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Masters Degrees (Religion And Literature)

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Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature. Read more
Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature.

We want you to join in the debates over the nature of literature, the future of English literature, and the past and new cultural experiences of writing and communication which are shaping our lives, with our team of active researchers and committed teachers.

We see research as a public activity, and the course offers ways in which to explore the research process as engagement in the cultural conversation.

Our modules offer the opportunity to research a diverse range of literary periods and forms – from the Early Modern to Contemporary fiction, engaging with genres including historical fiction, fantasy literature, modernism, e-writing, and film.

The MA also explores a wide range of critical and theoretical approaches, including historical and textual analysis, ethical reading, cognitive poetics, and critical theory.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00

Please take the time to look out for updates on our funding page: http://www.chi.ac.uk/study-us-0/fees-finance/funding-and-money-advice-0/funding-postgraduate-students

Our facilities
The Department of English and Creative Writing is a thriving and successful Department, with a staff of active researchers and committed teachers.

The Department hosts the Centre for Research in Folklore, Fairytales and Fantasy, the South Coast Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Research Group, which hold regular research events, alongside a full Departmental programme, including film showings, visiting speakers, and theatre talks.

Recent visiting speakers include Dame Gillian Beer, Professor Jacqueline Simpson, Dr Frances White, and Professor Jacqueline Labbe.

In collaboration with our colleagues in Creative Writing, we also have regular events with writers and poets Simon Brett, Matthew Sweeney, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Michele Roberts, and Jo Shapcott.

The Department has close contact with local cultural institutions: the Chichester Festival Theatre, Pallant House Gallery, the Chichester Public Records Office, and other local institutions.

These offer you further research opportunities. Chichester and the local area has a strong literary history, attracting writers from the eighteenth-century radicals William Blake and Charlotte Smith, to H. G. Wells and Mervyn Peake.

Learning Resource Centre

The Learning Resource is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished.

On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

The Bishop Otter LRC also offers:

130 open access PC workstations
45 Apple iMacs
Ample printing facilities
Netbooks available on loan
Professional editing suites
Media loans counter
Wi-Fi and plug points throughout
Where this can take you
Our MA is designed to transform you into an active and confident researcher in the broad field of English Literature.

The course is a gateway to PhD research, providing an opportunity to focus your research, develop your independence in a supportive environment, and refine your research skills.

The MA is also for anyone who wants to develop their skills, subject knowledge, and confidence in research and the presentation of research.

It is particularly relevant for careers in research-related fields, from librarianship to arts management, for teachers in English Literature and related subjects, and for careers requiring high-level abilities in writing, presentation, and critical analysis.

Indicative modules
Literature in the Present Moment

What is literature and how do we think literature today? The concept of ‘literature’ is crucial and elusive, expanding under the impact of digitalisation and new forms of creative and critical writing. In this course students will explore new techniques in archival research, issues in intellectual history, theoretical developments, and the transformations of the very concept of ‘literature’, past and present.

Theatres of Pain and Pleasure, 1400-1700

Focusing on the Renaissance stage this course explores the theatre as a site of bodies engaged with forms of pain and pleasure: crime, sexuality, war and religion. Ranging across Shakespeare, Jacobean Tragedy, and Restoration Comedy, you will explore the space of the city and a rich diversity of sites, local and national, of theatrical representation.

Visions of the Real: Literature, Myth, and Science, 1800-Present

Fiction has always has a tense relationship with reality. Is fiction more real than reality, as literary characters come to ‘life’, or is fiction a betrayal of reality? In this course you will engage with the blurred lines between literature, science and myth. From the moment of the Enlightenment and Romanticism, in tension between the ‘clear’ vision of reality and the power of myth, the course traces out the crisis of realism, from fantasy literature to modernism to the avant-garde.

Activating Research

How do you become a researcher? Exploring the research process as one that involves integrating a range of ‘voices’, from primary texts, archives, peers, critical and theoretical work, and audience, this course gives you the capacity to engage with this diversity. While research is often presented as an intensely private and personal activity, this course will help you develop your research project as a public process, giving you the tools to find your own critical voice and the confidence to engage with peers, the academic community, and the public.

Teaching and Assessment
You will be assessed over four modules, three with an assessment of an essay of 5,000 words.

The module on ‘activating research’ will be assessed by a presentation (25%) and a written submission (3000 words).

The Dissertation will be a 15,000 assessment.

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Research profile. The literature of the Victorian era offers an extraordinary range of styles, themes and intellectual ideas. This diverse and dynamic literary field reflects a period which witnessed rapid change in almost every area of existence. Read more

Research profile

The literature of the Victorian era offers an extraordinary range of styles, themes and intellectual ideas. This diverse and dynamic literary field reflects a period which witnessed rapid change in almost every area of existence.

Writers such as Dickens, Eliot, the Brontë sisters, Stevenson, Tennyson, Browning, and Christina Rossetti used their work to explore new developments in topics that ranged from religion to sexuality, evolution to imperialism, and mass culture to aestheticism. This programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Victorian literature, and have particular strengths in social, historical and philosophical approaches to literature, in gender studies, and in the literary culture of the fin de siecle.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Programme Structure

The course includes a 15,000-word dissertation, completed under the supervision of one or more of the course tutors. Students will undertake a seminar based programme of research methods training in core research skills and subject specific methodologies. They will also take two option courses covering areas of Victorian literature and culture related to their chosen fields and will write two extended essays in relation to these courses.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.



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In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Read more
In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Durham has particular strengths in the study of Mormonism; death, dying and disposal; shamanism; religion and emotion; religion/faith and globalisation; religion and politics; contemporary evangelicalism and post-evangelicalism; and religion and generational change. It also boasts the Centre for Death and Life Studies and the Project for Spirituality, Theology and Health.

Course Structure

Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.

Core Modules

-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Literature and Religion
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Catholic Social Thought
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching. Read more
The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching.

Course Structure

Choice of one of the three core modules, Three option modules, Dissertation.

Core Modules

One of the following:
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
AND
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included (2-3 choices from):
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Catholic Social Thought
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Doctrine of Creation

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level.

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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The Masters in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture is a flexible, interdisciplinary programme taught by Glasgow’s internationally renowned team of experts. Read more
The Masters in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture is a flexible, interdisciplinary programme taught by Glasgow’s internationally renowned team of experts. It offers students the practical, historical, and theoretical skills needed for advanced study in this area. The programme’s flexibility means that you can tailor your study according to your own research interests. Students are also able to draw on Glasgow’s exceptional holdings of medieval and early modern manuscript and printed materials.

Why this programme

● This Masters is taught by an internationally renowned team of experts in medieval and early modern studies.
Students are able to draw on the superb medieval and early modern holdings in the University Library Special Collections and the Hunterian.

● The major research libraries in Glasgow and Edinburgh are easily accessible and you will be part of a vibrant community of academics and students working in the field.

● You will be part of MEMNET (the Medieval and Early Modern Network) at Glasgow and have the opportunity to hear distinguished guest speakers and to participate in events and conferences.

● The programme offers the option of studying languages, which may include medieval Latin, Old English, Old Icelandic, Old Irish and Old French as well as a range of modern languages.

● You can tailor the programme to your own interests and requirements, while gaining an excellent grounding in the technical skills required for advanced study in this field.

Programme Structure

Core courses:

• From Medieval to Early Modern
• Current Issues in Medieval and Early Modern Literary Studies
• Research Methods

Optional courses:

• Gender and Religion in Medieval English Literature
• Alternative Continuities: Scottish Literature, 1425-1625
• Early Modern Mythmaking
• Seventeenth-Century Women Writers
• Humour, Opposition, and Literature in Early Modern England
• Introduction to English Medieval Manuscripts
• Medieval Palaeography
• Early Modern Palaeography
• Independent study option (in consultation with Course Convener and member of staff)

Resources and Facilities

• Special Collections, University of Glasgow Library
• Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery
• Proximity to the major research libraries in Glasgow and Edinburgh, including the National Library of Scotland

Please refer to our website to look at the [[Research Environment ]]http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/medievalandearlymodernenglishliteratureandculture/#/whythisprogramme,programmestructure,researchenvironment

Please refer to our website to look at

Career Prospects

http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/medievalandearlymodernenglishliteratureandculture/#/careerprospects

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This dedicated masters programme in science and religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for PhD work. Read more

This dedicated masters programme in science and religion is intended for students who wish to engage in the advanced interdisciplinary study of science and religion, including those who wish to prepare for PhD work.

This is one of the world’s very few science and religion programmes.

Much of the recent debate surrounding ‘new atheism’ has taken place within a poorly informed view of the history and philosophy of science and its relationship with religion. This programme aims to inform and engage with the debate in depth, looking at it from scientific, philosophical, historical, ethical and theological perspectives.

The history of science is studied from ancient times through the modern scientific revolution, together with philosophical trends in our understanding of reality. The main areas of dialogue between science and religion are explored in depth, including cosmology, evolution, divine action and miracles, consciousness and the human person.

Programme structure

This programme is run over one year full-time (or two years part-time). You will be taught mainly in small classroom/seminar groups. You will be given training in research methods which offers a practical approach to postgraduate level skills of critical investigation and writing, and receive individual supervision for your 15,000 word dissertation.

Compulsory courses

Compulsory courses comprise History of Science and Religion in the Christian Tradition; Cosmos, Cell and Creator: Current Debates in Science and Religion; and two courses in research methods.

Option courses

You will choose three options, which can be taken from courses in science and religion, such as:

  • Economy, Ecology, and Ethics
  • Key Thinkers in Science and Religion
  • Philosophy of Time
  • Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Debates
  • Science and Religion in Literature
  • Science and Scripture

The options on offer change from year to year, so please consult the Programme Director for advice on what will be available. With the agreement of your Programme Director, you may also choose options from other taught masters programmes, language courses, and advanced undergraduate courses.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed to provide a strong foundation for postgraduate research in the field or for employment in a range of areas requiring critical analysis and empathetic understanding.



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This programme provides a thorough and cutting-edge exploration of classic and contemporary debates in theology and religious studies, incorporating the latest scholarship in the field. Read more
This programme provides a thorough and cutting-edge exploration of classic and contemporary debates in theology and religious studies, incorporating the latest scholarship in the field.

Why this programme

◾You will have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive overview of the field and to develop an area of expertise.
◾You will be taught by academics who are currently engaging in and shaping the international debates around the specialisations offered.
◾This programme is open to those of all faiths and none, and to those who are new to the study of religion.

Programme structure

The 180 credit programme is comprised of two compulsory 30 credit core courses, two 20 credit optional courses, a compulsory 20 credit research skills course, and a compulsory 60 credit dissertation of 12,000 - 15,000 words.

The 12 month programme structure for full-time students is as follows:

Semester 1:
◾Core 1: Reason, Religion and Culture
◾Option 1
◾Research skills course

Semester 2:
◾Core 2: Reading, Religion, and Culture
◾Option 2
◾Dissertation (submitted in September)

Theology and Religious Studies has a selection of optional courses available, including:
◾Modern Islamic Thought
◾Muhammad
◾Reading Theology: Hermeneutics and Interpretation Theory
◾Writing Theology: Creative Writing as Theological Reflection
◾Central Issues in Christian Theology
◾Theology in the Catholic Tradition
◾Foundations of Contemporary Biblical Studies
◾Bible, Culture and Criticism
◾Sacred Texts and Critical Theories
◾Political Theologies
◾Religion and Violence
◾Directed Study

Please contact the Programme Convener for further details about planned taught courses. In order to promote interdisciplinary study, students can elect to take one optional course from any other University of Glasgow Masters programme. The directed study option allows for one-to-one supervision on a topic of personal interest.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this programme, you will be in possession of a variety of subject specific and transferable skills and graduate attributes which will equip you for a wide range of careers and for further academic study.

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As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. Read more
As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world.

It combines a focus on both the local and the global author through compulsory modules contextualising the variety of ways in which Dickens engaged with the social, cultural and political issues of his age. Interdisciplinary approaches are employed, using Dickens as a focus, to consider the relationships between19th-century fiction and journalism, the Victorians’ engagement with material culture, and their fascination with the body and its metaphors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/219/dickens-victorian-culture

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation on a subject related to Dickens and/or Victorian culture between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In 2015 the following three specialist modules were available: EN836 Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel, EN876 Dickens and the Condition of England, EN835 Dickens, the Victorians and the Body. Students would be required to take at least two. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide excellent postgraduate-level study that deepens and extends your understanding of work in the field of Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of studies in Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your research skills in the relevant field so as to provide a pathway for you to undertake PhD work in the area of Dickens and Victorian culture

- build upon and extend an already-established reputation at Kent for distinction in the learning and teaching of Dickens and Victorian culture.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/staff).

- Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid:

Lecturer in English and American Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture, especially representations of nature and the environment, time, history, queer theory; sublimity; ecology and psychogeography.

- Dr Sara Lyons:

Lecturer in Victorian Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture; Victorian poetry and critical prose; fin-de-siècle aestheticism and decadence; the interrelations between literature, religion, secularism in the long nineteenth century.

- Professor Wendy Parkins:

Professor of Victorian Literature
Victorian modernity; gender and sexuality in the 19th century; the Victorian novel (especially Dickens, Gaskell, Collins); literature of the fin-desiècle period; aestheticism and William Morris.

- Dr Catherine Waters:

Professor of 19th-Century Studies
Victorian literature and culture, especially fiction and journalism; Dickens; Sala; George Eliot; literature and gender.

- Dr Sarah Wood:

Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature
Creative critical writing; 19th and 20th-century poetry and fiction, especially Robert Browning and Elizabeth Bowen; writing and visual art; literary theory; deconstruction, especially Derrida; psychoanalysis; continental philosophy.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
This programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. It enables students to study Early modern literature from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century.

Course Overview

This Programme enables students to study at an advanced level literature in English from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, including a selection of the period’s major works, such as The Faerie Queene, Hamlet, King Lear, and Paradise Lost, and some of its major writers, including Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton, as well as non-canonical and non-literary works by lesser-known authors.

Critical attention is given to a range of kinds of early modern text from diverse disciplines such as medicine, psychology, theology, and ethics. The programme focuses upon key areas of literature and aspects of the study of culture in the early modern period, including the development of the genre of epic, allegory, and romance, and the representation of bodily, mental, and ethical disorder. The programme is underpinned by the development of advanced research methods and the scholarly examination of early printed books in the Roderic Bowen Library and Archives. Within this framework of study, students will then be able to develop their own research interests as part of their dissertation work. The MRes programme is designed to appeal to those students who wish to pursue their own independent research to a further extent than in an MA.

The University has a well-established record of research and teaching in English. Unusually for the sector, its provision at all levels has enabled students to study Medieval and Early Modern Literature drawing on specialist staff expertise and resources, particularly the holdings of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works, 8 medieval manuscripts, around 100 post medieval manuscripts, and 69 incunabula.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methods
-Comparative Critical Approaches
-Epic, Religion, Philosophy
-Bodily Distempers

All modules in the programme seek to lead students to a coherent and fuller or more accurate understanding of the literature, of its various contexts and relationships, of threshold concepts that facilitate the interpretation of related texts and contexts, and of critical, scholarly, and theoretical orientations. The taught part of the programme thereby prepares students to undertake a dissertation on a topic of their choosing, continuing where appropriate to make use of the special collections in the Roderic Bowen Library and Archives and/or e-resources such as Early English Books Online (EEBO).

Key Features

The MRes in Early Modern Literature is taught on-campus and as a distance-learning programme. When delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter, the modules are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback. For campus-based students, access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning. Moodle, our VLE, is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, whereby students are better able to revise and explore topics and access electronic resources. It is the primary learning interface for distance-learning students.

Assessment

The MRes in Early Modern Literature involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographical exercises, creation of research project proposals, editorial exercises, and the dissertation. This variety of assessment inculcates the development of skills in presenting academic and scholarly material in a clear, professional manner. For the majority of assignments students choose their own topic on which to be assessed in relation to each module, always in consultation with the module tutor. The dissertation allows students to undertake to a greater extent than on an MA a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Librarianship and archives management (with further professional qualifications)
-Bookselling
-Law (with further professional qualifications
-Human resources
-Social work
-Public sector administration, civil service

With its 120-credit Dissertation, the Masters by Research programme provides a firm foundation for postgraduate research, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, and providing greater opportunity for students to pursue their own research interest, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a qualification that is useful for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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Looking around the world today, it is clear that religion plays a role in many of the major conflicts going on at various levels. Read more
Looking around the world today, it is clear that religion plays a role in many of the major conflicts going on at various levels. Furthermore religion plays an important role in people's lives worldwide, and has become one of the major ways people connect with each other across the globe. However, the persistence and prominence of the role of religion in contemporary societies is still not sufficiently understood in academic research and in the work of policy-makers, NGO's and journalists.

This master's track addresses the pivotal place of religion in the dynamics of globalization and conflict that shape present-day societies. The programme is interdisciplinary, examining political, social, psychological and cultural dimensions. You will learn to:

• investigate the consequences of globalization for religious practices and individual, ethnic and national identities
• understand the relationship between religion, conflict and peace-building
• analyse national and international conflicts, and learn how they are interwoven with religious interests and opinions

You can specialize in either conflict and peacebuilding, migration or gender

Degree: MA in Theology & Religious Studies

Why in Groningen?

• The combination of anthropology, sociology and political science is unique in the world.
• Rated the best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands.
• Top 100 university
• Relates latest research and theories to current developments.
• Vibrant research tradition with international links.
• Internships at embassies, ministry of foreign affairs, international NGO's.
• Taught by leading experts with a world-class reputation.
• You can follow your own research interests.

Job perspectives

With your degree, you can advise or write policy documents on different subjects, such as, developmental assistance or multicultural society. You could work for the government, in business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education. Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a place on the Research Master after your regular Master's programme. You can complete this two-year programme in one year.

Job examples

- Consulting & Policy
In a globalizing world, national and international conflicts are farreaching.There is a need for experts who can explain and help solve these conflicts. With your degree, you can advise or write policy documents on different subjects, such as developmental assistance or multicultural society. You could work for the government, in business or at an NGO. More specifically, this could mean working for the think-tank of a political party, for the Netherlands Institute for Social Research or for the Netherlands Institute of International Relations Clingendael.

- Media & Journalism
Religion is in the news every day, often in a negative way, from terrorism to integration issues. With your expertise in the field of religion and conflict, you can intensify the debate in society and, where necessary, add some nuance to the picture. You can put your knowledge into practice as an editor at a publishing company, a broadcasting company, a newspaper or a current affairs magazine.

- Education
You will have enough knowledge of the subject to teach Religious Studies and Philosophy or Social Studies in secondary education. You could also opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

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Are you a fan of fantasy fiction? Or are you simply curious as to why the fantastic can be found all around us in the twenty-first century, from videogames and films to poetry, songs, television, novel series, and so-called 'mainstream' fiction? This programme allows you to engage with one of the most vibrant literary genres of the last two centuries - and a major cultural phenomenon of our time. Read more
Are you a fan of fantasy fiction? Or are you simply curious as to why the fantastic can be found all around us in the twenty-first century, from videogames and films to poetry, songs, television, novel series, and so-called 'mainstream' fiction? This programme allows you to engage with one of the most vibrant literary genres of the last two centuries - and a major cultural phenomenon of our time.

Why this programme

◾You will be supported by a friendly, internationally acclaimed team of scholars working in all areas of the arts, from literature and comics to film, TV, history of art and modern languages.
◾You will have access to world class libraries, museums and teaching/research facilities. And there will be the opportunity to immerse yourself in the vibrant cultural scene of Glasgow itself, which attracts major fantasy-related conventions and is famous throughout the world for its musical, artistic, technological and literary energy.

Programme structure

The programme involves core and optional taught sessions, followed by a period of research and writing over the summer when you will undertake supervised independent work on a special topic of your choice, researching, planning and writing a 15,000 word dissertation.

You will take a research training course which will prepare you both to work on your dissertation and to develop a proposal and funding applications for a PhD, should you choose to pursue research at doctoral level.

You will have the opportunity to meet and learn from visiting scholars, writers and publishers from the UK, Europe and the United States. And you will form part of the dynamic graduate/research community of the School of Critical Studies and the College of Arts.

The programme is made up of three components:
◾Core course: taught over two ten-week teaching periods, from October to December and January to March.
◾Optional courses: also taught in ten-week blocks. Full-time students usually study one topic course in each semester.
◾A dissertation: written during the final phase of the course, from April to September.

Core Course

Part 1 introduces you to the history of fantasy literature in English and its attendant theories from c. 1780 to 1950. As well as charting the early history of modern fantasy, including major children’s fantasies where these had a significant impact on the development of adult fantasy literature, the course will introduce you to the most influential critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic.

Part 2 investigates the history of fantasy literature in English from 1950 to the present. It will also consider the unprecedented spread of fantasy in recent decades through comics, films and the new media, and delve into the critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic that have emerged since the 1950s.

Optional Courses

You may choose from the available optional courses offered by any of the Masters programmes in the School of Critical Studies. You may also opt for courses from other Masters programmes in the College of Arts (subject to approval by the relevant convener). One course can be taken at Honours level. Examples of possible options include:
◾Animation
◾Children's Literature And Literacies: Critical Enquiry
◾Core Structures Of Scottish Culture
◾Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline)
◾Decadence And The Modern
◾Finn in Gaelic Literature
◾Magical Narratives: Imagination, Fantasy and the Creation of Worlds
◾Modern Everyday
◾Neovictorianism
◾Religion, Theology and Culture Directed Study
◾Science Fiction

For further information, contact the convener.

Dissertation

The topic normally arises out of the work of the taught sessions, but the choice is very much open to your own initiative. The only restrictions are that the topic should be capable of serious scholarly treatment, and that adequate supervision is available. Your supervisor will help you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology.

In addition, you will attend seminars in the School Research Training Programme and the College of Arts Graduate School Research Training Course. Topics include:
◾Use of library resources
◾Advanced humanities computing
◾Research skills and research management.

Career prospects

The critical and analytic skills you develop and the ability to conduct rigorous independent study make this programme an ideal step towards an academic career.

Graduates from English Literature have also gone on to careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching and the media.

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This programme enables students to study literature in English from the eighth to the seventeenth century, including a selection of the period’s major works, such as Beowulf, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost, and some of its major writers, such as Chaucer, the Gawain poet, Shakespeare and Donne, as well as non-canonical and non-literary works by lesser-known authors. Read more
This programme enables students to study literature in English from the eighth to the seventeenth century, including a selection of the period’s major works, such as Beowulf, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost, and some of its major writers, such as Chaucer, the Gawain poet, Shakespeare and Donne, as well as non-canonical and non-literary works by lesser-known authors.

Course Overview

Critical attention on this programme is focused especially on continuities and discontinuities between the medieval and early modern periods. For example, Anglo-Saxon heroic literature may be studied in conjunction with the heroic mode of the English Renaissance epic, and medieval dream poetry in conjunction with early modern literary (as well as philosophical and medical) representations of psychological disorders.

The programme is underpinned by advanced research methods, the study of theoretically informed critical approaches, and the scholarly examination of manuscripts and early printed books.

The University has a well-established record of research and teaching in English. Unusually for the sector, its provision at all levels has enabled students to study Medieval and Early Modern Literature drawing on specialist staff expertise and resources, particularly the holdings of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works, 8 medieval manuscripts, around 100 post medieval manuscripts, and 69 incunabula.

Modules

-Research Metoods
-Comparative Critical Approaches
-Medieval Manuscript Studies

And optional modules in topics such as:
-Epic, Religion, Philosophy
-Bodily Distempers
-Beowulf and Heroic Literature
-Medieval Poetry of Dream and Debate

Key Features

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Literature is taught on-campus and as a distance-learning programme. When delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter, the modules are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback. For campus-based students, access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning. Moodle, our VLE, is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, whereby students are better able to revise and explore topics and access electronic resources. It is the primary learning interface for distance-learning students.

Assessment

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Literature involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographical exercises, creation of research project proposals, presentations – oral and PowerPoint-based, editorial exercises, and the dissertation. This variety of assessment inculcates the development of skills in presenting academic and scholarly material in a clear, professional manner, whether orally or in writing. For the majority of assignments students choose their own topic on which to be assessed in relation to each module, always in consultation with the module tutor. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Journalism, publishing, copywrighting, media
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Librarianship and archives management (with further professional qualifications)
-Law (with further professional qualifications)
-Human resources
-Social work
-Public sector administration, civil service

The programme provides a foundation for postgraduate research, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a qualification that is useful for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

Read less
This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree or equivalent in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject. Read more
This programme is intended for students who hold a BA (Honours) degree or equivalent in another discipline, but who wish to acquire a knowledge of Theology and Religion at a level which would permit them to undertake further study in the subject.

Course structure

Four option modules; dissertation.

Core Modules

-Graduate Diploma dissertation

Optional Modules

-Optional Modules in previous years have included (2 choices from):
-Landscapes of Worship in Contemporary South Asia
-Literature and Theology of the Old Testament
-New Testament Theology
-Topics in Christian Ethics
-Death, Ritual and Belief
-The Making of Modern Christianity: Medieval and Reformation Europe
-Christian Theology: Essential Questions I
-Christian Theology: Essential Questions II
-God, Freedom and the Soul
-Philosophy and the Christian Tradition
-One further 20 credit module offered by the Department of Theology & Religion at Levels 1 or 2

Plus 2 choices from:
-Aramaic
-Biblical Theology
-Advanced Greek Texts
-Religious Innovations
-New Testament Ethics
-Issues in Old Testament Studies
-The Cross in the Shadow of the Crescent
-The First Urban Churches
-Religion and Film
-Religious Violence in the Reformation Era
-Emotion and Identity in Religion
-The Sociology of Conservative Protestantism
-The Postmodern God
-1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (English)
-1 Peter and the Petrine Tradition (with Greek)
-The Theology of Thomas Aquinas
-Marriage and Family in Christian Social Teaching
-War and Peace in the Orthodox Tradition
-Gospel, Mission and Empire
-The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (English)
-The Letters of John and the origins of Gnosticism (Greek)
-The Historical Jesus
-Reading Greek Sources about the Historical Jesus
-Jesus Christ in the Twentieth Century
-Faith and the Experience of War in the Christian World
-Religions in Sub-Saharan Africa
-Religious Difference in the Reformation World
-The Doctrine of the Church from the Fathers to the Present

Learning and Teaching

As a student on the Graduate Diploma, you will receive on average 7.5 hours of timetabled contact per week. This will include a combination of lectures, seminars, and tutorials. Timetabled contact is only the beginning of your learning. It provides a starting point for your development as an independent learner. Typically, classroom teaching and learning will form nearly 25% of the time you will spend on your studies; you will be expected to spend the remaining 75% of your time on independent research.

The culmination of the process of your becoming an independent researcher is the Dissertation, a large research project that counts for one third of your marks. This gives you the opportunity to engage at an advanced level with creative cutting-edge research at the forefront of the discipline, working on a topic of your choice. For the dissertation you will have a supervisor who will guide and discuss your research with you. The dissertation represents the cumulative development of skills in analysis, synthesis, presentation and interpretation that the degree programme aims to foster.

In addition to all this the Department also has an extensive programme of research-related activities that you are warmly encouraged to attend. These include several research seminar series and public lectures from high-profile guest speakers and visiting scholars; the University also frequently hosts eminent and well-known visiting speakers.

Other admission requirements

It is also ideal if you have already studied theology and religion to first degree level in another country, and wish to become familiar with the critical approach to these subjects that is typical in British public universities. When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience.

You reflect on these areas of thinking in themselves and as they relate to particular literary texts, to post-enlightenment philosophy and to other relevant areas of culture and experience. It is for those interested in writing, reading, language, art, the self, literature and discovering more about the relations between literature and philosophy.

The MA in Critical Theory offers a choice of two core courses that survey a wide range of modern theoretical approaches, and a range of taught options covering postcolonial theory, theories of art, modern approaches to comparative literature, deconstruction and a chance to work in depth on a single key theoretical text and the writings it refers to.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/216/critical-theory

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; one core module (FR866: Literature and Theory) and three optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a theory-based dissertation between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH833 - Contemporary Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)

Assessment

The course is assessed by coursework for each module and by the dissertation which accounts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of modern literary and critical theory

- study the reading-practices, analytic tools and vocabularies of modern critical thought

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced theoretical study of literature

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach critical theory, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical awareness of the expressive and analytical resources of language

- offer scope for the study of critical theory within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by philosophy

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- examine this writing in the wider context of literature, culture and philosophy

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree, should you so wish.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
This programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. It enables students to study a broad range of Medieval literature.

Course Overview

The programme in Medieval Literature looks closely at the eighth to the twelfth century, including a selection of the period’s major works, such as Beowulf, The Faerie Queene, as well as non-canonical and non-literary works by lesser-known authors. Critical attention on this programme is focused especially on continuities and discontinuities between the early medieval and late medieval periods, with a special focus upon Anglo-Saxon heroic literature and medieval dream poetry.

The programme is underpinned by advanced research methods, the study of theoretically informed critical approaches, and the scholarly examination of manuscripts and early printed books.

The University has a well-established record of research and teaching in English. Unusually for the sector, its provision at all levels has enabled students to study Medieval Literature drawing on specialist staff expertise and resources, particularly the holdings of the Special Collections of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works, 8 medieval manuscripts, around 100 post medieval manuscripts, and 69 incunabula.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Metoods
-Comparative and Critical Approaches
-Medieval Manuscript Studies
-Epic, Religion, Philosophy
-Beowulf and Heroic Literature
-Medieval Poetry of Dream and Debate

Key Features

The programme is delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize winning authors.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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