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Masters Degrees (Regionalism)

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This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. Read more

About the course

This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. A wide selection of modules allows them to specialise in a variety of different areas. Dissertations are written under the guidance of experienced academic staff, which includes world-leading experts on China, Japan, the UK, the US, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Russia, among others. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories, will be trained in research methods, and gain access to (and we hope contribute to) the latest research in international relations and world history.

Students can choose from a range of modules in international relations and international history, which include, in addition to subjects directly related to international relations and world history, modules in diplomacy/foreign policy analysis, development, international economics, international organisations, European politics, regionalism, traditional and non-traditional security, environmental policy, area studies (including China, Russia, the US, Europe, the UK, Japan, the Middle East, Africa, etc.) and of course research methods, to name a few. Small seminars allow students to develop their analytical skills, and oral and written presentation techniques, as well as their capacity to research, compile and produce thematic reports, essays, and papers.

Case studies and occasional simulation games deepen students’ theoretical and practical knowledge of negotiations, diplomacy, world history and international relations. The dissertation will give students the opportunity to prove the breadth and depth of their knowledge.

Course structure

The MA in International Relations and World History is offered as a two year programme. A part time path is also an option. Students must take 240 credits to graduate, comprised of 60 credits each semester for three semesters (four modules each semester at 15 credits each), plus 60 credits for the dissertation (normally done the final semester of the second year). Students must pass the taught components before proceeding to the dissertation.

Year one

Compulsory modules:

Core Concepts in International Relations and World History
Contemporary China Issues
Government and Politics of China
China in International Relations
Economic Development in Contemporary China

Students will also have the option to choose some of the modules below in year one:

The Rise of Modern China
Contemporary Chinese Culture, Ideology and Society
Management for China
Chinese Business and Society
Mandarin 1A
Mandarin 1B
Welfare States
US Foreign Policy
Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Politics and History of the Middle East
Other languages 1A (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
Diplomacy in a Globalised World
Special World History Project
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Regionalism in Europe and Asia
Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
International Organization
Research Methods II (Quantitative)
China and Africa
Other languages 1B (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)

Year two

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods I
Dissertation

Students will also have the option to choose some of the modules below in year two:

Internship*
China and the World
Mandarin 2A
Welfare States
US Foreign Policy
Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Politics and History of the Middle East
Languages 2A (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
Mandarin 2B
Diplomacy in a Globalised World
Special World History Project
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Regionalism in Europe and Asia
Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
International Organization
China and Africa
Research Methods II (Quantitative)
Languages 2B (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)

*The Internship can start in the summer of Year 1 and be completed by the end of Autumn semester of Y2. Assessement will be in the Autumn semester of Y2. Long-term part-time internships may be agreed with the School in consultation with the convenor.

Please visit the website for more detailed module information by clicking the link below

http://www.nottingham.edu.cn/en/internationalstudies/pg/ma-china-in-international-relations-and-world-history.aspx

Our staff

The School of International Studies has academic staff from all across the world, who are world-leading experts in their fields. Students gain from a variety of perspectives and backgrounds which compliment the global nature of this programme.

Your degree certificate

All students who successfully complete their studies at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China will be awarded a University of Nottingham, UK degree.

There are no differences between certificates awarded in the UK and those awarded in China.

Postgraduate scholarships

To encourage academic excellence, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC) offers a comprehensive and expanding range of scholarships to postgraduate students. For more information please click the link below

http://live-china-uon.cloud.contensis.com/en/study/postgraduate/masters/scholarships/index.aspx

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* Subject to validation, 2017 entry. The only postgraduate award of its kind in the UK, the MA in Contemporary Popular Theatres is a part time, evening programme. Read more
* Subject to validation, 2017 entry

The only postgraduate award of its kind in the UK, the MA in Contemporary Popular Theatres is a part time, evening programme. This degree course is based at Liverpool Hope’s Creative campus which is near Liverpool City Centre and will draw on the expertise of resident staff at the University’s Dance, Drama and Performance Studies Department as well as guest lecturers and practitioners.

Liverpool Hope University’s MA in Contemporary Popular Theatres is aimed at postgraduate students with an interest in Contemporary British or Irish Popular Theatre. Students who have enjoyed the work of Lee Hall (Billy Elliott, The Pitmen Painters) or Dermot Bolger (Dublin Quarter) or Amanda Whittington (Be my Baby, Ladies Day) as well as the works of more established popular writers such as Willy Russell, Jim Cartwright and John Godber will find the course a unique opportunity for detailed study of underrepresented material.

Liverpool Hope University is privileged to have John Godber as a visiting Professor of Contemporary theatre, Professor Godber is best known for his innovative work in theatre – Bouncers, Teechers, Up n Under to name but three from the fifty-three plays produced to date. He has also written and directed a significant number of plays for television. Students on the MA will have an opportunity to meet Professor Godber as part of their programme.

The MA Contemporary Popular Theatre will focus on contemporary British and Irish popular theatre, analysing popular theatre productions and examining their historic context. It will investigate issues of excellence, access, regionalism, metropolitanism and the gendered nature of the popular. Distinctive features of the course will include the use of a wide range of research strategies to assist information retrieval in an under-represented area; a Special Topic module allowing some practical exploration and the impact of ‘Capital of Culture’ status on popular theatre production. Theatre visits will also be built into the programme.

The Award Director for the MA is one of very few academics researching and publishing in the field of popular theatre. Research is one of the strengths of the programme and students will be working alongside scholars who will be disseminating new material in this field.

The programme will begin with the year-long taught module, Contemporary Contexts which will look at aspects of cultural theory and aesthetics. This will run in parallel with the supervised Special Topic module and both will be assessed at the end of the first year. The Special Topic module will involve a small amount of practical work. The Dissertation module will be launched in the first year with the allocation of supervisors and the agreement of research areas and will be assessed at the end of the second year. The Regionalism module will consider aspects of Localism and will be taught and assessed in the second year.

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This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. Read more

About the course

This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. A wide selection of modules allows them to specialise in a variety of different areas. Dissertations are written under the guidance of experienced academic staff, which includes world-leading experts on China, Japan, the UK, the US, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Russia, among others, specialising in sub-fields such as security studies, international relations theory, women’s issues, international history, development, environmental policy, foreign policy analysis, quantitative methods, international economics, etc. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories, will be trained in research methods, and gain access to (and we hope contribute to) the latest research in international relations and world history.

Students can choose from a range of modules in international relations and international history, which include, in addition to subjects directly related to international relations and world history, modules in diplomacy/foreign policy analysis, development, international economics, international organisations, European politics, regionalism, traditional and non-traditional security, environmental policy, area studies (including China, Russia, the US, Europe, the UK, Japan, the Middle East, Africa, etc.) and of course research methods, to name a few. Small seminars allow students to develop their analytical skills, and oral and written presentation techniques, as well as their capacity to research, compile and produce thematic reports, essays, and papers.

Case studies and occasional simulation games deepen students’ theoretical and practical knowledge of negotiations, diplomacy, world history and international relations. Your dissertation will give you the opportunity to prove the breadth and depth of your knowledge.

Course content

The MA in International Relations and World History is offered as a one year programme (twelve full months). This degree programme can also be taken in a part time capacity over two years. Students must take 180 credits to graduate, comprised of 60 credits each semester (four modules each semester at 15 credits each), plus 60 credits for the dissertation (normally done over the summer for full time students). Students must pass the taught components before proceeding to the dissertation.

Compulsory modules:

Core Concepts in International Relations and World History
Research Methods I
Dissertation

Students will also have the option to study some of the modules listed below:

China and the World
China in International Relations
International Political Economy
Development Politics
Other languages 1A (Mandarin, French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
Other languages 1B (Mandarin, French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
International Political Economy
Welfare States
US Foreign Policy
Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Politics and History of the Middle East
Diplomacy in a Globalised World
Special World History Project
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Regionalism in Europe and Asia
Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
International Organisation
China and Africa

Please refer to the website for more detailed module information by clicking the link below

http://live-china-uon.cloud.contensis.com/en/internationalstudies/pg/ma-international-relations-china.aspx

Our staff

The School of International Studies has academic staff from all across the world, who are world-leading experts in their fields. Students gain from a variety of perspectives and backgrounds which compliment the global nature of this programme.

Our class size

We anticipate that the 2016 class size will be approximately ten students.

Your degree certificate

All students who successfully complete their studies at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China will be awarded a University of Nottingham, UK degree.

There are no differences between certificates awarded in the UK and those awarded in China.

Postgraduate scholarships

To encourage academic excellence, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC) offers a comprehensive and expanding range of scholarships to postgraduate students. For more information please click the link below

http://live-china-uon.cloud.contensis.com/en/study/postgraduate/masters/scholarships/index.aspx

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This cutting-edge Masters programme, delivered over one full academic year, broadens students' global perspectives on issues of governance and contemporary international relations. Read more
This cutting-edge Masters programme, delivered over one full academic year, broadens students' global perspectives on issues of governance and contemporary international relations. Students can choose from a wide range of elective modules, such as International Ethics, International Security, Asia-Europe Relations: Between Interregionalism and Bilateralism, and Globalisation, Regionalism and Global Governance. Graduates of this programme forge careers working for international organisations, governments and global political institutions.

Subject guide & modules

Sample module options: The following module descriptions are indications only - the modules on offer and the content of the modules is subject to change.

Core Modules
-International Relations Theory (LPM006)
-Globalisation, Regionalism, and Global Governance (LPM026)
-Dissertation (LRM005)

Choice of options totalling 80 Aston credits. Note that not all options will be available in any given year due to periods of staff research leave.
-The EU as a Global Actor (LPM020)
-The EU: A Web of Institutions (LPM007)
-Leaders and Leadership in a European and Global Context (LPM011)
-Europe’s Regions and their Governance (LPM013)
-Asia-Europe Relations:Between Interregionalism and Bilateralism (LPM014)
-Religion and Politics (LPM015)
-Security and Defence in Europe (LPM022)
-International Political Communication (LPM023)
-Concepts and strategies for social researchers (LPM003)
-International Ethics and Literature (LPM027)
-Transatlantic Relations in Historical Perspective:The US and Europe (LPM029)
-International Security (LPM034)
-Comparative and International Political Economy (LPM036)
-EU Law and PolicyMaking (LPM037)
-Concepts and Strategies for Qualitative Social Science (LPM038)
-Concepts and Strategies for Social Data Analysis (LPM039)
-Rethinking European Integration (LPM040)
-International Political Thought (LPM016)
-20 credit Module from the University Wide Language Programme

Learning, teaching & assessment

You will take part in interactive seminars, discussion and simulation exercises, as well as undertaking group project work. There are also opportunities for individual research and guided study. MA students are a fundamental part of the intellectual life of the Politics and International Relations study group. All students on MA programmes take part in the regular series of guest lectures and research seminars on issues of contemporary political relevance as well as taking part in the conferences and events organised and hosted by the Aston Centre for Europe and by the study group.

All students have the opportunity to take part in a week long study trip to visit the EU institutions and related organisation in Brussels.

All students are allocated a personal tutor at the start of their studies; this member of academic staff can offer individual study advice and guidance and is there to help support your studies. Assessments on the MA programme take a wide variety of forms, ranging from essays and examinations through to policy reports, briefings and campaign portfolios.

Career prospects

All of our MA Programmes equip students with the knowledge and analytical and transferable skills to pursue further postgraduate research or a successful career in the public and private sector. The careers pursued by our students vary greatly, but typical careers include:
-Employment in international organisations (EU, WTO, UN etc.)
-Research in policy-oriented domestic or international think tanks
-Careers in government administration
-Further postgraduate research at PhD level
-Journalism
-International marketing or business

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This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deeper understanding and analytical excellence in two fields of increasing importance, international relations and international business, drawing from the combined strengths of UNNC’s School of International Studies and Nottingham University Business School (NUBS). Read more

About the course

This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deeper understanding and analytical excellence in two fields of increasing importance, international relations and international business, drawing from the combined strengths of UNNC’s School of International Studies and Nottingham University Business School (NUBS). A wide selection of modules allows them to specialise in a variety of different areas in international relations and international business. Dissertations are written under the guidance of experienced academic staff, which include world-leading international relations experts focusing on China, Japan, the UK, the US, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Russia, among others. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories in both fields, will be trained in research methods, important historical and contemporary cases and hot-button issues, and gain access to (and we hope contribute to) the latest research in international relations and international business.

Students can choose from a range of modules in international relations and international business, which include, in addition to subjects directly related to international relations and international business, modules in diplomacy/foreign policy analysis, development, international economics, dimensions of world history, international organisations, European politics, regionalism, traditional and non-traditional security, environmental policy, area studies (including China, Russia, the US, Europe, the UK, Japan, the Middle East, Africa, etc.) and of course research methods, to name a few. Small seminars allow students to develop their analytical skills, and oral and written presentation techniques, as well as their capacity to research, compile and produce thematic reports, essays, and papers.

Case studies and occasional simulation games deepen students’ theoretical and practical knowledge of negotiations, diplomacy, world history and international relations. The dissertation will give students the opportunity to prove the breadth and depth of their knowledge.

Course structure

The MA in International Relations and International Business is offered as a one year programme (twelve full months). This degree programme can also be taken in a part time capacity over two years. Students must take 180 credits to graduate, comprised of 60 credits each semester (four modules each semester at 15 credits each), plus 60 credits for the dissertation (normally done over the summer for full time students). Students must pass the taught components before proceeding to the dissertation.

Compulsory modules:

Core Concepts in International Relations and World History
Research Methods I
International Business Environment
China in International Relations
International Political Economy
Dissertation

Students must also choose ONE module from this group:

Welfare States
US Foreign Policy
Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Politics and History of the Middle East

and ONE module from this group:

Managing International Business in China
Project Management
International Business Strategy

Plus ONE module from this group:

Research Methods II (Quantitative)
Special World History Project
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Regionalism in Europe and Asia
Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
International Organization
Essentials of International Marketing
Strategic Human Resource Management
Entrepreneurial Management
Launching New Ventures
E-Business

Our staff

The School of International Studies has academic staff from all across the world, who are world-leading experts in their fields. Students gain from a variety of perspectives and backgrounds which compliment the global nature of this programme.

Your degree certificate

All students who successfully complete their studies at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China will be awarded a University of Nottingham, UK degree.

There are no differences between certificates awarded in the UK and those awarded in China.

Postgraduate scholarships

To encourage academic excellence, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC) offers a comprehensive and expanding range of scholarships to postgraduate students. For more information please click the link below

http://live-china-uon.cloud.contensis.com/en/study/postgraduate/masters/scholarships/index.aspx

Read less
Gain a rich understanding of the variety and interconnections of American writing, exploring major poetic, fictional, non-fictional and dramatic works. Read more
Gain a rich understanding of the variety and interconnections of American writing, exploring major poetic, fictional, non-fictional and dramatic works. American literature is topical and contemporary; Author Junot Díaz’s book The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao was declared the best novel of the 21st century (so far!). This is just one of the novels that you will have the opportunity to study on this course.

At Essex, we challenge the study of the United States as a territorially bound space by embracing an expanded conception of ‘America’, which explores the richness of U.S. and Caribbean literatures in dialogue. This allows you to formulate sophisticated analyses of the role of space and place in the production of American writing and identities.

You explore how cultural geography may be integrated into literary history, concentrating on American literatures topics including:
-How violence and conflict have shaped writing across the American tropics
-The difference between reality and the “American Dream”
-Caribbean modernities and post-colonialism
-US nationalism and regionalism in literature
-African American literature

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015) and in the Top 200 worldwide (QS World University Rankings), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have shaped writing as we know it and has included Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

This course reflects our longstanding strengths in the literatures and cultures of the Americas, particularly the US South and Caribbean regions. You are taught by leading area specialists who have researched and published extensively on Caribbean and US literatures:
-Professor Maria Cristina Fumagalli has published widely on Caribbean literature and culture, including her recent book On the Edge: Writing the Border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic
-Dr Owen Robinson is a US literature specialist with particular interests in William Faulkner and the US South; forthcoming publications include Myriad City: Towards a Literary Geography of New Orleans
-Dr Jak Peake has broad interests across Caribbean and US writing, with particular expertise in Trinidadian literature; forthcoming publications include Between the Bocas: A Literary Geography of Western Trinidad

We are an interdisciplinary department and our academic staff have expertise in literature, film theory and practice, drama, creative writing and journalism.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities. A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA American Literartures
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-War, Violence & Conflict in the American Tropics
-US Nationalism and Regionalism
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
-Dissertation
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean
-Writing Magic (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

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The course has a very distinct ethos based around the theme of environmentally sensitive building design. The aim is to provide you with skills and understanding that would enable you to take a leading professional and specialist role. Read more
The course has a very distinct ethos based around the theme of environmentally sensitive building design. The aim is to provide you with skills and understanding that would enable you to take a leading professional and specialist role. It is also driven by the following key underlying themes that apply across all our architecture courses:

• Critical regionalism;

• Sustainability;

• User Centred Design; and

• Professional Development

Environmental issues rank at the very highest levels in the concerns of the general public and are particularly affected by the impact of the design and construction industry. The scale of influence ranges from building to urban dimensions. These are global problems requiring global and interconnected solutions and the course is designed to address issues from a world perspective. Issues are considered for different climate types and locations, giving a strong international dimension as well as providing opportunities to develop solutions that address local circumstances. The course is designed to give you the chance to acquire a mixture of skills and knowledge that would support roles as integrated and important members of design and construction teams. The course also provides opportunities to understand the specific needs of progression onto research degrees in the subject area.

Buildings consume vast amounts of natural resources during their construction and subsequent operation, accounting for around a third of the total energy used globally, and demand exploitation of natural resources to supply the materials. In use, building emissions add to global warming, damage the environment and create waste disposal problems. Buildings can also cause ill health and discomfort for their occupants due to poor air quality and inadequate internal conditions. This course considers the full range of issues associated with sustainable architecture including:

• Energy You will have the opportunity to understand human comfort and energy use and to examine critically the links between energy consumption and emissions of carbon dioxide. This includes an exploration of energy assessment methods for both domestic and non-domestic buildings in a variety of cultural and climatic contexts.

• Materials and resources You will have the opportunity to be able to examine the relationships between resource use and the design of building fabric, and both passive and active mechanisms for human control of the environment and environmental services.

• Global environment The course is suitable for students from a variety of cultural backgrounds and from different climatic regions. You will have the opportunity to consider the differences and similarities of built environments around the globe and to seek innovative approaches to the development of appropriate architecture in widely different contexts.

• Health and well being Central to the course ethos is the notion of user-centred design. All design aims to improve life. But in complex scenarios of construction the user, as the primary beneficiary of architecture, can become overlooked. The course aims to ask you to question the needs of the user and examine human comfort in relation to the quality of the built environment.

In all of these aspects you are asked to develop your own perspective and attitude, as part of your own continuing professional development. A key aspect of the course is that we ask you to become pro-active researchers in a complex field, making connections between a huge range of information and responding innovatively and with enterprise. At the heart of the student experience lie the shared experience of personal growth and development and the acquisition of knowledge, skills and understanding pertinent to the individual in developing their own careers in the field.

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Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. Read more
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. You explore literature across time, geography, and genre, combining scholarly research with innovative, practical ways of engaging with texts.

You grapple with the challenges of conducting research into Shakespeare and other early modern literature, acquiring specialist skills in archival research, palaeography, and the study of rare and antiquated books. You study materials on 18th century drama and literature, visiting the UK’s only surviving Regency Theatre to investigate how architecture affected the content of drama, and how drama reflected Georgian society. You have the opportunity to explore the history of genres such as the novel and lyric poetry, and study a truly extensive range of work; your reading takes you from African American literature, through Caribbean literatures, to the literature and performance of New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow and London.

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have been Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Our Department is a vibrant conservatoire of scholars and practitioners who are committed to unlocking creative personal responses to literature. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning novelists, poets and playwrights, as well as leading literature specialists.

Our academic staff specialise in a range of areas including modernism, comparative and world literature, Shakespeare, the Renaissance, modernism, travel writing, nature writing, translated literature, cultural geography, Irish and Scottish writing, U.S. and Caribbean literatures, and the history of reading.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City (optional)
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean (optional)
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

Read less
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Read more
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programmes offer up-to-date training in research methods and skills and a wide selection of literature modules from which you choose three; you will also write a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to follow up particular interests by studying a named pathway, or to designate your own area of study within the broad MA in English Literary Studies, tailoring an individual programme based on period, theme or genre. An MA in English is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take one of the named pathways, you will be expected to select two modules from those available within a pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to your named pathway. You need not confine your choices to a named pathway, as on the broad MA in English Literary Studies you may choose any three from the full list of modules on offer if you prefer. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules:
Research Methods and Resources
Dissertation

Typical optional Modules might include:
Old Norse
Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
Old English Language and Literature
Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Renaissance Tragedy
Renaissance Humanism
Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
Romantic Forms of Grief
Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
The Literatures of Slavery
Literature of the Supernatural
Modernism and Touch
Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
Life Narratives
Post-War British Drama
Modern Poetry
The Contemporary US Novel
Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative
The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than twenty of the above will run in any one year.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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How will East Asia accommodate the rise of a more economically and militarily assertive China? Is the US declining as a superpower in the region, or will it maintain its regional dominance? Does Japan still have designs upon regional economic leadership, and will it come to play a bigger military role in the region? How does a ‘non-state’ conduct international relations?. Read more

How will East Asia accommodate the rise of a more economically and militarily assertive China? Is the US declining as a superpower in the region, or will it maintain its regional dominance? Does Japan still have designs upon regional economic leadership, and will it come to play a bigger military role in the region? How does a ‘non-state’ conduct international relations?

Our MA in International Politics and East Asia gives you the opportunity to approach and answer these questions from a disciplinary basis. This is not a traditional area studies course on East Asia, but rather a disciplinary degree that focuses on the region for its case studies and thus offers unique advantages: strong disciplinary expertise combined with genuine regional expertise. East Asia’s emergence as the most dynamic region in the global political economy continues despite a series of crises since the early 1990s. If anything, the crises reinvigorated the study of the international relations and political economy of East Asia. Instead of just focusing on business and economics, the crises highlighted the politics of international economic relations, the impact of globalisation on the region and existing development paradigms, and the need for greater regional cooperation to cope with future economic shocks.

Our IPEA programme is one of the leading postgraduate programmes of its kind. We have among the greatest concentration of disciplinary based East Asia experts in the UK and Europe, and we are home to the Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation, researching issues of Asia-Pacific and East Asian regionalism

Programme content

East Asia’s emergence as the most dynamic region in the global political economy continues despite a series of crises since the early 1990s. If anything, the crises reinvigorated the study of the international relations and political economy of East Asia. Instead of just focusing on business and economics, the crises highlighted the politics of international economic relations, the social, political, and security consequences of economic crises, the impact of globalisation on the region and existing development paradigms, and the need for greater regional cooperation to cope with future economic shocks. At the same time, the region has been faced with a series of major crises and challenges in the political and security dimensions, which are demanding of greater study by students of international relations.



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Successful completion of this RIBA validated course provides exemption from Part 2 of the ARB prescribed Examination in Architecture. Read more
Successful completion of this RIBA validated course provides exemption from Part 2 of the ARB prescribed Examination in Architecture.

As part of the process of becoming a professionally-qualified Architect in the UK, graduates are required to complete a period of supervised ‘practical training', 12 months of which (commonly referred-to as the ‘Year Out') is normally undertaken before commencing full-time academic study at Master's level. This period of practical training constitutes Year 1 of the University of Huddersfield M.Arch course.

Therefore, students who have not previously completed a satisfactory period of practical training should join the course in Year 1. Students who have already completed a satisfactory period of practical training should join the course in Year 2.

Years 2 and Year 3 of the course are design-centred and intended to enable you to explore issues of critical regionalism and tectonic expression in relation to establishing your own theoretical position, through which you will be expected to develop a high degree of sensitivity to the context within which design work is undertaken in geographical, cultural, social and technical terms.

All design projects explore applications of sustainability and encourage a wide and plural outlook appropriate for both developed and developing countries. In this global worldview, understanding of progressive theories of design and the application of advanced construction methods co-exist with concern for the implementation of sustainable technologies, awareness of regional development issues and respect for craft-based building practices.

The rationale and definition of ‘International' both builds upon the studies undertaken as part of the Architecture (International) BA(Hons) degree awarded by the University of Huddersfield and acknowledges the reality of rapidly changing architectural practice in a fast moving, global context. Our course will aim to prepare you for new and emerging forms of practice through the development of your personal learning skills and a deep understanding of the need for flexibility, adaptability, innovation and enterprise in your career.

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Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Read more
Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Against a background of intensifying economic, political, cultural and military globalisation, there is now a heightened awareness of terrorism and international crime as threats to global security.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree identifies the features of these respective threats and explores the challenges to national and global governance, human rights and ethics, criminality and regionalism. This course examines the character of these contemporary global threats, considers specific case studies, and contributes to the debate over how to respond intellectually and in practical policy to these major threats to global security in the post-9/11 world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-Provides learners with an integrated security perspective
-Combines traditional militarised security concerns with contemporary threats of terrorism, international crime, and non-traditional security
-Provides the opportunity to develop the necessary analytical tools to critically explore the global security environment of the new century
-Among the first course of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying the increasingly prevalent themes of terrorism, international crime and global security
-You will obtain a critical awareness of the complex and inter-connected diplomatic, legal and economic dimensions of these threats, as well as an understanding of counter-terrorist and counter-crime policies, strategies and operational responses at local, national and global levels

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

This dynamic and innovative course is aimed at both UK and international students and offers the opportunity to be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Field trips are an integral part of the course, which will include visits to EU agencies and international NGOs.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree course is among the first of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying terrorism, international crime and global security. UK and International Competitive internships will be offered to the most motivated students.

The course comprises three mandatory topics designed to establish the core agenda of the course in terrorism, international crime and global security, and six core-option subjects from which you must study at least two.

The topics included in the course are delivered as interactive and multimedia workshops. They blend case studies, practical illustrations and theoretical analysis. Each session is designed to encourage interaction and debate. This concept is equally applicable to the numerous extra-curricular activities organised to complement the subjects.

Within all sessions, we draw on our own research experience and this ensures some lively debates and reassurance that there is no ‘right way’ of undertaking research. The course team ensures that you have extensive tutorial access to discuss your relationship with the course’s subject matter and their own intellectual development and to provide structure to their studies.

The key themes of this Masters degree are addressed in courses three core subjects:
-International organized crime
-International terrorism
-Threats to global security

You then have the opportunity to supplement these compulsory subjects with optional units, broadening your understanding of the concept of global security. Typical choices include:
-Counter crime and terrorism (study trip)
-Governance for security in the developing world
-Post-colonial African politics
-Gender and international human rights
-Case study: analysing primary sources
-Trafficking in human beings

In parallel to studying the above subjects, students also design, research and write a 15,000 word Masters dissertation addressing a topic of their own choice.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security is designed for those seeking to put current security debates into some sort of academic context. In terms of career advancement, the course offers generic skills and professional development that have seen past graduates go on to jobs within:
-International NGOs
-Civil service
-Private sector
-Management
-Journalism

In this sense, the degree is not designed to promote any one specific vocation. However, the issues studied would be of particular interest to those wishing to start, or advance, a career in:
-The armed forces
-The police force
-International agencies such as the United Nations or the European Union
-Other international NGOs

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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Our taught MA pathway in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. Read more
Our taught MA pathway in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the field. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the beginnings of the literature of revolution, to life writing, to contemporary US crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programme offers up-to-date training in research methods and skills. You will choose three modules, at least two of which are from within the pathway, and you will write a dissertation on a subject related to twentieth- and twenty-first-century studies.

An MA in Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literary Studies is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take this named pathway, you will be expected to select at least two modules from those available within the pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to it. Your third optional module may, if you wish, be chosen from the full list of MA modules on offer in the Department. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Typical modules might include:
-Modern Poetry
-Literatures of Slavery
-Modernism and Touch
-Life Narratives
-Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
-Post-War British Drama
-The Contemporary US Novel
-The Writing of Poetry
-Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative.
-Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than five of the above will run in any one year.

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to indicate your choice of modules as well as to provide a personal statemen

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Studies. All students take 3 modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating eighteen hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities.

All students register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of teaching over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Written work for the RMR module involves significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by three and a half hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish ().

We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office at

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Through this programme, graduates gain a high-level understanding of political and economic power in a globalised world. Read more
Through this programme, graduates gain a high-level understanding of political and economic power in a globalised world. Studying modules on topics such as Religion and Global Politics, Security and Defence in Europe and International Political Communication and Leaders, students develop wide-ranging insights into political behaviour and skills in the critical analysis of contemporary political issues.

This programme is ideally suited to internationally oriented careers in the public or private sector.

Sample Module Options

The following modules are indications only - the modules on offer and the content of the modules is subject to change.

Core Modules
-Concepts and strategies for social researchers (LPM003)
-The EU as a Global Actor (LPM020)
-Dissertation (LRM005)

Choice of options totalling 60 Aston credits. Note that not all options will be available in any given year due to periods of staff research leave.
-International Relations Theory (LPM006)
-The EU: A Web of Institutions (LPM007)
-Leaders and Leadership in a European and Global Context (LPM011)
-Europe’s Regions and their Governance (LPM013)
-Asia-Europe Relations:Between Interregionalism and Bilateralism (LPM014)
-Religion and Politics (LPM015)
-Partisan Politics in Europe (LPM019)
-Security and Defence in Europe (LPM022)
-International Political Communication (LPM023)
-Globalisation, Regionalism, and Global Governance (LPM026)
-International Ethics and Literature (LPM027)
-Transatlantic Relations in Historical Perspective:The US and Europe (LPM029)*
-International Security (LPM034)
-Comparative and International Political Economy (LPM036)
-EU Law and PolicyMaking (LPM037)
-Concepts and Strategies for Qualitative Social Science (LPM038)
-Concepts and Strategies for Social Data Analysis (LPM039)
-Rethinking European Integration (LPM040)
-International Political Thought (LPM016)
-20 credit Module from the University Wide Language Programme

Learning, teaching and assessment

You will take part in interactive seminars, discussion and simulation exercises, as well as undertaking group project work. There are also opportunities for individual research and guided study. MA students are a fundamental part of the intellectual life of the Politics and International Relations study group. All students on MA programmes take part in the regular series of guest lectures and research seminars on issues of contemporary political relevance as well as taking part in the conferences and events organised and hosted by the Aston Centre for Europe and by the study group.

All students have the opportunity to take part in a week long study trip to visit the EU institutions and related organisation in Brussels.
All students are allocated a personal tutor at the start of their studies; this member of academic staff can offer individual study advice and guidance and is there to help support your studies.

Assessments on the MA programme take a wide variety of forms, ranging from essays and examinations through to policy reports, briefings and campaign portfolios.

Career prospects

All of our MA Programmes equip students with the knowledge and analytical and transferable skills to pursue further postgraduate research or a successful career in the public and private sector. The careers pursued by our students vary greatly, but typical careers include:
-Employment in international organisations (EU, WTO, UN etc.)
-Research in policy-oriented domestic or international think tanks
-Careers in government administration
-Further postgraduate research at PhD level
-Journalism
-International marketing or business

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Politics and international relations in the Middle East display many of the characteristic features of the modern world. Contentious legacies of imperial map-making fuel frontier disputes and throw into question the legitimacy of the territorial nation state. Read more
Politics and international relations in the Middle East display many of the characteristic features of the modern world. Contentious legacies of imperial map-making fuel frontier disputes and throw into question the legitimacy of the territorial nation state. Governments have been repeatedly challenged by populations tired of the old rationales for authoritarian rule and angered by its repressive effects. The politics of national identity, sometimes bound up with ideas of religious identity, have been given new urgency by class conflict, by military occupation and by the growth of the security state. Meanwhile, the long history of external intervention in the states of the region has heightened domestic and regional tensions.

The degree offers students an opportunity to study politics in the region through a number of disciplinary approaches, such as political sociology (class, gender, ethnicity and sect), comparative politics (state power, political economy of development, democratic openings and nationalism), and international politics (war, international political economy, regionalism and dependency). At the same time, it provides thematic courses that encourage students to look at political processes in the region from distinct perspectives, such as the study of political violence, the examination of the politics of resistance and the understanding of Islamic political ideologies and political movements.

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students are expected to read extensively, to make a number of presentations and to engage actively in seminar discussions. They are also expected to write substantial papers, guided by their course tutors, but requiring significant independent work.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscmepol/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 129kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscmepol/file39939.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

SOAS MSc Middle East Politics students leave SOAS not only with a knowledge and understanding of the complex political and cultural issues of international politics, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers, both in business and in the public sector.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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