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Supervision can and should play an important role in enabling those in the helping professions to reflect on and develop the service they provide to clients. Read more
Supervision can and should play an important role in enabling those in the helping professions to reflect on and develop the service they provide to clients. It can support practitioners in their role and enhance and encourage their professional development. It is essential, therefore, that the ‘helping professions’ (education, health and social care, for example) incorporate supervision into their delivery plans and are clear as to its value. This course seeks to continue to provide the opportunity for quality training for those people who will be offering supervision, either as line managers or non-line managers within the ‘helping context.’

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/supervision-studies.aspx

Suitability

The aim of the course is to provide an assessed course of study to enable managers, team leaders, and supervisors from a range of disciplines and employment settings to develop a common understanding of the role of supervision within the helping context. The course aims to ensure that participants who successfully complete the qualification will be capable of offering supervision within their particular organisation. It is, however, an introductory course, and of insufficient length to include assessed practice in the workplace.

Content

You will review and develop your knowledge of supervision, learning about the theories and concepts underpinning effective supervision practice and developing a skills base on which to frame your interventions, thus enhancing your capabilities in facilitating a supervisory relationship.

The content of the programme reflects the skills, knowledge and values required to offer an effective supervision relationship. The emphasis is on the development of the capability of the supervisor to offer this relationship, using experiential methods and practical examples drawn from the work of helping professionals nationally.

Format

• Day one – orientation to the course and introduction to supervision
The first day includes an introduction to the programme and an overview of the whole course, including a brief explanation of the assignment task. The day focuses on exploring a rationale for supervision within the work context.

• Day two – preparing for supervision
Day two focuses on effective preparation for supervision. You will consider issues such as creating an appropriate learning environment, being sensitive to the dynamics and boundaries of the relationship between supervisee and supervisor and being cognisant of the principles and approaches to anti oppressive and reflective practice

• Day three – establishing the supervision relationship
Day three will focus on establishing the supervisory relationship. You will have the opportunity to explore the nature and the importance of developing an effective ’working alliance’ between the supervisor and supervisee. You’ll consider issues such as relationship-building, establishing expectations, contracting, confidentiality and informed consent. You will also examine the impact of dealing with diverse learning styles in supervision.

• Day four – developing the supervisory relationship
You examine the factors which impact on the development of the supervisory relationship in more detail. You will focus on the ways in which different models of supervision might be facilitated in practice, including managerial and non-managerial approaches etc., and be introduced to a range of theoretical approaches and models for supervision.

• Day five – the working alliance
Day five focuses on the strategies and interventions for promoting a culture of reflective practice and it considers approaches that can enable participants to work in more depth in their supervisory practice.

• Day six – ending the supervisory relationship
Day six offers you the opportunity to reflect on your learning and supervision practice during their eight- week study gap. The day focuses on ‘endings’ and explores issues and techniques around closure and ending the supervisory relationship.
This course may either be taught from a University campus or from a local course centre. Attendance at all sessions is important. There is an attendance requirement for this course.

Assessment

Through a 4000-word written assignment and action plan for your development.

What can I do next?

This qualification provides evidence of training in supervision and will enhance your current supervisory practice.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The MSc Therapeutic Counselling programme is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. It provides excellent training and education for those who seek a formal counselling qualification matched to BACP professional body requirements and competences. Read more
The MSc Therapeutic Counselling programme is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. It provides excellent training and education for those who seek a formal counselling qualification matched to BACP professional body requirements and competences.

This programme is suitable for applications from: allied health disciplines; those who are seeking to make a career change but have some experience (voluntary or otherwise) in a helping capacity e.g. human resources, law, social services, education; or those seeking to enhance current professional practice with insight into the theory and practice of counselling and psychotherapy and the management of high intensity distress.

The MSc Therapeutic Counselling's flexible entry system may also appeal if you have previous post graduate counsellor training and are seeking a master's level qualification accredited by the BACP.

Students of this programme will attend an afternoon and evening per week, for three terms (i.e. 28 weeks) per year. Applications are considered throughout the year.

The Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling is a trusted provider of excellent academic degrees and vocational training. Our teaching staff are research active and are experts in their respective field. The department is consistently rated highly in the National Student Survey. We pride ourselves on combining high-quality teaching with world-class research and a vibrant student experience. We have well-equipped facilities and laboratories to support our activities and we employ creative teaching methods and assessment techniques. All our programmes offer a wide choice of courses and we welcome and offer support to students from a range of backgrounds.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide you with a range of therapeutic counselling techniques based on an integrative relationship model

- To enable you to examine critically and reflect on counselling theory in the light of a range of contextual issues and cultural differences

- To give you opportunities to understand the impact of context on the practice of counselling

- To provide you with the opportunity to follow individual theoretical, professional and research interests, determine how to integrate theory and practice, evaluate your practice in the light of different theoretical perspectives, and study a theoretical approach to an advanced level.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/psy/therc

Psychology and Counselling

The Department of Psychology & Counselling at Greenwich has a strong record of delivering high quality programmes, research and consultancy. All our programmes offer a wide choice of courses and we employ creative teaching methods and assessment techniques. We welcome and offer support to students from a range of backgrounds.

What you'll study

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

The Integrative Relationship in Context (20 credits)
Professional Aspects of the Integrative Relationship in Context (20 credits)
The Integrative Relationship & Practice 1: Professional Issues (20 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

The Integrative Relationship and Therapeutic Counselling (20 credits)
Professional Aspects of the Integrative Relationship (20 credits)
The Integrative Relationship & Practice 2 (20 credits)

- Year 3:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Advanced Clinical Theory and Practice (20 credits)
Counselling Research Methodology and Project (40 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through coursework and continuous assessment.

Career options

Graduates from the MSc Therapeutic Counselling programme can pursue careers as professional counsellors.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/643837/MSc-Therapeutic-Counselling.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This is a two-year programme designed for postgraduates who wish to become social work practitioners. The initial qualification for social work is generic, preparing you to work in a range of settings and with a wide range of user groups. Read more
This is a two-year programme designed for postgraduates who wish to become social work practitioners. The initial qualification for social work is generic, preparing you to work in a range of settings and with a wide range of user groups. The curriculum framework, based on the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), ensures the development of specific skills, common to all kinds of social work intervention.

You will get experience of working with two different service user groups in two different practice settings.

The academic and practice curriculum, associated learning outcomes and the award of MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Social Work will enable you to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as ready and safe to practice social work. On successful completion, you will be able to enter employment as newly qualified social workers with a range of statutory and voluntary agencies and service user groups. At the end of the programme, you will have your own Professional Development Portfolio, which you can take forward into your Assessed and Supported Year in Employment (ASYE), which is the next step for a newly qualified social worker.

The MA in Social Work will:
- provide you with challenging academic and practice learning opportunities that will enable you to critically evaluate, apply and integrate knowledge, understanding and skills in core areas specified by QAA subject benchmarks, the nine capabilities outlined in the Professional Capabilities Framework (at qualifying level) and the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Workers.
- equip you to understand critique and contribute to the political, social and moral debate about the contested nature, scope and purpose of social work while practising competently in the context of contested knowledge and uncertainty.
- equip you to think and work creatively in collaboration with other professionals and agencies and to negotiate different professional values, areas of knowledge and skills and critically evaluate how these may contribute to inter-disciplinary assessment, intervention and service provision.
- enable you to understand and critically reflect on the relationship between social work values, ethical and legal imperatives and their code of practice in responding positively to cultural diversity and the relationship between social inequality/discrimination, changes through the life course and social context as this impacts upon people's lives.
- enable you to understand and critically reflect on the relationship between social work values, ethical and legal imperatives and their code of practice in responding positively to service users' rights to (re)gain and maintain their autonomy, via a process of complex analysis and evaluation of the relative rights, needs, risks to self and others and respect for service users' autonomy.
- enable you to develop and practice high level transferable skills in critical reasoning and complex problem-solving as well as more generic skills such as time-management, written and verbal communication, IT skills and collaborative problem-solving and planning.
- enable you to develop and refine their research, analytical and intellectual skills and their understanding of the relationship between methodological issues and the creation and interpretation of knowledge, through undertaking a limited piece of research with a focus on social work policy and/or practice.
- develop your abilities to organise and critically discuss complex information and argument and provide an opportunity for students to think in creative and original ways about their area of research, within the parameters of reasoned argument and relevant evidence sources.
- develop your confidence and ability to take responsibility for their learning and work-load management, while making appropriate use of supervision to support, challenge and debate their work using high developed critical reasoning and discursive skills.

At initial qualifying level, graduates will be at the start of their journey through the Professional Capabilities Framework, which will be used to guide them as they progress through different stages of their career.

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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While coaching is about you as a person, supervision explores the nature of your relationship with the people you coach and your developing practice. Read more

Become an accredited supervisor and an expert in coaching supervision.

While coaching is about you as a person, supervision explores the nature of your relationship with the people you coach and your developing practice.

Supervision makes an important contribution to the professional development and quality assurance of consultants and executive coaches. It can be a key differentiator in the marketplace and is increasingly central to many formal consulting and coaching qualifications.

This programme offers experienced O.D. consultants and executive coaches an opportunity to be supervised on any aspect of their work, individually and in a group of equally experienced coaches, and to learn how to be a supervisor of other consultants and coaches.

Similar to our philosophy on the Ashridge Masters programmes in Executive Coaching and Organisation Change, this programme takes a relational perspective.

About the programme

This is a two year part-time programme that has been developed by experienced practitioners who have a combination of supervision, research, psychological and organisation development experience.

The qualification will give you the skills, credibility and confidence to offer a new service to your clients. It is designed to build your status as a senior practitioner and supervisor of coaches and consultants.

Aimed at experienced OD consultants and executive coaches, this is an opportunity to be supervised on any aspect of your work, individually and as part of a group of equally experienced coaches. You will learn how to supervise other consultants and consultants effectively.

As with all Ashridge coaching programmes, this programme takes a relational perspective. It develops your theoretical knowledge of the psychological underpinnings of supervision and your critical evaluation of supervision models and theories.

Ashridge approach to Supervision

The Ashridge perspective on coaching and consulting supervision has been the subject of a number of articles and publications. We also run Coaching Supervision sessions which either form part of the qualification or can be purchased individually.

Ashridge sees supervision as an essential quality assurance process for coaches and consultants. It ensures that the client benefits from a professional consultant who is equipped with the insight and personal resourcefulness to make a difference.

We believe that the power and effectiveness of supervision stems from the possibility for new scrutiny and fresh perspectives.

We take a broadly relational perspective on supervision, based on personal experience of effective coaching and the themes and issues at the core of the process.

This is based on the following core principles:
• Human beings are deeply motivated to be in relationships with others, so part of what we (consultant and supervisor) hope to get from this relationship is to repeat our previous relational patterns and through awareness of these, create better patterns both inside and outside the coaching space
• All content of supervision can be seen as relational, i.e. supervisees are continually, even if subliminally, linking relationships elsewhere (real and imagined) to this one
• This supervisory relationship is worth constantly exploring because of the rich learning it can offer
• The supervisee's experience of the supervisory relationship is worth enhancing

Course Structure:

The course is structured around three modules. The first two are based on a series of eight intensive workshops, spread across two years - each lasting one or two days. The third is the accreditation module.

Benefits to you:

If you run your own consulting practice, you will benefit by:
• Being able to offer supervision as well as finely-tuned coaching skills to individuals and organisations
• Having the Ashridge accreditation quality stamp to give clients the added reassurance that you can offer high-level supervision
• Having more confidence in your abilities and being able to introduce new knowledge and skills in your daily work.

If you work for an organisation, it will benefit from:
• The new practices that you can share with colleagues and/or your organisations clients
• Your supervision work - a useful differentiator for the business
• Added credibility thanks to your Ashridge accreditation
• Your increased self-awareness, knowledge and network could make you a candidate for senior level positions in the organisation

More course information:

https://ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/the-postgraduate-diploma-in-organisational-supervi/

Meet the Ashridge faculty:

https://ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/the-postgraduate-diploma-in-organisational-supervi/faculty/

Events and Webinars:

https://ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/the-postgraduate-diploma-in-organisational-supervi/events-and-webinars/

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Introduction. Philosophy of Language is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language. Read more
Introduction
Philosophy of Language is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language. The study of language has given rise to a number of distinctive philosophical problems that became central to western philosophy in the nineteenth century and that have dominated research and discussion in the twentieth century.

Philosophy modules give students a thorough grounding of philosophical insights and critical reflection on the relationship between socio-political context and philosophical debate. Students are able to explore the history of philosophy from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century through to the development of a variety of critical and analytical traditions that have emerged from those foundations.

Philosophy of language modules examine the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language, focusing on the critical analysis of the relationship between philosophy of language and linguistics.
Philosophy of Language students approach their studies by:
- analysing and evaluating aspects of philosophy that have had significant influence on the general understanding of what language is and how its use interacts with, and exploits, context
- engaging with philosophical frameworks starting with Frege, through to Russell and Wittgenstein, which attempt to account for meaning in language
- evaluating philosophical foundations of critical theory that have contributed to debates on the understanding of history, politics and the nature of meaning.

Course structure
The course can be studied full or part-time - one year full-time, two years part-time. Part-time students attend the university on one day a week.
The programme offers opportunities for study within a flexible framework that can fit in with students' professional and personal commitments. Where possible, sessions are timetabled in later afternoon and early evening slots to allow for as much flexibility as possible.

Areas of study
Meaning, Truth and Use enables students to engage with a range of theoretical frameworks which adopt a formal approach to explaining meaning in language.
Semantics-pragmatics Interface: approaches to the study of meaning looks at the relationship between philosophy of language and linguistics and the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language.
Foundations of Critical Theory provokes critical reflection on the relationships between socio-political context and philosophical insight. It provides a grounding in the history of political philosophy from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century as well as offering close and critical reading of pivotal texts.
Traditions of Critical Theory engages students with the relationship between intellectual traditions and political analysis of pivotal texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It maps the development of the variety of critical and analytical traditions that have emerged from those foundations.
The course structure gives students an opportunity to focus their study and research in the areas of philosophy and links between philosophy and language (ie theoretical linguistics). The culmination of this experience comes through a major piece of independent research, the dissertation.
Students also join those studying on other courses in attending fortnightly research seminars and talks by visiting and local speakers which will enhance their understanding of the subject areas, as well as offering opportunities to experience ways in which academic work and ideas can be presented to academic audiences. Weekly seminars on methodology and relevant research skills are also offered.

Syllabus
Semantics-pragmatics: minimalism and contextualism
Philosophy of Language
Critical Foundations
Critical Traditions
Research Methods

Career and progression opportunities
The course offers a profound experience, advanced understanding of a specialist area of philosophy of language and cultural and critical theory, and effective preparation for doctoral research in philosophy of language, philosophy, linguistics, cultural and critical theory or politics.
Other career opportunities may be in linguistics, philosophy of language, linguistic anthropology, politics, sociology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing and teaching.

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The MA in Transportation Design emphasises the design of niche and alternative fuelled forms of transport that explore our evolving relationship to mobility in a shrinking world. Read more
The MA in Transportation Design emphasises the design of niche and alternative fuelled forms of transport that explore our evolving relationship to mobility in a shrinking world. Design strategies aim to encourage free thinkers who are prepared to challenge received wisdom in the pursuit of excellence in vehicle design.

Course Overview

This programme explores the inter-relationship of form and emotion in the design and development of all forms of transport. The programme provides a platform for students to further their knowledge of the nature of vehicle design and the necessity for its application in the design of sustainable forms of transport, bridging the gap between human interaction and innovative transportation solutions. The programme provides graduates with the opportunity to develop their expertise to make them a mover effective and reflective design practitioner. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted, allowing the students the freedom to challenge conventions through cross collaborative experimentation and lateral thinking, with a goal of harnessing design ambiguity into a tangible outcome.

The programme is about pushing the envelope of Transportation Design by educating the next generation of visionaries and implementers, who will embrace, reflect and address environmental, economic and social-cultural challenges through the medium of creative dialogue.

An interdisciplinary approach allows the students the freedom to challenge conventions through cross collaborative experimentation and lateral thinking, with a goal of harnessing design ambiguity into an entrepreneurial outcome. It is our intention to promote the growing reputation of the School by embedding a culture of design led research activity closely supported by local, national and international organisations.

The MA Transportation Design programme aims to educate designers for professional practice with the modules in Part 1 focusing on design thinking and the development of the student’s creative and philosophical attributes, with Part 2 allowing the student freedom to deliver an in-depth investigation to a self-defined question. Students will explore the evolving relationship between humans and mobility in an ever shrinking world, challenging the current conventional approach and proposing new directions for getting from A to B.

The programme is a platform for students to further their knowledge and application in the design of sustainable forms of transport, bridging the gap between human interaction, innovative transportation solutions and the creative approach to new vehicle aesthetics, providing graduates with the opportunity to develop their expertise to make them a more effective and reflective design practitioner, reflecting society’s future needs.

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

The MA Transport Design programme within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

This programme is written from an employability enhancement perspective, creating the platform for students to embrace the spectrum of commercial and cultural opportunities available, encouraging real life engagements, networking and other activities.

One of the guiding principles and enhancements of this programme is a commitment to flexible learning, with creative flexible learning and teaching relationships and discourses in order to make sure that the student’s individual needs and projected career opportunities are at the centre of their activities. This flexibility and concentration on individual needs and opportunities within learning is placed primarily at the service of employability.

Students will be encouraged to embrace professional networks and create links with enterprise – locally, nationally and globally, as well as connect with external agencies and organisations. Additionally the postgraduate programme has great potential to contribute to the commercial, academic and applied research aspirations of the University and its desire to contribute knowledge to the field of innovation, product and transportation research and development.

Professional Accreditations

The programme is not accredited by any single professional body. The programme team encourages students to participate in the work of professional bodies such as the Chartered Society of Designers and the Royal Society of Arts. The programme also benefits from close collaboration with industry through annual live projects. This flexible relationship with industry and the professions allows students to engage with events and projects from a broad spectrum of external bodies.

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The programme offers students with undergraduate qualifications in both Law and Business (also including economics or finance) the opportunity for advanced study in both disciplines. Read more
The programme offers students with undergraduate qualifications in both Law and Business (also including economics or finance) the opportunity for advanced study in both disciplines. The Programme will be led by the McCann FitzGerald Professor of International Law Business, established with the generous sponsorship of leading Dublin law firm McCann Fitzgerald.

In the programme there are two core modules which link Law and Business from both a theoretical and applied perspective and in their international context. There is the opportunity to take four elective modules across the two disciplines and the programme is completed by a capstone project. On completion, students will have developed critical thinking abilities not only on the development of and relationship between the two disciplines, but also on the application of the knowledge to the worlds of law and business.

Globalisation has made it necessary to have a sound knowledge of international law and business, whether you wish to join a major law firm or be engaged in a company with european and international aspirations.

This interdisciplinary programme promotes critical analysis of different aspects of international law and business, and is directed at well-qualified graduates in law, business and associated disciplines.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/mscinternationallawandbusiness/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law and the Smurfit School of Business offer a wide range of modules for this Master’s programme. Students will take the core modules on International Law and Business to develop critical thinking abilities, both in respect of the
development of and relationship between the two disciplines. Optional modules to complete the programme include:
Corporate Governance; Supply Chain Management; Regulatory Governance; International Economic Law; Economic Foundations of Strategy; International Tax Law; Global Competitive Strategies; International Commercial Arbitration; and, Work and Employment in a Global Economy. Having completed six modules, you will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation or a structured
and assessed period of internship linked to a project.

Your future

The enhanced knowledge and understanding of law and business and their interrelationship allows you to go on to careers in: leading international law firms; multinational professional services firms as professional advisers; and, inhouse counsel with major multinational businesses. The knowledge and skills acquired will also equip you to work with major international companies located in Ireland, Europe, and beyond.

Features

Our MSc International Law and Business graduates will be expected to be able to select and pursue appropriate learning to enhance their personal and professional competencies

Students will develop learning skills across a range of activities and assessment forms.

Students will demonstrate specialized, detailed knowledge and understanding of global legal systems, of the major branches of law in those systems and of the principles, concepts and methods of business.

Students’ knowledge and understanding of both the legal and business components of their learning will be underpinned by advanced theories, concepts or methods concerning the relationship between business and law and will include a clear awareness of ongoing controversies about how that relationship is to be properly understood and analysed and of the limitations of current knowledge in both fields.

Careers

Graduates from this Programme will go on to careers with leading international law firms, with multinational professional services firms, as professional advisers and in-house counsel with major multinational businesses and as entrepreneurs in fields where outstanding knowledge of and engagement with international law and business are highly relevant.

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/mscinternationallawandbusiness/apply,187034,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/mscinternationallawandbusiness/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. Read more
The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. It satisfies all the requirements of the professional bodies including the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Transform your career

With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Study law in the heart of the capital - connected and convenient, with excellent transport options and a short walk from the Royal Courts of Justice.

Steps to becoming a solicitor or barrister

On successfully completing the CPE you are eligible to enter the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course (for intending barristers), which has some additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency.

Experienced tutors

The course is taught by an experienced team of tutors most of whom are solicitors or barristers which provides you with invaluable insight into the details of legal principals and real case examples.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/law-conversion-legal-pgdip-cpe

Modules

You'll study seven modules required by the professional bodies for students intending to apply for the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC):

- Introduction to the English legal system
You'll be introduced to the basic structure of the English Legal System and the essential aspects of civil and criminal litigation. You'll explore sources of law and key skills such as statutory interpretation, reading of law reports and the concept of judicial precedent. This introductory course will assist you in the study of the core modules, where legal skills will be developed further.

- Law of the European Union
Law of the European Union reflects the importance of EU law in the English Legal system. It is important to the management of the UK economy and relevant to the financial practitioners in the City. Business leader's decisions are influenced by EU competition law. It is important to migrants and practitioners of immigration law, to consumers and trading standards officials, to all employees through employment law and to all of us in relation to the environment.

- Obligations 1 (law of contract)
This module covers the principles of English contract law, sources, development, application in context and reform and includes reference to European developments. Contract is treated from formation to discharge and remedies with underlying concepts, rationales and influences and its relation to other forms of liability. Through the subject treatment, particularly examination of judicial reasoning and legislative technique, knowledge and skills are taught and/or developed. Skills include problem-solving, critical evaluation, reasoned argument and communication.

- Obligations 2 (law of tort)
You'll learn about civil liability in tort, focusing on an in-depth analysis of negligence, employers' liability for accidents at work, occupiers' liability for dangerous premises, manufacturers' liability for dangerous products, defences and vicarious liability. You'll develop your legal skills by reading and critically analysing cases and will apply your knowledge to complex, yet everyday, problem scenarios. You'll be encouraged to become critical and independent thinkers, and to communicate your ideas and awareness of the role of policy and the need for reform in the law of tort. In addition to its importance as an area of academic interest, tort is of practical significance to the intending practitioner, featuring heavily in the case scenarios of Legal Practice and Bar Professional Courses, as well as in everyday legal practice.

- Public law
You'll study the fundamental laws, practices and principles of Public law which define and influence the relationship between the individual and the state as characterised by various governmental institutions in the UK. Detailed consideration is given to the fundamental mechanisms by which human rights are protected and government is subject to legal and political accountability. Various skills are developed including those of analysis, critical evaluation and problem solving.

- Land law
Land law is a study of relationships. You'll study the relationship between the land and the rights which can exist in or over it, the relationship between the various persons who own an estate or interest over the land or want to defeat the competing interests in or over the land. You'll look at the rights and duties of each party to that relationship, how these relationships co-exit and what happens when the relationships come into conflict. Land Law governs the relative priorities enjoyed by two or more interests concerning the same piece of land. Land Law creates clear rules and formalities as to how the owner of an interest in land can acquire, transfer or extinguish that interest in land. You'll study the interests over land which Land Law is prepared to recognise and how these interests must be protected to ensure enforceability against third parties.

- Criminal law
This module aims to develop your ability to analyse and critically evaluate problems in Criminal Law so that you become independent and reflective legal practitioners able to contribute to public debate on legal issues. The main areas taught are: murder, manslaughter, non-fatal offences against the person including sexual offences and a variety of property offences including theft and fraud, accomplice liability and inchoate offences. You'll have additional support by way of on-line quizzes and narrated summaries.

- Equity and trusts
Principles of Equity are vital in the administration of justice. The 'trust' is a legal doctrine developed from those principles of equity which is fundamental to the commercial, business and employment worlds (pensions) and to individuals in the gifting of their property (personal trusts; wills).

- Project module
The project module satisfies the requirement of the academic stage of legal education that one other area of legal study must be successfully undertaken in addition to the seven modules which constitute the "Foundations of Legal Knowledge." It comprises the completion of a 4000 word extended essay, under the supervision of a member of the academic staff, based on the analysis of legal literature which takes differing interpretations over an issue related to law or its underlying theories. Its aim is to foster the development of the key elements of legal reasoning and legal method, research methods used in the conduct of autonomous research in law or law related topics as well as the development of skills in relation to the review and evaluation of journal articles, advanced texts and other secondary legal material.
Dissertation for the award of LLM

- Dissertation (LLM only)
This is an optional module as it is not required to complete the academic stage of legal education and so is not required to obtain the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. Its successful completion is required to obtain the LLM. A prerequisite to undertake this module is the successful completion and award of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. It comprises the completion of a 15,000 word Master's level dissertation under the supervision of an appropriate academic member of staff. It requires the student to independently conceive, plan and execute an appropriate piece of research based on firm academic and theoretical foundations. The module builds upon the research skills already acquired in the successful completion of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and common professional examination.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by exams, exams plus coursework or presentations.

Award
X8 modules = PgDip + CPE
X8 modules and dissertation = LLM

Employability

- Solicitor or Barrister
This course can lead to one of many careers in law from a professional qualification as solicitor or barrister to a wide variety of careers in both public and private sectors.

While our graduates may go on to join professional courses leading to qualification as a solicitor or barrister, the Diploma is also useful for numerous jobs that value skills in analysis, clear communication, efficient organisation and reasoned persuasion.

- BSB and SRA
This course is fully recognised by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority and constitutes completion of the Academic Stage of Training for the purposes of further study on either the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course for intending barristers (with additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency).

LLM Progression

Unlike a Graduate Diploma in Law our PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE is a postgraduate level qualification. After successfully completing the course you'll accumulate sufficient postgraduate credits to be eligible to submit for the further award of LLM by dissertation.

The LLM is an optional qualification additional to your Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies. To obtain the LLM you must successfully complete a supervised 15,000 word dissertation for which preparation has already been undertaken by your successful completion of the project module forming part of the programme leading to the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. The Masters dissertation is usually submitted in the semester following completion of the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. You'll not be required to attend classes when researching and writing your dissertation and you'll therefore be able to enrol on the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course in the September following the successful completion of the PgDip in Legal Studies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

The primary aims of the course are to ensure that you achieve a sound understanding of English law covered in the seven foundation subjects, which provides a solid grasp of the structure and operation of the English legal system.

Classes consist of a mixture of lectures and smaller group meetings where exam technique and problem solving approaches are practiced. The course is well supported by online materials and search resources, which can be accessed off-campus.

You'll have free access to OUP Law TROVE to access books for all foundation subjects.

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The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. Read more
The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. To become an accredited practitioner candidates are also required to hold the Advanced Diploma in Child and Adolescent Counselling. The increased emphasis on the integration of education, social services and health in the delivery of services to children under the Children's Act 2004, make this route particularly pertinent and valuable, not only to teachers but to a wide range of practitioners within the area.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmpepc

Course detail

The four main elements of the route are:

1. The Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Processes
This element explores an integrative approach to the therapeutic relationship. It will include a study of the working alliance, the transferential relationship and the person to person relationship.

2. Professional Issues in Therapy with Children
In these sessions, the key professional, ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of therapeutic counselling and research on counselling are examined. Since the context of work with children and adolescents is rapidly changing, with increased emphasis on working with other agencies, systems and groups as well as with individuals, it is important to understand different contexts and the different modes of working within them.

3. Understanding Child and Adolescent Development
This element explores the key theoretical frameworks for individual and group development in childhood and adolescence and their implications for therapeutic practices.

4. Developing Children's Social and Emotional Well Being

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- Demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of an integrative, relational, developmental and ecosystemic approach to psychological therapy with children and young people
- Shown abilities and skills to work therapeutically with children and young people
- Demonstrated a highly developed ethical attitude both in therapeutic practice and research
- Shown a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific topic;
- Demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- Shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- Demonstrated self-direction, originality and ethical awareness in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Each term, written work is submitted and formative feedback is provided. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions (three times a term). At the end of each term, supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

- Thesis: Up to 20,000 words
- Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
- Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MPhil in Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. Read more
The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. To become an accredited practitioner candidates are also required to hold the Advanced Diploma in Child and Adolescent Counselling. The increased emphasis on the integration of education, social services and health in the delivery of services to children under the Children's Act 2004, make this route particularly pertinent and valuable, not only to teachers but to a wide range of practitioners within the area.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmeepc

Course detail

The four main elements of the route are:

1. The Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Processes
This element explores an integrative approach to the therapeutic relationship. It will include a study of the working alliance, the transferential relationship and the person to person relationship.

2. Professional Issues in Therapy with Children
In these sessions, the key professional, ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of therapeutic counselling and research on counselling are examined. Since the context of work with children and adolescents is rapidly changing, with increased emphasis on working with other agencies, systems and groups as well as with individuals, it is important to understand different contexts and the different modes of working within them.

3. Understanding Child and Adolescent Development
This element explores the key theoretical frameworks for individual and group development in childhood and adolescence and their implications for therapeutic practices.

4. Developing Children's Social and Emotional Well Being
This element explores how children's social and emotional well being can be developed in proactive and educational, as well as therapeutic, ways.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme students will have:

- Demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of an integrative, relational, developmental and ecosystemic approach to psychological therapy with children and young people
- Shown abilities and skills to work therapeutically with children and young people
- Demonstrated a highly developed ethical attitude both in therapeutic practice and research
- Shown a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific topic;
- Demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- Shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- Demonstrated self-direction, originality and ethical awareness in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Written feedback is provided on the thesis by two independent assessors. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions. Supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.

Students following the two year MEd programme are required to submit the following in Year 1:
Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the Masters in Education to PhD or Ed D are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The goal of the Master’s Programme in Philosophy is to provide you with systematic knowledge of philosophy as an independent field of science and of its specialisation fields, as well as to enhance your skills of philosophical analysis and argumentation. Read more
The goal of the Master’s Programme in Philosophy is to provide you with systematic knowledge of philosophy as an independent field of science and of its specialisation fields, as well as to enhance your skills of philosophical analysis and argumentation. In addition, the Master’s programme provides you with the skills necessary to conduct independent philosophical analyses through both spoken and written media.

Philosophy graduates have been employed in a wide range of positions. Most of them work as researchers and teachers at institutions of higher education, general upper secondary schools and other educational institutions. Others serve in very different positions, often in jobs focusing less on a narrow field of specialisation and more on understanding broader issues, such as in communications as well as administration and planning duties.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Philosophy deals with the most fundamental and universal questions about the world and people’s place in it. Central topics include knowledge, reality, the mind, meaning, truth, science, society, action, value, and right and wrong. In Finland, philosophy has traditionally been divided into theoretical philosophy, and practical philosophy. The contents of the degree follow this division. The study track of philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction represents a tradition in which this division does not exist. The degree programme in philosophy covers all central areas of philosophy. In addition to the general studies shared by all, you can specialise in a specific field of philosophy.

If you are particularly interested in social phenomena and wish to complete a Master of Social Sciences degree, choose practical philosophy or the equivalent content in philosophy in Swedish. If you are interested in other areas of philosophy, it is recommended that you complete a Master of Arts degree. During the course of studies in practical philosophy, you will explore basic issues of human activity and society, as well as common philosophical dilemmas in the field of social sciences.

Theoretical philosophy focuses on the traditional core questions of philosophy, which pertain to the structure of reality, the nature and possibility of knowledge, the relationship of language and the mind to reality, and the rules of competent deduction. It encompasses logic, metaphysics, epistemology, the history of philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of language, and philosophy of the mind. Metaphysics studies the fundamental nature of existence. Epistemology examines the general criteria for the justification or rationality of knowledge or belief. The history of philosophy follows the development of the main fields of theoretical and practical philosophy from antiquity to the present day. The particular focus of the philosophy of science is scientific knowledge, deduction and explanation. Logic examines the rules of formally competent deduction, formal languages and the philosophical applications of logical conceptual analysis. Research in the philosophy of language focuses on the relationship between language and reality as well as the nature of linguistic meaning and language use, while the philosophy of mind investigates the nature of mental states and events as well as their relationship with the brain and reality.

Practical philosophy studies the conceptual foundations of morality and society. The studies concentrate on conceptual issues related to norms, values and ideologies as well as on how various normative claims can be justified. Applied ethics examines concrete moral problems in the light of theories of normative ethics.

The philosophy of social science studies the principles of concept and theory formation as well as their epistemological and logical foundations. It also explores the nature and development of the social sciences, the special methods of mathematics and logic they apply, social ontology, and the relationship of the social sciences to society at large.

In addition to examining the fields described above, the study track of philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction analyses the problem of the Enlightenment, contemporary philosophical criticism and the tradition of Socratic philosophy in which fundamental issues of knowledge, existence and morality are viewed as conceptually inseparable.

The history of philosophy follows the development of the main fields of philosophy, from antiquity to the present day.

The studies consist of lectures, seminars, book examinations, end-of-course examinations, essays, theses and brief presentations. The discipline also has several active research seminars, which allow you to follow the latest trends in international research. You should contact potential supervisors when you are selecting your thesis topic.

Selection of the Major

Students admitted to the Master’s Programme in Philosophy graduate with a Master of Arts or Master of Social Sciences degree. The study tracks in theoretical philosophy (and philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction) as well as practical philosophy correspond to the above degrees. In other words, the following three study tracks are offered:
-Theoretical philosophy
-Practical philosophy
-Philosophy with Swedish as the language of instruction

When applying for the programme, you must inform us which degree you wish to pursue and which study track you wish to select. You can freely change your study track within the Master’s programme, but to graduate you must complete all the studies required for a single study track.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master’s degree is 120 credits, comprising:
-Advanced studies (60–110 credits), including a Master’s thesis (30 credits) and other studies in the discipline.
-Professional skills studies (5–15 credits), which can consist of a traineeship, a professional skills project or other studies that develop your professional skills.
-Elective studies (max. 55 credits).

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme trains researchers and subject teachers of philosophy for general upper secondary education. Studies in philosophy prepare you for all professions that require critical and exact thinking and the ability to write clearly and convincingly. The fundamental nature of the discipline and its capacity to provide both an all-round foundation and diverse opportunities for specialisation form an excellent basis for employment in a wide range of positions. Previous philosophy graduates have found employment in education, administration, communication and the commercial sector. According to a recent survey, 93% of American employers felt that the ability to think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems is more important than a candidate’s major subject. A suitable combination of expertise in philosophy and other areas enables you to work in a wide range of intellectually challenging jobs.

Internationalization

Studying philosophy at the University of Helsinki provides excellent opportunities for gaining international experience:
-The most common option is to become an exchange student at one of the Faculty’s or University’s partner institutions abroad. You can complete part of your degree studies at a university outside of Finland. The philosophy disciplines have several Erasmus and Nordplus exchange agreements with European universities.
-Another option is to complete a traineeship abroad.
-You can help international students as a peer tutor.
-You can be involved in the international activities of the subject organisations or the University’s Student Union.
-You can also improve your language skills and cultural knowledge by participating in the language courses of the University of Helsinki Language Centre.
-A bilingual degree (in Finnish and Swedish) provides you with access to the Nordic job market.

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This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing. On this MSc Marketing course, starting in January, you will develop the knowledge and skills essential for a career in marketing. Read more
This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing.

On this MSc Marketing course, starting in January, you will develop the knowledge and skills essential for a career in marketing. You will work on live case studies and consultancy projects throughout the course, including a marketing research project for an organisation. Along with the theory, you will gain the practical marketing experience that employers are looking for. Additional workshops further improve your career opportunities, through gaining knowledge from experts and by developing key transferable skills. You will gain a good understanding of how these marketing are applied.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/marketing-january/

Why choose this course?

- Employability: This course helps you develop academically and professionally through professional skills workshops held throughout the course. This enhances your future employment prospects. You will benefit from the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) dual award for a professional diploma. Oxford Brookes is also recognised as an exam centre for the Institute of Direct and Digital Marketing (IDM). You can access the IDM's resources and job website. By focusing on the digital aspects of marketing you will be prepared for a range of careers including customer relationship management and direct marketing.

- Teaching and Learning: Oxford Brookes University Business School offers a great environment for studying Marketing. We have a track record of excellence in teaching, learning and research and you will be supported in your studies and beyond. Oxford Brookes University Business School received the top award from the Higher Education Funding council for England to become a Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

- Experiences: Our course is interactive and social. We provide you with the chance to bond with your classmates and get to know your new surroundings. One way in which we do this is through the GPS Oxford Challenge. You will search Oxford for clues and tasks, earning points for completing the challenges on the tablet device, with the winning team announced at the end of the day.

- Oxford Location: Oxford offers everything you could want as a student and more. As one of the world’s great centres of learning, it is a bustling and stunning cosmopolitan city full of history and beautiful buildings. Located just over an hour from the hub of business life in London with easy access to international airports, you'll be at the heart of the UK's most successful economic region. Oxford will provide you with a host of learning and employment opportunities with a range of internships and graduate jobs available.

- Student support: As a student you will be assigned to an Academic Adviser who will provide both academic and personal support. Student Support Co-ordinators provide guidance for your course and university-wide administrative issues. They organise a range of events to help you adjust to postgraduate study and are able to help you get advice about any issues you may have during your studies.

Teaching and learning

Much of the teaching on the course takes the form of interactive workshops, but there are also lectures from staff and visiting speakers. Lectures, discussions, role-play exercises and seminars are linked with selected case studies and assessments to strengthen your practical analysis and decision-making skills. You will develop your skills in working as part of a team through structured group assignments and online group-based marketing simulation. You will gain practical experience and put your knowledge of marketing approaches and theory into practice for an organisation in a supervised marketing project. This project will be in response to a briefing by a client organisation.

Teaching staff at the Business School are researchers and/or come from an industry background with an in-depth practical experience of business and management issues. Visiting speakers from business, industry, consultancies and research bodies provide further input.

Approach to assessment

Much of the teaching on the course takes the form of interactive workshops, but there are also lectures from staff and visiting speakers. Lectures, discussions, role-play exercises and seminars are linked with selected case studies and assessments to strengthen your practical analysis and decision-making skills. You will develop your skills in working as part of a team through structured group assignments and online group-based marketing simulation. You will gain practical experience and put your knowledge of marketing approaches and theory into practice for an organisation in a supervised marketing project. This project will be in response to a briefing by a client organisation.

Teaching staff at the Business School are researchers and/or come from an industry background with an in-depth practical experience of business and management issues. Visiting speakers from business, industry, consultancies and research bodies provide further input.

Specialist facilities

Our Business School Postgraduate Centre at Wheatley Campus has a state-of-the-art lecture theatre, well equipped seminar rooms and a postgraduate lounge and private study area.

The Wheatley Campus library provides specialist business resources including 1,000 sets of UK and overseas companies' annual reports, statistics on all aspects of business and management, postgraduate MA, MBA, MSc and PhD theses in marketing and marketing examination papers.

How this course helps you develop

- You will develop an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of the most important and current marketing concepts, approaches and frameworks. Concepts are related to a wide variety of marketing contexts, with an international and multicultural dimension, to develop your ability to apply your learning to their specific circumstances.

- The class discussions, hands-on projects, consulting assignments and guest talks with marketing professionals from a broad range of organisations create an intellectually stimulating environment. You will learn about marketing management in practice, about the latest research developments and about what it takes to succeed in a career in marketing. We provide personalised guidance and access to a large range of workshops and networking opportunities. You can take advantage of the exemptions that the programme carries for the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) professional certification and prepare for the Institute of Direct and Digital
Marketing (IDM) professional certificate.

Careers

- By completing this master's course you will ready for a career in marketing within many different types of organisations, including manufacturing and retailing, service organisations, charities and government.

- You will enhance your career opportunities and be well prepared for a range of roles including marketing manager, product and brand management, market analysis and research, customer relationship and services management, sales and account management, direct marketing, internet marketing, public relations, media and advertising.

- You will be equipped to start your own business.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Research areas covered in the department of Marketing include brand management (including brand equity, branded content, brand personality, political branding, brand mapping and place branding), customer engagement and retention strategies, digital marketing strategies, digital economy and social media.

Research in this department is grouped around three clusters: Brand Strategy, Customer Relationship Management and Digital Marketing.

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