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This is the only MA programme in the United Kingdom focusing exclusively upon the history, theory and practice of Anglo-German cultural relations from circa 1800 until the present. Read more
This is the only MA programme in the United Kingdom focusing exclusively upon the history, theory and practice of Anglo-German cultural relations from circa 1800 until the present. The programme deals mainly with the literary, theoretical and cultural dimensions of these relations, and also contains a unique practical component, in which students are taught by practitioners from British and German cultural institutions, as well as by experts from the fields of publishing, translating and the media. As such the programme provides a pathway either for future academic study or for a career outside of academia.

Programme outline
You will take the core module: Theory and Practice of Anglo-German Cultural Transfers � which includes the study of inter- and intracultural relations between (national) cultures and will analyse the theory and history of Anglo-German cultural transfers from the late Eighteenth-Century to the present day. The second part will bring students into contact with practitioners in this field and introduce them to the reality of cultural transfers.

You will also take two out of the following three module options:

Anglo German Aesthetics in the �Long� Eighteenth-Century
Anglo-German Travel Writing
In Pursuit of Prejudice? Mutual Perceptions of Identity
You may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for your intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor.

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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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This MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner course is for healthcare professionals who want to extend the scope of their practice regarding consultation, assessment, diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. Read more
This MSc Advanced Clinical Practitioner course is for healthcare professionals who want to extend the scope of their practice regarding consultation, assessment, diagnosis and therapeutic interventions.

Modern healthcare services are dynamic, diverse and challenging, often requiring care and interventions delivered by healthcare practitioners with advanced clinical skills and sound theoretical knowledge. This course will allow you to develop your skills at an advanced level, thereby meeting the requirements set by National Leadership and Innovation Agency for Healthcare (NLIAH).

You will develop your understanding of altered physiology to effectively assess patients health or ill health status. In addition you will study research methods, influences on current health care practices and independent prescribing.

The MSc can be achieved within three years and you will need to be supported by a medical and professional mentor in practice.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/355-msc-advanced-clinical-practitioner

What you will study

Modules:
Years One

- Clinical Conditions 1
This will involve developing your understanding of altered physiological processes in relation to cardiovascular, respiratory and musculoskeletal disease processes, for example Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), heart failure and Myasthenia Gravis disease.

- Clinical Skills 1
This will involve further developing your knowledge and skills in relation to examining patients with cardiac, respiratory and musculosketal diseases. This will include completing a comprehensive patient medical history, thoroughly examining each system mentioned above and identifying their treatment and management plan based on an individual clinical presentation.

- Influences on practice
You will debate the political, legal and professional influences on advanced practice in context with today’s healthcare system. Professional influences include considering the role of advanced practice within the Welsh Advanced Practice Framework. Legal influences include accountability and political influences will address the requirements advocated by Welsh Government.

Year Two:
- Clinical conditions 2
This will involve developing your understanding of altered physiological processes in relation to endocrine, neurological and abdominal disease processes, for example Diabetes and Thyroid disease, Parkinson’s disease, liver and gut diseases.

- Clinical Skills 2
You will continue to develop your knowledge and skills in relation to examining patients with endocrine, neurological and abdominal disease. This will include completing a comprehensive patient medical history, thoroughly examining each system mentioned above and identifying their treatment and management plan based on an individual clinical presentation.

- Research methods
You will learn how to critically evaluate a range of research methodologies.

Year three:

- Dissertation
You will choose a topic relevant to your own area of practice and critically evaluate the role of the advanced practitioner within your area.
- Independent Prescribing or

Optional module:
- Critical reflection on learning in the workplace.
- Leading effective teams in health & social care.

There is a dedicated route for paediatric practitioners.

Learning and teaching methods

You will attend the University one day a week. First year students will study on Mondays, whilst second and third years are taught on Thursdays.

You will be taught by a variety of methods including tutorials, lectures, case study presentations, peer presentations, and problem-based learning. You will also undertake practicals in our Clinical Simulation suite as well as in actual clinical practice.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

On this degree, you will develop a range of clinical skills in greater depth and gain the knowledge to assess, diagnose and treat patients.

Study of relevant protocols, policy and research will complement this to allow safe practice at an advanced level.

Assessment methods

Assessments include written examinations, assignments and OSCEs (Objective Structured Clinical Examinations). The OSCE’s will take place in May each year and be completed as part of the clinical skills modules and involve undertaking a comprehensive patient history, examining a particular bodily system, and identifying a management and treatment plan for the individual.

Facilities

Our state of the art Clinical Simulation Centre is set up to replicate an acute care NHS environment, providing realistic clinical facilities for our Nursing and Midwifery students and qualified healthcare professionals.

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Our leadership and management masters is a challenging and innovative course that has been designed for mid-senior managers looking to enhance their career prospects and refine their own individual qualities to become a leader in the workplace. Read more
Our leadership and management masters is a challenging and innovative course that has been designed for mid-senior managers looking to enhance their career prospects and refine their own individual qualities to become a leader in the workplace.

The course is made up of a number of creative and innovative modules which are designed to provide you with a broad knowledge of strategic and operational processes, and techniques associated with leadership activities within an organisation.

Ideal for individuals or organisations who want to tailor a programme of study to address particular development needs, the course makes it possible to gain credit and recognition for work-based projects or professional development activities whilst topping up your professional skills and managerial knowledge.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/793-msc-leadership-and-management

What you will study

The MSc Leadership and Management will give you the opportunity to explore the behaviours and the role of leadership and how it may influence the individual, the team and the organisation. Theories of leadership will be discussed and applied to your own leadership practice and that of your organisation.

Organisational leadership themes relating to power, politics, ethics, gender and cross-cultural leadership will be considered.

Significant leadership and management processes will be studied such as creating an environment for constant change; understanding and moulding organisational culture; building trust and a high performance team culture; managing and leading complex networks, alliances and partnerships; and the contribution of Human Resource Management.

We will also explore new and cutting edge approaches to leading including critical studies that have questioned the nature and necessity of leadership in organisations.

Modules of study include:

- Managing Professional Development
Through studying this skills based module you will become critically self-reflective in relation to your practice. You will also enhance your employability.

- Strategic Leadership
This module will provide you with the knowledge and understanding of leading/managing for high performance.

- Global & Strategic Issues in Leadership & Management
You will explore how modern leaders and managers need to have some understanding of global and strategic issues.

- Understanding & Managing Change
You will examine leadership and management in relation to change, specifically looking into the business case for change.

- Research Methods
Studying this module you will gain the skills and knowledge required in relation to methodology and methods to undertake your dissertation.

- Coaching for Executive Leadership & Management
Coaching is increasingly being used in companies as a means of supporting enhanced performance either as a general management approach or through the use of a formal external coach. This module will build your skills in relation to the use of coaching as a management tool for enhancing goal-orientated performance.

- Dissertation
You will be required to undertake an in-depth piece of academic work where you will critically evaluate literature and apply this to an original piece of research normally within your place of work. This will be of significant value to your organisation.

Learning and teaching methods

Course delivery is highly flexible and includes a mixture of classroom and work based learning, so you can fit your career development around your work commitments. Throughout the course you will undertake a number of bespoke work related assignments and gain additional support through our personal mentor/work based mentor scheme.

You will also be encouraged to take responsibility for your own learning by completing guided reading, individual and organisational analyses, and written assignments.

Delivery is normally by blended learning using 3 day weekend blocks over two weekends on a Saturday/Sunday.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Through a supportive learning environment active, participative and an action learning approach you will have the opportunity to develop your knowledge, skills, and understanding of leadership and management theory and practice that will be relevant to you and your organisation.

Studying the MSc Leadership and Management will give people who have a few years management experience the opportunity to contextualise their own and their organisational leadership practice.

This MSc Leadership and Management will enhance the career prospects of leaders and managers from all sectors.

Assessment methods

There are no examinations and all modules are assessed through course work. Assessments are work-based so students should normally be in work to undertake the course.

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MA Child and Adolescent Mental Health is for you if you’re working with, or intend to work with children or young people whose social and emotional development and functioning is affected adversely, or who risk being affected by mental health difficulties. Read more
MA Child and Adolescent Mental Health is for you if you’re working with, or intend to work with children or young people whose social and emotional development and functioning is affected adversely, or who risk being affected by mental health difficulties. Students who wish to study the Masters at the University may be a graduate and/or have significant relevant experience.

At the University of South Wales, you will broaden your understanding of the causation, presentation and implications of child and adolescent mental health difficulties, and social emotional and behavioural difficulties. You’ll develop the knowledge and skills to input where appropriate into interventions for individuals and groups with child and adolescent mental health difficulties and social emotional and behavioural difficulties (CAMHD/SEBD). Also to advise colleagues and parents on the formulation of appropriate strategies for working with children and young people with CAMHD/SEBD and to contribute to the development of appropriate policy and guidelines. You will explore the need for evidence based approaches and interventions which will promote children and young peoples’ mental health and social and emotional competencies.

The MA Child and Adolescent Mental Health encourages students to critically evaluate and reflect upon current theoretical perspectives in relation to child and adolescent mental health, and social emotional and behavioural difficulties (CAMHD/SEBD). The Masters also enables students to reflect on and contextualise current practice, and to make connections between theory and practice. In addition, the course encourages students to look critically at the research in relation to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Difficulties and Social Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1160-ma-child-and-adolescent-mental-health

What you study

You will take two compulsory modules:

- Child and Adolescent Mental Health - The module introduces students to definitions and concepts in the field of CAMH and the current structuring of CAMH Services in the United Kingdom. Sessions look in detail at particular Mental Health Difficulties, which include Attachment Difficulties, Emotional Difficulties, and Behavioural Difficulties. Particular study is made of gender and culture in relation to Mental Health Difficulties and these sessions include a focus on eating disorders, self-harm and trauma.

- Research Methodology - In common with all of the MA Education programmes, you must take the core module; Research Methodology.

Additional specialist modules can include:

- Managing and Supporting Children and Adolescents with SEN (CAMH/SEBD) - This module focuses on the theory that underpins practice in this area of work, and compliments the core module. The module looks at definitions and conceptual difficulties in relation to CAMH and SEBD, and then goes on to examine how theory impacts on interventions in different models (therapeutic, behaviourist and bio-psycho-social.

- Children’s Wellbeing - This module takes a broad view of Children’s wellbeing by exploring the concept of, and the challenges of, measuring wellbeing in addition to considering how wellbeing is addressed in Health, Education, Social Care, Youth Justice and by Non-Governmental Organisations. The module will also explore and evaluate a range of approaches to promoting Children’s wellbeing and an integral part of the lecture programme will be the use of Visiting Lecturers to illustrate examples of evidence-based practice.

- Working with Vulnerable Children - This module examines contemporary models of childhood and adolescence and introduces the concepts of vulnerability, risk and resilience. The module also considers the challenges of research and intervention with vulnerable groups.

Alternatively you can take one module from one of the other MA Education pathways. To complete the full MA you will present a 17,000 word research dissertation and a 3,000 word research dissemination plan.

Learning and teaching methods

Each module is assessed via a written assignment of 5,000 words, which usually takes the form of an essay. Each course member is supported by a tutor who provides individual tutorials and guidance during the assignment writing process.

Assessment methods

To complete the full MA you will present a 17,000 word research dissertation and a 3,000 word research dissemination plan. If you wish to exit earlier, the Postgraduate Diploma is awarded to students who complete four modules which form the taught element.

Employment Prospects

A Masters degree is required for professional advancement in numerous occupations, and is widely seen as evidence of a successful commitment to high level professional development. An MA award demonstrates that you have developed advanced level skills in analysis, evaluation and research.

If you are interested in the possibility of a higher degree by research, your tutors will be pleased to discuss the opportunities for doing so here at the University of South Wales.

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in Climate Change and Human Rights challenges you to seriously engage with an emerging and fascinating area of law – climate change law. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in Climate Change and Human Rights challenges you to seriously engage with an emerging and fascinating area of law – climate change law. You will examine the latest developments in how climate change and accompanying legislation is impacting human rights issues and law. By grasping the opportunity this course presents, you will involve yourself in arguably one of the most forward-looking areas of law in relation to the established core area of human rights.

Climate change presents one of the most pressing legal issues of today which impact the health, security and freedoms of billions of people around the world. This broad subject includes a foundation in human rights law, as well as an interrogation of environmental law and the emerging field of climate changes law. The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in climate change law in relation to human rights advocacy, business, international law firms and a range of government and non-governmental organisations.

Every course at Aberystwyth offers a programme of study that will push you to extend your expertise whilst broadening your general employability. You will emerge from this LLM degree with both cutting-edge subject expertise and a proven record in academic research, analysis, reporting, argument-construction and critical thinking. These combined traits will make you a highly attractive prospect for a range of potential employers.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/climate-change-human-rights-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to receive an advanced exposition of climate change and human rights law
- If you wish to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course detail

The LLM in Climate Change and Human Rights provides a comprehensive overview of human rights law and how it works in relation to the environment and the urgent topic of climate change. The course balances theory with the urgently practical – for example, combining the necessarily comprehensive detail of human rights legislation with the complex reality of situations of weather change and its impact on the local human population. Subjects of study include climate change law, contemporary issues in food law and policy, human rights law in relation to climate change law and policy, among others.

In addition to specialist subject knowledge, you will cultivate skills useful in a range of employment contexts. You will develop your abilities in critical analysis, team work and presentation. You will be able to identify assumptions, evaluate evidence, detect false logic and reasoning and identify suggestive trends in data – all traits which are prized by employers in every industry.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who possess both expertise and experience of law in this fascinating area. Under their personal tutelage, you will enjoy a degree of freedom in directing your own study path through the choice of option modules. In addition, you will explore the subject-specialism of your choice by researching and writing your Master's dissertation. This is your opportunity to select a project topic which has a direct bearing on your professional life and our previous LLM students have found this to be an invaluable opportunity towards establishing a successful career.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the contentious and urgent field of climate change. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies:

Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data regarding climate change and its relationship with human rights, and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any specifically legal or more general professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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SOAS MA in Gender Studies is unique in that it refocuses issues of Western Gender Studies on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Read more
SOAS MA in Gender Studies is unique in that it refocuses issues of Western Gender Studies on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the expertise of staff across all SOAS faculties, it offers the specialised study of gender in relation to Asian, African and Middle Eastern cultures, together with rigorous training in and questioning of contemporary gender theory.

Course detail

The MA in Gender Studies will be administered by the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences. Like the MA Area Studies programmes, it will not have a specific departmental home, reflecting its academic structure as an interdisciplinary degree.

You will gain an invaluable insight into issues of gender and develop a breadth of knowledge of the multifaceted nature of the subject through different critical perspectives and socio-political backgrounds.

Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, University College London Library and Senate House Library.

Suitability

The SOAS MA in Gender Studies will appeal to students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives:

• those coming from Women's Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation, especially, but not exclusively, the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

• those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender into their own areas of expertise; and

• those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Cultural and Media Studies, Religious Studies, Comparative Literature, History, Politics, etc.

A global perspective

Studying Gender Studies at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective. Our MA programme is unique in that it offers a rigorous and specialised study of gender across the world and you will be encouraged to question contemporary gender theory.

Depending on courses selected, you can choose the following pathways:

• Specialised research training MA in Gender Studies – ideal if you are contemplating advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with regional specialisation.

• A broad MA programme if you have a background in Women's/ Gender/ Area Studies etc. and you are seeking to enhance your knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural issues.

• A special interest MA, enabling you to study in depth gender issues in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation, e.g. Gender in the Middle East, Gender in Music etc.

Expert at where the world is changing

Drawing on the expertise of staff across SOAS, the programme will give you the opportunity to engage with academics who make a significant contribution to the field. An example of one of our many research projects is our partnership with Power2youth: http://www.power2youth.eu/project#sthash.3HdEUFiM.dpuf

The project, funded under the European Commission’s 7th Framework Programme, is in its third year and explores the dynamics of youth exclusion and the prospects for youth transformative agency through an interdisciplinary and gender-sensitive approach in the South East Mediterranean region.

Format and assessment

The programme is structured in the same way as most SOAS MA degrees: students take three taught units and complete a dissertation.

All students take the compulsory course Gender Theory and the Study of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Further options include a wide range of gender and gender-related courses from a comprehensive list offered by the Faculties of Languages and Cultures and Arts and Humanities. Students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on either the compulsory course or one of the component courses.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS caters for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS caters for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives:

- those coming from Women’s Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation and to connect this with legal knowledge, especially, but not exclusively, the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

- those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender and law into their own areas of expertise; and

- those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Cultural and Media Studies, History, Politics, Religious Studies, Sociology, Refugee/Diaspora Studies etc.

This programme provides:

- specialised research training in Gender Studies, in addition to focused study of feminist legal theories and a particular area of law. This pathway is suitable for students considering advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with a regional specialisation;

- a broad MA programme for students with some background in Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Area Studies etc. who wish to enhance their knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural legal issues;

- a special interest MA, which enables students to study gender issues in depth in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation alongside the acquisition of knowledge of feminist legal approaches and a study of a legal sub-discipline.

The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS is a unique programme, its principal aim being to re-focus issues prioritised in western Gender Studies and Legal Theory on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. Jointly housed by the Centre for Gender Studies and the School of Law, the programme offers the specialised study of gender and law in relation to the cultures of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, together with rigorous training in, and questioning of, contemporary gender theory. In terms of gender theory, it offers a solid foundation with sufficient breadth and depth to facilitate a range of specialist pathways. In terms of specialisation, it draws on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars of Asian, African and Middle Eastern Studies at SOAS.

Email:

Phone: 020 7898 4367

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/genderlaw/

Structure

Students take courses to the value of four units and complete a dissertation (which is also the assessment for the fourth course Feminist Legal Theory).

All students take the Preliminary course in law, legal reasoning and legal methods. This is a compulsory component which runs as an intensive two-week course in September, prior to the start of term.

All students take the compulsory core courses Gender Theory and the Study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East and Feminist Legal Theory (Dissertation). Further options include a wide range of gender and gender-related courses from a comprehensive list. Students also choose one Law option from the general MA in Law list (subject to course convenor approval).

Upon completion of coursework and written examinations in May/June, students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on material acquired from Feminist Legal Theory.

- Programme Specification 15/16 (pdf; 175kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/genderlaw/file101845.pdf

Materials

Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University College London Library and Senate House Library.

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

Each taught course has its own approved methods of assessment, designed to address the particular learning outcomes of that course. Assessment methods may include essays, weekly reaction papers, unseen, seen or take-home examinations, research projects, individual or group presentations, translations, learning journals, oral examinations etc., as appropriate.

Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA Gender and Sexuality at SOAS aims to cater for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Gender and Sexuality at SOAS aims to cater for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives:

- those coming from Women’s Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation and to connect this with the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

- those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender and sexuality into their own areas of expertise; and

- those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Cultural and Media Studies, History, Politics, Religious Studies, Sociology, Refugee/Diaspora Studies.

The programme provides:

- specialised research training in Gender Studies, in addition to focused study of sexuality as well as gender and sexual diversity. This pathway is suitable for students considering advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with a regional specialisation;

- a broad MA programme for students with some background in Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Area Studies etc. who wish to enhance their knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural issues raised by appreciation of the relationship between gender and sexuality in various legal and political contexts;

- a special interest MA, which enables students to study gender issues in depth in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation alongside the acquisition of knowledge of emergent and contemporary study of sexuality in cross-cultural contexts.

The MA Gender and Sexuality at SOAS is a unique programme, its principal aim being to re-focus issues prioritised in western Gender Studies and the study of sexuality on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. The programme offers the specialised study of gender and sexuality in relation to the cultures of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, together with rigorous training in, and questioning of, contemporary gender theory. In terms of gender theory, it offers a solid foundation with sufficient breadth and depth to facilitate a range of specialist pathways. In terms of specialisation, it draws on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars of Asian, African and Middle Eastern Studies at SOAS.

Gender Studies is widely regarded by a range of employers as an excellent training, equipping holders of the degree with a range of relevant employable skills. Increasingly policy makers and governing structures understand the need to engage with gender and sexuality, such that graduates with disciplinary understanding of gender and sexuality, especially as sites of rights and responsibility are required in policy, research and legal environments. The value and relevance of the discipline are evidenced by the great variety and distinction of careers gender studies graduates have embarked upon with success. These include employment in international organizations, NGOs, think tanks, research organizations, the media (newspapers, radio & TV), as well as government ministries and programmes. There are growing numbers of gender studies programmes at universities throughout the world, although very few that combine study of gender and sexuality in a global context.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/ma-gender-and-sexuality/

Structure

Students take courses to the value of three units and complete a dissertation as a fourth module. All students take Gender Theory and the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East (full unit) and Queer Politics in Asia, Africa and the Middle East (half unit) as core courses. A further 1.5 units are chosen from a wide range of gender and gender-related courses included in Gender Studies List 1. Students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on either the compulsory course or one of the component courses.

Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board.

As part of the course, the Centre for Gender Studies offers integrated work experiences in the form of internships with relevant organizations such as Women Living Under Muslim World (WLUML), the Council for the Assistance of Academic Refugees (CARA) and other organizations as well as with the Centre for Gender Studies itself.

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 96kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/ma-gender-and-sexuality/file101844.pdf

Materials

Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University College London Library and Senate House Library.

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

Each taught course has its own approved methods of assessment, designed to address the particular learning outcomes of that course. Assessment methods may include essays, weekly reaction papers, unseen, seen or take-home examinations, research projects, individual or group presentations, translations, learning journals, oral examinations etc., as appropriate.

Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Upon completing the master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to. -Understand theories and identify concepts and empirical research methods relevant to urban studies and planning from the related fields of social sciences, humanities, ecology, engineering, architecture, design and art. Read more
Upon completing the master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to:
-Understand theories and identify concepts and empirical research methods relevant to urban studies and planning from the related fields of social sciences, humanities, ecology, engineering, architecture, design and art.
-Demonstrate a working understanding of the role of urban government, policy-making and planning in urban development.
-Critically and creatively pose and answer significant research questions relevant within and across multiple fields of theory and practice.
-Gather, process and develop relevant conclusions based on information from multiple sources.
-Produce, collect and analyse cases and data relevant to urban phenomena.
-Use digital and other tools to collect, analyse and share data.
-Develop responses to urban problems using relevant tools and techniques for representing, modelling, prototyping, testing and evaluating solutions.
-Understand and develop integrated approaches within and across urban research and applied planning.
-Communicate your understanding of and responses to urban phenomena visually, graphically, orally and in writing.
-Write academic, professional and popular texts on urban themes based on relevant literature.
-Apply and develop skills for co-production of knowledge and co-design.
-Work productively and cooperatively in multidisciplinary, multiprofessional and international environments.

And in terms of knowledge and skills in relation to specialisations and professions, you will be able to:
-Apply the general knowledge and skills introduced, developed and demonstrated within the courses and thesis work.
-Place urban analyses and proposals in relation to your specialisation and contextualise them in relation to others.
-Identify, differentiate and articulate relations among various theories and methods relevant to your specialisation.
-Develop and reflect on your competence in urban studies and planning in relation to your professional role.
-Carry out independent research on urban issues in your field using relevant research methods and responsible scientific practice.
-Analyse phenomena and develop solutions through the use of digital and other tools, such as GIS and CAD.
-Fulfil specific professional degrees in accordance with the relevant professional codes and directives (such as those of architects, landscape architects, and urban planners.
-Demonstrate your competence to work as a professional and/or researcher in urban studies and planning.
-Communicate professionally and constructively with different experts, practitioners and stakeholders in the field of urban studies and planning.
-Articulate your professional identity in terms of established and emerging roles relevant to urban studies and planning.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees.

Programme Contents

Urbanisation is a global phenomenon that is shaping the future of our societies. Most of the key challenges of contemporary societies are encountered and addressed in cities. Cities provide enormous economic, technical and cultural opportunities, but they are also places of social conflict and segregation as well as environmental and health problems. The magnitude of these challenges implies that no single profession or field of research can tackle them. Urban development requires an integrated approach. To this end, two prominent Finnish universities have joined forces in this unique and interdisciplinary Master’s programme.

The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies and Planning prepares you to excel as a professional capable of understanding and addressing complex urban development challenges. You will learn to address such challenges through a curriculum and pedagogical approach that includes interdisciplinary breadth as well as depth in core areas of knowledge, skills and practice. The programme balances theoretical, historical and conceptual knowledge with the acquisition of methods, skills and experience. You will thus gain a broad understanding of urban phenomena as well as practical experience in collaborative and practical situations. This is the foundation of the programme and of the elements in the curriculum.

Taking full advantage of the joint university structure, the programme unites leading expertise from the University of Helsinki and Aalto University into three major study lines. The signature elements in the programme are interdisciplinary studies that address urban challenge themes. These themes relate to urgent contemporary issues found not only in Finland but on the European and global scale, including controversies intrinsic to urbanisation. The urban challenge themes may be attached to focus areas, research projects or collaborations within our universities, municipalities and regions in order to provide a constructive and critical framework for study and practice. These themes cross the boundaries of disciplines and professions, and are united in addressing a common challenge and emphasising a forward-looking perspective.

Selection of the Major

There are three study lines in the Master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning:

Urban Planning and Design
Urban Planning and Design (USP Plans) addresses urban development by integrating the knowledge, skills and pedagogical approaches of planning and design and by developing synergies across multiple disciplines. The constructive power of design to imagine, structure, visualise and communicate is combined with the analytical rigour and critical understanding of planning and urban governance history, methodologies and tools. USP Plans develops and deepens such skills while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based learning within concrete cases, multi-disciplinary collaboration, and learning-by-doing experimentation. USP Plans is oriented towards planners, architects, landscape architects, and spatial, service and strategic designers.

Urban Life, Economy and Cultures
Urban Life, Economy and Cultures (USP Peoples) addresses urban development by integrating analysis of socio-economic, digital and physical structures with planning. Here you will explore and apply theories and methodologies from the social and political sciences. The focus is on socio-spatial dynamics changes, including influences of policies and markets, actors and structures, decision-making processes, social mixing and demographics. USP Peoples deepens your knowledge of foundational studies while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based and collaborative learning, including situated municipal and field studies. USP Peoples is oriented towards planners, urban economists and managers and those interested in urban humanities.

Urban Ecologies and Systems
Urban Ecologies and Systems (USP Systems) addresses urban development by integrating technical and natural science knowledge. This includes methodologies for studying, assessing and planning for social and ecological resilience, technological innovation and complex adaptive systems. It applies systems approaches to identify multi-dimensional planning while retaining a holistic perspective on the complex and historical dynamics affecting multiple scales. USP Systems develops your understanding of foundational studies while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based and collaborative learning, including urban, digital and ecological field studies. USP Systems is oriented towards planners, engineers, architects, landscape architects, and environmental managers.

Programme Structure

The requirement for completing the Master’s programme in Urban Studies and Planning is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be done in two years. The curriculum consists of:

Core Urban Challenge Studios (20 credits)
Common urban challenge studios integrate multiple expert areas to study and address contemporary urban phenomena from different perspectives. Here you will explore urban challenge themes theoretically from different perspectives and you will address them practically within specific cases, sites or initiatives. Your teachers represent key disciplines and professions, and your studies will be conducted in cooperation with partners in research and municipalities. Examples of urban challenge themes include:
-Urban economies and the challenge of governance and welfare.
-Social integration and the challenge of urban typologies and heritage.
-Liveability and the global challenge of fast-paced cities.
-Socio-Ecological habitats and the challenge of densification.

Specialisation coursework (20 credits)
The three study lines offer courses for you to specialise within one of the three competence areas in the broad field of urban studies and planning. Both universities offer courses for each study line; these can be adapted to support your advancement, background knowledge and skills. The courses cover topics such as urban geography, urban sociology, urban ecology, urban economics, urban ethnology and history, environmental policy, urban planning, urban design, landscape architecture, real estate economics, service and strategic design, etc.

Core skills and methods coursework (20 credits)
Core skills for thesis research and professional practice are offered as basic courses. These include skills relevant to digital representation, analysis and communication, modalities and techniques of communication and argumentation, research methods and methodologies of academic research. You will learn, for example, how to use digital tools to analyse and study urban phenomena and how to illustrate your ideas and solutions visually and graphically. You will also become familiar with the theories and tools of communication and argumentation, and you will study and apply research methods.

Electives (30 credits)
You can select elective courses according to your personal study plan. You can select electives to deepen your knowledge in a specialisation or broaden your exposure to additional areas relevant to planning. For architects and landscape architects, some electives will guide your development according to the EU directive for these professions. You can also take courses at other Finnish universities, in a student exchange abroad, or in an internship in city planning and development.

Master’s Thesis (30 credits)

Career Prospects

The programme prepares you to be a professional in a field that is meaningful, growing and in demand. You will acquire the knowledge, skills and experience needed to fill both traditional and emerging planning roles (such as urban planning and design, real estate development, strategic planning, environmental planning, landscape architecture, policy and service design). To these established or emerging roles, you will bring an integrated understanding of, and training in applying, more interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to urban development. As a graduate you will be prepared to compete for local and international positions within public, private and non-profit organisations, planning, architectural and policy advisory firms, research institutes and NGOs.

Internationalization

The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning provides international scope in many ways, taking advantage of the unique Helsinki context and diverse urban contexts around the world. Each year, new students in the Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning include both Finnish and international applicants. We look for students whose varied backgrounds, experiences, and education reflect the richness of contemporary society. The teachers of the programme have an international background and experience, and the programme builds on their strong international connections in their respective fields. Researchers and invited lecturers from abroad take part in the teaching of the programme. The Master’s Programme builds on the joint University of Helsinki and Aalto University Bachelor’s Program ‘Urban Academy’, including its teaching faculty, international network and advisory board of leading international experts. Your elective coursework can include a student exchange or internship abroad, and you are also encouraged to collaborate internationally on your Master’s thesis. You will thus have an opportunity to study in an international environment and acquaint yourself with different cultures. For international and Finnish students, Helsinki and Finland are well-known internationally for progressive approaches to planning. Helsinki is a UNESCO creative city; planning and design have strong roles within municipalities, government and the public sector. Finland is a European and international forerunner in technological research and innovation, such as open data in municipalities. Local and national policies support experimental and participatory culture and development. In the context of urban challenges, Helsinki provides a unique case for engaging with progressive approaches to welfare state paradigms, including public-private dynamics, changing demographics and cultures, and diverse approaches to market growth and sustainability.

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The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. Read more
The MA in Anthropology and Cultural Politics is an interdisciplinary programme in anthropology, directed at students from a wide range of disciplines in the humanities, social and political sciences, artists, and professionals in the media and cultural sectors. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

The objective of the MA is to address contemporary issues in culture and politics from an anthropological perspective, drawing on the commitment of the Department of Anthropology at Goldsmiths to build a public anthropology.

The MA is organised around a critical investigation of the central thematic concepts of its title: 'culture', 'power', and 'politics', as well as 'anthropology' itself.

Each of these terms are posited in this programme as questions for critical reflection and students are encouraged to pursue independent research projects that investigate the meanings attributed to these terms in contemporary social contexts.

The programme is particularly interested in the intersections of 'culture' and 'power', and the consideration of what may be called 'cultural politics'.

- How and when does 'culture' become apprehensible as 'political'?
- How and when does 'power' operate upon or within 'culture'? Is it even tenable to uphold and retain this distinction?
- If so, what are the analytical or interpretive benefits?
- What may be the disadvantages or pitfalls?
- If not, what is implicated in the politicisation of 'culture' or the culturalisation of 'power' and 'politics'?
- How can these concerns be studied in the ongoing struggles over 'culture' in everyday life?

In addition to the core modules, options can be selected from several departments and centres.

See the website http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-anthropology-cultural-politics/

Core Modules

The MA is made up of four parts:
- Anthropology and Cultural Politics (30 credits)
- Anthropology Theory (30 credits)
- Option modules [within the Department of Anthropology, or the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, Media & - Communications, Politics, Sociology, or Centre for Cultural Studies] (60 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

- Anthropology and Cultural Politics:

What is the relationship between culture and power?; How is power manifested or articulated 'culturally'?; In what ways may culture be understood to be 'political'?

This module is centrally preoccupied with social and political theories organised around the question of 'culture' and its relation to 'power', and vice versa, and with comprehending what may be the stakes of the politics of 'culture'. The module elaborates upon the problem of 'politics' and its always complex configuration with respect to what comes to be deemed to be 'cultural', specifically in relation to creative and productive labour, alienation, capitalism and commodification, the state, ideology, and hegemony.

We also consider the concepts of the critique of everyday life, the society of the spectacle, and the production of space. While principally concerned with a series of theoretical problems, the module will nonetheless also marshal the insights that may be gleaned from ethnography, in the effort to situate the discipline of socio-cultural anthropology in relation to the problems posed by or for 'cultural politics'.

- Anthropological Theory:

The aims and objectives of this module are to introduce you to major subfields of modern anthropology and to do so in a broadly historical and comparative framework.

The lectures will enable you to see how different anthropologists approach a number of central contemporary issues. The topics chosen will focus upon some of the theoretical developments and methodological strategies pursued in response to profound and widespread social transformations. Each week the module will focus on a single technique, methodology or strategy in anthropology in the work of a specific anthropologist.

Assessment

Dissertation – a thorough critical discussion of existing knowledge in a relevant area; reports; take-home papers. Options may require a presentation or production of visual material.

Department: Anthropology

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

The programme is great preparation for any role that involves research and communication. Graduates have pursued opportunities in journalism, other media, policy, education and public debate; they have also gone on to research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/apply/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas. Read more
This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-fine-art/

While on the programme you will continually engage with what it means to practise as an artist today and the position taken by an art-practice in relation to art's complex history and its currency in wider social and cultural processes.

Given the wide international breadth of artists on the programme and the open range of media welcomed in it, a primary concern in discussion is how a particular artist's work and ideas are understood in and across different social, artistic and intellectual contexts.

Our primary emphasis is on how artists look to shift prevalent expectations and whether their work does so – perhaps then transforming what art might be. We place a strong emphasis on student-centred learning, particularly in the studio seminars and personal tutorials based on your art-making, its key concerns and ideas and their mutual interdevelopment. A lecture programme will in addition contribute to your understanding of concerns relating to contemporary art in broader contexts.

The degree has been described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world.

Visit us

Why not visit one of our Postgraduate Art Open Days? You can also explore our exhibitions and events archive.

You can also view our programme activities and projects on art.gold, follow staff, student and alumni activity on Facebook, and get course announcements on Twitter.

Guest Research Student

If you are an international student and would like to study a 'tailor-made' programme (for up to a year), you may be interested in applying as a Guest Research Student.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sadie Murdoch.

Structure

The programme is divided into two parts:

Year One (Diploma stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late July) or part-time for two years (until late July in both years). This year seeks to establish the core conecerns and ambitions of your art.

Year Two (MFA stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late August) or part-time for two years (until late July, and then until late August in the final year). This stage of the programme enables you to address your ambitions for your art with an awareness of how it is situated.

Applicants who are already in possession of 120 grade credits for postgraduate study from another programme are able to apply for direct entry into Year Two of the programme on either a full or part-time basis. You may also take advantage of an exit point at the end of Year One of the programme and graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art.

What you study

This two-stage programme is designed to subject the making of art work, the ideas and concepts involved, and the works of art themselves, to artistic and critical scrutiny. This will include individually directed research to review, consolidate and strengthen your individual position as an artist. Students accepted onto the programme work in media areas including painting, sculpture, printmaking, installation, performance, art writing, textiles, digital media and video. The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred learning – especially on your individual response to the divergent views you will experience in relation to your practice.

Among other qualities, you are expected to: contribute actively in tutorial and seminar discussions; to welcome and encourage sustained analysis of your practice by tutors and fellow students; to understand that the production of contemporary art takes place in a demanding and testing environment; and to take an independent path in developing your practice and its concerns.

Learning on the programme is primarily achieved through an appropriate combination of self-initiated and directed work in studio-practice and Critical Studies. Individual tutorials, seminars, lectures, workshops and research laboratories support this work. All parts of the programme are mandatory for all students. There are no optional modules on the programme. Modules and assessments are structured similarly on both parts of the programme.

Studio seminars

Seminars help you develop the confidence and ability to discuss your own work and the work of others, and to use the combined knowledge and experience of the group to assist in understanding and developing your own practice. This element of the programme is student-led with tutors responding to the needs and concerns of the participants. Studio seminars are organised by groups and take place weekly. Each student presents work for a seminar once in each term.

Tutorials and group tutorials

These develop your practice within contemporary art and current debate. You receive scheduled one-to-one tutorials with your Group Tutors and other staff from the study area. Two tutorials a term are scheduled with the core studio staff. In addition, you are expected to select a number of visiting tutors relevant to your practice for tutorials. These tutors are chosen in consultation with your Group Tutor, and cover a wide range of specialisms – discussion with them should further your understanding of your work in terms of the development of your practice. You are expected to write a report immediately after each tutorial summarising what took place and recording your considered responses to it.

Critical Studies

You are expected to identify and initiate the discussion of the critical concerns and interests of your practice. These concerns are developed through studio-based teaching and in discussions with your Critical Studies tutors, and developed further through the Critical Studies seminar and essay. For this reason, and in contrast to many other programmes, Critical Studies for the MFA Fine Art at Goldsmiths does not offer a series of subjects taught and learnt through seminars, group reading and discussion, but bases the teaching and learning of Critical Studies primarily in relation to your own practice.

Lectures

These introduce and develop issues of critical significance in contemporary culture and fine art by presenting arguments and discursive frameworks for contemporary practice. Lectures run through the first two terms on a weekly basis. They provide an opportunity for you to critically engage with your own practice in terms of wider cultural debates with which they may be unfamiliar. The lectures also provide an occasion for all members of the postgraduate programmes to meet on a regular basis.

Taught workshops

Each workshop will comprise four staff-led discussion-based sessions on a philosophical, theoretical or historical topic relevant to contemporary art practice, and will involve texts to be read in advance. Each student takes two workshops during the first year (students may apply to substitute part of this requirement with structured independent study).

Collaborative seminars

Student-led collaborative seminars, supported by staff and teaching assistants around a topic of mutual interest, are held during the second year. These will involve engagement with the professional art community, may take place outside the college in collaboration with other institutions such as museums and galleries, and may culminate in an open event or publication.

Assessment

The three examination elements for both Year One and Year Two are: Collection of Tutorial Reports, Exhibition, and Critical Studies Essay. All three elements must be passed to successfully complete each part of the programme. Each element of examination has both progression and final points of assessment.

Skills & Careers

Graduates from the MFA in Fine Art Goldsmiths go on to success in a range of fields. As well as the many internationally reknown artists who have studied at Goldsmiths, others have gone onto become gallerists or curators or have entered the fields of art administration, education and other cultural industries.

The course at Goldsmiths enables you to focus on the development of your own skills and aspirations and to equip you with the resources to succeed in your chosen profession.

Other entry requirements

Requirement for part-time study: you need to have your own studio space in which to work over the four years of the programme.

You might also be considered for some programmes if you aren’t a graduate or your degree is in an unrelated field, but have relevant experience and can show that you have the ability to work at postgraduate level.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This specialised interdisciplinary Master’s course is an exciting, innovative and forward thinking course which will help you challenge your current working practice in rehabilitation. Read more
This specialised interdisciplinary Master’s course is an exciting, innovative and forward thinking course which will help you challenge your current working practice in rehabilitation. The course offers you the opportunity to enhance the skills of critical enquiry and gain an appreciation of the underlying theory, research and policy guiding current rehabilitation practice.

Suitable for all practitioners working in health and social care like nurses, doctors, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, social workers and speech and language therapists. Previous cohorts have included an interdisciplinary mix of practitioners working in both general and specialist areas of rehabilitation in community, intermediate care, acute, independent sector and local authorities, both in the UK and overseas.

Students can study the full MSc or can opt to study individual modules.

Highlights

>Shared campus with one of the largest teaching hospitals in the UK
>Led by a team of senior academics and advanced practitioners in rehabilitation
>Interprofessional education: Shared learning alongside all other MSc postgraduate courses and both pre and post registration students
>You will undertake and present a research project based on your chosen specialism
>Careers advice embedded into our teaching.

[[Modules]

The minimum period of study for the part-time programme route is 24 months; maximum period of study is 60 months.

The minimum period of study for the full time route is 12 months; maximum period of study is 36 months.

It is possible to study modules on a standalone basis leading to an MSc, PgDip or PgCert over five years.

Core modules:

Policy and practice in health care
Evaluation of reflection in rehabilitation
Critical thinking in practice
Data analysis
Research methods
Research project

Optional modules:

Cognitive behavioural approaches in health
Psychology for exercise
Exercise intervention for obesity and diabetes
Cardiac rehabilitation
Managing fatigue: implications for exercise
Pulmonary rehabilitation
Quality and innovation in rehabilitation
Pain management
Self-management in long term and neurological conditions
Work based learning
Professional development in rehabilitation
Life after stroke

Studying

Members of the planning and teaching team come from multidisciplinary backgrounds and have considerable experience of implementing and teaching on Master's level courses. The team also has a range and depth of experience in both service delivery and research in rehabilitation.

We have considerable experience in neurological and elderly rehabilitation, and have contributed or been responsible for service delivery in both acute and community healthcare, as well as the voluntary and independent sector.

There is also specific expertise in the rehabilitation of individuals with stroke, dementia, acute brain injury, pain management, cardiac and chronic pulmonary disease, falls, progressive neurological disease and palliative care.

Careers

In addition to developing your understanding of your specialist area this course will enable you to:

>Develop a critical understanding of the key policy drivers in rehabilitation and critically evaluate the implications on your own practice.
>Develop a critical awareness and systematic understanding of research methods used in rehabilitation research.
>Critically evaluate your effectiveness in relation to the delivery of person centred rehabilitation.
>Develop leadership skills and advanced practice to promote effective inter-professional working and service delivery in rehabilitation.
>Critically evaluate and advance the most current evidence- based programmes of care in relation to the complex and changing needs of individuals.

You will also gain an understanding of the complex areas of government policy in relation to rehabilitation, and will look at models of disability and rehabilitation and their influence on practice from the perspective of both the practitioner and the patient/client.

Application

To download an application for the course and find out more information about the process and our deadlines, please visit our website.

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The MA Fine Arts degree programme will enable you to develop and locate your practice in relation to current bodies of knowledge and practice in the fine arts. Read more
The MA Fine Arts degree programme will enable you to develop and locate your practice in relation to current bodies of knowledge and practice in the fine arts. You will build a strong and increasingly confident practice through awareness and interaction with current contexts of professional practice and research.

Course detail

The curriculum, which also supports awards at Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma levels, is uniquely designed and focused on developing artists’ abilities and capacities for professional, vocational and academic innovation. We emphasise relationships between composition, reflection, practice and dissemination across a dynamic breadth of fine arts disciplines and discourses. Teaching, learning and research on the programme will enable discovery of the variety of ways in which composition, creation and dissemination in fine arts practice has evolved into its present media and forms.

This degree enables students who already have some experience of fine arts practice to expand their artistic horizons, develop their reflective abilities and expand their portfolio as thinking practitioners.

Format

You will follow two strands, consisting of two 40 credit modules is designed to enhance your abilities as a self-reflective practitioner. It recognises the deep interrelationship between reflection, documentation, dissemination and production, in terms of the development of an artist’s work and practice in terms of its function and operation within critical and public domains. You will be introduced to the variety of ways in which composition, creation and dissemination in the production of fine arts practice has evolved into its present media and forms. This will be accompanied by investigation into the potential of strategies concerning documentation as useful modes of reflection and realisation. This module strand will be primarily focused around your own practice, contextualised by examination of various key practitioners, modes or epistemologies.

Modules

- Questions of Practice -

This is a practice-based module that encourages you to think and reflect through development of studio practice and discovery of related questions of practice. It recognises critical and creative reflection on studio practice as an active and essential aspect of working processes. It aims also to guide you in the development and enhancement of your conceptual, intellectual, practical and technical range of abilities, skills and knowledge in relation to models and strategies of making and reflecting upon current fine arts practice.

- Practice in Context -

This module encourages you to develop a nascent body of practice-based work in response to issues of context. Where work in ‘Questions of Practice’ encourages speculative approaches to studio practice, this module asks you to identify and respond to any of a range of historical, social and cultural contexts. This could range from re-examining approaches to site-specific practice, the ‘white cube’ gallery space, or networked, online spaces. The module allows time and opportunity for you to develop and enhance your conceptual, intellectual, practical and technical range of abilities, skills and knowledge in relation to issues and opportunities of making/disseminating practice-based research in fine arts practice.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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The MSc Health Sciences (Management) is designed to offer the opportunity for health practitioners and those working in health care organisations to focus on practices, policies and drivers in relation to their impact. Read more

About this course

The MSc Health Sciences (Management) is designed to offer the opportunity for health practitioners and those working in health care organisations to focus on practices, policies and drivers in relation to their impact. The intention is to create the conditions in which students can reflect on issues that are relevant to their own professional work. The MSc Health Sciences (Management) course enables individuals to consider the implications of their learning, reading and enquiry for policy and practice in their own area of interest.

The aim of the course is to establish the conditions and standards for rigorous critical enquiry and to extend the criteria for judging taken-for-granted assumptions underlying policy and practice in the Health Management field. The MSc Health Sciences (Management) course will enable students to develop an increasing respect for evidence and discourse and the capacity to initiate and sustain change, both in their own practice and more generally within their professional context.

There are no placements on this course.

See the website https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/health-sciences-management-ft-dtfhsm6/

Facilities

When you want to get hands-on experience within Public Health and Wellbeing we can support you. The Clinical Skills Centre, which has been established for 10 years, is the result of our continued commitment to create an interactive environment in which health related students can be equipped with a diverse range of skills.

Research

- Top quartile in the UK for its research power in Allied Health Sciences and Nursing

- More than 80% of research activity in Allied Health Sciences and Nursing is rated as world leading or internationally excellent (REF 2014)

Who would this Course suit?

The MSc Health Sciences (Management) is designed to offer the opportunity for health practitioners and those working in health care organisations to focus on practices, policies and drivers in relation to their impact.The MSc Health Sciences (Management) is designed to offer the opportunity for health practitioners and those working in health care organisations to focus on practices, policies and drivers in relation to their impact.

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