• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
"religions"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Religions)

  • "religions" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 96
Order by 
The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS is the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa. It is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in the theory of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions.

It provides a unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

For the Japanese pathway please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students are generally required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses (which may include one language course), and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 300kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/file93574.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:

- Advanced knowledge and understanding of selected approaches, methods and theories in the study of religions, with particular reference to the religious traditions of Asia and Africa.

- Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in religious studies, also as a platform for further research at doctoral level.

- Advanced skills in presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religious studies.

- Specialisation in one area from among those covered by the units listed in the programme structure.

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other relevant traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, such as manuscript transcription, textual bibliography, the editing of texts; familiarity with the study of religions as an academic field of study and its varieties.

- Aspects of literature in the Study of Religions, philosophy, learning, iconography and history, the impact of religion on society.

- Acquisition of language skills.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Those students who take a language option should be able to assess primary sources in foreign languages and critically evaluate interpretations proposed by different scholars.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of religions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing.

- IT-based information retrieval and processing.

- Presentational skills.

- Examination techniques.

- Independent study skills and research techniques.

- Reflexive learning.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.

- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).

- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.

- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.

- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.

- Make judgements involving complex factors.

- Develop self-reflexivity.

- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.

- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS offers the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa.

The programme is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in theories and methods in the study of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions. It ensures students can benefit from the unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

Email:

Phone: 020 7898 4217

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/mareligions/

Structure

Overview:
1. Students take taught courses (half and/or full units) equivalent to three units in total from the list of taught courses.

2. The 4th and final unit is a Dissertation.

3. Languages: Students in the MA Religions of Asia and Africa may substitute one of their taught courses for a language course (most are taught in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures).

Note: Students wishing to take other SOAS courses relevant to their studies but taught outside the department may do so with the written approval of the tutor of the relevant course, the Department's MA Convenor and the Faculty's Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa Programme Specification 2012-13 (msword; 223kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/mareligions/file80695.doc

Employment

An MA in Religions of Asia and Africa from SOAS equips students with important knowledge and understanding of different cultures, history and beliefs across the regions of Asia and Africa. As well as subject expertise, students develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional careers in the private and public sectors as well as essential skills necessary to pursue further research. These include: the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources - often both in the original or other relevant languages; analytical skills to assess critically the materials relevant to a specific issue; written and oral communication skills to present, discuss and debate opinions and conclusions; and problem solving skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Arts and Humanities

Welcome to the Faculty of Arts & Humanities at SOAS, University of London. The Faculty is home to the departments of Anthropology & Sociology, Art & Archaeology, History, Music, Study of Religions and the Centre for Media Studies, as well as a number of subject specific Centres.

The study of arts and humanities has been central to SOAS activity since 1917. All Faculty staff are specialists in regions as well as disciplines, and all subjects taught at undergraduate level within the Faculty can be combined with other disciplines across the School. Indeed, the range of course options and combinations is a distinctive characteristic of studying at SOAS, with the option of studying language units included within all our degrees.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework Music, which was already ranked highly, has risen to 5th in the UK, with over half of its publications judged ‘world-leading’; History of Art and Archaeology has seen a dramatic rise up the league tables, from 17th to 8th (out of 25), coming in the top 5 nationally for the quality of its publications. This is just one indication of the international importance of the research activity carried out by academic staff, and staff research provides the basis of teaching activity in the Faculty.

At postgraduate level the Faculty is committed to providing stimulating courses that enable students to study particular countries or regions in depth, and to explore comparisons and contrasts across the major areas of Asia and Africa. The programmes are designed to provide students with the knowledge they need to understand the nature of other societies and cultures, and to form ideas about the past, present and future of the complex and multicultural world in which we all live.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MA in Ancient Religions will appeal particularly to those students who are interested in a broad geographic expanse of ancient societies with a particular focus on their religions. Read more
The MA in Ancient Religions will appeal particularly to those students who are interested in a broad geographic expanse of ancient societies with a particular focus on their religions.

Course Overview

The MA Ancient Religions offers students whose interests centre on this field the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to investigating the Celtic, Christian, Egyptian, Jewish, Greek, Minoan/Mycenaean and Roman religions, The programme enables students to gain a clearer understanding of the interrelations of religion and society in a cross-cultural perspective and so better enables them to understand multi-religious worlds. Moreover, students will gain a wider understanding of the cultural economic and social forces underpinning the ancient world and these ancient ideas and practices in particular.

Modules

-Pagans, Jews and Christians in Late Antiquity
-Ancient Egyptian Religious Beliefs
-Cosmology, Magic and Divination
-Celtic Otherworlds: From the Druids to the Monastic Voyage Tale
-Spaces, Places and Objects in Ancient Mediterranean Religions
-New Testament Apocrypha

Key Features

If you wish to expand your knowledge about ancient religions at a postgraduate level, then the MA in Ancient Religion is for you. The scheme allows you to study a wide range of modules covering a wide range of ancient religions.

All our modules in the MA in Ancient Religions are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries. Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are better able to revise and explore difficult topics and access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Assessment

An MA degree in Ancient Religions involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint-based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in a clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

Read less
This MA programme is based on the recognition that religion plays a crucial role in human affairs, and seeks to foster an understanding of this rich subject area. Read more
This MA programme is based on the recognition that religion plays a crucial role in human affairs, and seeks to foster an understanding of this rich subject area.

Course Overview

The aim of the programme is not to focus on any one tradition, but to enable engagement with different traditions in a manner that is free, fair, accurate and open to correction.

This programme has a distinctive focus on contemporary religions. Its range of modules, exploring different aspects of religion today, has been designed by staff members with a background in sociology, anthropology, and religious studies. The modules enable students to explore not just the theoretical, but also the practical, lived aspects of religious faith and practice in different contexts.

The programme is delivered as a full-time and part-time programme of study, and is also available as distance learning. All module content is available through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and students will be supported throughout their studies through regular access to their module tutors, either one to one (by email, skype, phone), in groups (using media such as Skype), or via VLE module discussion forums or wikis.

Campus-based students will be supported through lectures, research seminars and public lectures. An annual residential graduate summer school is held for all students in July where students are able to experience lectures and seminars covering both issues related to generic learning and subject-specific information and to engage with a number of our research students.

Modules

-Study Skills
-Theory and Methodology in the Study of Religions
-Religion, Spirituality and Secularisation

The MA then offers further modules, of which students are required to make a selection of any three.
-Religious Experience Today
-Ritual and Religion
-Modern Yoga and Ayurveda
-Fieldwork in the Study of Religions
-Islam Today
-Cosmology, Magic and Divination
-Buddhist Philosophy

Key Features

-An opportunity to engage with different religious traditions
-An opportunity to consider some of the key debates in the field of religion today
-Designed by staff members with a background in sociology, anthropology, and religious studies
-Highly experienced academic staff who have taught in different institutions and countries and who bring with them valuable expertise in guiding international students through their programmes of study.

Assessment

Assessment is usually based on written work in the form of long and short essays, reports, book reviews and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

The programme has been designed to attract students interested in developing both their generic as well as their subject-specific skills. It offers opportunities for students who have recently graduated to move on to work at level 7 in their specialist field of study and help prepare them for careers in education, ministry and research. The programme also offers excellent continuing professional development for teachers at various stages of their career, ministers currently in pastoral charge seeking further professional development and other interested parties. In addition, the programme will be attractive to students who wish to study out of personal interest or faith commitment.

Read less
The subject of religion in education is internationally recognised as needing more specialist expertise at both primary and secondary levels. Read more
The subject of religion in education is internationally recognised as needing more specialist expertise at both primary and secondary levels. This flexible course is aimed at teachers of religious education and related subjects, and those working with young people in a faith or belief context.

You will have the opportunity to engage with the internationally recognised curriculum development work of the Warwick Religions and Education Research Unit, and with its qualitative and quantitative research in the field of religions and education. You’ll complete all of your learning online through a distance learning portal, using a mixture of online text extracts and journals, with email supervision from your subject tutor.

You’ll take four modules, usually over three years. These include a core module in Interpreting Religious World Views, plus other subject specific modules that include Current Issues in Religious Education and Inter Faith Dialogue for Young People. You’ll then take an Introduction to Research Methods in RE module, and complete a dissertation under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Read less
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World. Encounter and Conflict. Read more
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World: Encounter and Conflict

Why is Jerusalem still such a contested place? What are the reasons for the systematic destruction by the Islamic State (IS) of the cultural heritage of the past? Why do sacred texts produced centuries ago continue to shape the lives of people today? How are they used and abused? Why does the sword sometimes replace the word in religious matters? How did religious groups, ideas and artefacts travel from one continent to another and how did that migration transform them? In other words, how did religious conflicts and encounters shape the modern world and why do they still matter today?

These are some of the topics MF Norwegian School of Theology tackles in its new M.Phil programme in History of Religions, with a primary focus on Religion in the Pre-Modern World: Encounters and Conflicts.

The programme is focused on the issues of religious cross-pollination, coexistence and conflict in three target areas: Europe, South-East Asia and the Middle East. Addressed in a long historical perspective stretching from Late Antiquity to the European Renaissance, the programme seeks to illuminate the roots of present peaceful coexistence and interchange, as well as of today’s antagonisms and conflicts. The underlying idea of the programme is that, in order to fully grasp current religious conflicts and alliances, we need to understand how the perceptions of past and present are intertwined, reciprocally dependent and constantly reshaped.

Based on a multidisciplinary approach and applying various theoretical frameworks and interpretative methods, the core courses of the programme aim to reveal historical dynamics, privileging ‘how’ and tentatively ‘why’ over ‘who’ and ‘when’.

The programme is conceived at the intersection between political history and history of religions, but relies also on other disciplines, such as the history of ideas, art history and archaeology. These are meant to provide the depth of field expected in Big History by illustrating and clarifying the macro-historical perspectives.

Teaching and learning are driven by a hands-on and case-oriented attitude and core courses are complemented by lectures and seminars of theory and method.

The programme is open to all students with a BA in related disciplines (history, religious studies, theology, archaeology, art history, social sciences, etc.).

The programme coordinator is Victor Ghica, Professor of Antiquity and Early Christian Studies. The core courses of the programme will be taught by Kristin B. Aavitsland, Professor of Cultural History, Liv Ingeborg Lied, Professor of the

Read less
This programme aims to provide students in Religions and Theology with the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of these fields. Read more
This programme aims to provide students in Religions and Theology with the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of these fields. It stresses a broad, interdisciplinary and comparative approach.

Programme Structure
The programme structure is as follows:

A Faculty-led core course, which will give students the opportunity to acquire a variety of basic research and presentation skills, both written and oral. It will also introduce students to the superb research resources of the John Rylands University Library (15 credits)

A course on Method and Theory in the Study of Religion (core course - 15 credits)

Three taught courses from the following list (30 credits each):

Sanskrit
The Mystical Tradition in Judaism
Religion, Culture and Society in England (c.1750 - c.1930)
Gnosticism in Antiquity
Ancient Israel: Recent Research
Dead Sea Scrolls
Ethnic Minorities in Britain
Law and Narrative in the Old Testament
Archaeology of Jerusalem and Palestine
Jewish La: History, Authority and the problems of the Agunah
God in Digital
Sexual Ethics
Existentialism
Kierkegaard's Concluding Unscientific
Postscript to Philosophical Fragments
Religion and the Family from Augustus to Charlemagne
Research Methods in Theology and Practice I
Research Methods in Theology and Practice II
Liberation Theology: Text and Context

Following the successful completion of the taught courses, students will undertake a supervised dissertation of 12,000 - 15,000 words on related topic.

Read less
The MRes is a new programme of study, appropriate for all those seeking to further their knowledge of religion through multidisciplinary study and research. Read more
The MRes is a new programme of study, appropriate for all those seeking to further their knowledge of religion through multidisciplinary study and research. It is aimed at individuals with keen research skills who are interested to explore particular aspects of religious traditions by means of rigorous academic study. Students on the programme are required to first complete three taught modules of 20 credits each, making up a total of 60 credits. They then complete a research dissertation of 30,000 words, worth a further 120 credits.

Course Overview

The programme places particular emphasis on contemporary religions. It aims to enable in-depth analytical engagement with different traditions in a manner that is free, fair, accurate and open to discussion and debate. Students are encouraged to explore not just the theoretical, but also the practical, lived aspects of religious faith and practice in different contexts. Staff members contributing to the programme have backgrounds in sociology, anthropology, and religious studies, and work on traditions from different parts of the world including South Asian, Afro-Carribbean and Latin American, Western European and North American contexts.

The programme can be completed via either full-time or part-time study, and is available in distance-learning (home-based learning) format. All module content is available through the University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and students are supported throughout their studies through regular access to their module tutors, on a one-to-one basis (by email, skype, phone), in groups (using media such as Skype), or via VLE module discussion forums.

An annual residential graduate summer school is held for all students in July when participants attend lectures and seminars covering issues related to both generic and subject-specific learning, and engage with other research students at this University.

Key Features

Available evidence suggests that religion remains a vital and significant aspect of both private and public life in the modern world. This programme enables interested individuals to delve deep into aspects of religion and culture, and research areas of interest using the theories and methods central to the academic study of religion. It engages students in current debates about the place of religion in the modern world and empowers them to consider religion and religious traditions in an academically rigorous and analytical manner.

The programme draws upon an established pool of expertise in the study of religion in the School. Research-active staff who publish on a range of religious traditions in different socio-historic contexts support the teaching and research supervision in this programme. This ensures a high quality educational experience. In addition students benefit from the vibrant research culture of the School and the Faculty of Humanities. Students are encouraged to attend the annual Graduate Summer School which includes a one-day conference where staff make presentations on ongoing research projects.

Assessment

Assessment methods for the taught component include long essays, short reviews and critiques, and reflective pieces. Students’ research skills are assessed on the basis of a 30,000-word research-based dissertation.

Career Opportunities

The programme has been designed to attract students interested in developing both their generic as well as subject-specific skills. It offers opportunities for recent graduates to move on to work at level 7 in their specialist field of study and helps prepare them for careers in education as well as research. The programme also offers excellent continuing professional development for teachers at various stages of their career, ministers currently in pastoral charge seeking further professional development, and other interested parties. In addition, the programme will be attractive to individuals who have a personal interest in this area and wish to deepen their knowledge through rigorous study.

Read less
The MA Buddhist Studies suits students with different academic backgrounds and prospective personal objectives, from those interested in broadening their knowledge of Buddhism as a whole or of specific Buddhist traditions to those intending to embark on language-based research or fieldwork among Buddhist communities. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Buddhist Studies suits students with different academic backgrounds and prospective personal objectives, from those interested in broadening their knowledge of Buddhism as a whole or of specific Buddhist traditions to those intending to embark on language-based research or fieldwork among Buddhist communities.

It typically suits:

- students planning to pursue further research in Buddhist Studies, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education.

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of Buddhism as a global cultural force is essential.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments.

- students from traditionally Buddhist countries, willing to broaden their knowledge of Buddhism as a global religion, and to be introduced to an academic approach that is characterised both by its critical distance and by its empathy.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-buddhist-studies/

Duration: Full time: 1 calendar year Part time: 2 or 3 calendar years. We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study.

Structure

The structure of MA Buddhist Studies provides a unique study pathway, characterised both by its coherence and by its flexibility. The core course, “Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies” (0.5 Unit), co-taught by four staff whose expertise cover most of Buddhist Asia, provides students with a broad and stimulating journey into key notions and methods in the study of Buddhism. Students will moreover have to submit a Dissertation in Buddhist Studies of 10,000 words, on a topic chosen from the course chosen as major. The remaining 2.5 Units may be chosen in the large pool of courses on Buddhist topics and languages, thus allowing each student to build up a specialized knowledge of one or more areas of Buddhist Asia. Students are allowed to take courses taught outside the department of the Study of Religions up to one unit, which may or may not include a language.

For more informations, please contact Antonello Palumbo () or Vincent Tournier ()

Programme Specification (msword; 247kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-buddhist-studies/file92979.doc

The Department

Key facts

- Two BA programmes (both single or joint degrees), five taught MA programmes, and Research Degree
- Unrivalled expertise in the religions and philosophies of Africa, Asia and the Middle East
- First philosophy degree in the UK centred on non-Western and global systems of thought
- Research-driven, interdisciplinary approach to all the world’s major religious traditions and philosophical systems

Department comes 2nd nationally for research publications:
18 December 2014: REF results highlight SOAS publications on religions. Find out more... (https://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem98005.html)

Our strengths:
At SOAS you can study a wider range of religious and philosophical traditions in more depth than any other programme in the field, anywhere in the world. With our highly diversified expertise, our comprehensive resources, and our interdisciplinary approach we offer a unique learning and research environment for a truly inter-cultural approach to systems of belief and thought in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The political and social dimensions of religions are at the heart of this innovative programme, which explores the role of religions and theology in global development. Read more
The political and social dimensions of religions are at the heart of this innovative programme, which explores the role of religions and theology in global development. You’ll consider religion as a resource, obstacle and participant in development, exploring the relationships between religions, aid agencies and local communities.

You will develop your understanding of both development and religious studies, as core modules introduce you to theories and issues in development and how they relate to developing countries across the Global South. In addition, you will choose from optional modules in each area, allowing you to specialise in topics such as the links between conflict or gender and development, or the role of religion in public life.

Drawing on sociological, historical, anthropological and political approaches, this diverse degree will equip you with the skills and knowledge to research the relationship between religions and development in a stimulating environment.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course Content

This course is taught jointly by Theology and Religious Studies and the Centre for Global Development.
Across the year you will study a core module introducing you to theories and approaches in development studies, and how social, economic and political inequalities lay at the heart of development. In Semester Two another core module will focus on the complex relationships between religions and global development – the views of different religious traditions towards issues such as poverty, gender and welfare, and the roles they can play in development.

At the same time you will be thinking about your dissertation: an independent research project on a topic of your choice which allows you to demonstrate the skills and subject knowledge that you gain. You can choose to extend your dissertation if you want to go into even greater depth. You will submit the finished dissertation by the end of the programme in August.

You will also have other opportunities to specialise, as you choose from optional modules to focus on topics that suit your interests or career plans. In development studies, you’ll select from modules on topics such as democracy and development, or Africa in the modern world. If you opt for the standard dissertation, you’ll choose another module from religious studies.

If you decide to study part-time, you will study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Read less
Our MA in Religious Studies allows you to specialise in one of two pathways. Asian Religions or Late Antiquity. Late Antiquity Pathway. Read more
Our MA in Religious Studies allows you to specialise in one of two pathways: Asian Religions or Late Antiquity.

Late Antiquity Pathway

On this pathway you will discover the great religious and cultural transformations of Late Antiquity - the landmark period when contemporary world faiths emerged. This pathway draws on internationally-recognised expertise in Religion from Late Antiquity to the contemporary era, across a wide geographical area, and with sensitivity to issues in the public eye. Acquiring advanced theological, historical and linguistic skills, you will analyse major texts and artefacts of the period (200 - 800AD) to better understand the major world religions. Drawing on the concentration of expertise found in the Centre for Late Antique Religion and Culture, you will explore religions such as Paganism, Gnosticism and Zoroastrianism. A highlight is the availability of Arabic, Greek or Latin teaching for deeper understanding of original sources.

Asian Religions Pathway

This pathway allows you to explore the religious literature and culture of South Asia or China in combination or isolation in this specialist programme.

You will be rooted within the Centre for the History of Religion in Asia, with expertise ranging from Chinese Buddhism to the study of the ancient Indian religious tradition of Jainism. At the heart of the UK’s largest single concentration of Mahabharata scholars, you also have the rewarding option of gaining a firm grounding in the classical Indian language of Sanskrit if you wish.

Distinctive features

Teaching by internationally renowned experts and informed by the latest research of our Centres for the History of Religion in Asia and Late Antique Religion and Culture.
The opportunity to engage in postgraduate research culture, by participating in Research Centre activities
Designed to be flexible to your interests

Read less
The three study streams at the graduate level are Western Religions, Eastern Religions, and Nature of Religion. Feasibility of programs within these streams is dependent on available research resources and faculty expertise. Read more
The three study streams at the graduate level are Western Religions, Eastern Religions, and Nature of Religion. Feasibility of programs within these streams is dependent on available research resources and faculty expertise.

Course Requirement

Five half-course equivalents in addition to individualized requirements set by the Departmental Graduate Committee at the time of admission. These will normally consist of:

RELS 601 Studies in Western Religions
RELS 603 Studies in Eastern Religions
RELS 605 Studies in the Nature of Religion
RELS 607 Supervised Master’s Thesis Inquiry
RELS 609 Critical Discourses in the Study of Religion

Thesis Requirements

Successful completion and defense of a thesis. The thesis will have the following maximum: 17,500 - 25,000 words (excluding bibliography).

Read less
Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies. Read more
Recent political shifts in Muslim majority countries have put Muslim minorities in the spotlight and impacted upon their relationship with their host societies.

This new programme gives you an opportunity to consider Muslim minority communities comparatively, within both western and non-western contexts. You will explore key themes such as ethnicity, gender, and the varieties of religious interpretations and practices that have resulted in issues and challenges arising uniquely within different Muslim minority communities. The programme is highly interdisciplinary and offers a flexible combination of module choices including for example, law, history, international relations, and diplomacy.

You will acquire skills necessary to work in a wide range of professions that require an understanding of inter-cultural relations and policy-making at both local and national levels. You will also gain the expertise to evaluate materials from different sources such as the media, government reports and legal documents as well as academic research.

The programme is offered by the Department of Religions and Philosophies http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/ and delivered by the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy (CISD) http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/

Structure

Students take four modules (comprising one core and three elective) over two years and write a dissertation

Core modules:

‌•Muslim Minorities in a Global Context
‌•Dissertation

Optional modules:

‌•Introduction to Islam
‌•Muslim Minorities and the State: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
‌•Islamic Law in a Global Context
‌•Religions and Development
‌•The Art of Negotiation
‌•Global Public Policy
‌•International Security
‌•Global Diplomacy: Citizenship and Advocacy
‌•Strategic Studies
‌•Political Islam in South Asia
‌•Contemporary India, State, Society and Politics

Disclaimer

Important notice regarding changes to programmes and modules http://www.soas.ac.uk/infocomp/programme-disclaimer/

Teaching and Learning

Teaching & Learning
Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

This programme is taught 100% online through our VLE. In the VLE you will have access to learning materials and course resources anytime so you can fit your studies around your existing commitments. For each module, students will be provided with access, through both the SOAS Library and the University of London’s Online Library, to all necessary materials from a range of appropriate sources.

A key component of the student experience will be peer to peer learning, with students enrolled in discussion forums.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by five written online assessments (‘etivities’*) comprising 30% and one 5,000 word essay comprising 70% of the module mark. The etivities provide formative and summative feedback to students as a means of monitoring their progress and encouraging areas in which they can improve.

Dissertation

The Dissertation is assessed by the submission of a written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words, excluding the bibliography and appendices, which will account for 85% of the mark awarded for the module. The remaining 15% of the module mark will be based on the mark obtained for a 1,500 word research proposal.

* An 'e-tivity' is a framework for online, active and interactive learning following a format that states clearly to the students its 'Purpose'; the 'Task' at hand; the contribution or 'Response' type; and the 'Outcome' (Salmon, G. (2002) E-tivities: The Key to Active Online Learning, New York and London: Routledge Falmer.)

How to Apply

You can apply using our online application form http://www.cefims.ac.uk/forms/appform/cisd_appform.shtml

If you have any questions please use our online enquiry form.

The deadlines for applications are as follows:

31 March 2016 for a 20 April 2016 start
Your completed application will be reviewed by a member of academic staff. If your application is successful, we will send you an official offer within ten working days and you will be asked to submit the relevant supporting documentation. Once in receipt of our offer, we
recommend submitting your documents immediately.

Supporting documentation for applications - please view website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/ma-muslim-minorities-in-a-global-context-online/

Email:

Phone: +44 (0)20 7898 4050

Read less
The impact of Christianity on society can be felt around the world - in international politics, economy, arts and cultural ideologies. Read more
The impact of Christianity on society can be felt around the world - in international politics, economy, arts and cultural ideologies. The opposite is true as well. Christianity and society thus mutually shape and guide each other, with implications for the lives of people everywhere in the world.

In this Master's program you will study this complex interaction from both sides: how Christianity influences society and how society has an effect on the tenets, organization and practices of Christianity.

The program is taught cooperatively by Christian theologians, sociologists, economists, law specialists and philosophers from different Tilburg University Schools.

Christianity and Society

Are you fascinated by religion and by Christianity in particular? Have you ever wondered what the impact of Christianity is on society, or how society influences Christianity? Would you like to study this topic in depth with students from around the world? Then Christianity and Society is the program for you!

Learn how Christianity influences law, politics, economics, modern art, science, and world religions:
In this program you will learn how Christianity influences law, politics, economics, modern art, science, and world religions. At the same time, you will study the effects that society has on the history, sociology and theology of the Christian faith. In this way, Christianity and society mutually shape and guide each other, with implications for the lives of people everywhere in the world.

You will benefit from:
•expert knowledge of highly qualified lecturers, 75 percent of whom are full professors;
•a multidisciplinary program taught by theologians, sociologists, economists, law specialists and philosophers;
•small classes (on average 5-10 students), allowing for individual attention and personal contact with fellow students and teachers; and
•an international classroom with students from various countries, religions and academic backgrounds, ensuring a lively and balanced dialogue.

You will become adept at:
•high-level philosophical questioning and debating;
•analyzing and reflecting on current theological and societal issues;
•understanding and solving problems in multidisciplinary contexts;
•writing clear academic papers and presenting them to an audience; and
•working in a self-directed and independent way.

After graduation

Upon graduation, you will be an expert on the relations between Christianity and society in multiple fields of study. You will be able to use your expertise in advisory or management roles in religious organizations and churches, in government organizations and in NGOs. You will also be able to apply your academic knowledge in the fields of media, politics and economic relations.

Low tuition fees and all academic disciplines are eligible
•Students from all academic disciplines or backgrounds can apply for this Master’s program, provided that you have successfully completed your Bachelor's degree at an accredited research university.
•Students who do not hold a Bachelor’s degree from a research university can apply for a six-month Pre-Master’s program taught in English.
•Christianity and Society has lower tuition fees than other Master’s programs at Tilburg University. Moreover, scholarships are available to enable students from all economic backgrounds to participate in this graduate program.

Read less
The MA in Religion & Contemporary Society combines Sociology & Anthropology of Religion to focus on key issues, from religion in public life to globalization, fundamentalism, and modern spirituality. Read more
The MA in Religion & Contemporary Society combines Sociology & Anthropology of Religion to focus on key issues, from religion in public life to globalization, fundamentalism, and modern spirituality. While focusing on Christianity, Islam and Judaism, the course will allow you to specialise in broad issues cutting across these traditions and societies (for example fundamentalism, new religions, or religious pluralism), or to concentrate on a particular society or religion.

Key benefits

- Unrivalled location gives you access to cosmopolitan and vibrant religious traditions.

- Close links and regular fieldwork trips to religious centres and communities in London offering many opportunities to examine the religious experience of living communities.

- Unique opportunity to engage in study of a variety of religious groups and movements within and outside the major traditions (Christianity, Judaism and Islam) in the contemporary world.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/religion-in-contemporary-society-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This unique interdisciplinary course is designed to develop your knowledge and skills in social sciences and humanities and to encourage your constructive, critical and independent thought in this field. While focusing on Christianity, Islam and Judaism, the course will allow you to specialise in broad issues cutting across these traditions and societies (for example fundamentalism, new religions, or religious pluralism), or to concentrate on a particular society or religion. Moreover, you will master a number of transferable skills that are necessary for professional expertise in a range of areas, from the academic study of religion to public policy and pastoral care.

- Course purpose -
To provide training in analysis and understanding of religion in contemporary societies.

- Course format and assessment -
Taught compulsory and optional modules assessed by coursework plus a dissertation.

Career Prospects:

Graduates apply their skills in a range of professions, such as academic careers in departments of Theology, Social & Political Sciences, journalism, business, international relations, teaching, government, mass media, and religious institutions.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X