems, organizational theory, financial management, and leadership practice. Full-time or part-time study is available. The program increases access to graduate education for practicing nurses who need time flexibility and for those in remote areas.

MTSU’s School of Nursing offers the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) through the TN eCampus with concentrations in Nursing Administration, Nursing Education, and Family Nurse Practitioner. MTSU also offers a RN to MSN pathway through TN e-Campus.

The program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing and approved by the Tennessee Board of Nursing.

Career

The Master of Nursing programs helps train nurses who seek to practice as advanced clinicians, want to teach in entry-level nursing programs, or wish to manage professional practice workplaces. Graduates may work in a variety of settings including hospitals, nursing homes, businesses, private practices, HMOs, schools and community centers.

Employers of MTSU alumni include:

Fast Pace Urgent Care
Frist Group
Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare
Middle Tennessee State University
Primary Care Hope Clinic
St. Thomas Hospital System
Stonecrest Medical Center
Take Care Clinic at Walgreen
Tennova Healthcare

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-The first UK professional doctorate in Hearing Therapy. -Blended learning – study predominantly undertaken on-line alongside professional practice. Read more
-The first UK professional doctorate in Hearing Therapy
-Blended learning – study predominantly undertaken on-line alongside professional practice
-Can alternatively study for an MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert as part of the same programme framework
-Combination of taught modules and supervised practice-based research makes the course highly relevant to professionals engaged in the field of rehabilitation in audiology
-Students complete an in-practice research project with support from an academic supervisor

Programme outline & modules

PGCert – all taught modules are 20 credits
-Hearing Therapy (5 days face to face delivery + online support)
-Tinnitus Management (online delivery)
-Aural Rehabilitation (online delivery)

PGDip – all taught modules are 20 credits
-Evidence Based Practice (online delivery)
-Health Behaviours (online delivery)
-Vestibular Rehabilitation (online delivery)

MSc – all taught modules are 20 credits
-Research Methods (face to face + online delivery)
-Research Project I (face to face + online delivery)
-Research Project II (face to face + online delivery)

Doctor of Hearing Therapy – all taught modules are 20 credits. Students will select one of the following two modules:
-Qualitative Research Methodology (online delivery)
-Quantitative Methods and Advanced Statistics (online delivery)
-Research project & thesis. The personal research project is the core of Doctor of Hearing Therapy programme.

All modules can also be undertaken independently as continuing professional development.

Learning, teaching & assessment

Taught modules are 20 credits each, nominally equivalent to 200 hours of student learning. Modules consist of remote access lectures with electronic formative assessments and a module coursework assignment such as reflective case records, or an essay/literature review related to the module. Module results are ratified at Examination Boards held shortly after the end of each study period.

The research project is the major component of the doctorate, supervised by members of the Applied Health Research Group (http://www.aston.ac.uk/lhs/research/centres-facilities/applied-health-research-group/). Students will develop their research proposals based upon their own clinical interests, or may opt to select a project nominated by an Aston academic. Because this is a distance-learning programme, the research is not normally carried out on the University campus, and it is essential that the student has access to the facilities and resources needed to carry out the research, usually in the student's place of work.

The research stage requires a significant long-term commitment, as it is equivalent to around 2 years of full-time work (i.e. 4 years part-time). Candidates ultimately submit a thesis which is examined in a viva voce examination.

The Doctor of Hearing Therapy programme is aimed at practising audiologists, who will complete case records where required for taught module coursework, and will undertake a practice- based research project.

Students are on campus at the start of the programme when they have the opportunity to participate in group activities.

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