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Masters Degrees (Regional Development)

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This MSc provides the opportunity to understand socio-economic change in different towns, cities, regions and city-regions globally. Read more

This MSc provides the opportunity to understand socio-economic change in different towns, cities, regions and city-regions globally.

Overview

The MSc Urban and Regional Development course is designed for those who want to understand more about spatial development theory and practice and help meet the policy challenge.

The course will provide you with the opportunity to understand socio-economic change in towns, cities, regions and city-regions; issues that are of increasing significance globally. There is a focus on developing knowledge of the key theoretical tools to understand the nature and source of this socio-economic change and its uneven impact on different social groups and different places around the world.

Drawing on leading-edge theoretical debates about uneven spatial development, you will develop the key skills required to shape local and regional development in the worlds of policy and practice. These skills include data analysis and research skills, problem-solving skills through project-based teamwork, and skills in engaging and working across different sectors and organisations, including public, private and third sector organisations. The course also enables you to focus in more depth on understanding the specific challenges of uneven development at particular spatial scales - from the broader regional and city-regional scale to the more localised community and neighbourhood scale.

The course also addresses the public policy agenda to enable you to understand, research and apply your knowledge and skills to the practical challenge of designing strategies to help cities and regions to become more innovative and resilient places in which to live and work.

Distinctive features

  • You will study the theory, policy and practice of urban and regional development in South Wales, which has the longest experience of regional policy development in the world.
  • This MSc is recognised by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) as a 'specialist' masters, allowing those who have completed a three year RTPI recognised undergraduate spatial planning degree to complete the RTPI's educational requirements for membership.
  • Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), allowing completion of the educational requirement for RICS membership.

Learning and assessment

How will I be taught?

An array of teaching and learning styles are used throughout this programme.

You will attend lectures, participate in seminars and discussions, and attend field study visits. Most of the taught modules in the programme are compulsory, though there is some scope for choice in the second semester at Cardiff University.

You should attend all timetabled sessions of the programme – lectures, seminars and presentations – but are also expected to engage in independent study of at least 20 hours per week.

How will I be supported?

You will be allocated a personal tutor at the start of the course. You will retain this tutor throughout the two years.

All modules make extensive use of Learning Central, our Virtual Learning Environment, where you will find your course materials.

You will be given the chance to reflect on your abilities and performance through the Personal Development Planning module, available on Learning Central, through the Professional Development module that forms an integral part of the third semester experience, and through personal tutor meetings.

Resources and facilities

  • Access to a dedicated PC laboratory with high quality peripherals including: network account laser printing, large format colour printing, A4 colour printing
  • GIS facilities/workstation/access to Edina digimap digital mapping facility
  • Two dedicated computer technicians
  • A 30-PC open-access laboratory in the Glamorgan Building
  • An excellent library containing more than 12000 specialised books, 280 journal titles and stock expenditure of over £100,000 per year
  • Access to dyslexia resource facilities
  • Support for students working/assessed through the medium of Welsh
  • Professional skills delivery during the induction week to provide students with training on computer use; presentation skills etc.

Career prospects

The course offers the knowledge and expertise to enable you to work within a large number of urban and regional development-related careers. These can range from research, policy development and implementation, planning roles within the public and private sectors to agencies and businesses involved in new and re-development projects.

The course is suitable for both UK and international students.



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This course integrates regional development and spatial planning concerns in an international context. It brings together two disciplines and addresses the challenges of building capacity for analysis, strategy and policy making. Read more
This course integrates regional development and spatial planning concerns in an international context. It brings together two disciplines and addresses the challenges of building capacity for analysis, strategy and policy making.

The course is a joint initiative involving staff based in the Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies (CURDS) and The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape (APL).

The Regional Development and Spatial Planning course offers a distinctive integration of regional development and spatial planning not found at other institutions elsewhere in the UK. It has an international focus and outlook and includes conceptual, practical and policy content. There is an emphasis on links between theory, policy and practice.

Delivery

Our teaching and learning strategy is seminar based, combining a mixture of sessions led by full-time staff and programme participants. We use interactive and participant focused teaching methods, including:
-Discussion of taught and read material
-Individual and group projects
-Case study analyses
-Practical projects
-External practitioner speakers

Facilities

This course is taught in dedicated Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies (CURDS) seminar and meeting rooms. The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape has a range of facilities available to students including:
-A workshop
-Studios
-Exhibition spaces
-Crit rooms
-Seminar rooms
-IT suites

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This course provides an opportunity to engage with contemporary debates in local and regional development theory and policy in an international context. Read more
This course provides an opportunity to engage with contemporary debates in local and regional development theory and policy in an international context. It fulfils the current demand to build capacity and skills for strategic analysis and policy-making. We place a distinctive emphasis on the links between theory, policy and practice.

The Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies (CURDS), where you will be based, has played a leading role in contemporary academic and policy debates for over 35 years, and our research contributes directly to the teaching of this course. It offers you a great opportunity to engage with contemporary debates in local and regional development theory, governance and policy in an international context.

Delivery

You are taught by highly research active staff in a welcoming and supportive environment. We use interactive and participant focused teaching methods, including:
-Discussion of taught and read material
-Individual and group projects
-Case study analyses
-Practical projects
-External practitioner speakers

The course is comprised of 180 credits of compulsory core modules including the 15,000 word Research Dissertation.

Our teaching and learning strategy is seminar based, combining a mixture of sessions led by staff and course participants.

Facilities

This course is taught in dedicated Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies (CURDS) seminar and meeting rooms.

The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape has a range of facilities available to students including:
-A workshop
-Studios
-Exhibition spaces
-Crit rooms
-Seminar rooms
-IT suites

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Coastal Communities and Regional Development is an international, multidisciplinary master’s program on the development of rural and remote areas in the past and in the future. Read more

Coastal Communities and Regional Development is an international, multidisciplinary master’s program on the development of rural and remote areas in the past and in the future. It focuses on coastal communities along the North Atlantic and the Arctic, although theoretical foundations might be found in other regions.

The program is especially built on the principle and practice of sociology, macro-economics and geography/planning. By the end of the program students understand the changes and challenges of coastal communities' development, and have versed themselves in methods and skills to predict their development and manage it. The language of teaching and general communication is English. The program is offered by the University Centre of the Westfjords in Ísafjörður in co-operation with the University of Akureyri. Teaching takes place in Ísafjörður.

Program Organisation

The program consists of 120 ECTS at the master’s level; this includes 75 ECTS in the form of courses and 45 ECTS in the form of a thesis. All courses are taught in modules. The program starts in the autumn semester and the first year is made up of core courses and elective courses from the teaching schedule.

In order to complete 75 ECTS in one academic year, courses are taught in intensive modules from August through July of the next year. Courses are weighted from 1 ECTS to 8 ECTS and range from half a week to four weeks in length. Each ECTS is expected to involve approximately 25-30 hours of student work. On average students take 2 ECTS a week which corresponds to no less than a 50 hour workload per week.

After the courses finish, at the end of June/beginning of July, more of the students’ attention moves to the 45 ECTS thesis. According to the above work time calculation, the 45 ECTS should be equivalent to 1.5 semesters’ work. Students are free to choose whether or not they stay in the Westfjords to complete their theses. Theses are submitted for marking and defense at the beginning of the spring semester the next year. In this manner it is possible to complete the whole program in 18 months. No provision for summer holiday is made, however, if this pace of study is chosen. It is also possible to submit theses in April and the program then takes 21 months.

While the program covers a wide arc of geographical and development related areas students can specialise within this sphere through elective courses and with their choice of a topic for their thesis. Students are welcome to take elective courses at other universities, with the Master’s program committee's approval.

Students graduate from the University of Akureyri with MA degrees (Master of Arts).



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The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. Read more

The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. The course will provide you with a unique blend of theory and practice teaching, aimed at deepening your knowledge of the history of communications within the development process of emerging economies. It will critically evaluate the impact of international and regional institutions from a critical political economic perspective. Teaching by academic staff, guest lecturers and other carefully selected staff from development organisations will provide you with an overview of the policies, actions and impact of state and non-state institutions within the area of communication media and development.

A distinctive feature is its emphasis on the practical role of communication media in development. You will participate in media production workshops and take part in our internship programme, offered in partnership with media and development organisations in London. As part of the work experience module, students participate in an extensive NGOs and media seminar series featuring experts and panel discussions. The work placement programme is in line with the University of Westminster’s strategy of nurturing of the critical practitioner.

The course team is led by Dr Winston Mano and includes Professor Daya Thussu, Professor Christian Fuchs, Professor David Gauntlett, Professor Naomi Sakr, Dr Anthony McNicholas, Dr Xin Xin, Dr Anastasia Kavada, Dr Maria Michalis, Dr Roza Tsagarousianou, Dr Tarik Sabry, Paul Majendie, Geoffrey Davies and Michaela O’Brien. Visiting Lecturers include Jackie Davies, founder and Director of the Communication and Development Network (C4D) (http://www.c4d.org), a community of professionals working in communication for development. As a peer network the C4D Network is aimed at communication for development practitioners plus allied development workers, donors, academics and communication experts from the BBC, UN and major development organisations. The joining criterion is an engagement in communication for development - either professionally or through academia. Students on the Media and Development MA have the option to join the C4D network and each can do a fellowship/internship with the network during the course.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

One Semester One module from the below:

Semester 1 (option modules)

One Semester Two module from the below:

Semester 2 (option modules)

Industry links

We have strongly developed links with media and development organisations such as UNICEF, UNESCO, C4D, BBC Media Action, Internews Commonwealth Public Media Alliance.

Our large network of alumni keep our name and reputation alive in the industry.

Career path

Graduates apply for posts in development organisations based in London such as OneWorld, Oxfam, Save the Children, Red Cross, ActionAid, Panos, DfiD, Intermedia, BBC, Institute of War and Peace, Christian Aid and War on Want. Some students were able to build on knowledge, skills and their background in working for governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations (in Romania, Pakistan and India) and a range of international business organisations, including the BBC. The course also prepares students for further studies and for a higher degree, e.g., a PhD. Some students apply for PhD Scholarships advertised by the Faculty of Media, Arts and Design and they were all encouraged to join the Communication for Development Network (C4D) which meets once a month in London.

We are aware that the range of skills needed is exceptionally diffuse, and that students on the course hope to develop careers in a variety of fields in many different countries. We are also aware that we are preparing you for careers in a rapidly changing job market and the structure of the course allows you take advantage of change, and not to be its victim. It, therefore, would be misleading and unhelpful to place too much emphasis on acquiring a precise set of skills drawn from one part of the media and development sector. Finally, with a view to your professional development planning, the course is designed to give you a wide-ranging and critical knowledge of the development industry that you plan to enter.



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Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice. Read more

Develop the skills and understanding to tackle the global challenges of poverty, inequality, conflict, sustainability and social justice.

Whether you are a graduate aiming to make a difference in the world, or a professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical thinking, our suite of International Development MSc courses is for you.

Engaged with current debates in policy and practice and grounded in interdisciplinary social sciences, you will develop the tools and confidence to work towards creative solutions that address practical problems in strategic ways.

Four distinct pathways provide a choice of flexibility and breadth, or the chance to pursue a particular interest in greater depth.

Innovative learning approaches promote in-depth investigation of particular cases and issues. These will draw out connections and contradictions between different actors and analytical perspectives, across global, regional, national and local scales.

The opportunity of a placement, leading to a work-based project, will provide hands-on experience to complement classroom-based learning.

You will leave the course with:

  • a critical understanding of the concepts and approaches used in international development and humanitarian action, and their strengths and limitations
  • practical skills in research, analysis and communication and an understanding of how these can be applied in work for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South
  • the ability to analyse the complex interaction of social, economic, political and environmental factors in shaping problems and proposed solutions
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Course pathways

MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action

The MSc International Development with Conflict and Humanitarian Action pathway enables you to gain an in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary humanitarian action and conflict response. You will also form a critical understanding of humanitarian, peacebuilding and development policy and practice. You will learn how to interpret and evaluate research information and evidence on topics related to humanitarianism, conflict and development.

MSc International Development with Economics

The MSc International Development with Economics pathway covers the key economic concepts, theories and tools required to understand development issues, policies and practices, including those of heterodox and social economics. You will learn how to apply them to analyse specific development problems, such as through appropriate combinations of quantitative and qualitative methods.

MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability

The MSc International Development, Social justice and Sustainability pathway enables you to gain an interdisciplinary understanding of theories and concepts of social and environmental justice, wellbeing and sustainability. You will develop in-depth knowledge of people’s practical struggles globally and locally for a better life, and the forms of policy and politics that can support or frustrate these. You will also explore how integrated perspectives can capture the complex interactions between social and ecological systems. Additionally, you will consider areas of complementarity and the trade-off between economic development, human wellbeing and environmental sustainability.

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

Graduate prospects

This course provides an excellent background for those wishing to pursue an international development career and improve people’s lives.

You will be qualified to work in a wide variety of roles, including social research, public policy, public information and campaigning.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high profile organisations, including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while others have stayed in academia, to complete doctoral studies.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Management of international development
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Economics for development
  • Social and environmental justice
  • Conflict, development and peacebuilding

Semester 2

  • Global political economy
  • Sustainability and wellbeing
  • Humanitarianism
  • International development policy analysis and evaluation
  • Education and international development

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.



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This highly regarded programme will prepare you for a career in urban planning and development, where you may be required to shape and consider development proposals and devise or interpret plans and policies, negotiate and regulate development schemes, undertake community consultations, develop evidence and present reports to clients and decision makers. Read more

This highly regarded programme will prepare you for a career in urban planning and development, where you may be required to shape and consider development proposals and devise or interpret plans and policies, negotiate and regulate development schemes, undertake community consultations, develop evidence and present reports to clients and decision makers. In line with our academic  strengths in planning and development and real estate markets and investment, this Master’s programme will develop your specialist knowledge and skills in planning and development and equip you for a career in the private or public sector. The MSc Spatial Planning and Development is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

The programme focuses on planning as it engages with economic and property development processes at all levels, from the site, neighbourhood, local, national and international. You will be able to concentrate on particular aspects of development planning to suit your interests and career aspirations (e.g. strategic, economic, environment, regeneration or countryside) and you will have the opportunity to undertake in-depth study, within a framework that emphasises integration, as well as apply your learning to another country through the European field study.

Why Henley?

Programme

The MSc Spatial Planning and Development is recognised in the UK and more widely, to be one of the foremost planning programmes which develops both spatial planning competencies but also market aware planners who are well prepared for the orchestration and negotiation of development schemes. The programme has strong appeal for future employers in the private and public sectors because of the blend of analytical rigour and practical application. Many graduates of this programme, and its forerunners, have progressed to senior positions in the real estate and planning sector.

Real Estate & Planning

Our School is the largest in the UK for teaching and research in real estate and planning. Established in 1968 at the University of Reading, we are the only major UK real estate and planning centre to be located within a business school. Being part of the Henley Business School reflects our close and longstanding collaborative relationship with industry.

We enjoy a worldwide reputation for excellence in both teaching and research and we are consistently highly ranked in all major league tables. We undertake internationally recognised, leading edge research into real estate, planning and land and we offer a comprehensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses, all of which are accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). Our planning courses are also fully accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute.

Our programmes are held in high regard by leading employers, many of whom come to us each year to recruit our graduates. We are proud of our outstanding employment record, with more than 95% of our students entering graduate level jobs within 6 months of leaving us.

Henley Business School:

  • Consistently maintain highest standards: Henley is in top 1% of business schools worldwide to hold accreditation from all three bodies in the UK, Europe and US
  • Excellent networking potential : 72,000 Henley alumni members in 150 countries
  • High calibre students: always oversubscribed, 1,000 ambitious new Masters students join Henley each year
  • Award winning campus: beautiful, green, 134 hectares, with state of the art facilities
  • World-leading faculty: widely published, frequently asked for expert comment by media and to speak at events
  • Henley is proud to be part of the University of Reading. The University is ranked within the top 200 universities worldwide (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2016/17 and QS World University Rankings 2018) and 98% of the research is rated as being of international standard.

Course content

Module descriptions are correct for modules taught in the academic year 2017/18. Optional module listings are indicative, and may be subject to change.

Compulsory Modules

Optional modules

from a range which may include:

Careers and accreditations

Our graduates tell us that the programme has led to excellent and prestigious employment opportunities, helped in part by developing their commercial awareness as well as other key skills.

The MSc Spatial Planning and Development programme is a leader of its type and students benefit from its strong connections to industry and across the profession generally. Many successful graduates have been highly sought after by both private and public sector employers, including planning consultancies, development companies, local planning authorities and large multidisciplinary property firms.

Reading has an excellent reputation with the planning profession in both the private and public sectors. Our postgraduates tend to be sought after by employers and many find employment before graduating.

Our alumni association, The Reading Real Estate Foundation, organise career development and recruitment events for our students throughout the year. These include an evening lectures series with key industry speakers, an annual Careers Fair and our highly successful Mentoring Programme which pairs students with professionals in the industry.

We have a professional Careers Development Advisor, , who helps our students with every aspect of the career development process, including identifying work placement, internships and permanent career opportunities.

In the public sector there are varied options at the local, regional and national levels: government offices and departments, regional agencies and local planning authorities. The range and diversity of jobs and careers offered under the mantle of 'planning' is really very wide and stimulating. We will be happy to advise you in finding work experience and talk to you about your employment options during your time with us.

The MSc Spatial Planning and Development is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.



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Learn about global development from a heterodox economics perspective, and gain the skills to work in economic and development policy and practice. Read more

Learn about global development from a heterodox economics perspective, and gain the skills to work in economic and development policy and practice.

This course addresses the contemporary challenges of global development, utilising core economic concepts, theories and methods. Rooted in real-world practical and policy challenges, the course is founded on Bath’s longstanding engagement in international development and applied economic analysis. It uses innovative learning approaches to promote in-depth investigation of cases and issues, drawing links across global, regional, national and local scales. We offer you the opportunity of a placement-based research project, providing hands-on experience to complement campus-based learning.

The course is ideal if you’re a recent graduate who wants to pursue a career in international development as an economic analyst. It is also suitable if you’re an established professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical understanding of international development from an economics and broader social science perspective.

You will leave the course with:

  • in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary global development issues
  • a critical understanding of economic theory and development policy and practice, including from the perspective of heterodox and social economics
  • practical skills in research, policy analysis and communications, and their application in the field of international development
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

We encourage diversity of intake, in experience, qualifications and interests, to stimulate the richness of experience and learning.

Graduate prospects

Our courses provide an excellent grounding for careers in international development, humanitarian action and working for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South. They provide the core skills required in a range of policy, communication, advocacy, research and programmatic roles.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high-profile organisations including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK’s Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK’s Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while some have stayed in academia to complete doctoral studies.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Economics for development

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Global political economy
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

  • Management of international development
  • Sustainability and wellbeing
  • Humanitarianism
  • International development policy analysis and evaluation
  • Education and international development

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Attendance
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Online assessment
  • Oral assessment
  • Portfolio
  • Practical work
  • Residential
  • Seminar
  • Thesis
  • Work-based placement
  • Written examination
  • Other


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This MA course will give you the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to practise professionally as a spatial planner. Read more

This MA course will give you the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to practise professionally as a spatial planner. It is designed to meet the growing employer needs for staff who can investigate changes in the natural and built environments, manage the challenges of climate change through sustainable development, and debate and critically reflect upon the knowledge and values underpinning current approaches to land use development. Completion of the MA course is the first step to become a full member of the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI).

The course will support your personal and professional development. You will be able to work in the interdisciplinary and cross-sector environment of urban and regional development, in a variety of private, public and community contexts, and apply your knowledge to practise in specialist areas of planning. The course builds on the University's experience of delivering postgraduate courses in town planning for more than 60 years.

The course explores the current context and content of spatial planning. It does so from a UK and European perspective, and also investigates underlying theoretical debates.

If you want to gain a greater understanding of spatial planning, but do not want to study for a full Masters course, we also offer an Urban and Regional Planning Postgraduate Diploma and an Urban and Regional Planning Postgraduate Certificate. Scroll to the bottom of this page to find out more about these courses. 

Course structure

For the award of the MA students need to pass modules totalling 180 credits. MA students take all core modules and choose one specialist option module.

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Optional modules

Professional accreditation

On successful completion of the MA course students can become licentiates of the RTPI. After two years' experience in practice, they may make a submission for their Assessment of Professional Competence and, if successful, are then entitled to full RTPI membership.

Industry links

Visiting lectures are given by a wide range of external practitioners. The teaching team has extensive links with planning institutions including the RTPI and the Town and Country Planning Association. The course includes part-time students working in planning-related positions in private and public sectors.

Career path

Most of the students on the course are already in planning or planning-related posts. Full-time students graduating from the course as qualified planners will normally be offered planning positions in the public or private sector on graduation.

Examples of companies that have recruited our graduates include:

  • Belinda Greenwell
  • Graduate Planner, Savills UK
  • Marisa Teuma
  • Town Planner, Transport for London (TfL)
  • Yvonne Sampoh
  • Project Officer (Planning), Southwark Council
  • Kiran Curtis
  • Managing Director, Kiran Curtis Associates
  • Adam Hunt
  • Tottenham Planning and Regeneration Manager, London Borough of Haringey


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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Read more

The notion that “politics matters” has increasingly become the mantra of development policy-makers and practitioners – as well as development scholars - and there is now a growing recognition that international development is inherently political. Development agencies want staff trained in political economy analysis skills while academics and governments now focus more than ever on the political underpinnings of global development challenges.

This MSc makes a direct link between academic and practical policy approaches to international development, with an emphasis on exploring and understanding the politics of developing countries and the relationship between politics and development. Issues examined include: the impact of political systems, governance and political actors on developmental successes and failures; the relationships between global, regional, national and local organisations, networks and institutions and the driving of developmental change and the politics of aid and international donors.

The programme is designed for recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects.

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

It is now clearer than ever before that the greatest development challenges of our time – poverty, conflict, famine, poor governance etc. – are driven primarily by political, not technical, factors. The aim of this programme is to provide theoretical and empirical training to students to enable them to understand the role that politics plays in both facilitating and undermining development, in both the North and the South.

The programme is aimed at recent graduates preparing to work in international development and for professionals working for NGOs, donor agencies or development projects and focuses on a range of key questions, including:

  •  are democracy and development intrinsically linked?
  • how do theories of development link to development practice?
  • what is the ‘developmental state’?
  • how do historical and structural factors play into developmental change, or failure?

The programme is taught by some of the leading thinkers on the relationship between politics and development, each of whom work closely with policy-makers in the UK and internationally. Students will also benefit from engagement with major research programmes focused on the politics of development based in IDD, including theGovernance and Social Development Resource Centre.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work. In the summer term, students complete assignments and focus on their 12,000 word dissertation.

By the end of your study you will gain:

  • An in-depth understanding of competing development theories and approaches and the ability to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
  • The different political systems operating in developing countries and how and why such systems have come about.
  • The complex relationship between politics and development
  • The impact of political systems and political actors on developmental success and failure.
  • The impact of the political economy in developing countries and globally on aid and donor policies 
  • The ability to critically analyse and understand complex political and economic relationships and events.
  • The ability to understand in-depth and critically evaluate approaches to political analysis in developing countries.
  • The ability to critically, clearly and concisely argue the case for and against a range of development strategies.
  • The ability to interpret, explain and critically evaluate approaches to the political economy of development.
  • The ability to make presentations and write in a well argued, well-structured and readable manner, making good use of a wide range of references.

Enhancing your Student Experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organisations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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Course content. Develop an in-depth understanding of contemporary development issues, and gain the specialist skills to work in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and humanitarian response. Read more

Course content

Develop an in-depth understanding of contemporary development issues, and gain the specialist skills to work in peacebuilding, conflict analysis and humanitarian response.

Whether you are a graduate aiming to pursue a development or humanitarian career in conflict-affected regions, or a professional wishing to deepen your knowledge and critical thinking, this course is for you.

The course addresses the core global challenges of conflict and humanitarian crisis and explores a variety of tools and approaches for responding in these contexts. Rooted in real-world practical and policy challenges, the course is founded on Bath’s outstanding international expertise in international development. It uses innovative learning approaches to promote in-depth investigation of cases and issues, while drawing links across global, regional, national and local scales.

The course offers you the opportunity of a placement-based research project, providing hands-on experience to complement classroom-based learning.

You will leave the course with:

  • in-depth and interdisciplinary understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin contemporary humanitarian action and conflict response
  • a critical understanding of humanitarian, peacebuilding and development policy and practice
  • practical skills in research, analysis and communication and an understanding of how these can be applied to the fields of humanitarianism, conflict and development
  • rich experience of working with people from a wide range of disciplinary, professional and national backgrounds

Learning and teaching

You will join the Department of Social & Policy Studies here at Bath. We are ranked in the top 50 for Development Studies in the QS World University Rankings 2017.

Our staff are all active in this field, research-led, and united in their commitment to finding better solutions to the world’s development problems.

We encourage diversity of intake, in experience, qualifications and interests, to stimulate the richness of experience and learning.

Graduate prospects

Our international development courses provide an excellent grounding for careers in international development, humanitarian action, and working for social, economic and environmental justice in both global North and global South. They provide the core skills required in a range of policy, communication, advocacy, research and programmatic roles.

Many of our graduates from similar courses have found jobs with high profile organisations, including:

  • Economic Development Team Leader for the UK Department for International Development Palestinian programme in Jerusalem
  • Outreach Channel Director at Marie Stopes International
  • Humanitarian Policy Manager at Plan International
  • Microfinance Partnerships Manager at One Acre Fund
  • Regional Projects Manager at International Alert
  • Private Sector Development Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Power Sector Policy Adviser at the UK Department for International Development
  • Chair of the South West International Development Network and Executive Director of the Development Studies Association

Other graduates have chosen to work for themselves and set up their own charities, while some have stayed in academia to complete doctoral studies.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

The total number of credits for the taught-stage is 60 credits, with most units being 12 Credits. A typical week would approximately average between 6-10 hours of classes or seminars a week depending on options taken. The dissertation or practicum are 30 credits.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Doing research for international development
  • History and theory of international development
  • Conflict, development and peacebuilding

Semester 2

  • Doing research for international development
  • Humanitarianism
  • Plus one optional unit

Summer

  • Either Dissertation or Practicum

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

  • Management of international development
  • Global political economy
  • Sustainability and wellbeing
  • International development policy analysis and evaluation
  • Education and international development

Placement

As an alternative to writing a dissertation, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake a six-week placement (practicum), working with an organisation involved in international development. You'll write a report reflecting on a particular area of professional practice.

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Attendance
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Online assessment
  • Oral assessment
  • Portfolio
  • Practical work
  • Residential
  • Seminar
  • Thesis
  • Work-based placement
  • Written examination
  • Other


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This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Read more

This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Students acquire the tools necessary to respond to a diverse range of problems including productive capacity, intersectoral integration, economic and social diversification, and self-sufficiency.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to analyse the development process and to formulate appropriate policies for meeting development goals. The field trip, conducted in a developing country, provides the opportunity to study the problems encountered in development, and the cultural, administrative and institutional context in which decisions are made.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (30 credits) and dissertation (60).

A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (90 credits), optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

Four core modules 

  • Contemporary Approaches to Development Management
  • Development in Practice
  • Critical Ideas of Development Conceptions and Realities
  • Society and Market: Private Agency for Development

Recommended optional modules include:

  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Cost Benefit Analysis: Theory and Practice
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case Studies and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Food and the City
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Land, Food and Agriculture
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
  • Social Policy and Citizenship
  • The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
  • Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
  • Urbanisation and Development
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South

Or any other open MSc module in The Bartlett School of Planning.

Please note: not all optional modules listed above may be available.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word paper on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic is chosen by the student in dialogue with the Programme Director.

Teaching and learning

The programme consists of reading, essay writing and individual and group project work, in the context of lectures, seminars, workshops, case study analysis, and a field trip abroad. In recent years field trip destinations have included Uganda and Ethiopia. Student performance is assessed through coursework, unseen examinations and a final dissertation report.

Fieldwork

The overseas fieldwork trip is a practical research-based residential that helps draw the various elements of the degree together.

The DPU will cover the following costs of the field trip: return flights, visas, travel insurance, accommodation and fees, and costs of local experts and inputs. However, food, local travel and incidental expenses of a personal nature will not be covered by the DPU.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Development Administration and Planning MSc

Careers

Graduates are engaged in a diversity of professional activities including local, regional and national government, consultancy firms, national and international NGOs, United Nations programmes and international aid agencies. A small proportion of graduates pursue advanced research degrees while several work as academics in leading universities or as independent consultants.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Economic Development Intern, African Development Bank
  • Policy Making Intern, UNDP (United Nations Development Programme)
  • Policy Research Officer, Department for International Development (DFID)
  • Trade Negotiator, Ministry of Commerce of the Kingdom of Thailand
  • Consultant, United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

Employability

The central objective of this programme is to equip participants with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise necessary to make a positive contribution to the development effort in countries with which they are engaged. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Development Planning Unit (DPU) at UCL is an international centre concerned with promoting sustainable forms of development, understanding rapid urbanisation and encouraging innovation in the policy, planning and management of cities and regions, especially in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Its programmes are supported by international agencies and by national and provincial governments.

This MSc examines and analyses the theory and practice of development administration at international, national and regional levels to provide participants with an understanding of the processes generating social change and with the skills and abilities to respond.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Development Planning Unit

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Critically engage with an international development studies topic of choice, assembling information from a variety of sources to compose clear detailed and logical argument;
Learn to formulate a systematic and methodologically sound research process through undertaking a literature review and empirical research;
Where applicable, justify ethical considerations surrounding research carried out.

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities. You will also be prepared for doctoral study.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

Dissertation:
Demonstrate your achievement on the course as a whole, through the production of a 15,000-word research project on a topic of your choice, informed by the optional units you have selected, under the advice and guidance of a personal supervisor.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The course is designed to support the needs of those who hope to be, or are already, engaged in the international development sector. It offers highly desirable transferable skills such as communication, qualitative data collection, quantitative data manipulation and data analysis and writing skills. Additionally, the applied nature of this course means that students will be working within ‘live’ development contexts from the start. This will ensure that they are able to develop their professional networks and identify career opportunities. Additionally students will benefit from the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by the experts and development practitioners who teach on this course.

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