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Masters Degrees (Religion And Culture)

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Globalisation and immigration have transformed the religious and cultural landscape in 21st century multicultural societies, leading to many challenges and complexities posed by religion in modern democracies. Read more
Globalisation and immigration have transformed the religious and cultural landscape in 21st century multicultural societies, leading to many challenges and complexities posed by religion in modern democracies.

This new course, which is the first of its kind in the UK, addresses those challenges and complexities and will provide you with a framework to engage with issues relating to the place of religion in public life.

The course is hosted by Westminster Law School and shares modules with the rest of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities as well as Westminster School of Media Art and Design. The course is not affiliated to any particular faith but takes a broad approach to religion including non-religious beliefs. It will allow you to gain a deeper understanding of the place of religion in society and the role of law.

You can choose whether you want to study for the MA or LLM. For the MA you will need to have obtained a minimum of 180 credits at Level 7. You will have to take the three compulsory core modules which are: Law and Religion: Theory and Practice; Law and Religion in Context and Sociology of Law and Religion. In addition, you will have to write a dissertation and take an additional three optional modules of your choice.

Students who wish to obtain the award of LLM will need to write a dissertation with a substantial law element and are expected to take at least one law option in addition to the core modules.

MA
-Law and Religion Theory and Practice (20 credits)
-Law and Religion in Context (20 credits)
-Sociology of Religion (20 credits)
-MA Dissertation (60 credits)

3 options of your choice (from the proposed list)

LLM
-Law and Religion Theory and Practice (20 credits)
-Law and Religion in Context (20 credits)
-Sociology of Religion (20 credits)
-LLM Dissertation in Law (60 credits)

3 options one of which must be from Law

The course will equip you with key skills such as the ability to carry out independent research and to deal with sensitive topics. You will develop an awareness of world challenges posed by religion, a thorough knowledge of equality and non-discrimination legislation, debating and mooting skills, the ability to be non-judgmental, and to work in a multicultural environment.

Students will also benefit significantly from the Law and Religion Research Cluster which launched in February 2017. The research cluster will hold regular events on topical issues and provide an opportunity for students to network with academics and professionals associated with the field of religion, law and society.

Course content

The Religion, Law and Society MA/LLM provides a platform for critical debates around the relevance of religion in modern pluralist societies and the challenges that democratic states face in dealing with religion in the public sphere. Current debates in law and religion include the pursuit of freedom of and from religion; non-discrimination, manifestation of religion and beliefs, church-state relations, religion and democracy as well as the threat of extremism, terrorism and fundamentalism in liberal and pluralist societies.

The programme aims to explore those issues and contribute to a culture of tolerance by encouraging dialogue and critical self-awareness of individuals’ personal trajectories. You will be encouraged to challenge your own perception of religion in order to enter into a constructive dialogue. This will be done through respectful debates, peer review, critical thinking and reflection. The programme draws on interdisciplinary perspectives and offers students a wide range of options from the social sciences such as law, politics, sociology and media. This interdisciplinary perspective will allow you to develop your own theoretical framework for evaluating the interaction between law and religion in modern contemporary societies.

Employability

Our dedicated Career Development Centre is actively working with an ever-expanding network of over 3,000 employers to provide you with exceptional employability support and guidance. As a result we were nominated as finalists for a significant industry award – the NUE Awards Most Improved Commitment to Employability 2016.

We provide our students with work placements and international opportunities to support them in becoming highly employable, globally engaged graduates, and with one million businesses operating within 20 miles of the University of Westminster, over 84% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduation. Our graduates work in a variety of sectors and organisations, from small/medium-sized companies and start-ups to large not-for-profit organisations and corporates.

During your time at Westminster you will be able to use our comprehensive online vacancy service and meet with our experienced careers consultants, providing you with thorough training and support on CV writing, application forms, interview preparation and assessment centres.

In addition to this, you will receive careers support from academic staff and faculty work placement teams, offering targeted course-specific careers advice and assistance in securing a work placement during your time at Westminster. You can find out more about course-specific career opportunities by visiting the Prospects website.

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The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. Read more
The MA in Visual Arts and Culture at Durham is a distinctive interdisciplinary programme that invites students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the visual arts and of visual culture. To study visual arts and culture is a way of paying attention to phenomena that are literally everywhere. The concept of ‘visual culture’ acknowledges the pervasive nature of visual phenomena, and signals openness towards both the breadth of objects and images, and the range of theoretical and methodological perspectives needed to understand them adequately. Drawing upon research strengths across the departments that contribute to the programme, the MA in Visual Arts and Culture encourages you to take a broad view of geographical and chronological scope, while allowing you to engage with a wide range of visual phenomena, including fine art, film, photography, architecture, and scientific and medical imaging practices.

The importance of critical visual literacy in the contemporary world cannot be exaggerated. ‘The illiterate of the future’, wrote the Bauhaus artist and theoretician László Moholy-Nagy, ‘will be the person ignorant of the camera as well as of the pen’. This observation was made in the 1920s, when photography was first used in the periodical press and in political propaganda. The rich visual world of the early twentieth century pales in comparison with the visual saturation that now characterises everyday experience throughout the developed societies and much of the developing world. But the study of visual culture is by no means limited to the twentieth century. Turning our attention to past cultures with a particular eye to the significance of visual objects of all kinds yields new forms of knowledge and understanding.

Our programme facilitates the development of critical visual literacy in three main ways. First, it attends to the specificity of visual objects, images and events, encouraging you to develop approaches that are sensitive to the individual works they encounter. Second, it investigates the nature of perception, asking how it is that we make meaning out of that which we see. Finally, it investigates how our relationships with other people, and with things, are bound up in the act of looking.

Course structure

The course consists of one core module, two optional modules and a dissertation. The core module sets out the intellectual framework for the programme, offering a broad overview of key conceptual debates in the field of Visual Culture, together with training in analysis of visual objects of different kinds, an advanced introduction to understanding museum practice, and key research skills in visual arts and culture. The optional modules provide further specialised areas of study in related topics of interest to individual students, and the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation involves detailed study of a particular aspect of a topic related to the broad area of visual culture.

Optional modules

Previously, optional modules have included:
-Critical Curatorship
-History, Knowledge and Visual Culture
-Representing Otherness
-Negotiating the Human
-Theorizing History and Historicising Theory: An Introduction to Photographic Studies
-Digital Imaging
-Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities
-Current Issues in Aesthetics and Theory of Art
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage
-Monumental architecture of the Roman Empire in the Antonine and Severan periods
-Art in Ecological Perspective
-Texts and Cultures I: Visual and Verbal Cultures (Early Modern)
-Energy, Society and Energy Practices
-German Reading Skills for Research
-French Reading Skills for Research

The Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture, a field that entails the study of vision and perception, the analysis of the social significance of images and ways of seeing, and the attentive interpretation of a range of visual objects, from artworks to scientific images.

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

The Centre brings together scholars from across and beyond Durham University in order to provide a vibrant and dynamic setting for wide-ranging interdisciplinary research and debates about visual culture. The Centre provides a focus for cutting-edge research on visual arts and cultures: it aspires to train new generations of scholars through innovative postgraduate programmes, it fosters informed debate both nationally and internationally, and it offers an engaging, open environment for researchers at all levels.

CVAC takes a generous view of what constitutes visual culture and it is broad in both geographical and chronological scope, encouraging debate about the range of approaches, methods and theories that are most generative for research on visual phenomena. Durham’s current visual culture research includes the study of word and image, art and religion, medicine and visual representation, film, the history of photography, architecture, urban culture, heritage and philosophical aesthetics. It also includes the development of pioneering visual research methods and the study of vision.

Durham’s location itself provides a rich and inspiring environment for this field of research. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that also includes Durham Cathedral; its acclaimed Oriental Museum is a significant asset which houses three Designated Collections, recognised by the Arts Council as nationally and internationally pre-eminent; alongside an outstanding collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. CVAC has many established relationships with major national and international cultural organisations, and aims to develop further its links with museums, galleries and heritage sites.

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Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work. Read more
Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work.

The programme is primarily for students who wish to pursue further postgraduate research or research in other contexts. It offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork.

Following an autumn term at our Canterbury campus, you spend the spring term studying at Kent's Paris School of Arts and Culture, where you gain a specific insight into the influence of religion in a European context. Your knowledge is enhanced and shaped through the independence that is gained by living abroad for a period of time.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/thrs/postgraduate/taught-religion.html

About the Department of Religious Studies

Collectively, the staff at Kent cover all the current methodologies and theoretical approaches (from empirical research to psychology of religion, and to continental philosophy and history of ideas). As well as offering expertise in all the major world religions, we are widely recognised for leading work at the fringes of the category of religion, as well as for work on the invention of the category of 'religion'. Among the many options of Religion and covered in the department are: religion and media, religion and politics, religion and comparative literatures, and religion and society. See the staff research tab for further details.

The Department supports cross-disciplinary work and students are encouraged to take advantage of the wide range of postgraduate classes and seminars that are available within the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) and across the University as a whole.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus* There is an option to do the MA Religion with a term in Paris: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/350/religion-paris

Course detail

The programme offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork. You also study two modules of your choice, suited to your own specific interests.

Format and assessment

You have the opportunity to refine ideas for a research project through your taught modules and dissertation, and you also receive guidance on writing research proposals and seeking funding.

MA structure:
On the MA programme, you study four (30 credit) modules over two terms, as well as writing a dissertation.

PCert structure:
On the Graduate Certificate, you study two (30 credit) modules of your choice from the range of core and optional modules below.

Careers

The University’s aim that students are able to acquire discipline-specific and transferable skills through the curriculum is at the heart of this new MA programme. Its interdisciplinary nature allows you to specialise as well as prepare for the modern university employment market, where versatility and interdisciplinary is increasingly expected.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. Read more
As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world.

It combines a focus on both the local and the global author through compulsory modules contextualising the variety of ways in which Dickens engaged with the social, cultural and political issues of his age. Interdisciplinary approaches are employed, using Dickens as a focus, to consider the relationships between19th-century fiction and journalism, the Victorians’ engagement with material culture, and their fascination with the body and its metaphors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/219/dickens-victorian-culture

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation on a subject related to Dickens and/or Victorian culture between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In 2015 the following three specialist modules were available: EN836 Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel, EN876 Dickens and the Condition of England, EN835 Dickens, the Victorians and the Body. Students would be required to take at least two. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide excellent postgraduate-level study that deepens and extends your understanding of work in the field of Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of studies in Dickens and Victorian culture

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your research skills in the relevant field so as to provide a pathway for you to undertake PhD work in the area of Dickens and Victorian culture

- build upon and extend an already-established reputation at Kent for distinction in the learning and teaching of Dickens and Victorian culture.

Staff research interests

Full details of staff research interests can be found on the School's website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/staff).

- Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid:

Lecturer in English and American Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture, especially representations of nature and the environment, time, history, queer theory; sublimity; ecology and psychogeography.

- Dr Sara Lyons:

Lecturer in Victorian Literature
Nineteenth-century literature and culture; Victorian poetry and critical prose; fin-de-siècle aestheticism and decadence; the interrelations between literature, religion, secularism in the long nineteenth century.

- Professor Wendy Parkins:

Professor of Victorian Literature
Victorian modernity; gender and sexuality in the 19th century; the Victorian novel (especially Dickens, Gaskell, Collins); literature of the fin-desiècle period; aestheticism and William Morris.

- Dr Catherine Waters:

Professor of 19th-Century Studies
Victorian literature and culture, especially fiction and journalism; Dickens; Sala; George Eliot; literature and gender.

- Dr Sarah Wood:

Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature
Creative critical writing; 19th and 20th-century poetry and fiction, especially Robert Browning and Elizabeth Bowen; writing and visual art; literary theory; deconstruction, especially Derrida; psychoanalysis; continental philosophy.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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In the Research Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Religion you will focus on the philosophical reflection on religion in Western thought and contemporary society, as well as exploring the relation between philosophy and religion in Western and other cultural contexts. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Religion (Research)

In the Research Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Religion you will focus on the philosophical reflection on religion in Western thought and contemporary society, as well as exploring the relation between philosophy and religion in Western and other cultural contexts.

Information for students of the Research Master

What is the relation between philosophy and religion in Western culture and in other cultural contexts? How does modern and contemporary philosophy reflect on religion? What is meant by a philosophical critique of religion? Which theories of religion have been developed? What is religious experience? The specialisation in Philosophy of Religion explores both classical questions concerning religion, such as the problem of evil, the conceptualization of faith and religious practices, and the issues of religious pluralism and (in)tolerance.

Furthermore, it focuses on contemporary philosophical reflections on religion in a (post)secular society and in a global age. In this specialisation you will study the relation between philosophy and religion in non-Western contexts – for example in the Eastern (Indian) tradition, in the African context or in an Islamic context. The specialisation thus offers a combination of a focus on a Western philosophical body of thought and a comparative global approach to philosophical reflections on religion. You will gain insight in past and present philosophical thought on a conflict-ridden phenomenon.

Key authors include Agamben, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Weber, Freud, De Certeau, Foucault, Gauchet, Said and Taylor.

http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/philosophy-of-religion-research/

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
This is the only research master in philosophy in the Netherlands that offers a specialisation in philosophy of religion.
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/philosophy-of-religion-research/

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The Sikh Studies MRes is a research degree that includes taught components; it may be followed as an end in itself, but also provides an excellent foundation for subsequent doctoral research. Read more
The Sikh Studies MRes is a research degree that includes taught components; it may be followed as an end in itself, but also provides an excellent foundation for subsequent doctoral research.

The programme comprises four components; a compulsory Research Methodology module, two optional modules, and a 20,000-word thesis on a topic of your choice.

It aims to develop your critical reasoning skills to enable you to objectively analyse Sikh writings as well as writings about Sikhism by both Sikh and non-Sikh scholars.

Finally, throughout the programme there will be some emphasis on comparative study and its importance for the study of inter-religious dialogue and relations. The studies will be largely contemporary and will also make reference to wider ‘generic’ issues (eg, matters of Asian religious practices, world views and cultural aspects).

The University of Birmingham is an excellent centre for the study of religion and culture. It has built up good relationships and partnerships with Birmingham's many different communities, and such a rich cultural mix means that it provides an ideal setting to study the relations between Religion and Culture. The city is recognised as one of the most multicultural cities in Europe, with representation from most religious traditions.

Students of Sikh Studies come from a wide variety of backgrounds and often express very different opinions. Thus, there is no stereotypical student of Sikh Studies and all viewpoints are freely discussed in a friendly atmosphere.

Theology and Religion at the University of Birmingham was ranked second among all Theology departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise, with over 50% of our research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Our MA in Religious Studies allows you to specialise in one of two pathways. Asian Religions or Late Antiquity. Late Antiquity Pathway. Read more
Our MA in Religious Studies allows you to specialise in one of two pathways: Asian Religions or Late Antiquity.

Late Antiquity Pathway:

On this pathway you will discover the great religious and cultural transformations of Late Antiquity - the landmark period when contemporary world faiths emerged. This pathway draws on internationally-recognised expertise in Religion from Late Antiquity to the contemporary era, across a wide geographical area, and with sensitivity to issues in the public eye. Acquiring advanced theological, historical and linguistic skills, you will analyse major texts and artefacts of the period (200 - 800AD) to better understand the major world religions. Drawing on the concentration of expertise found in the Centre for Late Antique Religion and Culture, you will explore religions such as Paganism, Gnosticism and Zoroastrianism. A highlight is the availability of Arabic, Greek or Latin teaching for deeper understanding of original sources.

Asian Religions Pathway:

This pathway allows you to explore the religious literature and culture of South Asia or China in combination or isolation in this specialist programme. You will be rooted within the Centre for the History of Religion in Asia, with expertise ranging from Chinese Buddhism to the study of the ancient Indian religious tradition of Jainism. At the heart of the UK’s largest single concentration of Mahabharata scholars, you also have the rewarding option of gaining a firm grounding in the classical Indian language of Sanskrit if you wish.

Distinctive features

• Teaching by internationally renowned experts and informed by the latest research of our Centres for the History of Religion in Asia and Late Antique Religion and Culture.

• The opportunity to engage in postgraduate research culture, by participating in Research Centre activities

• Designed to be flexible to your interests.

Structure

This course can be completed in 1 year with full-time study or in 3 years with part-time study.

You will take a mixture of core and optional modules totalling 120 credits over two (full-time) or four (part-time) semesters.

On successful completion of the taught stage, you will progress to your dissertation (60 credits), researching and writing a dissertation (20,000 words) on a topic or theme of your choice in consultation with your academic supervisor.

Teaching

Classes are delivered via small student-focussed tutorials rather than formal lectures, and with individual interests and flexibility in mind.

As part of the programme, you will be encouraged to deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

Assessment

Assessment is via written assignments of approximately 4,000 words, and language exams if you specialise in language study.

Career Prospects

This programme is essentially a research preparation programme. Graduates from this programme have successfully applied for funded places as PhD students. Beyond that, this programme also enhances the skills and knowledge base acquired through a first degree in Religious Studies. Previous graduates have therefore successfully embarked on careers in a range of employment, such as religious organisations, primary and secondary teaching, print and broadcasting media, and higher education administration and management.

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Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work. Read more
Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work.

Following an autumn term at our Canterbury campus, you spend the spring term studying at Kent's Paris School of Arts and Culture (https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/), where you gain a specific insight into the influence of religion in a European context. Your knowledge is enhanced and shaped through the independence that is gained by living abroad for a period of time.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or split site between Canterbury and Paris.

Course structure

The programme is primarily for students who wish to pursue further postgraduate research or research in other contexts. The MA offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork.

You complete two core modules (one in the Autumn; one in the Spring), both attracting 30 credits. You can also select two 30-credit option modules that will help you to further develop your specific interests.

Compulsory modules:

- Religion and Modern European Thought
- The Study of Religion

You are also able to select optional modules that will help you to develop your specific interests. As demand for doctoral research funding becomes increasingly competitive, you also receive guidance on seeking funding and writing research proposals, as well as the opportunity to refine ideas for a research project through the taught modules and dissertation.

It is possible to enrol for 12-month, part-time study for a PCert in Religion, taking the two compulsory modules.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

TH830 - Religion and European Thought (Paris) (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH832 - The Study of Religion: Genealogies, Inventions and Interventions (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
TH998 - Dissertation:Theology & Religious Studies (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework on the taught modules and the dissertation on the MA programme.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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The Department for the Study of Religion offers Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy programs in the study of religion and facilitates research and publication on religion. Read more
The Department for the Study of Religion offers Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy programs in the study of religion and facilitates research and publication on religion. The department consolidates the vast curricular and faculty resources that are distributed throughout the many departments and colleges of the University and enables its students to use any resource in the University which serves the study of religion.

The department conceives the academic study of religion in interdisciplinary terms and embraces humanistic, historical, and social scientific approaches and methods. Programs of study are constructed individually to fit the specific needs and interests of each student. As a guideline for areas of strength in the department, we are organized by the following fields:
-Buddhist Studies
-Christianity
-Hinduism and South Asian Religions
-Islam
-Judaism
-Religion, Culture, and Politics
-Religion, Ethics, and Modern Thought
-Religion and Medicine
-Religions of Mediterranean Antiquity

These fields do not determine program requirements. Most faculty and students participate in multiple fields.

At the doctoral level, from the point of admission onward, student programs must be matched with the expertise of at least three professors who help supervise the student's work. The department's Graduate Studies Handbook, available on the web and from the department, gives full information on admissions and programs as well as the research and teaching interests of the faculty.

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This flexible and innovative course has been designed for professionals in leadership positions who want to get the most out of their roles by exploring issues of religion and belief. Read more

About the course

This flexible and innovative course has been designed for professionals in leadership positions who want to get the most out of their roles by exploring issues of religion and belief.

The course will be useful to a wide range of professional groups, including those working in law and criminal justice, health and social care, government, education, and corporate and professional organisations involved in community projects.

Throughout the course you’ll explore contemporary areas of religious debate and research. Your learning will have a direct impact on your professional practice.

Where your masters can take you

Our graduates go into a range of careers all over the world, including university lecturing, the creative industries and religious education. They work for a variety of organisations, from charities to museums and libraries.

The MA Biblical Studies Research is designed to be a good preparation for a PhD.

About us

This is one of the world’s leading institutes for multidisciplinary research on the Bible. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks us among the UK top ten for quality output.

We take a dynamic, contemporary approach to the subject. Drawing on expertise from various disciplines including archaeology, history and social science and literature, we examine the Bible’s influence on culture, society and politics.

Our current research includes projects on biblical literacy, religion and conflict, embodied religion, the Bible and forced migration, and religion and rape culture.

Outstanding teaching

When you study with us, you tap into a huge amount of specialist expertise. As a masters student, you’ll be part of the culture of the department, giving presentations at research seminars and engaging with visiting researchers.

Funding

Studentships are available for Home students through the AHRC Research Preparation Masters Scheme. The deadline for applications is May 1. For details see:

http://www.ahrc.ac.uk

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through interactive lectures, seminars and supervised research. You’ll be assessed on your coursework and a dissertation.

Core module

Research Methods in Biblical Studies.

Examples of optional modules

Options include: Issues in Cultural Studies; the Bible and Visual Culture; Issues in Religion, Theology and the Bible, and reading modules for which you can agree your own focus with the tutor to reflect your research interests.

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We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Read more

General Information

We offer a unique opportunity to explore the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. Our remarkably diverse faculty includes world experts who both teach, and conduct path-breaking research on, the archaeology, history, languages, literatures, and religions of ancient Egypt, the Near East, Greece and Rome, including Judaism, Christianity, and early Islam. Our programs, which can be individually tailored to fit specific interests, foster interdisciplinary study, at the same time developing the relevant skill sets to prepare our students for future study and employment.

What makes the program unique?

Every program is unique and students have the option to design a perfect curriculum for them. Our strengths include rigorous training in the primary languages, Ancient Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Middle Egyptian, and Classical Arabic; broad coverage of the mythic systems of ancient civilizations; in-depth study of the dramatic, historical, legal, literary and religious texts produced by those civilizations; advanced training in practical methods of archaeology and epigraphy; and exploration of the traditions and receptions of antiquity by later eras.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Ancient Culture, Religion and Ethnicity
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Ancient Language Requirement

Candidates will be required to demonstrate reasonable competence in one of the classical languages. The minimum standard required is a grade of B-/68% in 6 credits of one of the following: GREK 301/302 (Greek Literature of the Classical Period) or LATN 301 (Latin Literature of the Classical Period) or HEBR 479 (Readings in Biblical Hebrew) or ARBC 420 (supervised study in Classical Arabic) or their equivalents. These 6 credits may form part of the course requirements for the M.A. program.

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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Read more

Why American Studies in Nijmegen?

The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Our Master's program gives students the opportunity to become experts in the concept of ‘America' in a variety of fields: US history, literature, culture (including popular culture, film, theatre, political history, foreign policy, constitutional law, religion and social science. Radboud University's programme distinguishes itself from other's by emphasizing the cultural and political relations between the United States, its neighbours and Europe.

The open classroom experience is what teachers and researches of the Master`s program “North American Studies” want to create for their students. For an example of the experience, in the project “Politics & Culture of Liberation” students and teachers worked closely with the National Liberation Museum in Groesbeek, the Regional Archive in Nijmegen and the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The project resulted in an exhibition on the impact of American culture on Europe and the Transatlantic World. This is only one example of the many creative seminar projects that students realize in the Master`s program.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

Specializations

Specialisations in the Master's in North American Studies. The Master's programme in North American Studies offers two specialisations:

1. Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective
2. Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

America's cultural icons are the world's cultural icons. From Walt Disney to the Statue of Liberty, from Hollywood to Time magazine, and from Jack Kerouac to Philip Roth, the influence of American culture and literature around the world is huge. Our program allows students to critically explore the significance of American culture in countries around the globe. Aside from studying the variety of meanings assigned to American cultural products abroad, students will explore the diversity of the American cultural expressions themselves.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks beyond national borders. In this program you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States within, outside and at its borders. Central themes are the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe, and related issues in the field of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

Study American issues with an interdisciplinary view

True to the tradition of American Studies, our program teaches students to approach issues from different angles and to think in multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary ways. We also offer excellent internships, thanks to our global network. Furthermore, we are the only university in the Netherlands to teach oral communication skills in the American language throughout our Bachelor's program, so that students who go on to study for a Master's degree have near-native language abilities.

High level of communication in American English

In Nijmegen, you will find yourself in a dynamic learning environment where the level of scholarship and communication in (American) English is extremely high. This is one of the reasons why our program is so popular. Another reason is the choice the University offers between two fascinating fields within which you can create your own custom-made program: ‘Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective' and ‘Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society.'

Program outline

Within the program in North America Studies, you can choose from the following two specialisations. Each specialisation comprises of a one-year, 60 EC program including a 20 EC Master's thesis project. For more information about program outline, structure, and courses, please click on the links below.

Literature and Cultures of North America in International Perspective
All students enrolled in this Master's specialisation take compulsory foundational courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is an elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include courses on Native Americans, African-American literature and the American borderlands.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society
If you follow this specialisation, you will take several obligatory foundation courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is a small elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include a special course on the Beat Generation, one of America's most influential avant-garde movements; Native Americans; African-American Literature and Culture; American Borders: Contact Conflict and Exchange; or American Constitutional Law (taught in Dutch).

Career prospects

There is a wide range of opportunities for graduates from the Master's program in North American Studies. Your broad interdisciplinary education and excellent command of English will help you find a job in an international setting. You could work in school or university education, in research, in journalism or other media, in publishing, museums, international finance, government, business, international affairs or as a diplomat.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

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Depending on your module choices you could become critically acquainted with the ‘sources’ of theology, such as scriptural writings, historical traditions and theologies and ethics issues. Read more
Depending on your module choices you could become critically acquainted with the ‘sources’ of theology, such as scriptural writings, historical traditions and theologies and ethics issues.

You will also examine the importance of the sociological and cultural background; for example, in terms of new ‘readings’ of theology that have emerged out of gendered and ethnic contexts, and new insights into biblical scholarship which have arisen from contemporary culture.

You will also be encouraged to interrogate and critically analyse your own, and others’, presuppositions and approach your studies in ways that show sensitivity to the multi-disciplinary nature of the issues under discussion.

You will study one core module - Research Methods - and five optional modules, in addition to completing a 15,000-word dissertation.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Our MA in Religion (Canterbury and Paris) is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work. Read more
Our MA in Religion (Canterbury and Paris) is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work.

Following an autumn term at our Canterbury campus, you spend a Spring term studying in Paris, where you gain a specific insight into the influence of religion in a European context. Your knowledge is enhanced and shaped through the independence that is gained by living abroad for a period of time.

The programme is primarily for students who wish to pursue further postgraduate research or research in other contexts. It offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/thrs/postgraduate/taught-religion-paris.html

Course Structure

You complete two core modules (one in the Autumn; one in the Spring), both attracting 30 credits. You can also select two 30-credit option modules that will help you to further develop your specific interests. Assessment is by coursework on the taught modules and the dissertation on the MA programme.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the programme means that you can specialise while also being well-prepared for the modern University job market, where versatility and interdisciplinary is increasingly the norm. The University’s aim of ensuring our students acquire discipline-specific and transferable skills through the curriculum is at the heart of this new MA programme. Additionally, the experience of living overseas brings a confidence and independence that many employers find desirable. Although teaching is in English, you also enhance your linguistic skills, enhancing your skill set for the competitive job market.

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