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Rigorous. Relevant. Real. Reflective. If you are interested in becoming a fully accredited, professional executive coach, equipped with the latest knowledge in the field, this is the programme for you. Read more
Rigorous. Relevant. Real. Reflective.

If you are interested in becoming a fully accredited, professional executive coach, equipped with the latest knowledge in the field, this is the programme for you.

The Masters in Executive Coaching is a two-year, part-time, modular, self-directed programme. It is an opportunity to review and re-launch your practice, make the best of your natural skills, learn about yourself as a coach through supervision and co-coaching, and meet some of the most experienced practitioners in the field.

To download brochure click here

https://www.ashridge.org.uk/lp/emec/

You will develop your coaching and mentoring skills, either to integrate into your existing consultancy and coaching work or to create a solid foundation for a new coaching and consulting practice. The programme takes a relational psychological perspective, which will deepen your clients’ self-awareness and their understanding of the web of key relationships in their organisation. The aim is to develop your ability to respond to, initiate and enable change through the coaching process.

What will you learn?

During the programme you will:
‌•Be introduced to the the latest models and perspectives
‌•Learn about the relational approach to coaching
‌•Develop and broaden your coaching and mentoring skills
‌•Develop greater self-awareness enabling you to use your experience whilst coaching others
‌•Benchmark your approaches as a coach
‌•Understand and be informed by theoretical frameworks that support effective coaching
‌•Practise both familiar and new coaching skills and interventions
‌•Acquire a personal vision of the your own coaching work
‌•Become part of a diverse and experienced community of coaches.

How you will learn?

The programme reflects Ashridge’s philosophy about the nature of change and learning. You will be learning in an environment of reflection and experimentation, rather than simply relying on didactic input. The learning experience draws on the principles of adult learning and development and is well-grounded in research.
It is delivered through short teaching inputs on coaching theories and models, combined with small and large group discussions. Each module also includes ‘co-coaching’ with fellow participants as well as live supervision. In the second year, the programme delivery becomes a collective and deeper inquiry into the main elements of coaching: the coach, the client, the relationship and the organisation.

Expert faculty, research and peer learning

The approaches to executive coaching taught in this Master’s degree are inspired by our own expert faculty publications in the field and by the ongoing research that takes place within the Ashridge Centre for Coaching.
The teaching style of this fully-accredited coaching qualification is informal – we work in a large circle of chairs without tables and use the group process and dynamics to illustrate our points. This is not just a skills development programme – we make the theoretical content easy to digest, by inviting you to critically reflect on theory and practice. We focus on helping you turn knowledge into practice.

About Relational Coaching

The Ashridge approach to coaching involves paying attention to what goes on between the client and coach, and making the relationship explicit. Often this exploration casts new light on the client’s relationship with their organisation.

Relational coaching means understanding that the relationship between coach and client is at the heart of effective coaching and is an essential vehicle for learning and change. A key understanding that informs all our coaching contracts is that each relationship is specific to a particular organisational context.

The client’s agenda will be defined by their organisational context, and so will your relationship with that client, albeit at a more indirect and subtle level.

Clients will inevitably bring their own individual patterns of relating into the coaching arena, replaying their core beliefs and attitudes about themselves and their abilities. The coaching relationship therefore becomes a forum for understanding stale patterns and for experimenting with new ways of being in a relationship.

The theoretical approach is integrative, drawing on a range of sound psychological theories and principles from the fields of coaching, psychological therapies and organisation development. Ashridge coaches work on a relational basis with their clients and are likely to explore on a number of levels. These levels are primarily:

‌•The assumptions clients have about the organisation within which they operate
‌•The relationships that they have with the people within the organisation
‌•What the client personally brings to these relationships.
‌•The relationship between coach and the person being coached is entered into and agreed in an explicit way from the outset. We draw up an initial contract that specifies the boundaries and articulates the intentions and goals for the relationship. However, relationships are dynamic and the contract needs to reflect this. Ashridge believes that change takes place through the process of relating, and this is the whole point of a responsive coaching contract. Therefore, what seemed figural and important at the first meeting may shift to a new way of seeing the situation by the third or fourth meeting.
‌•We see this process of change emerging in relationships as a crucial way of understanding not only what goes on in an effective coaching relationship, but also how change takes place in organisations.

“The Masters programme opened a new door of ongoing learning for me. I have applied and continue to use many of the ideas in my work. It has helped me to define what I do and to make a step change in the level and seniority of clients that I coach.

If you are prepared to challenge yourself academically, be robustly honest with yourself about your coaching practice and enjoy learning interactively, AMEC will be an unforgettable and very rewarding experience.”
Jude Elliman, Director, Listening Partnership Ltd

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Supervision can and should play an important role in enabling those in the helping professions to reflect on and develop the service they provide to clients. Read more
Supervision can and should play an important role in enabling those in the helping professions to reflect on and develop the service they provide to clients. It can support practitioners in their role and enhance and encourage their professional development. It is essential, therefore, that the ‘helping professions’ (education, health and social care, for example) incorporate supervision into their delivery plans and are clear as to its value. This course seeks to continue to provide the opportunity for quality training for those people who will be offering supervision, either as line managers or non-line managers within the ‘helping context.’

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/supervision-studies.aspx

Suitability

The aim of the course is to provide an assessed course of study to enable managers, team leaders, and supervisors from a range of disciplines and employment settings to develop a common understanding of the role of supervision within the helping context. The course aims to ensure that participants who successfully complete the qualification will be capable of offering supervision within their particular organisation. It is, however, an introductory course, and of insufficient length to include assessed practice in the workplace.

Content

You will review and develop your knowledge of supervision, learning about the theories and concepts underpinning effective supervision practice and developing a skills base on which to frame your interventions, thus enhancing your capabilities in facilitating a supervisory relationship.

The content of the programme reflects the skills, knowledge and values required to offer an effective supervision relationship. The emphasis is on the development of the capability of the supervisor to offer this relationship, using experiential methods and practical examples drawn from the work of helping professionals nationally.

Format

• Day one – orientation to the course and introduction to supervision
The first day includes an introduction to the programme and an overview of the whole course, including a brief explanation of the assignment task. The day focuses on exploring a rationale for supervision within the work context.

• Day two – preparing for supervision
Day two focuses on effective preparation for supervision. You will consider issues such as creating an appropriate learning environment, being sensitive to the dynamics and boundaries of the relationship between supervisee and supervisor and being cognisant of the principles and approaches to anti oppressive and reflective practice

• Day three – establishing the supervision relationship
Day three will focus on establishing the supervisory relationship. You will have the opportunity to explore the nature and the importance of developing an effective ’working alliance’ between the supervisor and supervisee. You’ll consider issues such as relationship-building, establishing expectations, contracting, confidentiality and informed consent. You will also examine the impact of dealing with diverse learning styles in supervision.

• Day four – developing the supervisory relationship
You examine the factors which impact on the development of the supervisory relationship in more detail. You will focus on the ways in which different models of supervision might be facilitated in practice, including managerial and non-managerial approaches etc., and be introduced to a range of theoretical approaches and models for supervision.

• Day five – the working alliance
Day five focuses on the strategies and interventions for promoting a culture of reflective practice and it considers approaches that can enable participants to work in more depth in their supervisory practice.

• Day six – ending the supervisory relationship
Day six offers you the opportunity to reflect on your learning and supervision practice during their eight- week study gap. The day focuses on ‘endings’ and explores issues and techniques around closure and ending the supervisory relationship.
This course may either be taught from a University campus or from a local course centre. Attendance at all sessions is important. There is an attendance requirement for this course.

Assessment

Through a 4000-word written assignment and action plan for your development.

What can I do next?

This qualification provides evidence of training in supervision and will enhance your current supervisory practice.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The MSc Therapeutic Counselling programme is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. It provides excellent training and education for those who seek a formal counselling qualification matched to BACP professional body requirements and competences. Read more
The MSc Therapeutic Counselling programme is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. It provides excellent training and education for those who seek a formal counselling qualification matched to BACP professional body requirements and competences.

This programme is suitable for applications from: allied health disciplines; those who are seeking to make a career change but have some experience (voluntary or otherwise) in a helping capacity e.g. human resources, law, social services, education; or those seeking to enhance current professional practice with insight into the theory and practice of counselling and psychotherapy and the management of high intensity distress.

The MSc Therapeutic Counselling's flexible entry system may also appeal if you have previous post graduate counsellor training and are seeking a master's level qualification accredited by the BACP.

Students of this programme will attend an afternoon and evening per week, for three terms (i.e. 28 weeks) per year. Applications are considered throughout the year.

The Department of Psychology, Social Work & Counselling is a trusted provider of excellent academic degrees and vocational training. Our teaching staff are research active and are experts in their respective field. The department is consistently rated highly in the National Student Survey. We pride ourselves on combining high-quality teaching with world-class research and a vibrant student experience. We have well-equipped facilities and laboratories to support our activities and we employ creative teaching methods and assessment techniques. All our programmes offer a wide choice of courses and we welcome and offer support to students from a range of backgrounds.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide you with a range of therapeutic counselling techniques based on an integrative relationship model

- To enable you to examine critically and reflect on counselling theory in the light of a range of contextual issues and cultural differences

- To give you opportunities to understand the impact of context on the practice of counselling

- To provide you with the opportunity to follow individual theoretical, professional and research interests, determine how to integrate theory and practice, evaluate your practice in the light of different theoretical perspectives, and study a theoretical approach to an advanced level.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/psy/therc

Psychology and Counselling

The Department of Psychology & Counselling at Greenwich has a strong record of delivering high quality programmes, research and consultancy. All our programmes offer a wide choice of courses and we employ creative teaching methods and assessment techniques. We welcome and offer support to students from a range of backgrounds.

What you'll study

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

The Integrative Relationship in Context (20 credits)
Professional Aspects of the Integrative Relationship in Context (20 credits)
The Integrative Relationship & Practice 1: Professional Issues (20 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

The Integrative Relationship and Therapeutic Counselling (20 credits)
Professional Aspects of the Integrative Relationship (20 credits)
The Integrative Relationship & Practice 2 (20 credits)

- Year 3:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Advanced Clinical Theory and Practice (20 credits)
Counselling Research Methodology and Project (40 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through coursework and continuous assessment.

Career options

Graduates from the MSc Therapeutic Counselling programme can pursue careers as professional counsellors.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/643837/MSc-Therapeutic-Counselling.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Rigorous. Relevant. Real. Relational. Become an accredited supervisor and an expert in coaching supervision. Make a difference to your practice today. Read more
Rigorous. Relevant. Real. Relational.

Become an accredited supervisor and an expert in coaching supervision.

Make a difference to your practice today. Our next intake is April 2018.

While coaching is about you as a person, supervision explores the nature of your relationship with the people you coach and your developing practice.

To download brochure click here

https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/postgraduate-diploma-in-organisational-supervision/

Find out more about our ‘Trust and Safety in Supervision’ research, conducted by Ashridge in Spring 2016.

Supervision makes an important contribution to the professional development and quality assurance of consultants and executive coaches. It can be a key differentiator in the marketplace and is increasingly central to many formal consulting and coaching qualifications.

About the programme

This 14-month part-time programme was developed by experienced practitioners who have a combination of supervision, research, psychological and organisation development (OD) experience.

The qualification will give you the skills, credibility and confidence to offer a new service to your clients. It is designed to build your status as a senior practitioner and supervisor of coaches and consultants.

Aimed at experienced OD consultants and executive coaches, this is an opportunity to be supervised on any aspect of your work, individually and as part of a group of equally experienced coaches. You will learn how to supervise other consultants and coaches effectively.

As with all Ashridge coaching programmes, this programme takes a relational perspective. It develops your theoretical knowledge of the psychological underpinnings of supervision and your critical evaluation of supervision models and theories.

The programme is a natural follow-on from the Masters in Executive Coaching https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/masters-in-executive-coaching/ and the Masters in Organisational Change https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/masters-in-organisational-change/
It is structured around three modules. The first two are based on a series of six intensive workshops, spread across the 14 months - each lasting two days. The third is the accreditation module.

Ashridge Approach to Supervision

The Ashridge perspective on coaching and consulting supervision has been the subject of a number of articles and publications. We also run Coaching Supervision sessions which either form part of the qualification or can be purchased individually.

Ashridge sees supervision as an essential quality assurance process for coaches and consultants. It ensures that the client benefits from a professional consultant who is equipped with the insight and personal resourcefulness to make a difference.

We believe that the power and effectiveness of supervision stems from the possibility for new scrutiny and fresh perspectives.

We take a broadly relational perspective on supervision, based on personal experience of effective coaching and the themes and issues at the core of the process.

This is based on the following core principles:
‌•Human beings are deeply motivated to be in relationships with others, so part of what we (consultant and supervisor) hope to get from this relationship is to repeat our previous relational patterns and through awareness of these, create better patterns both inside and outside the coaching space
‌•All content of supervision can be seen as relational, i.e. supervisees are continually, even if subliminally, linking relationships elsewhere (real and imagined) to this one
‌•This supervisory relationship is worth constantly exploring because of the rich learning it can offer
‌•The supervisee’s experience of the supervisory relationship is worth enhancing.

Benefits to you

‌•If you run your own consulting practice, you will be benefit by:
‌•Being able to offer supervision as well as finely-tuned coaching skills to individuals and organisations
‌•Having the Ashridge accreditation quality stamp to give clients the added reassurance that you can offer high-level supervision
‌•Having more confidence in your abilities and being able to introduce new knowledge and skills in your daily work.
‌•If you work for an organisation, it will benefit from:
‌•The new practices that you can share with colleagues and/or your organisation’s clients
‌•Your supervision work - a useful differentiator for the business
‌•Added credibility thanks to your Ashridge accreditation
‌•Your increased self-awareness, knowledge and network could make you a candidate for senior level positions in the organisation.

Find out more about The Ashridge Difference https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/the-ashridge-difference/ and what makes an Ashridge Masters so relevant to business today.

Alternatively, read our participant case studies https://www.ashridge.org.uk/qualifications/postgraduate-certificate-in-advanced-coaching-and/participant-insights/ to find out how this qualification has benefitted them.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The MA in Transportation Design emphasises the design of niche and alternative fuelled forms of transport that explore our evolving relationship to mobility in a shrinking world. Read more
The MA in Transportation Design emphasises the design of niche and alternative fuelled forms of transport that explore our evolving relationship to mobility in a shrinking world. Design strategies aim to encourage free thinkers who are prepared to challenge received wisdom in the pursuit of excellence in vehicle design.

Course Overview

This programme explores the inter-relationship of form and emotion in the design and development of all forms of transport. The programme provides a platform for students to further their knowledge of the nature of vehicle design and the necessity for its application in the design of sustainable forms of transport, bridging the gap between human interaction and innovative transportation solutions. The programme provides graduates with the opportunity to develop their expertise to make them a mover effective and reflective design practitioner. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted, allowing the students the freedom to challenge conventions through cross collaborative experimentation and lateral thinking, with a goal of harnessing design ambiguity into a tangible outcome.

The programme is about pushing the envelope of Transportation Design by educating the next generation of visionaries and implementers, who will embrace, reflect and address environmental, economic and social-cultural challenges through the medium of creative dialogue.

An interdisciplinary approach allows the students the freedom to challenge conventions through cross collaborative experimentation and lateral thinking, with a goal of harnessing design ambiguity into an entrepreneurial outcome. It is our intention to promote the growing reputation of the School by embedding a culture of design led research activity closely supported by local, national and international organisations.

The MA Transportation Design programme aims to educate designers for professional practice with the modules in Part 1 focusing on design thinking and the development of the student’s creative and philosophical attributes, with Part 2 allowing the student freedom to deliver an in-depth investigation to a self-defined question. Students will explore the evolving relationship between humans and mobility in an ever shrinking world, challenging the current conventional approach and proposing new directions for getting from A to B.

The programme is a platform for students to further their knowledge and application in the design of sustainable forms of transport, bridging the gap between human interaction, innovative transportation solutions and the creative approach to new vehicle aesthetics, providing graduates with the opportunity to develop their expertise to make them a more effective and reflective design practitioner, reflecting society’s future needs.

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

The MA Transport Design programme within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

This programme is written from an employability enhancement perspective, creating the platform for students to embrace the spectrum of commercial and cultural opportunities available, encouraging real life engagements, networking and other activities.

One of the guiding principles and enhancements of this programme is a commitment to flexible learning, with creative flexible learning and teaching relationships and discourses in order to make sure that the student’s individual needs and projected career opportunities are at the centre of their activities. This flexibility and concentration on individual needs and opportunities within learning is placed primarily at the service of employability.

Students will be encouraged to embrace professional networks and create links with enterprise – locally, nationally and globally, as well as connect with external agencies and organisations. Additionally the postgraduate programme has great potential to contribute to the commercial, academic and applied research aspirations of the University and its desire to contribute knowledge to the field of innovation, product and transportation research and development.

Professional Accreditations

The programme is not accredited by any single professional body. The programme team encourages students to participate in the work of professional bodies such as the Chartered Society of Designers and the Royal Society of Arts. The programme also benefits from close collaboration with industry through annual live projects. This flexible relationship with industry and the professions allows students to engage with events and projects from a broad spectrum of external bodies.

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The programme offers students with undergraduate qualifications in both Law and Business (also including economics or finance) the opportunity for advanced study in both disciplines. Read more
The programme offers students with undergraduate qualifications in both Law and Business (also including economics or finance) the opportunity for advanced study in both disciplines. The Programme will be led by the McCann FitzGerald Professor of International Law Business, established with the generous sponsorship of leading Dublin law firm McCann Fitzgerald.

In the programme there are two core modules which link Law and Business from both a theoretical and applied perspective and in their international context. There is the opportunity to take four elective modules across the two disciplines and the programme is completed by a capstone project. On completion, students will have developed critical thinking abilities not only on the development of and relationship between the two disciplines, but also on the application of the knowledge to the worlds of law and business.

Globalisation has made it necessary to have a sound knowledge of international law and business, whether you wish to join a major law firm or be engaged in a company with european and international aspirations.

This interdisciplinary programme promotes critical analysis of different aspects of international law and business, and is directed at well-qualified graduates in law, business and associated disciplines.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/mscinternationallawandbusiness/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law and the Smurfit School of Business offer a wide range of modules for this Master’s programme. Students will take the core modules on International Law and Business to develop critical thinking abilities, both in respect of the
development of and relationship between the two disciplines. Optional modules to complete the programme include:
Corporate Governance; Supply Chain Management; Regulatory Governance; International Economic Law; Economic Foundations of Strategy; International Tax Law; Global Competitive Strategies; International Commercial Arbitration; and, Work and Employment in a Global Economy. Having completed six modules, you will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation or a structured
and assessed period of internship linked to a project.

Your future

The enhanced knowledge and understanding of law and business and their interrelationship allows you to go on to careers in: leading international law firms; multinational professional services firms as professional advisers; and, inhouse counsel with major multinational businesses. The knowledge and skills acquired will also equip you to work with major international companies located in Ireland, Europe, and beyond.

Features

Our MSc International Law and Business graduates will be expected to be able to select and pursue appropriate learning to enhance their personal and professional competencies

Students will develop learning skills across a range of activities and assessment forms.

Students will demonstrate specialized, detailed knowledge and understanding of global legal systems, of the major branches of law in those systems and of the principles, concepts and methods of business.

Students’ knowledge and understanding of both the legal and business components of their learning will be underpinned by advanced theories, concepts or methods concerning the relationship between business and law and will include a clear awareness of ongoing controversies about how that relationship is to be properly understood and analysed and of the limitations of current knowledge in both fields.

Careers

Graduates from this Programme will go on to careers with leading international law firms, with multinational professional services firms, as professional advisers and in-house counsel with major multinational businesses and as entrepreneurs in fields where outstanding knowledge of and engagement with international law and business are highly relevant.

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/mscinternationallawandbusiness/apply,187034,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/mscinternationallawandbusiness/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. Read more
The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. To become an accredited practitioner candidates are also required to hold the Advanced Diploma in Child and Adolescent Counselling. The increased emphasis on the integration of education, social services and health in the delivery of services to children under the Children's Act 2004, make this route particularly pertinent and valuable, not only to teachers but to a wide range of practitioners within the area.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmpepc

Course detail

The four main elements of the route are:

1. The Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Processes
This element explores an integrative approach to the therapeutic relationship. It will include a study of the working alliance, the transferential relationship and the person to person relationship.

2. Professional Issues in Therapy with Children
In these sessions, the key professional, ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of therapeutic counselling and research on counselling are examined. Since the context of work with children and adolescents is rapidly changing, with increased emphasis on working with other agencies, systems and groups as well as with individuals, it is important to understand different contexts and the different modes of working within them.

3. Understanding Child and Adolescent Development
This element explores the key theoretical frameworks for individual and group development in childhood and adolescence and their implications for therapeutic practices.

4. Developing Children's Social and Emotional Well Being

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- Demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of an integrative, relational, developmental and ecosystemic approach to psychological therapy with children and young people
- Shown abilities and skills to work therapeutically with children and young people
- Demonstrated a highly developed ethical attitude both in therapeutic practice and research
- Shown a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific topic;
- Demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- Shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- Demonstrated self-direction, originality and ethical awareness in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Each term, written work is submitted and formative feedback is provided. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions (three times a term). At the end of each term, supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

- Thesis: Up to 20,000 words
- Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
- Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the MPhil in Education to PhD are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. Read more
The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling Masters degree is part of a B.A.C.P. and U.K.A.P.C. accredited route to becoming a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic counsellor. To become an accredited practitioner candidates are also required to hold the Advanced Diploma in Child and Adolescent Counselling. The increased emphasis on the integration of education, social services and health in the delivery of services to children under the Children's Act 2004, make this route particularly pertinent and valuable, not only to teachers but to a wide range of practitioners within the area.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ededmeepc

Course detail

The four main elements of the route are:

1. The Therapeutic Relationship and Therapeutic Processes
This element explores an integrative approach to the therapeutic relationship. It will include a study of the working alliance, the transferential relationship and the person to person relationship.

2. Professional Issues in Therapy with Children
In these sessions, the key professional, ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of therapeutic counselling and research on counselling are examined. Since the context of work with children and adolescents is rapidly changing, with increased emphasis on working with other agencies, systems and groups as well as with individuals, it is important to understand different contexts and the different modes of working within them.

3. Understanding Child and Adolescent Development
This element explores the key theoretical frameworks for individual and group development in childhood and adolescence and their implications for therapeutic practices.

4. Developing Children's Social and Emotional Well Being
This element explores how children's social and emotional well being can be developed in proactive and educational, as well as therapeutic, ways.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme students will have:

- Demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the theory and practice of an integrative, relational, developmental and ecosystemic approach to psychological therapy with children and young people
- Shown abilities and skills to work therapeutically with children and young people
- Demonstrated a highly developed ethical attitude both in therapeutic practice and research
- Shown a comprehensive understanding of research techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature applicable to their specific topic;
- Demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- Shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- Demonstrated self-direction, originality and ethical awareness in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The course is composed of two key elements: (i) the research methods training course and (ii) the 'Child and Adolescent Psychotherapeutic Counselling' thematic route. Teaching time is split between the two elements, with 32 hours of teaching being given to research methods and 64 hours being given to the subject specific content. The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, smaller group seminars and individual supervisions.

Written feedback is provided on the thesis by two independent assessors. Informally, feedback will also be provided through regular supervisions. Supervisors are required to provide a report on student progress which can be viewed by the student through CGSRS.

Assessment

Thesis: Up to 20,000 words.

Students following the two year MEd programme are required to submit the following in Year 1:
Essay 1: 6,000-6,500 words.
Essay 2: 6,000-6,500 words.

Continuing

Students wishing to continue from the Masters in Education to PhD or Ed D are required to achieve:

1) an average of 70 across both sections with the thesis counting as double-weighted (eg: (Essay 1 + Essay 2 + thesis + thesis) divided by 4 = 70 or above.
Or
2) a straight mark of 70 or higher for the thesis.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Faculty is pleased to say that, in general, education students are successful in most of the funding competitions, and, in a typical year, will host students who have been awarded funding from all of the major funding bodies.

In addition, a number of Colleges have their own scholarships/bursaries, but these will be restricted to College members. Finally, it is important to note that deadlines for scholarships and bursaries are early, so applicants are strongly encouraged to explore funding opportunities as soon as possible - at least a year in advance of the start of the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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Description. This degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in marketing. Read more
Description

This degree is designed for graduates wishing to start, or further develop, careers in marketing. It explores the principles, theoretical concepts and practice of marketing within the context of business and management and will focus on developing academic and applied skills in Marketing including advertising, brand management and loyalty, customer service, public relations and market research.

The programme will also develop students’ knowledge and skills across a broader range of business and management subjects, including organisations, their management and the changing external environment in which they operate and develop students’ ability to take a strategic overview of business and organisational issues.

An important objective is to provide relevant analytical training in the latest strategic, managerial and industrial developments in Marketing both the public and private sectors. We look at marketing at local, national and global levels developing skills in strategic analysis, problem-solving and decision making.

The programme will prepare students for a career in marketing or in business and management. Students may choose to undertake a dissertation in a business or marketing topic. The Bangor Business School has a Chartered Institute of Marketing student chapter which enables our students to become involved in real life issues and enjoy hands-on experience of Marketing.

MA Business and Marketing course structure

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods
This module equips students with knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, which they will encounter in other modules and in their dissertations. The module also provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Marketing Strategy
This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

Management and Organisational Behaviour
This module provides an integrated analysis of management as an academic discipline, drawing on the work of classical and contemporary writers in the field, and as a practical strategic activity in a dynamic environment of continual change.

Corporate Strategy
This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

Human Resource Management
This module develops a critical awareness of the key human resource management issues that arise within organisations. You will examine the theory and practice of human resource management in a variety of organisational settings, including an international dimension.

Marketing Communications
This module will examine the processes by which integrated marketing communications (IMC) programs are planned, developed and executed as well as the influencing factors. Individual communication vehicles included in an Integrated Marketing Communications plan are also explored.

Relationship Marketing
This module builds on the fundamental concepts examined in the Marketing Strategy module by exploring Relationship Marketing theory and practice in a range of global environments and business contexts. Theoretical approaches, integrated with relationship marketing models and analytical tools will be used to develop managerial understanding and competence.

Management Research
This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Finance for Managers
This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

Plus Optional modules - choose 3 from:

- Business Planning

- European Business

- Knowledge Management

- International Business

- New Venture Creation


Dissertation - approximately 10,000 words

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Examines the complex relationship between language and cultural diversity, and equips students with an advanced knowledge of major approaches to linguistic aspects of culture. Read more
Examines the complex relationship between language and cultural diversity, and equips students with an advanced knowledge of major approaches to linguistic aspects of culture. Training will be provided in the research skills and knowledge relevant to further study in empirical and applied linguistics.

Key benefits

- Strong research environment including a number of research workshops and seminar series.

- A broad range of module choices with three thematic areas, and our MA programmes are both research and professionally oriented.

- Stimulating and intellectually challenging teaching and learning environment with a variety of teaching and learning methods including lectures, seminars and tutorials, with the view of maximizing students' critical analysis skills and autonomous learning.

- The Centre for Language Discourse & Communication forms part of the King’s Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Centre, supported by the Economic and Social Research Council and we occupy a prominent position in national and international research networks.

- Superb location, with access to important social, cultural, and textual resources, such as King's own Maughan Library and the British Library.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/language-and-cultural-diversity-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This programme examines the complex relationship between language and cultural diversity, and equips students with:

- An advanced knowledge of major approaches to linguistic aspects of culture and the complex relationship between language and cultural diversity.

- An understanding of language use in urban multi-cultural contexts in a globalised world, and of how personal and socio-cultural identities such as gender, age and ethnicity are shaped, both institutionally and at a local level of everyday social interaction.

- An ability to critically analyse and evaluate issues of cultural diversity and intercultural communication.

- Research skills and knowledge relevant to further study in empirical and applied linguistics.

- Modules will be selected from those available to construct a coherent programme of study.

- Course format and assessment -

In order to gain the MA, students must successfully complete modules equivalent to a total of 180 credits, divided between taught modules (totalling 120 credits) and a supervised research dissertation (60 credits).

Career prospects

Doctoral research, language-related professions, e.g. teaching, translation and interpreting, journalism, publishing and international relations.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Our E-Business (E-Marketing) MSc combines business strategies, leading technology, entrepreneurship and organisational behaviour. Read more
Our E-Business (E-Marketing) MSc combines business strategies, leading technology, entrepreneurship and organisational behaviour. We will prepare you to excel in using the internet to attract, engage and retain customers.

Customers are at the core of all winning corporate strategies. An e-commerce business markets products based on the tracking of consumer activities on the internet.

Enterprise systems and service personnel must be able to fulfil the requirements of clients once sales materialise. They must also be able to solve or escalate any concern at any point of the interaction. This relies on fully integrated systems, strong cross-functional working and a customer-centric culture.

This course addresses the full customer relationship cycle, which includes marketing, sales and service.

Your development

The course will also support your personal development, shape your entrepreneurial mind-set and enhance your employability prospects.

On completion of the course you will demonstrate knowledge of:
-The business value of contemporary technologies
-Your personal development as an entrepreneur and intrapreneur
-The feasibility of disruptive e-business models
-Business planning and new ventures
-The link between business strategy and systems
-Business processes, such as the ones involving clients and suppliers
-Business intelligence systems
-Organisational alignment for the attainment of e-business benefits
-The marketing function in organisations
-Customer relationship management

Other topics you will cover include:
-Social media planning
-Mobile commerce
-Data analytics
-Behavioural targeting
-Campaign management
-E-mail marketing
-E-sales
-Call centres
-Online self-service
-Contact channels integration
-Customer segmentation and life cycle
-Customer-oriented culture

Career focus

This course is designed for professionals from any academic background who want to excel in the use of the internet to influence the full relationship cycle with clients. It is suitable if you want to work for a technology start-up or multinational company, including product and service providers.

Our graduates progress into careers as e-marketing consultants, CRM managers or project managers. The course is also relevant to industry analysts and product development managers in the e-business sector.

Many graduates from our E-Business courses have worked for international companies, such as:
-Google
-Yahoo
-IBM
-Dell
-Accenture
-KPMG
-Ernst & Young
-PwC
-Hewlett-Packard
-The Hut Group
-Travix International
-Hitachi Solutions
-BAE Systems Applied Intelligence
-Ctrl-Shift
-HSBC
-Lloyds Banking Group
-GlaxoSmithKline
-Datwyler
-Walmart

Other graduates have used their acquired expertise to start up their own companies, or develop their family business.

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